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Sample records for monitor vital signs

  1. Wearable system for vital signs monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rita; Loriga, Gianni; Taccini, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    A new concept in healthcare, aimed at providing continuous remote monitoring of user's vital signs, is emerging. An innovative system named WEALTHY is presented, where conducting and piezoresistive materials in the form of fiber and yarn are integrated and used as sensor and electrode elements. The simultaneous recording of vital signs allows parameter extrapolation and inter-signal elaboration that contribute to producing alert messages and synoptic patient tables. Cardiac patients in the rehabilitation phase can be continuously monitored during selected time intervals, such as during physical activity or occurrence of symptoms, to discover potential threats and generate appropriate alerts to the patient and/or to an emergency center. The core of the system sensing is a textile interface, in which the sensing components are elements of the fabric: the sensorized garment is comfortable like a common article of clothing and is made with knitting machines; furthermore, the position of the electrodes and sensors is fixed and the elasticity of the fabric allows a good fitting to the body. The system is provided with a portable electronic unit, where signals are acquired, elaborated and transmitted. A monitoring system allows extrapolation of a new physiological index and data flow coordination as well as alarm management and database creation.

  2. Monitoring of Vital Signs with Flexible and Wearable Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasser; Ostfeld, Aminy E; Lochner, Claire M; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    Advances in wireless technologies, low-power electronics, the internet of things, and in the domain of connected health are driving innovations in wearable medical devices at a tremendous pace. Wearable sensor systems composed of flexible and stretchable materials have the potential to better interface to the human skin, whereas silicon-based electronics are extremely efficient in sensor data processing and transmission. Therefore, flexible and stretchable sensors combined with low-power silicon-based electronics are a viable and efficient approach for medical monitoring. Flexible medical devices designed for monitoring human vital signs, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, and blood glucose have applications in both fitness monitoring and medical diagnostics. As a review of the latest development in flexible and wearable human vitals sensors, the essential components required for vitals sensors are outlined and discussed here, including the reported sensor systems, sensing mechanisms, sensor fabrication, power, and data processing requirements.

  3. Microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Hee, Hwan Ing; Ng, Soon Huat; Teo, Ju Teng; Yang, Xiufeng; Wang, Dier

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring that is free from direct contact with skin, cableless, electromagnetic interference free and low cost. The feasibility of our device was studied on infants undergoing surgery and 10 participants ranging from one month to 12 months were enrolled. The sensor was placed under a barrier sheet on the operating table. All patients received standard intraoperative monitoring. The results showed good agreement in heart rate and respiratory rate between our device and the standard physiological monitoring when signals are clean.

  4. Development of a wearable vital signs monitor for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Jonathan; Lemos, Diego; Meneses, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Alher M

    2010-01-01

    In development countries the vital signs data measurement normally is performed at hospitals or laboratories where patients remain under observation with many electrodes attached on the body. The integration of biomedical data acquisition systems and information technologies (IT) enables continuous real time monitoring of physiological data in daily life, which improves patient's medical care and medical research possibilities. To achieve this goal, the research and development of some wearable intelligent sensors, sensors miniaturization, signal processing, wireless transmission, and databases development for these vital data have been done. Our goal is to implement a wearable system that can be used in places located outside of hospitals and medical institutions coverage area. In this paper, we present the current stage of the project where some intelligent modules have been implemented and other are under construction. Preliminary results concerning Non-Invasive Blood Pressure (NIBP), ECG and wireless connection are also presented.

  5. Evaluation of Wireless Vital Signs Monitor in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients). An additional 23 prehospital patients were excluded because of missing or incomplete data...or new algorithms based on non-invasively measured vital signs or other physiologic variables, that could aid in the triage and diagnosis of trauma

  6. Vital sign monitoring utilizing Eulerian video magnification and thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubakir, Bauyrzhan; Nurimbetov, Birzhan; Tursynbek, Iliyas; Varol, Huseyin Atakan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a proof of concept for non-contact extraction of vital signs using RGB and thermal images obtained from a smart phone. Using our method, heart rate, respiratory rate and forehead temperature can be measured concurrently. Face detection and tracking is leveraged in order to allow natural motion of patients. Heart rate is estimated via processing of visible band RGB video using Eulerian Video Magnification technique. Respiratory rate and the temperature is measured using thermal video. Experiments conducted with 11 healthy subjects indicate that heart rate and respiration rate can be measured with 92 and 94 percent accuracy, respectively.

  7. Vital sign monitoring using human patient simulators at pharmacy schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroki; Setoguchi, Nao; Matsuoka, Toshikazu; Hirokane, Taminori; Yamaoka, Akihiro; Sato, Keizo

    2010-09-10

    To develop, implement, and assess an experience-based education program using human patient simulators to instruct pharmacy students in monitoring vital signs to identify drug treatment effects and adverse events. Medical emergency care programs using human patient simulators were prepared and facilitated practical clinical training in resuscitation, which required selecting drugs while monitoring changes in blood pressure, pulse, and arterial blood oxygen saturation. Training encompassed the monitoring of routes of drug administration, drawing of simulated blood, vital-sign monitoring based on a pharmaceutical universal training model, vital-sign monitoring devices and simulators, and medical emergency education using biological simulators. Before and after bedside training, students were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess their understanding of vital sign monitoring and emergency care. Students successfully learned how to monitor routes of drug administration, vital signs, and pathological conditions. There was a significant increase in students' recognition of the importance of vital-sign monitoring. Experienced-based training using patient simulators successfully prepared pharmacy students to monitor vitals signs and identify drug treatment effects and adverse events.

  8. Vital sign monitoring using human patient simulators at pharmacy schools in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroki; Setoguchi, Nao; Matsuoka, Toshikazu; Hirokane, Taminori; Yamaoka, Akihiro; Sato, Keizo

    2010-01-01

    To develop, implement, and assess an experience-based education program using human patient simulators to instruct pharmacy students in monitoring vital signs to identify drug treatment effects and adverse events...

  9. Vital Sign Monitoring Using Human Patient Simulators at Pharmacy Schools in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin Tokunaga; Norito Takamura; Kenji Ogata; Hiroki Yoshida; Nao Setoguchi; Toshikazu Matsuoka; Taminori Hirokane; Akihiro Yamaoka; Keizo Sato

    2010-01-01

      To develop, implement, and assess an experience-based education program using human patient simulators to instruct pharmacy students in monitoring vital signs to identify drug treatment effects and adverse events...

  10. Novel Use of Google Glass for Procedural Wireless Vital Sign Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Cara A; Zayed, Mohamed A; Aalami, Oliver; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study investigates the feasibility and potential utility of head-mounted displays for real-time wireless vital sign monitoring during surgical procedures. Methods In this randomized controlled pilot study, surgery residents (n = 14) performed simulated bedside procedures with traditional vital sign monitors and were randomized to addition of vital sign streaming to Google Glass. Time to recognition of preprogrammed vital sign deterioration and frequency of traditional monitor use was recorded. User feedback was collected by electronic survey. Results The experimental group spent 90% less time looking away from the procedural field to view traditional monitors during bronchoscopy (P = .003), and recognized critical desaturation 8.8 seconds earlier; the experimental group spent 71% (P = .01) less time looking away from the procedural field during thoracostomy, and recognized hypotension 10.5 seconds earlier. Trends toward earlier recognition of deterioration did not reach statistical significance. The majority of participants agreed that Google Glass increases situational awareness (64%), is helpful in monitoring vitals (86%), is easy to use (93%), and has potential to improve patient safety (85%). Conclusion In this early feasibility study, use of streaming to Google Glass significantly decreased time looking away from procedural fields and resulted in a nonsignificant trend toward earlier recognition of vital sign deterioration. Vital sign streaming with Google Glass or similar platforms is feasible and may enhance procedural situational awareness.

  11. Wi-Fi Based Vital Signs Monitoring and Tracking System for Medical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Deshmukh Rohit Sunil

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients at a disaster scene can greatly benefit from technologies that continuously monitor their vital status and track their locations until they are admitted to the hospital. We have designed and developed a real-time patient monitoring system that integrates vital sign sensors, location sensor, ad-hoc networking, electronics patients status. This system shall facilitate communication between providers at a disaster scene, medical professionals at a local hospital, and specialists available for consultation from distant facilities

  12. Monitoring and analysis of vital signs of a patient through a multi-agent application system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel HERNÁNDEZ DE LA IGLESIA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the medical environment, the clinical study of the most basic vital signs of a patient represents the simplest and most effective way to detect and monitor health problems. There are many diseases that can be diagnosed and controlled through regular monitoring of these medical data. The purpose of this study is to develop a monitoring and tracking system for the various vital signs of a patient. In particular, this work focuses on the design of a multi-agent architecture composed of virtual organizations with capabilities to integrate different medical sensors on an open, low-cost hardware platform. This system integrates hardware and software elements needed for the routine measurement of vital signs, performed by the patient or caregiver without having to go to a medical center.

  13. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios.

  14. Remote, real-time monitoring and analysis of vital signs of neonatal graduate infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Robert; Olivier, Chris; Pugh, J Edward; Eklund, J Mikael; McGregor, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a system for the remote monitoring of a newborn infant's physiological data outside the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. By providing a simple means for parents to enable monitoring, and physicians a simple mobile application to monitor live and historical physiological information, this system provides the insight once only possible in an Intensive Care Unit. The system utilizes a variety of connectivity means such as Wi-Fi and 3G to facilitate the communication between a multitude of industry standard vital sign monitor and a remote server. A system trial monitoring an infant to simulate neonatal graduate monitoring has determined the system was able to successfully transmit 99.99% of data generated from the vital sign monitor.

  15. Visualizing Patient Journals by Combining Vital Signs Monitoring and Natural Language Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan; Petersen, John Asger; Hoppe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    monitoring vital signs and then combining these into Early Warning Scores (EWS). Hereafter, techniques from Natural Language Processing (NLP) are applied on the existing patient journal to extract all entries. Finally, the two methods are combined into an interactive timeline featuring the ability to see...

  16. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Fajkus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG. The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS. The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person's chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field.

  17. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir; Nazeran, Homer; Siska, Petr

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS). The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person’s chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field. PMID:28075341

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies for a Bio-Impedance Vital-Sign Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Bio -impedance can be used for peripheral pulse detection as a non-invasive method for continuous vital sign monitoring. The objective of this study...was to evaluate the commercially available electrode materials that might be useful as wearable electrodes for the measurement of bio -impedance puse...Reproducibility and sensitivity of the bio -impedance measurement were comparable to the sensitivities of the pulse oximeter, laser Doppler, and

  19. FM-CW radar sensors for vital signs and motor activity monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Adrian Postolache

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes on-going research on vital signs and motor activity monitoring based on radar sensors embedded in wheelchairs, walkers and crutches for in home rehabilitation. Embedded sensors, conditioning circuits, real-time platforms that perform data acquisition, auto-identification, primary data processing and data communication contribute to convert daily used objects in home rehabilitation into smart objects that can be accessed by caregivers during the training sessions through human–machine interfaces expressed by the new generation of smart phones or tablet computers running Android OS or iOS operating systems. The system enables the management of patients in home rehabilitation by providing more accurate and up-to-date information using pervasive computing of vital signs and motor activity records.

  20. The effectiveness of Google GLASS as a vital signs monitor in surgery: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mohammed Husnain; Aydin, Abdullatif; Lowdon, Alexandra; Ahmed, Hamza Ibn; Muir, Gordon H; Khan, M Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the Google GLASS as a vital signs monitor in a surgical setting and identify potential uses. This prospective, observational and comparative study recruited novice (n = 24), intermediate (n = 8) and expert urologists (n = 5). All candidates performed a procedure on the GreenLight Simulator within a simulated setting using a standard vital signs monitor and then the Google GLASS. The time taken to respond to abnormal vital signs during both sessions was recorded. A quantitative survey was used to assess the usability and acceptability of the Google GLASS surgery. The majority (84%) of participants responded quicker to abnormal signs with the Google GLASS compared to a standard monitor (p = 0.0267). The average simulation score during a standard-monitor and GLASS-session scored to be statistically insignificant (p = 0.253). All parameters of simulation were also similar in both sessions including average sweep speed (p = 0.594), average blood loss (p = 0.761) and average grams vaporised (p = 0.102). Surgical performance between both sessions was similar and not hampered by the use of Google GLASS. Furthermore, 81% of candidates stated the GLASS was comfortable to wear during the procedure. This study has demonstrated that head-mounted displays such as the Google GLASS are potentially useful in surgery to aid patient care without hampering the surgeons view. It is hoped that the innovation and evolution of these devices triggers the potential future application of such devices within the medical field. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A fuzzy model for processing and monitoring vital signs in ICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentim Ricardo AM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The area of the hospital automation has been the subject of much research, addressing relevant issues which can be automated, such as: management and control (electronic medical records, scheduling appointments, hospitalization, among others; communication (tracking patients, staff and materials, development of medical, hospital and laboratory equipment; monitoring (patients, staff and materials; and aid to medical diagnosis (according to each speciality. Methods In this context, this paper presents a Fuzzy model for helping medical diagnosis of Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients and their vital signs monitored through a multiparameter heart screen. Intelligent systems techniques were used in the data acquisition and processing (sorting, transforming, among others it into useful information, conducting pre-diagnosis and providing, when necessary, alert signs to the medical staff. Conclusions The use of fuzzy logic turned to the medical area can be very useful if seen as a tool to assist specialists in this area. This paper presented a fuzzy model able to monitor and classify the condition of the vital signs of hospitalized patients, sending alerts according to the pre-diagnosis done helping the medical diagnosis.

  2. Real Time Monitoring of Human Body Vital Signs using Bluetooth and WLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeed Ahmed Khan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The technology of telemedicine is emerging and advancing day by day, it is capable of taking the field of healthcare to a whole new level of personalization. A person can keep a close check on his/her health's critical signs and can receive suitable feedback if required,- to help maintain the best of health status with the help of Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN concept. The sensor nodes can wirelessly communicate with any smart phone through an Android application to continuously monitor and have complete access to the medical data of the patient. Moreover it also aims to maintain an efficient electronic medical record of the person. Moreover, the consultant and the caretaker of the patient can have this important information remotely through an internet connection and provide with significant advice which encapsulates the term -smart first aid technology. In the proposed framework miniaturized sensors are worn on the body and non-intrusively monitor a person’s physiological state. The body vital signs (e.g.: heart rate, temperature etc. are recorded through the sensor nodes and transmit to the smart phone via Bluetooth, where the data of vital signs is stored and will further transmitted to remote locations if needed.

  3. Planetary Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  4. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Seong Kyu; Khan, Faheem; Cho, Sung Ho

    2017-05-30

    In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash.

  5. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Seong Kyu; Khan, Faheem; Cho, Sung Ho

    2017-01-01

    In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash. PMID:28556818

  6. Vital Sign Monitoring and Mobile Phone Usage Detection Using IR-UWB Radar for Intended Use in Car Crash Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Kyu Leem

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to avoid car crashes, active safety systems are becoming more and more important. Many crashes are caused due to driver drowsiness or mobile phone usage. Detecting the drowsiness of the driver is very important for the safety of a car. Monitoring of vital signs such as respiration rate and heart rate is important to determine the occurrence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, robust vital signs monitoring through impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB radar is discussed. We propose a new algorithm that can estimate the vital signs even if there is motion caused by the driving activities. We analyzed the whole fast time vital detection region and found the signals at those fast time locations that have useful information related to the vital signals. We segmented those signals into sub-signals and then constructed the desired vital signal using the correlation method. In this way, the vital signs of the driver can be monitored noninvasively, which can be used by researchers to detect the drowsiness of the driver which is related to the vital signs i.e., respiration and heart rate. In addition, texting on a mobile phone during driving may cause visual, manual or cognitive distraction of the driver. In order to reduce accidents caused by a distracted driver, we proposed an algorithm that can detect perfectly a driver's mobile phone usage even if there are various motions of the driver in the car or changes in background objects. These novel techniques, which monitor vital signs associated with drowsiness and detect phone usage before a driver makes a mistake, may be very helpful in developing techniques for preventing a car crash.

  7. Sharing Vital Signs between mobile phone applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Walter; Dumont, Guy A; Scheffer, Cornie

    2014-01-01

    We propose a communication library, ShareVitalSigns, for the standardized exchange of vital sign information between health applications running on mobile platforms. The library allows an application to request one or multiple vital signs from independent measurement applications on the Android OS. Compatible measurement applications are automatically detected and can be launched from within the requesting application, simplifying the work flow for the user and reducing typing errors. Data is shared between applications using intents, a passive data structure available on Android OS. The library is accompanied by a test application which serves as a demonstrator. The secure exchange of vital sign information using a standardized library like ShareVitalSigns will facilitate the integration of measurement applications into diagnostic and other high level health monitoring applications and reduce errors due to manual entry of information.

  8. Developing brain vital signs: Initial framework for monitoring brain function changes over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy eGhosh Hajra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical assessment of brain function relies heavily on indirect behavior-based tests. Unfortunately, behavior-based assessments are subjective and therefore susceptible to several confounding factors. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs, derived from electroencephalography (EEG, are often used to provide objective, physiological measures of brain function. Historically, ERPs have been characterized extensively within research settings, with limited but growing clinical applications. Over the past 20 years, we have developed clinical ERP applications for the evaluation of functional status following serious injury and/or disease. This work has identified an important gap: the need for a clinically accessible framework to evaluate ERP measures. Crucially, this enables baseline measures before brain dysfunction occurs, and might enable the routine collection of brain function metrics in the future much like blood pressure measures today. Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential brain vital signs. This framework enabled the translation/transformation of complex ERP data into accessible metrics of brain function for wider clinical utilization. To formalize the framework, three essential ERPs were selected as initial indicators: 1 the auditory N100 (Auditory sensation; 2 the auditory oddball P300 (Basic attention; and 3 the auditory speech processing N400 (Cognitive processing. First step validation was conducted on healthy younger and older adults (age range: 22-82 years. Results confirmed specific ERPs at the individual level (86.81%-98.96%, verified predictable age-related differences (P300 latency delays in older adults, p<0.05, and demonstrated successful linear transformation into the proposed brain vital sign (BVS framework (basic attention latency sub-component of BVS framework reflects delays in older adults, p<0.05. The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and

  9. Hemodynamic Monitoring Using Switching Autoregressive Dynamics of Multivariate Vital Sign Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Li-wei H.; Nemati, Shamim; Mark, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    In a critical care setting, shock and resuscitation endpoints are often defined based on arterial blood pressure values. Patient-specific fluctuations and interactions between heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), however, may provide additional prognostic value to stratify individual patients’ risks for adverse outcomes at different blood pressure targets. In this work, we use the switching autoregressive (SVAR) dynamics inferred from the multivariate vital sign time series to stratify mortality risks of intensive care units (ICUs) patients receiving vasopressor treatment. We model vital sign observations as generated from latent states from an autoregressive Hidden Markov Model (AR-HMM) process, and use the proportion of time patients stayed in different latent states to predict outcome. We evaluate the performance of our approach using minute-by-minute HR and mean arterial BP (MAP) of an ICU patient cohort while on vasopressor treatment. Our results indicate that the bivariate HR/MAP dynamics (AUC 0.74 [0.64, 0.84]) contain additional prognostic information beyond the MAP values (AUC 0.53 [0.42, 0.63]) in mortality prediction. Further, HR/MAP dynamics achieved better performance among a subgroup of patients in a low MAP range (median MAP < 65 mmHg) while on pressors. A realtime implementation of our approach may provide clinicians a tool to quantify the effectiveness of interventions and to inform treatment decisions. PMID:27774489

  10. Using Supervised Machine Learning to Classify Real Alerts and Artifact in Online Multisignal Vital Sign Monitoring Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Wang, Donghan; Fiterau, Madalina; Guillame-Bert, Mathieu; Bose, Eliezer; Kaynar, Ata M; Wallace, David J; Guttendorf, Jane; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R; Hravnak, Marilyn

    2016-07-01

    The use of machine-learning algorithms to classify alerts as real or artifacts in online noninvasive vital sign data streams to reduce alarm fatigue and missed true instability. Observational cohort study. Twenty-four-bed trauma step-down unit. Two thousand one hundred fifty-three patients. Noninvasive vital sign monitoring data (heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oximetry) recorded on all admissions at 1/20 Hz, and noninvasive blood pressure less frequently, and partitioned data into training/validation (294 admissions; 22,980 monitoring hours) and test sets (2,057 admissions; 156,177 monitoring hours). Alerts were vital sign deviations beyond stability thresholds. A four-member expert committee annotated a subset of alerts (576 in training/validation set, 397 in test set) as real or artifact selected by active learning, upon which we trained machine-learning algorithms. The best model was evaluated on test set alerts to enact online alert classification over time. The Random Forest model discriminated between real and artifact as the alerts evolved online in the test set with area under the curve performance of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.67-0.93) for peripheral oximetry at the instant the vital sign first crossed threshold and increased to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.71-0.95) at 3 minutes into the alerting period. Blood pressure area under the curve started at 0.77 (95% CI, 0.64-0.95) and increased to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.71-0.98), whereas respiratory rate area under the curve started at 0.85 (95% CI, 0.77-0.95) and increased to 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94-1.00). Heart rate alerts were too few for model development. Machine-learning models can discern clinically relevant peripheral oximetry, blood pressure, and respiratory rate alerts from artifacts in an online monitoring dataset (area under the curve > 0.87).

  11. A ZigBee-based wireless system for monitoring vital signs in hyperbaric chambers: Technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Cristian; Alorda, Bartomeu; Gracia, Luis; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Salinas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the replacement of a traditional wired communication link of the hyperbaric chambers with a wireless ZigBee-based system. This move allows a reduction in the costs of seals capable of withstanding the internal pressures and gives rise to a more versatile system. The new system is able to capture and process individual vital signs like the electrocardiography signal, and other analog sources, sending the data to an external computer and allowing analysis, representation and sharing with medical staff. This system solves such problems as the attenuation of the signal produced by the metal walls of the hyperbaric chamber and has a coverage area large enough to manage up to six patients with an effective data rate conversion of 2kHz. Furthermore, a battery-based and multiparameter platform is designed for multipatient hyperbaric chambers. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  12. A Detailed Algorithm for Vital Sign Monitoring of a Stationary/Non-Stationary Human through IR-UWB Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faheem; Cho, Sung Ho

    2017-01-01

    The vital sign monitoring through Impulse Radio Ultra-Wide Band (IR-UWB) radar provides continuous assessment of a patient’s respiration and heart rates in a non-invasive manner. In this paper, IR UWB radar is used for monitoring respiration and the human heart rate. The breathing and heart rate frequencies are extracted from the signal reflected from the human body. A Kalman filter is applied to reduce the measurement noise from the vital signal. An algorithm is presented to separate the heart rate signal from the breathing harmonics. An auto-correlation based technique is applied for detecting random body movements (RBM) during the measurement process. Experiments were performed in different scenarios in order to show the validity of the algorithm. The vital signs were estimated for the signal reflected from the chest, as well as from the back side of the body in different experiments. The results from both scenarios are compared for respiration and heartbeat estimation accuracy. PMID:28165416

  13. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system.

  14. The vital signs of chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Jahn, Andreas; Enarson, Donald A

    2009-06-01

    The vital signs of pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature and respiratory rate are the 'nub' of individual patient management. At the programmatic level, vital signs could also be used to monitor the burden and treatment outcome of chronic disease. Case detection and treatment outcome constitute the vital signs of tuberculosis control within the WHO's 'DOTS' framework, and similar vital signs could be adapted and used for management of chronic diseases. The numbers of new patients started on therapy in each month or quarter (new incident cases) are sensitive indicators for programme performance and access to services. Using similar reporting cycles, treatment outcomes for all patients can be assessed, the vital signs being: alive and retained on therapy at the respective facility; died; stopped therapy; lost to follow-up; and transferred out to another facility. Retention on treatment constitutes the prevalent number of cases, the burden of disease, and this provides important strategic information for rational drug forecasting and logistic planning. If case numbers and outcomes of chronic diseases were measured reliably and consistently as part of an integrated programmatic approach, this would strengthen the ability of resource-poor countries to monitor and assess their response to these growing epidemics.

  15. Vital Signs-Secondhand Smoke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-03

    This podcast is based on the February 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Secondhand smoke kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. Learn what can be done to prevent secondhand smoke exposure.  Created: 2/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/3/2015.

  16. Vital Signs - Child Passenger Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    This podcast is based on the February 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Over the past 10 years, more than 9,000 children 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes, and a third who died in 2011 weren't buckled up. Buckling up is the best way to reduce injuries and save lives.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  17. Clinical testing and Data Validation of a Novel Continuous Vital Sign Monitoring System in Cancer Patients – a cross border (DK– DE) collaboration project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov; Dynesen, Anja Weirsøe; Llambias, Maria Therese

    2016-01-01

    about how patients and relatives experience and perceive use of vital sig technologies. Further, nurses’ perception, attitudes and experience of nursing and care practices in relation to vital sign monitoring is explored Metods: The project is testing four innovative vital sign technologies in patients...... monitoring systems and also to integrate patients and relatives in the treatment in their home as well as in the hospital.Aim: The aim of this study is to implement and validate vital sign (pulse, temperature, Blood test etc) technologies in hospital wards as well as in patient’s home and to gain knowledge...... admitted to partner hospitals in Denmark and in Germany. The user perspective include qualitative data obtained by anthropologic observational studies, and qualitative interviews with patients, relatives and staff members. The validation of the vital sign technologies is performed by quantitative analysis...

  18. Application of Near-field intra-body communication and spread spectrum technique to vital-sign monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    As a novel vital sign monitor, we have developed wireless ECG monitoring system with Near-field intra-body communication technique. However, communication reliability is not so high because transmission channel is noisy and unstable. In order to improve the problem, we utilize spread spectrum (SS), which is known as robust communication technique even through poor transmission channel. First of all, we evaluated characteristics of human body to SS signal. The results show that SS can be used even through human body. Based on this result, we developed and tested near-field intra-body communication device enhanced by SS. The test result shows that SS can solve the problem mentioned above.

  19. Vital Signs-Trucker Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-03

    This podcast is based on the March 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In 2012 in the United States, about 317,000 motor vehicle crashes involved a large truck. Twenty-six thousand truck drivers and their passengers were injured in these crashes, and about 700 died. Learn what can be done to help truck drivers stay safe.  Created: 3/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/3/2015.

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... government is Tracking the nation’s progress in reducing crash injuries and deaths. www.cdc.gov/psr/national-summary/ ... Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety CDC: Child Passenger ...

  1. Progress Monitoring in an Integrated Health Care System: Tracking Behavioral Health Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Franklin, Allie; Mercer, Brian; Fraynt, Rebecca; Simon, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Progress monitoring implementation in an integrated health care system is a complex process that must address factors such as measurement, technology, delivery system care processes, patient needs and provider requirements. This article will describe how one organization faced these challenges by identifying the key decision points (choice of measure, process for completing rating scale, interface with electronic medical record and clinician engagement) critical to implementation. Qualitative and quantitative data will be presented describing customer and stakeholder satisfaction with the mental health progress monitoring tool (MHPMT) as well as organizational performance with key measurement targets.

  2. Design of an Integrated Sensor Platform for Vital Sign Monitoring of Newborn Infants at Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous health status monitoring and advances in medical treatments have resulted in a significant increase of survival rate in critically ill infants admitted into Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. The quality of life and long-term health prospects of the neonates depend increasingly on the reliability and comfort of the monitoring systems. In this paper, we present the design work of a smart jacket for vital sign monitoring of neonates at a NICU. The design represents a unique integration of sensor technology, user focus and design aspects. Textile sensors, a reflectance pulse oximeter and a wearable temperature sensor were proposed to be embedded into the smart jacket. Location of the sensor, materials and appearance were designed to optimize the functionality, patient comfort and the possibilities for aesthetic features. Prototypes were built for demonstrating the design concept and experimental results were obtained from tests on premature babies at the NICU of M�xima Medical Centre (MMC in Veldhoven, the Netherlands.

  3. Detecting Specific Health-Related Events Using an Integrated Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Adnane

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for the detection of apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data is presented. The method is based on the intelligent combination of an integrated sensor system for long-time cardiorespiratory signal monitoring and dedicated signal-processing packages. Integrated sensors are a PVDF film and conductive fabric sheets. The signal processing package includes dedicated respiratory cycle (RC and QRS complex detection algorithms and a new method using the respiratory cycle variability (RCV for detecting apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data. Results show that our method is suitable for online analysis of long time series data.

  4. Textile technology for the vital signs monitoring in telemedicine and extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Ferratini, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    This paper illustrates two extensive applications of a smart garment we previously developed for the monitoring of ECG, respiration, and movement. In the first application, the device, named Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata (MagIC), was used for the home monitoring of cardiac patients. The used platform included MagIC for signals collection, a touchscreen computer with a dedicated software for data handling, and a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) dongle for data transmission, via email, to three cardiologists. Three patients daily-performed 3-min telemonitoring sessions for 30 days by using the platform. The whole system behaved correctly in 85 out of 90 sessions. In five instances, a second session was required due to UMTS traffic congestion. Only in three sessions, cardiologists asked the patient to repeat the acquisition because of poor signal quality. In the second application, MagIC was used to evaluate the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on sleep and 24 h daily life in 30 healthy subjects at 3500 and 5400 m above sea level on Mount Everest slopes. The use of MagIC garment was reported to be simple and requiring short instrumentation time even in the demanding expedition environment. The signal quality was adequate in 111 out of 115 recordings and 90% of the subjects found the vest comfortable.

  5. Using Supervised Machine Learning to Classify Real Alerts and Artifact in Online Multi-signal Vital Sign Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Wang, Donghan; Fiterau, Madalina; Guillame-Bert, Mathieu; Bose, Eliezer; Kaynar, Ata M.; Wallace, David J.; Guttendorf, Jane; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R.; Hravnak, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Use machine-learning (ML) algorithms to classify alerts as real or artifacts in online noninvasive vital sign (VS) data streams to reduce alarm fatigue and missed true instability. METHODS Using a 24-bed trauma step-down unit’s non-invasive VS monitoring data (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], peripheral oximetry [SpO2]) recorded at 1/20Hz, and noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure [BP] less frequently, we partitioned data into training/validation (294 admissions; 22,980 monitoring hours) and test sets (2,057 admissions; 156,177 monitoring hours). Alerts were VS deviations beyond stability thresholds. A four-member expert committee annotated a subset of alerts (576 in training/validation set, 397 in test set) as real or artifact selected by active learning, upon which we trained ML algorithms. The best model was evaluated on alerts in the test set to enact online alert classification as signals evolve over time. MAIN RESULTS The Random Forest model discriminated between real and artifact as the alerts evolved online in the test set with area under the curve (AUC) performance of 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.93) for SpO2 at the instant the VS first crossed threshold and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.95) at 3 minutes into the alerting period. BP AUC started at 0.77 (95%CI 0.64-0.95) and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.98), while RR AUC started at 0.85 (95%CI 0.77-0.95) and increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.94–1.00). HR alerts were too few for model development. CONCLUSIONS ML models can discern clinically relevant SpO2, BP and RR alerts from artifacts in an online monitoring dataset (AUC>0.87). PMID:26992068

  6. Effectiveness of continuous or intermittent vital signs monitoring in preventing adverse events on general wards: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Morrell, M; Prgomet, M; Turner, R M; Nicholson, M; Hillman, K

    2016-10-01

    Vital signs monitoring is an old hospital practice for patient safety but evaluation of its effectiveness is not widespread. We aimed to identify strategies to improve intermittent or continuous vital signs monitoring in general wards; and their effectiveness in preventing adverse events on general hospital wards. Publications searched between 1980 and June 2014 in five databases. Main outcome measures were in-hospital death, cardiac arrest, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, length of stay, identification of physiological deterioration and activation of rapid response systems. Twenty-two studies assessing the effect of continuous (9) or intermittent monitoring (13) and reporting outcomes on 203,407 patients in-hospital wards across 13 countries were included in this review. Both monitoring practices led to early identification of patient deterioration, increased rapid response activations and improvements in timeliness or completeness of vital signs documentation. Innovative intermittent monitoring approaches are associated with modest reduction in in-hospital mortality over intermittent vital signs monitoring in 'usual care'. However, there was no evidence of significant reduction in ICU transfers or other adverse events with either intermittent or continuous monitoring. This review of heterogeneous monitoring approaches found no conclusive confirmation of improvements in prevention of cardiac arrest, reduction in length of hospital stay, or prevention of other neurological or cardiovascular adverse events. The evidence found to date is insufficient to recommend continuous vital signs monitoring in general wards as routine practice. Future evaluations of effectiveness need to be undertaken with more rigorous methods and homogeneous outcome measurements. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Detecting vital signs with wearable wireless sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented.

  8. Detecting Vital Signs with Wearable Wireless Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR Science Clips Error processing SSI file Preventing Melanoma Communities Play a Vital Role Language: English Español ( ... and use of indoor tanning by minors. Problem Melanoma is increasing. Melanoma skin cancer is common and ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Recipe for Food Safety Protecting people from deadly Listeria food poisoning Recommend ... for food production, like those included in the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) , so that food doesn't ...

  11. A study on reception electrodes for the vital-sign monitor using near-field intra-body communication enhanced by spread spectrum technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    As a novel vital sign monitor, we have developed wireless ECG monitoring system with Near-field intra-body communication (NF-IBC) technique. However, it was hard to ensure communication reliability because transmission channel is noisy and unstable. In order to solve the problem, we utilize spread spectrum (SS), which is known as robust communication technique even through poor transmission channel. In previous study, we have already developed an ECG monitor using NF-IBC enhanced by SS. In this paper, we evaluated on structure of the reception electrode for reliable communication. Based on the evaluations with bit error rate, we suggested the reception electrode structure which can keep the communication reliability. As the results we considered that we can expand the reception electrode up to 2.25 m(2). Moreover, we proposed the structure of the reception electrodes that can keep the communication reliability. Finally we suggested how to use the SS NF-IBC vital-sign monitor in room that larger than 2.25 m(2), and we had shown the practicability of the systems.

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 0:60 seconds] On Other Web Sites MedlinePlus - Teenage Pregnancy MedlinePlus - Birth Control The Doctor's Channel: CDC Vital Signs Long Acting Reversible Contraception [VIDEO - 3:30 minutes] Top of ... HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  13. Vital Signs-Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-03

    This podcast is based on the June 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Norovirus infects about 20 million Americans each year. Learn how to protect yourself and your family from this very contagious, potentially serious illness.  Created: 6/3/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/3/2014.

  14. Vital Signs-Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-10-07

    This podcast is based on the October 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Motor vehicle crashes are costly and preventable. Learn what can be done to help prevent motor vehicle injuries.  Created: 10/7/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/7/2014.

  15. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people’s activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of “smart clothing” system. PMID:28208620

  16. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people’s activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of “smart clothing” system.

  17. Record review to explore the adequacy of post-operative vital signs monitoring using a local modified early warning score (mews chart to evaluate outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una Kyriacos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To explore the adequacy of: vital signs' recordings (respiratory and heart rate, oxygen saturation, systolic blood pressure (BP, temperature, level of consciousness and urine output in the first 8 post-operative hours; responses to clinical deterioration. 2 To identify factors associated with death on the ward between transfer from the theatre recovery suite and the seventh day after operation. DESIGN: Retrospective review of records of 11 patients who died plus four controls for each case. PARTICIPANTS: We reviewed clinical records of 55 patients who met inclusion criteria (general anaesthetic, age >13, complete records from six surgical wards in a teaching hospital between 1 May and 31 July 2009. METHODS: In the absence of guidelines for routine post-operative vital signs' monitoring, nurses' standard practice graphical plots of recordings were recoded into MEWS formats (0 = normal, 1-3 upper or lower limit and their responses to clinical deterioration were interpreted using MEWS reporting algorithms. RESULTS: No patients' records contained recordings for all seven parameters displayed on the MEWS. There was no evidence of response to: 22/36 (61.1% abnormal vital signs for patients who died that would have triggered an escalated MEWS reporting algorithm; 81/87 (93.1% for controls. Death was associated with age, ≥61 years (OR 14.2, 3.0-68.0; ≥2 pre-existing co-morbidities (OR 75.3, 3.7-1527.4; high/low systolic BP on admission (OR 7.2, 1.5-34.2; tachycardia (≥111-129 bpm (OR 6.6, 1.4-30.0 and low systolic BP (≤81-100 mmHg, as defined by the MEWS (OR 8.0, 1.9-33.1. CONCLUSIONS: Guidelines for post-operative vital signs' monitoring and reporting need to be established. The MEWS provides a useful scoring system for interpreting clinical deterioration and guiding intervention. Exploration of the ability of the Cape Town MEWS chart plus reporting algorithm to expedite recognition of signs of clinical and physiological

  18. Vital Sign and Location/Attitude Monitoring with Sensor Networks for the Proposed Rescue System for Disabled and Elderly Persons Who Need a Help in Evacuation from Disaster Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Method and system for vital sign (Body temperature, blood pressure, bless, Heart beat pulse rate, and consciousness and location/attitude monitoring with sensor network for the proposed rescue system for disabled and elderly persons who need a help in evacuation from disaster areas is proposed. Experimental results show that all of vital signs as well as location and attitude of the disabled and elderly persons are monitored with the proposed sensor networks.

  19. CDC Vital Signs-Heroin Epidemic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-07-07

    This podcast is based on the July 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Heroin use and heroin-related overdose deaths are increasing. Most people are using it with other drugs, especially prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to prevent and treat the problem.  Created: 7/7/2015 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 7/7/2015.

  20. Vital Signs-Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-06

    This podcast is based on the January 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In the United States, an average of six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. Learn what you can do to prevent binge drinking and alcohol poisoning.  Created: 1/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/6/2015.

  1. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  2. Vital Signs-Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-07

    This podcast is based on the April 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Teen births in the U.S. have declined, but still, more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. Learn about the most effective types of birth control.  Created: 4/7/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/7/2015.

  3. CDC Vital Signs-Preventing Melanoma

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-06-02

    This podcast is based on the June 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. In 2011, there were more than 65,000 cases of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. Learn how everyone can help prevent skin cancer.  Created: 6/2/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 6/2/2015.

  4. Extracting vital signs with smartphone camera

    OpenAIRE

    GARCÍA PLO, MIGUEL

    2017-01-01

    Desarrollo de una app para sistema operativo Android. Hallar mediante la cámara de un dispositivo móvil el pulso de un paciente. Se utilizarán técnicas de procesado de imagen y la librería openCV. García Plo, M. (2016). Extracting vital signs with smartphone camera. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/80419. TFGM

  5. Noise considerations for vital signs CW radar sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jensen, Thomas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    The use of continuous wave (CW) radars for measuring human vital signs have recently received a lot of attention due to its many promising applications like monitoring people at hospitals or infants at home without the need for wired sensors. This paper briefly presents the typical CW radar setup...

  6. Noise considerations for vital signs CW radar sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jensen, Thomas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    The use of continuous wave (CW) radars for measuring human vital signs have recently received a lot of attention due to its many promising applications like monitoring people at hospitals or infants at home without the need for wired sensors. This paper briefly presents the typical CW radar setup...... and the underlying signal theory for such sensors. Then to point out and especially clarify one of the most important effects aiding the design of vital signs radars (VSR), a more detailed discussion concerning phase noise cancellation (or filtering) by range correlation is given. This discussion leads to some...

  7. Errors, Omissions, and Outliers in Hourly Vital Signs Measurements in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslove, David M; Dubin, Joel A; Shrivats, Arvind; Lee, Joon

    2016-11-01

    To empirically examine the prevalence of errors, omissions, and outliers in hourly vital signs recorded in the ICU. Retrospective analysis of vital signs measurements from a large-scale clinical data warehouse (Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care III). Data were collected from the medical, surgical, cardiac, and cardiac surgery ICUs of a tertiary medical center in the United States. We analyzed data from approximately 48,000 ICU stays including approximately 28 million vital signs measurements. None. We used the vital sign day as our unit of measurement, defined as all the recordings from a single patient for a specific vital sign over a single 24-hour period. Approximately 30-40% of vital sign days included at least one gap of greater than 70 minutes between measurements. Between 3% and 10% of blood pressure measurements included logical inconsistencies. With the exception of pulse oximetry vital sign days, the readings in most vital sign days were normally distributed. We found that 15-38% of vital sign days contained at least one statistical outlier, of which 6-19% occurred simultaneously with outliers in other vital signs. We found a significant number of missing, erroneous, and outlying vital signs measurements in a large ICU database. Our results provide empirical evidence of the nonrepresentativeness of hourly vital signs. Additional studies should focus on determining optimal sampling frequencies for recording vital signs in the ICU.

  8. Vital Signs-Cervical Cancer is Preventable!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  9. CDC Vital Signs-Heart Age

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This podcast is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  10. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  11. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  12. Monte-Carlo Simulation and Automated Test Bench for Developing a Multichannel NIR-Based Vital-Signs Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruser, Christoph; Strutz, Nils; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors mounted in beds promises to unlock new applications in home and low acuity monitoring. This paper presents a novel concept for such a system based on an array of near infrared (NIR) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. We focus on modeling and analyzing the underlying technical measurement principle with the help of a 2D model of a polyurethane foam mattress and Monte-Carlo simulations of the opto-mechanical interaction responsible for signal genesis. Furthermore, a test rig to automatically and repeatably impress mechanical vibrations onto a mattress is introduced and used to identify the properties of a prototype implementation of the proposed measurement principle. Results show that NIR-based sensing is capable of registering miniscule deformations of the mattress with a high spatial specificity. As a final outlook, proof-of-concept measurements with the sensor array are presented which demonstrate that cardiorespiratory movements of the body can be detected and that automatic heart rate estimation at competitive error levels is feasible with the proposed approach.

  13. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  14. Evaluation of Standard Versus Nonstandard Vital Signs Monitors in the Prehospital and Emergency Departments: Results and Lessons Learned from a Trauma Patient Care Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    pressure ( SBP ), diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, respira- tory rate (RR), and blood oxygenation (SpO2). Combinations of these vital signs...were also used to derive other measurements including shock index (shock index = HR / SBP ) and pulse pres- sure (pulse pressure = SBP j diastolic...systolic, 40 260 mm Hg/ diastolic, 20 200 mm Hg & SpO2 ranges 1 100 % saturation & SpO2 ranges 0 100 % saturation & 12-lead ECG & 3-lead (Lead II) ECG

  15. 移动式人体生理体征测量系统%Human Vital Signs Monitoring System Using Wearable Sensors in Daily Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱鹏; 蒋平; 朱劲; 程拥强; 王晓年

    2014-01-01

    We designed a human vital signs monitoring system based on multiple wearable sensors.It consists of an MSP430 mi-cro-controller for the central processing and a CC2540 SoC for the Bluetooth low-energy based on wireless data transmission.This paper presented its working principles, hardware design, software design and experiments.Experimental results show that the sys-tem can reliably capture and monitor the user's ECG ( electrocardiogram) , PPG ( photoplethysmography) , heart rate, spO2 ( oxy-gen saturation) , body temperature and blood pressure.It also can communicate with smart phones and then upload the data to a remote monitoring center for further analysis and diagnosis.This system provides a reliable solution for tele-healthcare supported by the technologies of Internet of things and embedded systems.%研究设计一种家用,对多种人体生理数据进行监测的监护系统。提出一种以MSP430微控制器为处理核心,以CC2540低功耗蓝牙4.0为无线数据传输的设计方案,包括工作原理、硬件设计和软件的设计实现。实验结果表明该系统能够可靠地采集并监测用户的ECG(心电图)、PPG(血氧波形图)、心率、spO2(血氧饱合度)、体温及血压数据,能与智能手机通讯并上传数据到远端的监护中心进行进一步分析与诊断。本系统为物联网技术和嵌入式系统在远程医疗健康监护中的应用提供了一套稳定可靠的解决方案。

  16. Speckle POF sensor for detecting vital signs of patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomer, M.; Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Revilla, P.; Herrero, G.; Madruga, F.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, both arterial pulse and respiratory rate have been successfully measured based on changes in speckle patterns of multimode fibers. Using two fiber-based transducers, one located on the wrist and another in the chest, both disturbances were transmitted to the fiber, varying the speckle pattern. These variations of the speckle pattern were captured using a commercial webcam and further processed using different methods. The achieved results have been presented and the simultaneous monitoring of both vital signs has been also discussed. The feasibility to use the proposed sensor system for this application is demonstrated.

  17. Rating the Vitality of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, J. Albert; Lewis, M. Paul; Simons, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    The Expanded Graded Intergenerational Disruption Scale (EGIDS), developed by Lewis and Simons and based on work by Fishman, provides a means of rating "language vitality"--the level of development or endangerment--where "development" is understood as adding or preserving functions and "endangerment" as loss of…

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV vaccine can reduce risk of cervical cancer. HPV causes most cervical cancers. Only 1 in 3 girls and 1 in ... Signs – Cervical Cancer [PSA - 0:60 seconds] Cervical Cancer Preteen and Teen Vaccines Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Associated Cancers What Should I Know About ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular Diseases Food Safety ... Engage in HIV education programs and support safe environments in schools for all youth. Make sure your ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... students were current (past 30-day) users of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, in 2014. Most e-cigarettes ... Related Pages Vital Signs Issue details: Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle School and High School Students ...

  1. Vital signs information wireless monitoring system based on the Android and WIFI%基于Android和WIFI的无线体征信息监测系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩方; 毛晓波; 邹倩; 崔孟丹; 石霄

    2013-01-01

    介绍一款采用无线WIFI传输的便携式体征信息监测系统.该系统利用STC89S52单片机及DS18B20温度传感器、HK2000B型压电式脉搏传感器等模块采集生理体征信息,通过HLK-WIFIM03进行无线传输,结合用户Android设备终端进行数据显示及反馈.采用人机友好交互界面进行体征信息管理,可实现远程体征信息监测、分析、警报等功能,具有低功耗、使用方便、操作简单等特点,应用前景广阔.%A portable signs monitoring system based on the application of Android intelligent system and wireless wifi transmission is introducd. The system mainly use MCU STC89S52, temperature sensor DS18B20 and piezoelectric pulse sensor HK2000B acquire physical signs information, HLK-WIF1M03 for wireless transmission, and the Android equipment terminal for data display and feedback. A friendly man-machine interactive interface is used to manage the signs information, which can complete remote signs information monitoring, analysis and warning. The system has many characteristics such as low power consumption, easy to use and sirrtple operation etc, which make it has a broad prospect of application.

  2. The detection of 4 vital signs of in-patients Using fuzzy database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris Rangkuti, A.; Erlisa Rasjid, Zulfany

    2014-03-01

    Actually in order to improve in the performance of the Hospital's administrator, by serve patients effectively and efficiently, the role of information technology become the dominant support. Especially when it comes to patient's conditions, such that it will be reported to a physician as soon as possible, including monitoring the patient's conditions regularly. For this reason it is necessary to have a Hospital Monitoring Information System, that is able to provide information about the patient's condition which is based on the four vital signs, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. To monitor the 4 vital signs, the concept of fuzzy logic is used, where the vital signs number approaches 1 then the patient is close to recovery, and on the contrary, when the vital signs number approaches 0 then the patient still has problems. This system also helps nurses to provide answers to the relatives of patients, who wants to know the development of the patient's condition, including the recovery percentage based on the average of Fuzzy max from the 4 vital signs. Using Fuzzy-based monitoring system, the monitoring of the patient's condition becomes simpler and easier.

  3. CDC Vital Signs–Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This podcast is based on the September 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Each year, more than 140,000 people die and many survivors face disability. Eighty percent of strokes are preventable. Learn the signs of stroke and how to prevent them.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  4. CDC Vital Signs–Opioid Prescribing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This podcast is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  5. CDC Vital Signs–Arthritis in America

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This podcast is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  6. Vital Signs-Children Need More Fruits and Vegetables!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-05

    This podcast is based on the August 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Children in the U.S. aren't eating enough fruits and vegetables. Learn what you can do to impact this problem.  Created: 8/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2014.

  7. Vital Signs – Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This podcast is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  8. Vital Signs – Alcohol Screening and Counseling?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This podcast is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  9. Vital Signs – Making Health Care Safer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-05

    This podcast is based on the March 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses lethal infections from carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, germs and ways health care providers can help stop CRE infections.  Created: 3/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/5/2013.

  10. Vital Signs – Childhood Obesity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-06

    This podcast is based on the August 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. The rate of obesity among low-income preschoolers has declined, but one in eight is still obese. This program briefly discusses what can be done.  Created: 8/6/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/6/2013.

  11. Wearable vital signs monitor based on piezoelectric film sensors and PSoC%基于压电薄膜和片上可编程系统的可穿戴体征监测系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧军; 许武军

    2015-01-01

    随着社会经济的发展,人口与建筑密度日益增大,火灾发生的概率越来越大,扑救难度也越来越高。传统的消防防护服属功能服装只能实现防火,隔热和阻燃等基本功能。而消防战斗员的生命体征无法被消防指挥员及时获知,这对保障消防战斗员的生命安全,和消防现场的应急指挥非常重要。正是在这种形势下,可穿戴体征监测系统的研究才具有重要的实用意义。研究的可穿戴体征监测系统,是可装配于救援防护服本体上,基于压电薄膜技术和片上可编程系统技术搭建的,具有生命体征监测和告警功能的电子系统。装配了该系统的救援防护服,不仅能够实现传统防护服对救援队员的保护作用,还可以实时监测救援队员的生命体征,通过声光告警电路将现场信息反馈给救援队员,提高了消防救援和指挥效率。%With the development of social economy, population and building density increases day by day, the probability of fire is more and more big, the difficulty to save is also more and more high. The traditional fire protective clothing can only achieve fire prevention function, heat insulation and basic function such as flame retardant. And fire fighters' vital signs cannot be acquired by commander in time, this is very important to ensure the life safety of the fire fighters and to command the scene of the fire emergency. In this situation, the study of the wearable vital signs monitoring system is importantly of practical significance. The wearable vital signs monitoring system, which is equipped on the rescue protective clothing ontology, based on the piezoelectric film and the programmable system chip technology, has the vital signs monitoring and warning function of electronic systems. The rescue protective clothing equipped this system, can not only realize the traditional protective function to rescue team members, can still monitor

  12. Vital Signs-Physical Activity and Adults with Disabilities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-06

    This podcast is based on the May 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Adults with disabilities who get no aerobic physical activity are 50 percent more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer. Learn what you can do to help.  Created: 5/6/2014 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 5/6/2014.

  13. CDC Vital Signs–Cancer and Obesity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-04

    This podcast is based on the October 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Obesity is a leading cancer risk factor. Unfortunately, two out of three U.S. adults weigh more than recommended. Find out what can be done to help people get to and keep a healthy weight.  Created: 10/4/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/4/2017.

  14. CDC Vital Signs-Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-03-03

    This podcast is based on the March 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Patients can get serious healthcare-associated infections, or HAIs, while receiving medical treatment in a healthcare facility. Learn how to prevent healthcare-associated infections.  Created: 3/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/3/2016.

  15. CDC Vital Signs-Communication Can Save Lives

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-04

    This podcast is based on the August 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotic-resistant germs cause at least 23,000 deaths each year. Learn how public health authorities and health care facilities can work together to save lives.  Created: 8/4/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/4/2015.

  16. CDC Vital Signs-Safer Food Saves Lives

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-03

    This podcast is based on the November 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Contaminated food sent to several states can cause multistate outbreaks of foodborne illness and make a lot of people seriously ill. Learn what can be done to prevent and stop outbreaks.  Created: 11/3/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/3/2015.

  17. CDC Vital Signs-Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-10-06

    This podcast is based on the October 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Hospitals can implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding to be designated as "Baby-Friendly" and support more moms in a decision to breastfeed.  Created: 10/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/6/2015.

  18. CDC Vital Signs–African American Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-02

    This podcast is based on the May 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. The life expectancy of African Americans has improved, but it’s still an average of four years less than whites. Learn what can be done so all Americans can have the opportunity to pursue a healthy lifestyle.  Created: 5/2/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/2/2017.

  19. Vital Signs – Prescription Painkiller Overdoses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-02

    This podcast is based on the July 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. Prescription painkiller overdoses are an under-recognized and growing problem among women. This program includes things that women and health care providers can do to reduce the risk of overdose.  Created: 7/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/2/2013.

  20. Vital Signs – When Food Bites Back

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-04

    This podcast is based on the June 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. It discusses food poisoning and specifically, Listeria. If you're 65 or older, have a weakened immune system, or are pregnant, you must be especially careful when selecting, preparing, and storing food.  Created: 6/4/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/4/2013.

  1. Vital Signs-Preventing Pregnancy in Younger Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-08

    This podcast is based on the April 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Births to teens are declining, still, in 2012, more than 86,000 teens ages 15 to 17 gave birth. This program discusses what health care providers, parents, and teens can do to help prevent teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/8/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/8/2014.

  2. Multi-parameter vital sign database to assist in alarm optimization for general care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, James; Kanter, Benjamin; Skora, Brooke; McCombie, Scott; Henry, Isaac; McCombie, Devin; Kennedy, Rosemary; Soller, Babs

    2016-12-01

    Continual vital sign assessment on the general care, medical-surgical floor is expected to provide early indication of patient deterioration and increase the effectiveness of rapid response teams. However, there is concern that continual, multi-parameter vital sign monitoring will produce alarm fatigue. The objective of this study was the development of a methodology to help care teams optimize alarm settings. An on-body wireless monitoring system was used to continually assess heart rate, respiratory rate, SpO2 and noninvasive blood pressure in the general ward of ten hospitals between April 1, 2014 and January 19, 2015. These data, 94,575 h for 3430 patients are contained in a large database, accessible with cloud computing tools. Simulation scenarios assessed the total alarm rate as a function of threshold and annunciation delay (s). The total alarm rate of ten alarms/patient/day predicted from the cloud-hosted database was the same as the total alarm rate for a 10 day evaluation (1550 h for 36 patients) in an independent hospital. Plots of vital sign distributions in the cloud-hosted database were similar to other large databases published by different authors. The cloud-hosted database can be used to run simulations for various alarm thresholds and annunciation delays to predict the total alarm burden experienced by nursing staff. This methodology might, in the future, be used to help reduce alarm fatigue without sacrificing the ability to continually monitor all vital signs.

  3. CDC Vital Signs-Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-24

    This podcast is based on the November 24, 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Preexposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a daily medicine that can be used to prevent getting HIV. PrEP is for people who don’t have HIV but who are at very high risk for getting it from sex or injection drug use. Unfortunately, many people who can benefit from PrEP aren’t taking it.  Created: 11/24/2015 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/24/2015.

  4. Vital Signs – Defeating Breast Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    This podcast is based on the November 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Better screening and treatment have contributed to a decline in breast cancer deaths, however, not all women have benefited equally from these improvements. Learn how we can all help reduce deaths from breast cancer.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  5. CDC Vital Signs-E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-05

    This podcast is based on the January 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Most electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and may harm brain development. More than 18 million middle and high school students were exposed to e-cigarette ads. Exposure to these ads may be contributing to an increase in e-cigarette use among youth. Learn what can be done to keep our youth safe and healthy.  Created: 1/5/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/5/2016.

  6. Monitoring physical functioning as the sixth vital sign: evaluating patient and practice engagement in chronic illness care in a primary care setting--a quasi-experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Julie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, one in three adults or almost 9 million people report having a chronic condition. Over two thirds of total deaths result from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory illness and 77% of persons ≥65 years have at least one chronic condition. Persons with chronic disease are at risk for functional decline; as a result, there is an increased awareness of the significance of functional status as an important health outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who receive a multi-component rehabilitation intervention, including online monitoring of function with feedback and self-management workshops, showed less functional decline than case matched controls who did not receive this intervention. In addition, we wanted to determine whether capacity building initiatives within the Family Health Team promote a collaborative approach to Chronic Disease Management. Methods A population-based multi-component rehabilitation intervention delivered to persons with chronic illnesses (≥ 44 yrs (n = 60 was compared to a group of age and sex matched controls (n = 60 with chronic illnesses receiving usual care within a primary healthcare setting. The population-based intervention consisted of four main components: (1 function-based individual assessment and action planning, (2 rehabilitation self-management workshops, (3 on-line self-assessment of function and (4 organizational capacity building. T-tests and chi-square tests were used for continuous and categorical variables respectively in baseline comparison between groups. Results Two MANOVA showed significant between group differences in patient reported physical functioning (Λ = 0.88, F = (2.86 = 5.97. p = 0.004 and for the physical performance measures collectively as the dependent variable (Λ = 0.80, F = (6.93 = 3.68. p = 0.0025. There were no within group differences for the capacity measures. Conclusion It is feasible to monitor

  7. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  8. An experimental vital signs detection radar using low-IF heterodyne architecture and single-sideband transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Yan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an experimental X-band radar system, called DTU-VISDAM, developed for the detection and monitoring of human vital signs is described. The DTU-VISDAM radar exploits a low intermediate frequency (IF) heterodyne RF front-end architecture and single-sideband (SSB) transmission for easier...... and more reliable extraction of the vital signs. The hardware implementation of the proposed low-IF RF front-end architecture and associated IF circuitry is discussed. Furthermore, the signal processing and calibration steps necessary to extract the vital signs information measured on a human subject...

  9. From a Vital Sign to Vitality: Selling Exercise So Patients Want to Buy It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segar, Michelle L; Guérin, Eva; Phillips, Edward; Fortier, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is Medicine (EIM) and physical activity as a vital sign are based on health-focused research and reflect ideal frames and messages for clinicians. However, they are nonoptimal for patients because they do not address what drives patients' decision-making and motivation. With the growing national emphasis on patient-centered and value-based care, it is the perfect time for EIM to evolve and advance a second-level consumer-oriented exercise prescription and communication strategy. Through research on decision-making, motivation, consumer behavior, and meaningful goal pursuit, this article features six evidence-based issues to help clinicians make physical activity more relevant and compelling for patients to sustain in ways that concurrently support patient-centered care. Physical activity prescriptions and counseling can evolve to reflect affective and behavioral science and sell exercise so patients want to buy it.

  10. Creating a hospital-wide patient safety net: Design and deployment of ZigBee vital sign sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tia; Selavo, Leo; Welsh, Matt

    2007-10-11

    Advancements in wireless technologies can enable patient monitors to be far more versatile than ones that are used today. We developed wireless vital sign sensors that operate on a robust, infrastructure-independent, and instantaneously deployable wireless communication network. These sensors were easily and rapidly deployed in a diverse variety of care settings to provide continuous patient monitoring.

  11. The design and implementation of a rescue terminal with vital signs telemonitoring based on Beidou 1 navigation satellite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junping; Zheng, Bing; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Yubin; Chen, Shifu; Zhang, Meikui; Zhou, Li; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Tongze

    2011-03-01

    This article presents the design and applications of a rescue terminal with positioning, vital signs sensing, and communicating function for special environment. The terminal provides three-dimensional positioning functionality via China's Beidou 1 Navigation Satellite (BD1) System and can collect users' vital signs with a set of wireless sensors. A controller of the terminal is in charge of processing data collected from the wireless sensors and communicating with the monitoring platform. With features such as small sizing, low power consumption, and accurate positioning, this terminal is very helpful in special circumstances such as disaster relief, dangerous outdoor sports and adventure monitoring, and antiterrorism activities.

  12. Analytical parameters and vital signs in patients subjected to dental extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jané-Pallí, Enric; Arranz-Obispo, Carlos; González-Navarro, Beatriz; Murat, Jesús; Ayuso-Montero, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Santamaría, Amparo; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2017-01-01

    Background Dental consultation may provoke stress to the patient, especially when a dental surgery is going to be performed, stressful situations can cause a reaction in the sympathetic nervous system that could lead to cardiovascular alterations. Blood pressure and cardiac frequency are used often as an indirect measurement and this parameters combined can serve as good indicators of stress. Objective: Analyze the changes in vital signs and analytical parameters induced by a dental extraction. Material and Methods 24 healthy patients who required a simple dental extraction underwent to a blood test and motorization of their pre- and post-extraction vital signs before, at 2 and 48 hours after the procedure. Data analysis was performed by means of repeated measures one way ANOVA followed by multiple comparisons Bonferroni’s Post-hoc test. Results The evaluated patients were 13 women and 11 men with an average age of 35.1. Thirteen patients (54.17% of the sample) were smokers and five were regular drinkers (20.8%). No significant differences were observed in the vital signs with the exception of diastolic blood pressure and cardiac rate that were slightly lower after extraction. Only two analytical parameters showed statistical significant changes. Total bilirubin was significantly higher at 48 hours after extraction and leukocyte count was significantly lower at this time. In any case, the magnitude of the changes observed was very low. The analytical parameters and the vital signs did not show any relevant change. Conclusions Eventual alterations found after simple tooth extraction should not be attributed to the procedure. Key words:Blood pressure, heart rate, monitoring physiologic, oxygen saturation, tooth extraction. PMID:28210440

  13. Vital Signs Evaluation of Human Behaviour via an Autonomous Body Area Network System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, S.; Takayama, S.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancing Quality of Life (QOL) has long been an explicit and implicit goal for individuals, nations, and the world. QOL involves diverse multidimensional factors spanning wealth, physical health, social well-being, and international relationships. This study presents a definition of QOL combining the measurement of health-related QOL with an autonomous Body Area Network System (BANs). A method of evaluating vital signs is performed and linked to physical intensity assistance in exercise. Specifically, BAN acts as a supportive system which can assist a user in monitoring his or her body's parameters, providing real-time feedbacks and dynamically sharing information from any location to one or more users.

  14. Is Heart Rate Variability Better Than Routine Vital Signs for Prehospital Identification of Major Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    use. Circulation 1996;93:1043–65. [25] Malik M, Cripps T, Farrell T, Camm AJ. Prognostic value of heart rate variability after myocardial infarction ...HRVmetrics could improve the diagnosis of hemorrhagic injury plus PRBC transfusion vs routine vital signs alone. Results: As univariate predictors, HRV...routine vital signs to test the hypothesis that HRV metrics could improve the diagnosis of hemorrhagic injury plus PRBC transfusion vs routine vital

  15. CDC Vital Signs: More People Walk to Better Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they feel protected from traffic and safe from crime and hazards. Maintaining surfaces can keep people who ... signs that are easy to read, and route maps that the public can easily find and use. ...

  16. Validating emergency department vital signs using a data quality engine for data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, N; Chandra, D; Ellis, S; Baumlin, K

    2013-01-01

    Vital signs in our emergency department information system were entered into free-text fields for heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation. We sought to convert these text entries into a more useful form, for research and QA purposes, upon entry into a data warehouse. We derived a series of rules and assigned quality scores to the transformed values, conforming to physiologic parameters for vital signs across the age range and spectrum of illness seen in the emergency department. Validating these entries revealed that 98% of free-text data had perfect quality scores, conforming to established vital sign parameters. Average vital signs varied as expected by age. Degradations in quality scores were most commonly attributed logging temperature in Fahrenheit instead of Celsius; vital signs with this error could still be transformed for use. Errors occurred more frequently during periods of high triage, though error rates did not correlate with triage volume. In developing a method for importing free-text vital sign data from our emergency department information system, we now have a data warehouse with a broad array of quality-checked vital signs, permitting analysis and correlation with demographics and outcomes.

  17. Fiber sensor for non-contact estimation of vital bio-signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-05-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in arterial pulse monitoring using optical fiber sensors. In this paper, we introduce a novel device based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual.

  18. Emergency nurses' decisions regarding frequency and nature of vital sign assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Katherine; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie

    2017-07-01

    To explore the factors emergency nurses use to inform their decisions regarding frequency and nature of vital sign assessment. Research related to clinical deterioration and vital sign assessment in the emergency department is in its infancy. Studies to date have explored the frequency of vital sign assessment in the emergency department; however, there are no published studies that have examined factors that emergency nurses use to inform their decisions regarding frequency and nature of ongoing vital sign assessment. A prospective exploratory design was used. Data were collected using a survey consisting of eight patient vignettes. The study was conducted in one emergency department in metropolitan Melbourne. Participants were emergency nurses permanently employed at the study site. A 96% response rate was achieved (n = 47/49). The most common frequency of patient reassessment nominated by participants was 15 or 30 minutely, with an equal number of participants choosing these frequency intervals. Abnormality in initial vital sign parameters was the most common factor identified for choosing either a 15- or 30-minute assessment interval. Frequency of assessment decisions was influenced by years of emergency nursing experience in one vignette and level of postgraduate qualification in three vignettes. Heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were all nominated by over 80% of participants as vital signs that participants considered important for reassessment. The frequency and nature of vital signs selected varied according to vignette content. There were significant negative correlations between assessment of conscious state and years of nursing experience and assessment of respiratory rate and years of emergency nursing experience. Level of postgraduate qualification did not influence selection of parameters for reassessment. Emergency nurses are tailoring vital sign assessment to patients' clinical status, and nurses are integrating known vital sign data

  19. CDC Signos Vitales-Seguridad de los camioneros (Vital Signs-Trucker Safety)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de marzo del 2015 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. En el 2012 en los Estados Unidos, ocurrieron cerca de 317 000 choques asociados a camiones pesados. Veintiséis mil camioneros y sus pasajeros sufrieron lesiones en esos choques, y cerca de 700 murieron. Infórmese sobre lo que se puede hacer para que los camioneros estén seguros.  Created: 3/3/2015 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 3/3/2015.

  20. Physical evaluation and the prevention of medical emergencies: vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1993-01-01

    It was assumed that dentists employ a complete system of physical evaluation for all new patients in their dental practices. Results of a survey of 1,588 dentists demonstrated that the use of a written medical history questionnaire was commonplace; however, recording of blood pressure and heart rate and rhythm on all new patients was quite limited. A greater percentage of dentists monitored blood pressure when there was a history of cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure. Monitoring of the heart rate and rhythm, even in patients with cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure, was severely limited in scope. A significant number of dentists still employ racemic epinephrine impregnated gingival retraction cord, and of these, 40% had observed "epinephrine-reactions."

  1. CDC Vital Signs–Think Sepsis. Time Matters.

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-23

    This podcast is based on the August 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sepsis is a medical emergency and can happen quickly. Learn the signs of sepsis and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/23/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 8/23/2016.

  2. Vital signs: teen pregnancy--United States, 1991--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    In 2009, approximately 410,000 teens aged 15-19 years gave birth in the United States, and the teen birth rate remains higher than in other developed countries. To describe U.S. trends in teen births and related factors, CDC used data on 1) teen birth rates during 1991-2009 from the National Vital Statistics System, 2) sexual intercourse and contraceptive use among high school students during 1991-2009 from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and 3) sex education, parent communication, use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), and receipt of reproductive health services among teens aged 15-19 years from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth. In 2009, the national teen birth rate was 39.1 births per 1,000 females, a 37% decrease from 61.8 births per 1,000 females in 1991 and the lowest rate ever recorded. State-specific teen birth rates varied from 16.4 to 64.2 births per 1,000 females and were highest among southern states. Birth rates for black and Hispanic teens were 59.0 and 70.1 births per 1,000 females, respectively, compared with 25.6 for white teens. From 1991 to 2009, the percentage of high school students who ever had sexual intercourse decreased from 54% to 46%, and the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months but did not use any method of contraception at last sexual intercourse decreased from 16% to 12%. From 1999 to 2009, the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months and used dual methods at last sexual intercourse (condoms with either birth control pills or the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera) increased from 5% to 9%. During 2006-2008, 65% of female teens and 53% of male teens received formal sex education that covered saying no to sex and provided information on methods of birth control. Overall, 44% of female teens and 27% of male teens had spoken with their parents about both topics, but among teens who had ever had sexual intercourse, 20% of females and 31

  3. Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Theodore, Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides statistical evidence that measures progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education in the United States. Data include racial inequality; graduation rates from liberal arts colleges, state universities, and black colleges; and graduation rates of black athletes. (GR)

  4. Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a health checkup, or during an emergency room visit. They include Blood pressure, which measures the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Blood pressure that is too high or too low can cause problems. Your ...

  5. Intramuscular ziprasidone: influence of alcohol and benzodiazepines on vital signs in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; MacDonald, Kai; Vilke, Gary M; Ronquillo, Linda; Feifel, David

    2013-12-01

    Ziprasidone is a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) approved for agitation. Few previous studies have examined ziprasidone in the emergency department (ED). For instance, it is unknown how often emergency physicians prescribe ziprasidone, whether it is typically prescribed in combination with a benzodiazepine, or whether use of intramuscular (i.m.) ziprasidone and benzodiazepines affects vital signs compared to i.m. ziprasidone alone. Our aims were to determine the demographics of patients receiving ziprasidone in an urban-suburban ED; the relative frequency with which ziprasidone is prescribed; and the effects on vital signs, repeat medication dosage, and lengths of stay. This is a multicentered structured chart review from 2003 to 2010 of ziprasidone use at two hospitals. If documented, vital signs were compared in patients who received concurrent benzodiazepines and in those who did not, and in patients who ingested alcohol and in those who did not. Patients on 95 visits received ziprasidone during the study period, with one third of these receiving accompanying benzodiazepines. Forty-nine unique patients who were treated with i.m. ziprasidone had documented vital signs. In these patients, alcohol intoxication was associated with decreased oxygen saturations irrespective of benzodiazepines. Concurrent benzodiazepines had no other deleterious effect on vital signs but resulted in longer ED stays. This study suggests that many ED physicians, who commonly prescribe a benzodiazepine with a first-generation antipsychotic like haloperidol, have transferred this practice to SGAs like ziprasidone. In this sample, this pairing did not adversely affect vital signs but was associated with marginally longer ED stays. Caution should be exercised when treating alcohol-intoxicated patients with ziprasidone, as this can decrease oxygen saturations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CDC Vital Signs–Cancer and Tobacco Use

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    This podcast is based on the November 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. There is a long list of cancers linked to tobacco use, the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. Learn more here.  Created: 11/10/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  7. Vital Signs – Hepatitis C: What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-07

    This podcast is based on the May 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. It discusses hepatitis C, a serious viral infection, and the need for everyone born from 1945 through 1965 to get tested.  Created: 5/7/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/7/2013.

  8. CDC Vital Signs–Zika Virus: Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    This podcast is based on the April 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects. Learn how to protect babies from Zika-related health conditions.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  9. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  10. Vital signs detection radar using low intermediate-frequency architecture and single-sideband transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous wave vital signs detection radar that utilizes a heterodyne transceiver architecture with a 10 MHz intermediate frequency to remove both unwanted DC offsets in the electronic components and the so-called null-detection-points. For successful removal of the latter...

  11. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xikun Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications.

  12. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xikun; Jin, Tian

    2016-11-30

    The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT) are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications.

  13. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  14. Student nurses' recognition of early signs of abnormal vital sign recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Martha M; Kyriacos, Una

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing urgency for nurses to recognize early signs of deterioration in patients and to take appropriate action to prevent serious adverse effects. To assess respondents' ability to identify abnormal recordings for respiratory and heart rate, oxygen saturation level, systolic blood pressure, level of consciousness, urinary output and normal temperature. A descriptive observational survey. A nursing college in Cape Town, South Africa. A sample of 77/212 (36.3%) fourth year students. A self-administered adapted questionnaire was employed to collect demographic data and respondents' selections of recorded physiological values for the purpose of deciding when to call for more skilled help. The median age for 62/77 (80.5%) of the respondents was 25years; 3/76 (3.9%) had a previous certificate in nursing. Most respondents were female (66/76, 85.7%). Afrikaans was the first language preference of 33 (42.9%) respondents, followed by isiXhosa (31/77, 40.3%) and English (10/77, 13.0%). Most respondents (48/77, 62.3%) recognized a normal temperature reading (35-38.4°C). However, overall there would have been delays in calling for more skilled assistance in 288/416 (69.2%) instances of critical illness for a high-score MEWS of 3 and in 226/639 (35.4%) instances at a medium-score MEWS of 2 for physiological parameters. In 96/562 (17.1%) instances, respondents would have called for assistance for a low-score MEWS of 1. Non-recognition of deterioration in patients' clinical status and delayed intervention by nurses has implications for the development of serious adverse events. The MEWS is recommended as a track-and-trigger system for nursing curricula in South Africa and for implementation in practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Detection of Low-volume Blood Loss: Compensatory Reserve Versus Traditional Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Detection of low-volume blood loss: Compensatory reserve versus traditional vital signs Camille L. Stewart, MD, Jane Mulligan , PhD, Greg Z. Grudic... Mulligan J., Grudic G. Z., Convertino V. A., Moulton S. L., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...Jane Mulligan (own ership), Greg Z. Grudic (ownership), and Steven L. Moulton (owner ship). This work is supported by the US Army Medical Research and

  16. CDC Vital Signs–Native Americans With Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-10

    This podcast is based on the January 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure and Native Americans have a greater chance of having diabetes than any other racial group in the U.S. Learn how to manage your diabetes to delay or prevent kidney failure.  Created: 1/10/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/10/2017.

  17. Vital Signs – HIV Among Youth in the US: Protecting a Generation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-27

    This podcast is based on the December 2012 CDC Vital Signs report, which presents information about the impact of HIV on youth, the factors that place youth at risk for HIV, and calls for prevention through parents, schools, and community-based HIV prevention programs for youth.  Created: 11/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/27/2012.

  18. Vital Signs-HIV Care Saves Lives: Viral Suppression is Key

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-25

    This podcast is based on the December 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. For people living with HIV, Viral suppression is critical. By getting tested and taking HIV medicines, individuals living with HIV can achieve very low levels of HIV in the body.  Created: 11/25/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/25/2014.

  19. CDC Vital Signs–HIV and Injection Drug Use

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-29

    This podcast is based on the December 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sharing needles, syringes, and other injection equipment puts you at risk for getting HIV and other infections, including hepatitis. Learn how to reduce your HIV risk.  Created: 11/29/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/29/2016.

  20. CDC Vital Signs–Too Loud for Too Long!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-07

    This podcast is based on the February 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Being around too much loud noise—like a leaf blower or rock concert—can cause permanent hearing loss. Learn how to prevent hearing loss.  Created: 2/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/7/2017.

  1. CDC Vital Signs–Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    This podcast is based on the October 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Dental sealants, applied soon after a child's permanent molars come in, can protect against cavities for up to nine years. Applying sealants in schools for low-income children could save millions in dental treatment costs.  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  2. CDC Vital Signs-Zika and Pregnancy: What You Should Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-04-01

    This podcast is based on the April 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. A pregnant woman who is infected with Zika virus can pass it to her fetus which is linked to microcephaly, a serious birth defect. This podcast discusses how to protect yourself from Zika virus.  Created: 4/1/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/1/2016.

  3. CDC Vital Signs–Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-06

    This podcast is based on the July 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. In the U.S., about 90 people die in motor vehicle crashes each day and thousands more are injured, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in direct medical costs each year. Learn what you can do to stay safe.  Created: 7/6/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 7/6/2016.

  4. CDC Vital Signs-ADHD in Young Children: What You Should Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-03

    This podcast is based on the May 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. For children ages two to five who have ADHD, behavior therapy is recommended before prescribing medicine. This therapy teaches parents ways to improve their child’s behavior and can work as well as medicine, without the risk of side effects.  Created: 5/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/3/2016.

  5. Vital Signs-Reducing Sodium in Children’s Diets

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-09-09

    This podcast is based on the September 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Many children in the U.S. eat more sodium than recommended and one in six has elevated blood pressure. Learn what you can do to lower sodium intake.  Created: 9/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2014.

  6. Vital Signs – Binge Drinking Among Women and Girls

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-08

    This podcast is based on the January 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which presents information about binge drinking among women and girls. Binge drinking is defined for women as four or more drinks in a short period of time. It puts women and girls at greater risk for breast cancer, sexual assault, heart disease, and unintended pregnancy.  Created: 1/8/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/8/2013.

  7. CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-06

    This podcast is based on the June 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Legionnaires’ disease is a serious, often deadly lung infection. People most commonly get it by breathing in water droplets containing Legionella germs. Learn how to prevent infections from Legionella.  Created: 6/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/6/2017.

  8. Vital Signs – Adult Smoking Among People with Mental Illness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-05

    This podcast is based on the February 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which shows that cigarette smoking is a serious problem among adults with mental illness. More needs to be done to help adults with mental illness quit smoking and make mental health facilities tobacco-free.  Created: 2/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/5/2013.

  9. Effects of static magnetic fields on cognition, vital signs, and sensory perception: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Angela; Szostek, Anne; Nees, Frauke; Meyer, Patric; Semmler, Wolfhard; Flor, Herta

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate whether cognitive processes, sensory perception, and vital signs might be influenced by static magnetic fields in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which could pose a risk for health personnel and patients, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that examined effects of static magnetic fields. Studies covering the time from 1992 to 2007 were selected. Cohen's d effects sizes were used and combined in different categories of neuropsychology (reaction time, visual processing, eye-hand coordination, and working memory). Additionally, effects of static magnetic fields on sensory perception and vital signs were analyzed. In the category "neuropsychology," only effects on the visual system were homogeneous, showing a statistically significant impairment as a result of exposure to static magnetic fields (d = -0.415). Vital signs were not affected and effects on sensory perceptions included an increase of dizziness and vertigo, primarily caused by movement during static magnetic field gradient exposures. The number of studies dealing with this topic is very small and the experimental set-up of some of the analyzed studies makes it difficult to accurately determine the effects of static magnetic fields by themselves, excluding nonspecific factors. The implications of these results for MRI lead to suggestions for improvement in research designs.

  10. The effect of live classical piano music on the vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Jorge G; Ruszkowski, Joseph M; Worak, Sandra R

    2008-06-25

    Music and surgery. To determine the effect of live classical piano music on vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Retrospective case series. 203 patients who underwent various ophthalmologic procedures in a period during which a piano was present in the operating room of St. Francis Medical Center. [Note: St. Francis Medical Center has recently been renamed Hawaii Medical Center East.] Demographic data, surgical procedures, and the vital signs of 203 patients who underwent ophthalmic procedures were obtained from patient records. Blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate measured in the preoperative holding area were compared with the same parameters taken in the operating room, with and without exposure to live piano music. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. 115 patients who were exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in the operating room compared with their vital signs measured in the preoperative holding area (P piano music showed a statistically significant increase in mean arterial blood pressure (P piano music lowered the blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

  11. Heart rate variability analysis is more sensitive at identifying neonatal sepsis than conventional vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Fredrick J; Mrazek, Amy A; Shabana, Mohamed T; Mims, Sarah; Radhakrishnan, Geetha L; Kramer, George C; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis remains the largest preventable source of neonatal mortality in the world. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and noninvasive cardiac output have been shown to be useful adjuncts to sepsis detection in many patient groups. With Institutional Review Board approval, 4 septic and 6 nonseptic extremely low birth weight patients were enrolled. Data from septic and healthy patients were collected for 5 hours. Electrocardiogram waveform and traditional vital signs were collected and the RR intervals were calculated; then HRV analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domain. HRV measurements in time domain, heart rate, and pulse oximetry (SpO2) were significantly different in septic patients vs nonseptic controls. These results indicate that nonconventional vital signs such as HRV are more sensitive than traditionally used vital signs, such as cardiac output and mean arterial pressure, in the confirmation of sepsis in extremely low birth weight neonates. HRV may allow for earlier identification of septic physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Web-based vital sign telemonitor and recorder for telemedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Patricia; Gonzalez, Perla; Villanueva, Brenda; Haltiwanger, Emily; Nazeran, Homer

    2004-01-01

    We describe a vital sign telemonitor (VST) that acquires, records, displays, and provides readings such as: electrocardiograms (ECGs), temperature (T), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) over the Internet to any site. The design of this system consisted of three parts: sensors, analog signal processing circuits, and a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). The first part involved selection of appropriate sensors. For ECG, disposable Ag/AgCl electrodes; for temperature, LM35 precision temperature sensor; and for SaO2 the Nonin Oximetry Development Kit equipped with a finger clip were selected. The second part consisted of processing the analog signals obtained from these sensors. This was achieved by implementing suitable amplifiers and filters for the vital signs. The final part focused on development of a GUI to display the vital signs in the LabVIEW environment. From these measurements, important values such as heart rate (HR), beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, SaO2 percentages, and T in both degrees Celsius and Fahrenheit were calculated The GUI could be accessed through the Internet in a Web-page facilitating the possibility of real-time patient telemonitoring. The final system was completed and tested on volunteers with satisfactory results.

  13. Through-Wall Multiple Targets Vital Signs Tracking Based on VMD Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Targets located at the same distance are easily neglected in most through-wall multiple targets detecting applications which use the single-input single-output (SISO ultra-wideband (UWB radar system. In this paper, a novel multiple targets vital signs tracking algorithm for through-wall detection using SISO UWB radar has been proposed. Taking advantage of the high-resolution decomposition of the Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD based algorithm, the respiration signals of different targets can be decomposed into different sub-signals, and then, we can track the time-varying respiration signals accurately when human targets located in the same distance. Intensive evaluation has been conducted to show the effectiveness of our scheme with a 0.15 m thick concrete brick wall. Constant, piecewise-constant and time-varying vital signs could be separated and tracked successfully with the proposed VMD based algorithm for two targets, even up to three targets. For the multiple targets’ vital signs tracking issues like urban search and rescue missions, our algorithm has superior capability in most detection applications.

  14. Safety Profile and Effects of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Vital Signs in Thyroid Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Ling Yong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze changes in vital signs (heart rate (HR, systolic (SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP during and after intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP and any other adverse effects. Methods. Retrospective review of charts of patients who received IVMP as treatment regime for thyroid eye disease. All subjects had vital signs charted during and after infusions. Results. This study included 38 subjects and a total of 242 infusions administered. IVMP resulted in a small but significant percentage drop in mean SBP at 30 min (p<0.001 and 60 min (p=0.03 but no difference at 90 min. There was also small but significant percentage drop in mean DBP and HR (DBP: p<0.001 for 30 min, p=0.001 for 60 min, and p=0.02 for 90 min and HR: p<0.001 for 30 min, 60 min, and 90 min. There were no cumulative effects on change of blood pressure or HR. There were 6 episodes of bradycardia (2.5% and 12 episodes of moderate to severe hypertension (5%. No significant cardiovascular or hepatic toxicity was found. Conclusion. IVMP is relatively safe and efficacious. IVMP demonstrated mild and noncumulative effects on vital signs. Severe hypertension may occur in susceptible individuals such as those with underlying hypertension and uncontrolled thyroid dysfunction, whereas bradycardia may be more likely in those on beta-blockers.

  15. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  16. [Blood destruction in pulmonary alveoli: signs of vitality and determination of survival time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M

    1984-01-01

    Lungs from 26 cases were examined in which blood was present as a result of a gunshot wound, a stab wound, or aspiration. Signs of vitality and of a time-dependent reaction sequence were evaluated to determine survival time. Only those morphologic criteria were considered that could be obtained on paraffin sections. In addition to H & E staining, siderin was identified with the Prussian blue reaction and the activities were determined of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, as macrophage marker, and naphthol AS-D chloracetate esterase, as granulocyte marker. The following criteria were evaluated: granulocyte emigration, erythrocyte adherence to the surface of macrophages, macrophage ingestion of erythrocytes, and determination of siderin as indicator of intracellular erythrocyte digestion. Adherence was also observed in those cases that did not survive. The initial sign of vitality was granulocyte emigration, which was observed for the first time after a survival time of 5 min. Erythrophages were found after a survival time of 30 min at least, siderophages after 17 h at the earliest. Literature dealing with vitality and age determination, as well as the pathogenesis of the reaction sequence, is discussed.

  17. Statistical assessment on a combined analysis of GRYN-ROMN-UCBN upland vegetation vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    different results and/or computational instability. However, when only fixed effects are of interest, the survey package (svyglm and svyolr) may be suitable for a model-assisted analysis for trend. We provide possible directions for future research into combined analysis for ordinal and continuous vital sign indictors.

  18. The Effect of Plastic Cover on Regulation of Vital Signs in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Cross-over Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the susceptibility of preterm infants to disturbances of vital signs, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of using plastic covers on regulation of vital signs in preterm neonates.Methods: This randomized, cross-over, clinical trial was carried out on 80 preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The study was conducted in two days (on the second and third days of the infants’ life. In group 1, plastic cover was used during the first day followed by the use of blanket on the second day, while the order was reversed in group 2. Digital thermometer was used to measure the infants’ axillary temperature. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured through monitoring. To analyze the data, descriptive (Mean and SE, 95%CI and inferential statistics (repeated measurement and ANCOVA tests were used in SPSS version 13 and MiniTab software.Results: Fourteen infants who were covered with blanket were found to suffer from hypothermia, while no infant with a plastic cover encountered this problem. The percentage of arterial blood oxygen saturation in the group with plastic covers was higher, and as a result, the infants received less oxygen supplements. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in heart rate between the groups.Conclusion: Use of plastic cover during NICU stay prevented hypothermia in premature infants, with the arterial blood oxygen saturation being within the normal limits. Yet, it did not seem to have a significant effect on other vital signs.

  19. Effect of advanced age and vital signs on admission from an emergency department observation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, Jeffrey M.; Hoover, Emily; Moseley, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective was to determine the relationship between advanced age and need for admission from an emergency department (ED) observation unit. The secondary objective was to determine the relationship between initial ED vital signs and admission. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of ED patients placed in an ED-based observation unit. Multivariable penalized maximum likelihood logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of need for hospital admission. Age was examined continuously and at a cutoff of ≥65 years. Vital signs were examined continuously and at commonly accepted cutoffs. We additionally controlled for demographics, co-morbid conditions, laboratory values, and observation protocol. Results Three hundred patients were enrolled, 12% (n=35) ≥65 years old and 11% (n=33) requiring admission. Admission rates were 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-14.9%) in older adults and 12.1% (95% CI, 8.4-16.6%) in younger adults. In multivariable analysis, age was not associated with admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% CI 0.05-1.67). Predictors of admission included: systolic pressure ≥180 mmHg (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.08-16.30), log Charlson co-morbidity score (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.57-5.46), and white blood cell count ≥14,000/mm3 (OR11.35, 95% CI 3.42-37.72). Conclusions Among patients placed in an ED observation unit, age ≥65 years is not associated with need for admission. Older adults can successfully be discharged from these units. Systolic pressure≥180 mmHg was the only predictive vital sign. In determining appropriateness of patients selected for an ED observation unit, advanced age should not be an automatic disqualifying criterion. PMID:22386358

  20. Utility of Vital Signs, Heart-rate Variability and Complexity, and Machine Learning for Identifying the Need for Life-saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    nurses nor an electronic monitor provides accurate measurements of respiratory rate in triage . Ann Emerg Med 45:68Y76, 2005. 13. Batchinsky AI, Cooke...WVSMVWireless Vital Signs Monitor INTRODUCTION Capture of high-frequency (HF) data for real-time triage and assessment of trauma patients is now a viable...to assess battlefield injuries (automated triage ) (2, 6). Although the last few decades have witnessed an emergence of various CDS systems and studies

  1. Vital Signs - Sobredosis de analgésicos recetados (Prescription Drug Overdose)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-02

    Este podcast se basa en un informe de Vital Signs, publicado por los CDC en julio del 2013. La sobredosis de analgésicos recetados es un problema creciente y que no se identifica adecuadamente en las mujeres. Este programa incluye lo que pueden hacer las mujeres y los proveedores de atención médica para reducir el riesgo de sobredosis.  Created: 7/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/2/2013.

  2. CDC Vital Signs-Alcohol and Pregnancy: Why Take the Risk?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-02

    This podcast is based on the February 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. More than three million women in the U.S. are at risk for exposing their developing baby to alcohol. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities that can affect a child’s whole life. Learn what can be done to keep developing babies healthy.  Created: 2/2/2016 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 2/2/2016.

  3. Vital Signs – Have You Been Tested for Colorectal Cancer?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer screening saves lives, but only if you get tested. If you’re between 50 and 75, talk with your doctor about which test is best for you. If you have inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, ask your doctor if you should start screening before age 50.  Created: 11/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/5/2013.

  4. CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-07

    This podcast is based on the June 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. People can get Legionnaires’ disease, a serious type of lung infection, from breathing in small water droplets of water contaminated with Legionella germs. Learn what can be done to help prevent Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks and keep people safe.  Created: 6/7/2016 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/7/2016.

  5. Vital Signs – Defeating Breast Cancer PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the November 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Better screening and treatment have contributed to a decline in breast cancer deaths, however, not all women have benefited equally from these improvements. Learn how we can all help reduce deaths from breast cancer.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  6. Vital Signs - ¡Cuidado con ese bocado! (When Food Bites Back)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-04

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de junio del 2013. Trata sobre las intoxicaciones alimenticias y en particular de las causadas por listeria. Si usted tiene 65 años o más, tiene un sistema inmunitario debilitado o está embarazada, debe ser muy cuidadoso al seleccionar, preparar y guardar alimentos.  Created: 6/4/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 6/4/2013.

  7. Research on vaccines during pregnancy: reference values for vital signs and laboratory assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Jeanne S; Munoz, Flor M; Beigi, Richard H; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Edwards, Kathryn M; Read, Jennifer S; Heine, R Phillips; Ault, Kevin A; Swamy, Geeta K; Jevaji, Indira; Spong, Catherine Y; Fortner, Kimberly B; Patel, Shital M; Nesin, Mirjana

    2013-09-13

    The Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health organized a series of conferences, "Enrolling Pregnant Women in Clinical Trials of Vaccines and Therapeutics", to discuss enrollment and safety assessments of pregnant women in clinical trials of vaccines. Experts in obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, infectious diseases, pediatrics, neonatology, genetics, vaccinology and clinical trial design were charged with identifying normal ranges for vital signs and laboratory assessments in pregnancy. A grading system for adverse events was then developed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing pain as a fifth vital sign in long-term care facilities: Recommendations from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L; Kobayashi, Mia; Holleran, Elizabeth A; Mezey, Mathy

    2005-03-01

    In long-term care facilities, pain management is complex because dementia, delirium, and other reasons for residents' altered communication ability are a significant barrier to pain assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore the status of implementation of pain as a fifth vital sign in a sample of long-term care facilities. A three-round Delphi survey was used to obtain consensus from personnel in 60 long-term care facilities in NY State. Findings are presented in terms of recommendations related to pain criteria, assessment methods, frequency of pain assessment, responsibility for pain assessment, monitoring strategies, education, documentation, and pain management education. The results of this study highlight many important considerations in the treatment of pain as a fifth vital sign in long-term care facilities. Evidence-based practice will be facilitated by further research related to underexplored aspects of pain assessment and management, and further attention to care delivery systems that support continued knowledge acquisition and the implementation of best practices.

  9. Vital Signs Monitoring and Interpretation for Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan

    . An introduced queue-based multiple linear regression (qMLR) model achieved best results with a root mean square error (RMSE) of RMSE = 3.11 on a Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) where degree of disability ranged from 0 - 46. Worse outcomes were observed in patients who had pulse > 80 and a negative correlation...

  10. Microwave Instrument for Human Vital Signs Detection and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup

    methods is presented and real measurements verifies its operation. At the moment of writing, VISDAM consists of two heterodyne radar units operating at X-band with IF frequency at 1 kHz. A small scale test is performed with VISDAM showing its capabilities to track the heart rate of a person in various...... be of benefit, it is assessed that the radar chip can contribute to a full VSD system. Time did not allow for this latter system implementation of the IC....

  11. Robust Face Skin Selection for Unobtrusive Vital Signs Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, M.; Van Leest, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this report we developed an algorithm that robustly selects faceskin. The algorithm has been tested on a set of challenging sequences. It is robust to partial occlusions, rotation of the head and spectrum changes of the illumination.

  12. EVALUATION OF PARAMETERS VITAL SIGNS MONITORED DURING THE THERAPEUTIC BATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Santos Oliveira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar se a retirada da monitorização visualizada acarreta prejuízos na terapêutica, causados pela perda momentânea da visualização das funções hemodinâmicas e cardiorrespiratórias. Metodologia: Pesquisa de campo que avaliou as variáveis das funções vitais em 34 pacientes internados em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital de grande porte localizado na região metropolitana do Rio de Janeiro. Resultados: O estudo mostrou que existe variação significativa nos parâmetros avaliados, em relação à freqüência cardíaca, freqüência respiratória, pressão arterial média e oximetria. Conclui que os sinais vitais constituem uma parte fundamental na avaliação clínica do paciente em todas as instituição de saúde; e que a retirada da monitorização visualizada, mesmo que por curto período de tempo, pode fazer com que alterações hemodinâmicas não sejam percebidas, retardando as intervenções necessárias; sugere que a monitorização visualizada deve ser preservada mesmo durante a higiene Corporal, importante para a tomada de decisões na terapêutica.

  13. Semiología de los signos vitales: Una mirada novedosa a un problema vigente:/Vitals sign semiology: the new look to an actual problem

    OpenAIRE

    Villegas González, Juliana; Residente otorrinolaringología, universidad de cartagena; Villegas Arenas, Oscar Alberto; Docente programa de medicina; Villegas González, Valentina; Médica de hospitalización, clínica Versalles

    2012-01-01

    Approach from the anatomical, physical, functional and clinical-making views and interpretation of vital signs (VS).It expounds on the signs that the health status of an individual externalized, although many can be conceptually speaking, work on those that are conventionally taken intoaccount for its dynamism as alterations to the human body, changes occur immediately and are easily detectable. They develop the physiological, pathological changes and in relation to different ages, events suc...

  14. Sensitivity Enhanced Vital Sign Detection Based on Antenna Reflection Coefficient Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yong-Jun; Yun, Gi-Ho; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a vital sign detection sensor based on reflection coefficient variance from an antenna used in wireless communication devices. The near-field effect is estimated by performing 3D full-wave simulations using a dipole antenna and the magnitude variation of the reflection coefficient induced by human thorax movement due to heart and lungs is observed. The results support the possibility of vital sign detection based on the magnitude variation of the reflection coefficient from an antenna, which can be explained as a narrowband modulation scheme. In particular, a sensitivity enhancement method is proposed and analyzed, and experiments are carried out for heartbeat detection using a dipole antenna with the proposed system. Experimental results are compared between the direct detection and sensitivity enhancement detection schemes. FM signal is also applied to confirm that the proposed sensor works properly in conjunction with an existing communication system. The proposed cardiopulmonary detection sensor is implemented with off-the-shelf components at 2.4 GHz and excellent performance is obtained.

  15. Noncontact proximity vital sign sensor based on PLL for sensitivity enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yunseog; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Byung-Hyun; Ha, Sung-Jae; Lee, Hee-Jo; Yun, Gi-Ho; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a noncontact proximity vital sign sensor, using a phase locked loop (PLL) incorporated with voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) built-in planar type circular resonator, is proposed to enhance sensitivity in severe environments. The planar type circular resonator acts as a series feedback element of the VCO as well as a near-field receiving antenna. The frequency deviation of the VCO related to the body proximity effect ranges from 0.07 MHz/mm to 1.8 MHz/mm (6.8 mV/mm to 205 mV/mm in sensitivity) up to a distance of 50 mm, while the amount of VCO drift is about 21 MHz in the condition of 60 (°)C temperature range and discrete component tolerance of ± 5%. Total frequency variation occurs in the capture range of the PLL which is 60 MHz. Thus, its loop control voltage converts the amount of frequency deviation into a difference of direct current (DC) voltage, which is utilized to extract vital signs regardless of the ambient temperature. The experimental results reveal that the proposed sensor placed 50 mm away from a subject can reliably detect respiration and heartbeat signals without the ambiguity of harmonic signals caused by respiration signal at an operating frequency of 2.4 GHz.

  16. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20minutes. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of one minute immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which nonverbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7 to 11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Methods: Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20min. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of 1min immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which non-verbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. Results: The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7-11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. Conclusions: The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. PMID:27080219

  18. Design Considerations for Aural Vital Signs Using PZT Piezoelectric Ceramics Sensor Based on the Computerization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerapong Tantrakoon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to illustrate how system developed for measurement of the aural vital signs such as patient’s heart and lung sounds in the hospital. For heart sounds measurement must operate the frequency response between 20 – 800 Hz, and lung sounds measurement must operate the frequency response between 160 – 4,000 Hz. The method was designed PZT piezoelectric ceramics for both frequency response in the same PZT sensor. It converts a signal from aural vital sign form to voltage signal. The signal is suitably amplified and re-filtered in band pass frequency band. It is converted to digital signal by an analog to digital conversion circuitry developed for the purpose. The results were that all signals can fed to personal computer through the sound card port. With the supporting software for drawing of graphic on the screen, the signal for a specific duration is accessed and stored in the computer’s memory in term of each patient’s data. In conclusion, the data of each patient call dot pcg (.pcg for drawing graph and dot wave (.wave for sound listening or automatic sending via electronic mail to the physician for later analysis of interpreting the sounds on the basis of their time domain and frequency domain representation to diagnose heart disorders.

  19. Effects of music therapy on pain, anxiety, and vital signs in patients after thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Petrini, Marcia A

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effectiveness of music listening on pain, anxiety, and vital signs among patients after thoracic surgery in China. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the thoracic surgery department of two tertiary hospitals in Wuhan, China. 112 patients were recruited and randomly assigned to either experimental (n=56) or control (n=56) group respectively. The experimental group received standard care and a 30-min soft music intervention for 3 days, while the control group received only standard care. Measures include pain, anxiety, vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate), patient controlled analgesia, and diclofenac sodium suppository use. The experimental group showed statistically significant decrease in pain, anxiety, systolic blood pressure and heart rate over time compared to the control group, but no significant difference were identified in diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, patient controlled analgesia and diclofenac sodium suppository use. The findings provide further evidence to support the practice of music therapy to reduce postoperative pain and anxiety, and lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate in patients after thoracic surgery in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of music on pain and vital signs of children before and after endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Alireza; Kianifar, Hamidreza; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Saeidi, Masumeh; Ahanchian, Hamid; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Jarahi, Lida

    2017-07-01

    Gentle music has relaxing and pain reducing effects. In this study, the effect of music on patients' vital signs and pain was investigated before and after endoscopy. This clinical trial study was conducted on 100 children from seven to fourteen years of age in Gha'em Hospital, Mashhad in 2015. Children were divided into two equal groups (case group=50 and control group=50). The control group received endoscopy according to the standards, without any other procedure. For the case group, a classic musical piece by Clayderman was played during endoscopy (from the time of entering the endoscopy room to the end of the process). After conducting endoscopy, FALCC scale and Baker-Wong pain scale were filled for both groups. In addition, children's vital signs including: heart rate (pulse), diastolic and systolic blood pressure were measured before and after endoscopy for both groups. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS16 with the help of Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. No significant difference was found in age, gender distribution of case or control groups (p>0.05). Heart rate and diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the music (case) group compared to the control group before endoscopy (p=0.012). In addition, pain score in patients of the music group was lower than the control group (pmusic for children during endoscopy can reduce pain and anxiety in patients before and after endoscopy.

  1. Community Vital Signs: Taking the Pulse of the Community While Caring for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Bazemore, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 both the Institute of Medicine and the National Quality Forum recommended the inclusion of social determinants of health data in electronic health records (EHRs). Both entities primarily focus on collecting socioeconomic and health behavior data directly from individual patients. The burden of reliably, accurately, and consistently collecting such information is substantial, and it may take several years before a primary care team has actionable data available in its EHR. A more reliable and less burdensome approach to integrating clinical and social determinant data exists and is technologically feasible now. Community vital signs-aggregated community-level information about the neighborhoods in which our patients live, learn, work, and play-convey contextual social deprivation and associated chronic disease risks based on where patients live. Given widespread access to "big data" and geospatial technologies, community vital signs can be created by linking aggregated population health data with patient addresses in EHRs. These linked data, once imported into EHRs, are a readily available resource to help primary care practices understand the context in which their patients reside and achieve important health goals at the patient, population, and policy levels.

  2. The effect of an emergency department clinical“triggers”program based on abnormal vital signs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason Imperato; Louisa Canham; Tyler Mehegan; John D Patrick; Gary S Setnik; Leon D Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of a clinical triggers program in the Emergency Department (ED) setting that utilized predetermined abnormal vital signs to activate a rapid assessment by an emergency physician led multidisciplinary team. Methods: A retrospective, separate sample, pre-post intervention study following implementation of an ED triggers program. Abnormal vital sign criteria that warranted a trigger response included: heart rate 130 beats/min, respiratory rate30 respirations/min, systolic blood pressure<90 mm Hg, or oxygen saturation<90%on room air. The primary outcome investigated was time to physician evaluation with secondary outcomes being the time to disposition decision and time to first critical therapeutic intervention. Results:The median time to physician evaluation was reduced by 25%from 28 min to 21 min (P<0.05). The median time to disposition decision was decreased by 12%from 154 minutes to 135 minutes (P<0.05). The median time to first intervention was 46 min and 43 min (P=0.33) in the before and after groups, which did not represent a statistically significant difference.Conclusions:In our model, the implementation of an ED triggers program resulted in a modest decreased time to physician evaluation and disposition decision but not time to intervention.

  3. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Lima Alcântara

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Methods: Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20min. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of 1min immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which non-verbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. Results: The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7-11 years (n=23; 56% and were males (n=26; 63.4%. There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. Conclusions: The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain.

  4. The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety and Vital Signs of Children during Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on pain, anxiety and vital signs in children undergoing colonoscopy.   Method and Materials: This randomized study was carried out on 101 children (7 to 14 years old requiring colonoscopy. Children were randomly allocated to a control or case group. The case group was played relaxing music (by Clayderman during the procedure. Spiegelberger and pain questionaires were administered immediately after the colonoscopy. Pulse rate, blood pressure and percent blood oxygen saturation were recorded for each subject. The control group was treated in an identical manner, but was not played music during the procedure. Data were analyzed using SPSS software.   Results: Satisfaction, anxiety, pain, and blood pressure were significantly different between the groups                (P0.05.   Conclusion: Music can reduce anxiety and pain during colonoscopy.   Key words: Anxiety, Music,Vital signs, Colonoscopy

  5. Effects of prenatal music stimulation on fetal cardiac state, newborn anthropometric measurements and vital signs of pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, J; Ventura Miranda, M I; Manchon García, F; Pallarés Ruiz, T I; Marin Gascón, M L; Requena Mullor, M; Alarcón Rodriguez, R; Parron Carreño, T

    2017-05-01

    Music has been used for medicinal purposes throughout history due to its variety of physiological, psychological and social effects. To identify the effects of prenatal music stimulation on the vital signs of pregnant women at full term, on the modification of fetal cardiac status during a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph, and on anthropometric measurements of newborns taken after birth. A randomized controlled trial was implemented. The four hundred and nine pregnant women coming for routine prenatal care were randomized in the third trimester to receive either music (n = 204) or no music (n = 205) during a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph. All of the pregnant women were evaluated by measuring fetal cardiac status (basal fetal heart rate and fetal reactivity), vital signs before and after a fetal monitoring cardiotocograph (maternal heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure), and anthropometric measurements of the newborns were taken after birth (weight, height, head circumference and chest circumference). The strip charts showed a significantly increased basal fetal heart rate and higher fetal reactivity, with accelerations of fetal heart rate in pregnant women with music stimulation. After the fetal monitoring cardiotocograph, a statistically significant decrease in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate in women receiving music stimulation was observed. Music can be used as a tool which improves the vital signs of pregnant women during the third trimester, and can influence the fetus by increasing fetal heart rate and fetal reactivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Menstruation in girls and adolescents: using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Angela; Laufer, Marc R; Breech, Lesley L

    2006-11-01

    Young patients and their parents often are unsure about what represents normal menstrual patterns, and clinicians also may be unsure about normal ranges for menstrual cycle length and amount and duration of flow through adolescence. It is important to be able to educate young patients and their parents regarding what to expect of a first period and about the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. It is equally important for clinicians to have an understanding of bleeding patterns in girls and adolescents, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate young patients' conditions appropriately. Using the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign adds a powerful tool to the assessment of normal development and the exclusion of pathological conditions.

  7. Vital Sign Prediction of Adverse Maternal Outcomes in Women with Hypovolemic Shock: The Role of Shock Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M El Ayadi

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal vital sign predictor of adverse maternal outcomes in women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage and to develop thresholds for referral/intensive monitoring and need for urgent intervention to inform a vital sign alert device for low-resource settings.We conducted secondary analyses of a dataset of pregnant/postpartum women with hypovolemic shock in low-resource settings (n = 958. Using receiver-operating curve analysis, we evaluated the predictive ability of pulse, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, shock index, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure for three adverse maternal outcomes: (1 death, (2 severe maternal outcome (death or severe end organ dysfunction morbidity; and (3 a combined severe maternal and critical interventions outcome comprising death, severe end organ dysfunction morbidity, intensive care admission, blood transfusion ≥ 5 units, or emergency hysterectomy. Two threshold parameters with optimal rule-in and rule-out characteristics were selected based on sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values.Shock index was consistently among the top two predictors across adverse maternal outcomes. Its discriminatory ability was significantly better than pulse and pulse pressure for maternal death (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively, diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome (p<0.01, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure for severe maternal outcome and critical interventions (p<0.01. A shock index threshold of ≥ 0.9 maintained high sensitivity (100.0 with clinical practicality, ≥ 1.4 balanced specificity (range 70.0-74.8 with negative predictive value (range 93.2-99.2, and ≥ 1.7 further improved specificity (range 80.7-90.8 without compromising negative predictive value (range 88.8-98.5.For women with hypovolemic shock from obstetric hemorrhage, shock index was

  8. Impact of peer pressure on accuracy of reporting vital signs: An interprofessional comparison between nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Alyshah; Beran, Tanya N

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical relationship between nursing and medicine has long been known, yet its direct influence on procedural tasks has yet to be considered. Drawing on the theory of conformity from social psychology, we suggest that nursing students are likely to report incorrect information in response to subtle social pressures imposed by medical students. Second-year medical and third-year nursing students took vital signs readings from a patient simulator. In a simulation exercise, three actors, posing as medical students, and one nursing student participant all took a total of three rounds of vital signs on a high-fidelity patient simulator. In the first two rounds the three actors individually stated the same correct vital signs values, and on the third round the three actors individually stated the same incorrect vital sign values. This same procedure was repeated with actors posing as nursing students, and one medical student. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that nursing student participants (M = 2.84; SD = 1.24) reported a higher number of incorrect vital signs than did medical student participants (M = 2.13; SD = 1.07), F (1,100) = 5.51, p = 0.021 (Cohen's d = 0.61). The study indicated that social pressure may prevent nursing students from questioning incorrect information within interprofessional environments, potentially affecting quality of care.

  9. Signos Vitales de los CDC Cómo prevenir los brotes de norovirus (Vital Signs-Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de junio del 2014 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Los norovirus infectan cada año a cerca de 20 millones de personas en los Estados Unidos. Sepa cómo protegerse y proteger a su familia de esta enfermedad que es muy contagiosa y potencialmente grave.  Created: 6/3/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/3/2014.

  10. CDC Signos Vitales: Enfermedad del legionario (CDC Vital Signs–Legionnaires’ Disease)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-07

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de junio del 2016 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Las personas pueden contraer la enfermedad del legionario, un tipo grave de infección pulmonar, al inhalar pequeñas gotitas de agua contaminada con bacterias Legionella. Obtenga más información sobre lo que se puede hacer para ayudar a prevenir brotes de enfermedad del legionario y mantener seguras a las personas.  Created: 6/7/2016 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/7/2016.

  11. A Feasibility Study for Life Signs Monitoring via a Continuous-Wave Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Soldovieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a feasibility study for life signs detection using a continuous-wave radar working in the band around 4 GHz. The data-processing is carried out by using two different data processing approaches, which are compared about the possibility to characterize the frequency behaviour of the breathing and heartbeat activity. The two approaches are used with the main aim to show the possibility of monitoring the vital signs activity in an accurate and reliable way.

  12. Miniaturized pulse oximeter sensor for continuous vital parameter monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Jens; Reichelt, Stephan; Werber, Armin; Bingger, Philipp; Zappe, Hans; Förster, Katharina; Klemm, Rolf; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2007-07-01

    A miniaturized photoplethysmographic sensor system which utilizes the principle of pulse oximetry is presented. The sensor is designed to be implantable and will permit continuous monitoring of important human vital parameters such as arterial blood oxygen saturation as well as pulse rate and shape over a long-term period in vivo. The system employs light emitting diodes and a photo transistor embedded in a transparent elastic cu. which is directly wrapped around an arterial vessel. This paper highlights the specific challenges in design, instrumentation, and electronics associated with that sensor location. In vitro measurements were performed using an artificial circulation system which allows for regulation of the oxygen saturation and pulsatile pumping of whole blood through a section of a domestic pig's arterial vessel. We discuss our experimental results compared to reference CO-oximeter measurements and determine the empirical calibration curve. These results demonstrate the capabilities of the pulse oximeter implant for measurement of a wide range of oxygen saturation levels and pave the way for a continuous and mobile monitoring of high-risk cardiovascular patients.

  13. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuantao Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors.

  14. Logistic regression function for detection of suspicious performance during baseline evaluations using concussion vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin David; Womble, Melissa N; Rohling, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized logistic regression to determine whether performance patterns on Concussion Vital Signs (CVS) could differentiate known groups with either genuine or feigned performance. For the embedded measure development group (n = 174), clinical patients and undergraduate students categorized as feigning obtained significantly lower scores on the overall test battery mean for the CVS, Shipley-2 composite score, and California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition subtests than did genuinely performing individuals. The final full model of 3 predictor variables (Verbal Memory immediate hits, Verbal Memory immediate correct passes, and Stroop Test complex reaction time correct) was significant and correctly classified individuals in their known group 83% of the time (sensitivity = .65; specificity = .97) in a mixed sample of young-adult clinical cases and simulators. The CVS logistic regression function was applied to a separate undergraduate college group (n = 378) that was asked to perform genuinely and identified 5% as having possibly feigned performance indicating a low false-positive rate. The failure rate was 11% and 16% at baseline cognitive testing in samples of high school and college athletes, respectively. These findings have particular relevance given the increasing use of computerized test batteries for baseline cognitive testing and return-to-play decisions after concussion.

  15. Educational technology "Anatomy and Vital Signs": Evaluation study of content, appearance and usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; de Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Oliveira, Gustavo Faria; Felipe, Helena Reche

    2015-11-01

    The use of new technology has recently grown considerably as an increasing number of college students using Internet. In nursing education, the personal computer and the Internet facilitate teaching theoretical and practical knowledge. Evaluate an educational technology known as "Anatomy and Vital Signs" with respect to content, appearance and usability. This was a first stage evaluation-by specialists to verify content and functioning, prior to a second validation as to learning by students. A methodological study in which instructional technologists (11 participants) and nursing specialists (17 participants) used the technology in an unguided manner and completed three questionnaires. The evaluation was measured by the difference between disagreement and agreement for each statement in the questionnaires. Most of the items were positively evaluated at a level higher than 70% by most of the evaluators except for the following usability criteria: grouping by shape, minimum actions and user control, which did not attain the 70% agreement level among instructional technologists. The evaluation was useful to improve the technology and guarantee suitable product for nursing education. It may be a reliable educational tool for nursing education that applies technological resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-01-01

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors. PMID:26115454

  17. Computational Depth of Anesthesia via Multiple Vital Signs Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammar Sadrawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the depth of anesthesia (DoA index using artificial neural networks (ANN which is performed as the modeling technique. Totally 63-patient data is addressed, for both modeling and testing of 17 and 46 patients, respectively. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD is utilized to purify between the electroencephalography (EEG signal and the noise. The filtered EEG signal is subsequently extracted to achieve a sample entropy index by every 5-second signal. Then, it is combined with other mean values of vital signs, that is, electromyography (EMG, heart rate (HR, pulse, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and signal quality index (SQI to evaluate the DoA index as the input. The 5 doctor scores are averaged to obtain an output index. The mean absolute error (MAE is utilized as the performance evaluation. 10-fold cross-validation is performed in order to generalize the model. The ANN model is compared with the bispectral index (BIS. The results show that the ANN is able to produce lower MAE than BIS. For the correlation coefficient, ANN also has higher value than BIS tested on the 46-patient testing data. Sensitivity analysis and cross-validation method are applied in advance. The results state that EMG has the most effecting parameter, significantly.

  18. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviours, and Cardiovascular Health: When Will Cardiorespiratory Fitness Become a Vital Sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Although it is generally agreed upon that a physically active lifestyle and regular exercise are good for heart health, it is much less appreciated by the public that the prolonged hours of sedentary time resulting from sitting at work or screen time are also risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes and other cardiometabolic diseases. In this short narrative review, evidence is discussed and prudent recommendations are made in the context of the sedentary, affluent lifestyle that characterizes a large proportion of our population. It has become overwhelmingly clear that a sedentary lifestyle is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. In addition, vigorous physical activity and exercise is also associated with metabolic and cardiovascular adaptations that are compatible with cardiovascular health. In that regard, cardiorespiratory fitness, a reliable metric to assess the ability of the cardiovascular system to sustain prolonged physical work, has been shown to be the most powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, way beyond classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. On the basis of the evidence available, it is proposed that both dimensions of overall physical activity level (reducing sedentary time and performing regular physical activity or endurance type exercise) should be targeted to reduce CVD risk. Finally, because of the robust evidence that poor cardiorespiratory fitness is an independent risk factor for CVD and related mortality, it is proposed that this simple physiological metric should be incorporated as a vital sign in CVD risk factor evaluation and management.

  19. Microminiature Monitor for Vital Electrolyte and Metabolite Levels of Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Koji; Gratzl, Miklos

    2004-01-01

    Ions, such as proton (pH) and potassium, play a crucial role in body fluids to maintain proper basic functioning of cells and tissues. Metabolites, such as glucose, control the energy available to the entire human body in normal as well as stress situations, and before, during, and after meals. These molecules diffuse easily between blood in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid residing between cells and tissues. We have developed and approach to monitoring of critical ions (called electrolytes) and glucose in the interstitial fluid under the human skin. Proton and potassium levels sensed using optode technology that translates the respective ionic concentrations into variable colors of corresponding ionophore/dye/polymeric liquid membranes. Glucose is monitored indirectly, by coupling through immobilized glucose oxidase with local pH that is then detected using a similar color scheme. The monitor consists of a tiny plastic bar, 100-200 microns wide and 1-2 mm long, placed just under the skin, with color changing spots for each analyte as well as blanks. The colors are read and translated into concentration values by a CCD camera. Direct optical coupling between the in vivo sensing bar and the ex vivo detector device requires no power, and thus eliminates the need for wires or optical fibers crossing the skin. The microminiature bar penetrates the skin easily and painlessly, so that astronauts could insert it themselves. The approach is fully compatible with telemetry in space, and thus, in vivo clinical data will be available real time in the Earth based command center once the device is fully developed. The information provided can be used for collecting hitherto unavailable vital data on clinical effects of space travel. Managing clinical emergencies in space with the sensor already in place should also become much more efficient than without a continuous monitor, as is currently the case. Civilian applications may include better glucose control of

  20. Microminiature Monitor for Vital Electrolyte and Metabolite Levels of Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Koji; Gratzl, Miklos

    2004-01-01

    Ions, such as proton (pH) and potassium, play a crucial role in body fluids to maintain proper basic functioning of cells and tissues. Metabolites, such as glucose, control the energy available to the entire human body in normal as well as stress situations, and before, during, and after meals. These molecules diffuse easily between blood in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid residing between cells and tissues. We have developed and approach to monitoring of critical ions (called electrolytes) and glucose in the interstitial fluid under the human skin. Proton and potassium levels sensed using optode technology that translates the respective ionic concentrations into variable colors of corresponding ionophore/dye/polymeric liquid membranes. Glucose is monitored indirectly, by coupling through immobilized glucose oxidase with local pH that is then detected using a similar color scheme. The monitor consists of a tiny plastic bar, 100-200 microns wide and 1-2 mm long, placed just under the skin, with color changing spots for each analyte as well as blanks. The colors are read and translated into concentration values by a CCD camera. Direct optical coupling between the in vivo sensing bar and the ex vivo detector device requires no power, and thus eliminates the need for wires or optical fibers crossing the skin. The microminiature bar penetrates the skin easily and painlessly, so that astronauts could insert it themselves. The approach is fully compatible with telemetry in space, and thus, in vivo clinical data will be available real time in the Earth based command center once the device is fully developed. The information provided can be used for collecting hitherto unavailable vital data on clinical effects of space travel. Managing clinical emergencies in space with the sensor already in place should also become much more efficient than without a continuous monitor, as is currently the case. Civilian applications may include better glucose control of

  1. International application of health literacy measures : Adaptation and validation of the newest vital sign in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Leenaars, Karlijn EF; Rowlands, Gill; Weiss, Barry; Pander Maat, Henk; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The newest vital sign assesses individual reading and numeracy skills. The aim of this study was to create a Dutch version (NVS-D) and to assess its feasibility, reliability, and validity in The Netherlands. Methods: We performed a qualitative study among experts (n = 27) and patients (n

  2. A 24 GHz integrated SiGe BiCMOS vital signs detection radar front-end

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Johansen, Tom K.; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a 24 GHz integrated front-end transceiver for vital signs detection (VSD) radars is described. The heterodyne radar transceiver integrates LO buffering and quadrature splitting circuits, up- and down-conversion SSB mixers and two cascaded receiver LNA's. The chip has been manufactured...

  3. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 4. Vital Signs, Patient Assessment. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fourth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content: vital signs (temperature, pulse, respirations, and blood pressure) and patient assessment at the scene of an emergency. Each section contains objectives,…

  4. Vector Autoregressive Models and Granger Causality in Time Series Analysis in Nursing Research: Dynamic Changes Among Vital Signs Prior to Cardiorespiratory Instability Events as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Eliezer; Hravnak, Marilyn; Sereika, Susan M

    Patients undergoing continuous vital sign monitoring (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], pulse oximetry [SpO2]) in real time display interrelated vital sign changes during situations of physiological stress. Patterns in this physiological cross-talk could portend impending cardiorespiratory instability (CRI). Vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling with Granger causality tests is one of the most flexible ways to elucidate underlying causal mechanisms in time series data. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the development of patient-specific VAR models using vital sign time series data in a sample of acutely ill, monitored, step-down unit patients and determine their Granger causal dynamics prior to onset of an incident CRI. CRI was defined as vital signs beyond stipulated normality thresholds (HR = 40-140/minute, RR = 8-36/minute, SpO2 time segment prior to onset of first CRI was chosen for time series modeling in 20 patients using a six-step procedure: (a) the uniform time series for each vital sign was assessed for stationarity, (b) appropriate lag was determined using a lag-length selection criteria, (c) the VAR model was constructed, (d) residual autocorrelation was assessed with the Lagrange Multiplier test, (e) stability of the VAR system was checked, and (f) Granger causality was evaluated in the final stable model. The primary cause of incident CRI was low SpO2 (60% of cases), followed by out-of-range RR (30%) and HR (10%). Granger causality testing revealed that change in RR caused change in HR (21%; i.e., RR changed before HR changed) more often than change in HR causing change in RR (15%). Similarly, changes in RR caused changes in SpO2 (15%) more often than changes in SpO2 caused changes in RR (9%). For HR and SpO2, changes in HR causing changes in SpO2 and changes in SpO2 causing changes in HR occurred with equal frequency (18%). Within this sample of acutely ill patients who experienced a CRI event, VAR modeling indicated that RR changes

  5. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Walston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rapid-response teams (RRTs are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations. The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10% based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results: A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25-3.27], tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73-4.92], and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42-3.56] upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65-4.60], more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08-2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19-2.80] for high BP, higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44-7.07] and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43-3.67]. Early RRT activation was associated with increased healthcare

  6. Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Newest Vital Sign: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamichi Kogure

    Full Text Available Health literacy (HL refers to the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services, and is thus needed to make appropriate health decisions. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS is comprised of 6 questions about an ice cream nutrition label and assesses HL numeracy skills. We developed a Japanese version of the NVS (NVS-J and evaluated the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in patients with chronic pain. The translation of the original NVS into Japanese was achieved as per the published guidelines. An observational study was subsequently performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NVS-J in 43 Japanese patients suffering from chronic pain. Factor analysis with promax rotation, using the Kaiser criterion (eigenvalues ≥1.0, and a scree plot revealed that the main component of the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors, and each factor consists of two NVS-J items. The criterion-related validity of the total NVS-J score was significantly correlated with the total score of Ishikawa et al.'s self-rated HL Questionnaire, the clinical global assessment of comprehensive HL level, cognitive function, and the Brinkman index. In addition, Cronbach's coefficient for the total score of the NVS-J was adequate (alpha = 0.72. This study demonstrated that the NVS-J has good validity and reliability. Further, the NVS-J consists of three determinative factors: "basic numeracy ability," "complex numeracy ability," and "serious-minded ability." These three HL abilities comprise a 3-step hierarchical structure. Adequate HL should be promoted in chronic pain patients to enable coping, improve functioning, and increase activities of daily living (ADLs and quality of life (QOL.

  7. The First Clinical Skills: Students Teach Students To Take Vital Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gregg Dwyer, M.D., Ed.D.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordi-nating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of the techniques to the entire class by a single practitio-ner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The former reduces the opportunity for close observation of technique and is less conducive to questions, while the latter requires multiple practi-tioners, which can be prohibitive given their already dense schedules. To reduce the stress for all in-volved and to maximize learning opportunities, an innovative approach to teaching the first skill, vital signs measurement, was developed. Small group instruction and practice were facilitated by senior medi-cal student volunteers in a simulated outpatient clinic using actual equipment. Instruction was provided in a relaxed, but guided format. Students were provided with a lesson plan that detailed both, technique and brief physiology points, as well as check sheets to use during the lab and later as a refresher guide. The lesson plan, instructions for facilitators, and student check sheets were developed by a senior medical stu-dent and reviewed by the course faculty. Recruitment and briefing of student facilitators and conduct of the lab were also performed by the senior student. The purpose of this trend article is to describe the de-velopment of a new course format and to report our experience with implementation of the new format. It is intended to spark interest in applying similar approaches to other curricular issues

  8. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Baker

    Full Text Available Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU in Tanzania.Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001. A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR 4.9 (2.9-8.3. Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5-16.2. In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02 giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94.The introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol

  9. A systems-based intervention to promote smoking as a vital sign in patients served by community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlish, Neil A; Ruland, Jodie; Rosinski, Marishka E; Hendry, Khati

    2006-01-01

    The frequency of asking and advising adult patients about tobacco use was measured after an intervention to adopt smoking as a vital sign at 7 community health centers. The intervention consisted of training staff, revising forms and vital sign stamps, and disseminating educational materials. Documentation in medical charts was reviewed for 1,571 randomly sampled patients in 2002 and 2003. The point prevalence (last encounter) and period prevalence (any annual encounter) of asking patients about smoking increased significantly from 2002 to 2003 (59% to 85%, and 71% to 97%, respectively) overall and at each health center. On advising smokers to quit, 4 health centers improved, but the overall point prevalence, 26%, and period prevalence, 46%, were unchanged over time. An intervention using multiple strategies may have contributed to improving the rates of asking but did not have as large or consistent an impact on rates of advising smokers to quit.

  10. The effect of foot reflexology massage on vital signs and anxiety related to injection during chemotherapy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazavi Akram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Cancer is a common disease in children. Chemotherapy as one of the most important treatments for cancer, can lead to anxiety and negative physiologic reactions. The current study aimed to determine the effect of foot reflexology massage on vital signs and anxiety after chemotherapy in children. Materials and Method: The current randomized clinical trial study was conducted on children of 6-12 years old with leukemia undergoing chemotherapy reffered to oncology center in Kerman in 2015.  120 children were recruited by convenience sampling and were randomly allocated into three groups of 40 persons. The intervention was done as a 20-minute session of foot reflexology massage for intervention group and simple touch for the placebo group immediately before the injection. The vital signs and anxiety of patients in three groups were measured immediately before and after the intervention through using the vital sign record form and Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress – Revised. The data were analyzed through using Kruskal-Wallis tests, chi-square, Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation coefficient in  SPSS16 . Results: After the intervention, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, , heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature (p<0.0001 and anxiety (p=0.003 was significantly decreased in the intervention group. This decrease in the placebo group was significant only in the systolic blood pressure (p Conclusion: Foot reflexology massage as a non-pharmacological method can reduce anxiety and improve the vital signs in children with leukemia, during the chemotherapy drug injection.

  11. Predicting the Need to Perform Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients by Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Patients by Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...to Perform Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks P R O J E C T - S U S T A IN IN

  12. Can Fluctuations in Vital Signs Be Used for Pain Assessment in Critically Ill Patients with a Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Arbour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many critically ill patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI are unable to communicate. While observation of behaviors is recommended for pain assessment in nonverbal populations, they are undetectable in TBI patients who are under the effects of neuroblocking agents. Aim. This study aimed to validate the use of vital signs for pain detection in critically ill TBI patients. Methods. Using a repeated measure within subject design, participants (N=45 were observed for 1 minute before (baseline, during, and 15 minutes after two procedures: noninvasive blood pressure: NIBP (nonnociceptive and turning (nociceptive. At each assessment, vital signs (e.g., systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, capillary saturation (SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and intracranial pressure (ICP were recorded. Results. Significant fluctuations (P<0.05 in diastolic (F=6.087, HR (F=3.566, SpO2 (F=5.740, and ICP (F=3.776 were found across assessments, but they were similar during both procedures. In contrast, RR was found to increase exclusively during turning (t=3.933; P<0.001 and was correlated to participants’ self-report. Conclusions. Findings from this study support previous ones that vital signs are not specific for pain detection. While RR could be a potential pain indicator in critical care, further research is warranted to support its validity in TBI patients with different LOC.

  13. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, Robert [Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: rjk9@cornell.edu

    2007-10-15

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite. - An assessment of the risk of foliar ozone injury on plants was conducted for 269 parks in support of the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network Program.

  14. South Africa's vital statistics are currently not suitable for monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10)[15] coding convention ... monitoring progress towards injury and violence Sustainable .... of death of children under five years in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

  15. Evaluating Effects of Language Recognition on Language Rights and the Vitality of New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rachel Locker; Manning, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Status planning through legislation made New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) an official language in 2006. But this strong symbolic action did not create resources or mechanisms to further the aims of the act. In this article we discuss the extent to which legal recognition and ensuing language-planning activities by state and community have affected…

  16. Effect of Massage Therapy on Vital Signs and GCS Scores of ICU Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahedian-Azimi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Unalleviated complications related to hospitalization, including stress, anxiety, and pain, can easily influence different structures, like the neural system, by enhancing the stimulation of sympathetic nervous pathways and causing unstable vital signs and deterioration in the level of consciousness. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of massage therapy by family members on vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Patients and Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the ICU of the Shariati Hospital during 2012; 45 ICU patients and 45 family members in the experimental group and the same number of patients and family members in the control group were consecutively selected . The data collection instrument consisted of two parts. The first part included demographic data (age, marital status and Body Mass Index and the second part included a checklist to record the patient’s vital signs (systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, respiratory rate (RR, pulse rate (PR and GCS. All measurements were done at the same time in both groups before the intervention (full body massage therapy, and 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours after intervention. The patients were provided with a 60 minute full body massage The massage protocol included static, surface tension, stretching, superficial lymph unload, transverse friction, and myofacial releasing techniques. Results Significant differences were observed between experimental and control groups in the SBP at 1 hour, SBP 2 hours, and SBP 3 hours, and also in GCS at 1 hour to GCS at 4 hours (P < 0.05. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant difference between experimental and control groups in SBP for all time points (P < 0.05. Conclusions Massage via family members had several positive effects on the patients’ clinical conditions, and therefore, it

  17. The implications of probability matching for clinician response to vital sign alarms: a theoretical study of alarm fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James M

    2015-01-01

    Alarm fatigue has been recognised as a significant health technology safety risk. 'Probability matching', in which clinicians respond to the alarm at a rate identical to the perceived reliability of the alarm, has been postulated as a model to explain alarm fatigue. In this article, we quantitatively explore the implications of probability matching for systolic blood pressure alarms. We find that probability matching could have a profound effect on clinician response to the alarm, with a response rate of only 8.6% when the alarm threshold is 90 mm Hg and the optimal threshold for a systolic blood pressure alarm would only be 77 mm Hg. We use the mathematical framework to assess a mitigation strategy when clinicians have a limit to the capacity to respond. We find that a tiered alarm in which clinicians receive information on the severity of vital sign perturbation significantly improves the opportunity to rescue patients. Practitioner Summary: Using a theoretical model, we predict that probability matching, a postulated model of clinician behaviour, can result in a profound decrease in clinician response to alarms for decreased blood pressure. A mitigating strategy is to create alarms that convey information on the degree of vital sign perturbation.

  18. Effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during laparotomy in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Naddaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during and after laparotomy in dogs. Eight clinically healthy, adult male dogs, weighing 20 kg were used. All dogs were initially sedated by acepromazine. Thirty minutes later, ketamine plus xylazine was used to induce anesthesia. Surgical incision of laparotomy was done. After a 5 min manipulation of the abdominal organs, the incision was sutured. Vital signs including heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature (RT were recorded at the times of -30: premedication, 0: induction and Surgical incision, 30: End of surgery, 60, 90 and 120 min. Blood was sampled at the above mentioned times and analyzed using a commercial ELISA kit for cortisol. A significant decreasing trend in RT was observed during the studied times. No significant changes were observed in heart rate and respiratory rate (p>0.05, except at the time of 60 respiratory rate significantly decreased when compared to the time of 90 (p=0.026 and 120 (p=0.041. A non-significant but increasing trend in plasma levels of cortisol was observed.

  19. Vital signs: births to teens aged 15-17 years--United States, 1991-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Romero, Lisa; Spitz, Alison; Gavin, Lorrie; Barfield, Wanda

    2014-04-11

    Teens who give birth at age 15-17 years are at increased risk for adverse medical and social outcomes of teen pregnancy. To examine trends in the rate and proportion of births to teens aged 15-19 years that were to teens aged 15-17 years, CDC analyzed 1991-2012 National Vital Statistics System data. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data from 2006-2010 were used to examine sexual experience, contraceptive use, and receipt of prevention opportunities among female teens aged 15-17 years. During 1991-2012, the rate of births per 1,000 teens declined from 17.9 to 5.4 for teens aged 15 years, 36.9 to 12.9 for those aged 16 years, and 60.6 to 23.7 for those aged 17 years. In 2012, the birth rate per 1,000 teens aged 15-17 years was higher for Hispanics (25.5), non-Hispanic blacks (21.9), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (17.0) compared with non-Hispanic whites (8.4) and Asians/Pacific Islanders (4.1). The rate also varied by state, ranging from 6.2 per 1,000 teens aged 15-17 years in New Hampshire to 29.0 in the District of Columbia. In 2012, there were 86,423 births to teens aged 15-17 years, accounting for 28% of all births to teens aged 15-19 years. This percentage declined from 36% in 1991 to 28% in 2012 (pteens aged 15-17 years received formal sex education on birth control or how to say no to sex, 24% had not spoken with parents about either topic; among sexually experienced female teens, 83% reported no formal sex education before first sex. Among currently sexually active female teens (those who had sex within 3 months of the survey) aged 15-17 years, 58% used clinical birth control services in the past 12 months, and 92% used contraception at last sex; however, only 1% used the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. Births to teens aged 15-17 years have declined but still account for approximately one quarter of births to teens aged 15-19 years. These data highlight opportunities to increase younger teens exposure to interventions that delay

  20. Monitoring, modeling, and management: why base avian management on vital rates and how should it be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David F. DeSante; M. Philip Nott; Danielle R. Kaschube

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that effective management of landbirds should be based on assessing and monitoring their vital rates (primary demographic parameters) as well as population trends. This is because environmental stressors and management actions affect vital rates directly and usually without time lags, and because monitoring vital rates provides a) information on...

  1. AMIA members' "vital signs": what the HIT implementation listserv says about goals for AMIA and for medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravvaz, Kourosh; Kuziemsky, Craig; Koppel, Ross; Kaplan, Bonnie; Adams, Samantha A; Adams, Martha B

    2015-01-01

    The health information technology (HIT) implementation listserv was conceived as a way to combine a substantial portion of American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) members who belonged to four working groups (WGs): CIS, Evaluation, ELSI, and POI. Other AMIA members joined in significant numbers. It immediately became a major forum for discussing medical informatics, informatics policies, and discussion of the purpose of AMIA itself. The listserv membership approximates 25% of AMIA's members and has generated over 6,000 posts. We report on a survey of the listserv's members: what members think about the listserv; what participants want for medical informatics; how they think those goals should be achieved, and what AMIA's role should be in this process. The listserv provides vital signs about AMIA and hopes for informatics. We combine qualitative analysis of members' comments and responses about the listserv using ATLAS.ti qualitative text analysis tool and a word cloud generator.

  2. Vital Signs – Derrotemos al cáncer de mama (Defeating Breast Cancer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-12

    Este podcast está basado en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de noviembre del 2012. El cáncer de mama es la segunda causa principal de muerte por cáncer en las mujeres en los Estados Unidos. Mejores pruebas de detección y tratamientos han contribuido a una disminución en las muertes por cáncer de mama; sin embargo, no todas las mujeres se han beneficiado igualmente de estos avances. Sepa cómo todos podemos ayudar a reducir las muertes por esta enfermedad.  Created: 11/12/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/12/2012.

  3. Vital Signs: Changes in Opioid Prescribing in the United States, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Gery P; Zhang, Kun; Bohm, Michele K; Losby, Jan; Lewis, Brian; Young, Randall; Murphy, Louise B; Dowell, Deborah

    2017-07-07

    Prescription opioid-related overdose deaths increased sharply during 1999-2010 in the United States in parallel with increased opioid prescribing. CDC assessed changes in national-level and county-level opioid prescribing during 2006-2015. CDC analyzed retail prescription data from QuintilesIMS to assess opioid prescribing in the United States from 2006 to 2015, including rates, amounts, dosages, and durations prescribed. CDC examined county-level prescribing patterns in 2010 and 2015. The amount of opioids prescribed in the United States peaked at 782 morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per capita in 2010 and then decreased to 640 MME per capita in 2015. Despite significant decreases, the amount of opioids prescribed in 2015 remained approximately three times as high as in 1999 and varied substantially across the country. County-level factors associated with higher amounts of prescribed opioids include a larger percentage of non-Hispanic whites; a higher prevalence of diabetes and arthritis; micropolitan status (i.e., town/city; nonmetro); and higher unemployment and Medicaid enrollment. Despite reductions in opioid prescribing in some parts of the country, the amount of opioids prescribed remains high relative to 1999 levels and varies substantially at the county-level. Given associations between opioid prescribing, opioid use disorder, and overdose rates, health care providers should carefully weigh the benefits and risks when prescribing opioids outside of end-of-life care, follow evidence-based guidelines, such as CDC's Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, and consider nonopioid therapy for chronic pain treatment. State and local jurisdictions can use these findings combined with Prescription Drug Monitoring Program data to identify areas with prescribing patterns that place patients at risk for opioid use disorder and overdose and to target interventions with prescribers based on opioid prescribing guidelines.

  4. The use of spectral skin reflectivity and laser doppler vibrometry data to determine the optimal site and wavelength to collect human vital sign signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.

    2012-06-01

    The carotid artery has been used extensively by researchers to demonstrate that Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is capable of exploiting vital sign signatures from cooperative human subjects at stando. Research indicates that, the carotid, although good for cooperative and non-traumatic scenarios, is one of the first vital signs to become absent or irregular when a casualty is hemorrhaging and in progress to circulatory (hypovolemic) shock. In an effort to determine the optimal site and wavelength to measure vital signs off human skin, a human subject data collection was executed whereby 14 subjects had their spectral skin reflectivity and vital signs measured at five collection sites (carotid artery, chest, back, right wrist and left wrist). In this paper, we present our findings on using LDV and re ectivity data to determine the optimal collection site and wavelength that should be used to sense pulse signals from quiet and relatively motionless human subjects at stando. In particular, we correlate maximum levels of re ectivity across the ensemble of 14 subjects with vital sign measurements made with an LDV at two ranges, for two scenarios.

  5. Education Vital Signs: Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariya, Sally Banks

    1985-01-01

    Population changes and demographics shape the future of public schools. Includes statistics on ethnic makeup of student population, the projected baby boomlet, children of working mothers, households without children, and the aging population. (MD)

  6. Monitoring of clinical signs in goats with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldmann Wilfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As there is limited information about the clinical signs of BSE and scrapie in goats, studies were conducted to describe the clinical progression of scrapie and BSE in goats and to evaluate a short clinical protocol for its use in detecting scrapie-affected goats in two herds with previously confirmed scrapie cases. Clinical assessments were carried out in five goats intracerebrally infected with the BSE agent as well as five reported scrapie suspects and 346 goats subject to cull from the two herds, 24 of which were retained for further monitoring. The brain and selected lymphoid tissue were examined by postmortem tests for disease confirmation. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the short clinical protocol in detecting a scrapie case in the scrapie-affected herds was 3.9% and 99.6%, respectively, based on the presence of tremor, positive scratch test, extensive hair loss, ataxia and absent menace response. All BSE- and scrapie-affected goats displayed abnormalities in sensation (over-reactivity to external stimuli, startle responses, pruritus, absent menace response and movement (ataxia, tremor, postural deficits at an advanced clinical stage but the first detectable sign associated with scrapie or BSE could vary between animals. Signs of pruritus were not always present despite similar prion protein genotypes. Clinical signs of scrapie were also displayed by two scrapie cases that presented with detectable disease-associated prion protein only in lymphoid tissues. Conclusions BSE and scrapie may present as pruritic and non-pruritic forms in goats. Signs assessed for the clinical diagnosis of scrapie or BSE in goats should include postural and gait abnormalities, pruritus and visual impairment. However, many scrapie cases will be missed if detection is solely based on the display of clinical signs. PrPd accumulation in the brain appeared to be related to the severity of clinical disease but not to the display of

  7. Rapid monitoring of cell size, vitality and lipid droplet development in the oleaginous yeast Waltomyces lipofer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, D; Knorr, D

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was the development of rapid methods suitable for monitoring the growth of the oleaginous yeast Waltomyces lipofer by means of cell size, vitality and the development of internal lipid droplets throughout different growth phases. Oleaginous yeasts are of interest for the industrial production of lipids and therefore precise monitoring of growth characteristics is needed. This paper provides information about both the method development as well as about examples for their use in monitoring applications. Cell size and shape were determined using FPIA (Flow Particle Image Analysis). Vitality and internal lipid droplets were measured using two independent staining methods for Flow Cytometry. Double staining with cFDA & PI was used for the distinction between "vital", "sublethal" and "dead" subpopulations, whereas Nile Red allowed the monitoring of lipid accumulation. In this approach the method for vitality measurement was optimized focussing on the staining buffer. An addition of 25 mM citric acid and pH 4.8 revealed to be optimal. The cells in the growth experiment showed a constantly high vitality, which was always above 90%, but slowly decreasing over time. In the course of lipid droplet development it could be seen that the cell size and the Nile Red fluorescence intensity increased. It was demonstrated that the tested method combination provides a powerful tool for rapid fermentation monitoring of the oleaginous yeast W. lipofer, which allows gaining information about the desired growth characteristics in less than 45 min. Further applications for the two methods will be discussed in this article.

  8. The primacy of vital signs--acute care nurses' and midwives' use of physical assessment skills: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Sonya; Douglas, Clint; Reid, Carol; Jones, Lee; Gardner, Glenn

    2015-05-01

    Registered nurses and midwives play an essential role in detecting patients at risk of deterioration through ongoing assessment and action in response to changing health status. Yet, evidence suggests that clinical deterioration frequently goes unnoticed in hospitalised patients. While much attention has been paid to early warning and rapid response systems, little research has examined factors related to physical assessment skills. To determine a minimum data set of core skills used during nursing assessment of hospitalised patients and identify nurse and workplace predictors of the use of physical assessment to detect patient deterioration. The study used a single-centre, cross-sectional survey design. The study included 434 registered nurses and midwives (Grades 5-7) involved in clinical care of patients on acute care wards, including medicine, surgery, oncology, mental health and maternity service areas, at a 929-bed tertiary referral teaching hospital in Southeast Queensland, Australia. We conducted a hospital-wide survey of registered nurses and midwives using the 133-item Physical Assessment Skills Inventory and the 58-item Barriers to Registered Nurses' Use of Physical Assessment Scale. Median frequency for each physical assessment skill was calculated to determine core skills. To explore predictors of core skill utilisation, backward stepwise general linear modelling was conducted. Means and regression coefficients are reported with 95% confidence intervals. A p value skills used by most nurses every time they worked included assessment of temperature, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, breathing effort, skin, wound and mental status. Reliance on others and technology (F=35.77, pwork area (F=3.79, p=.002), and clinical role (F=44.24, pskill use. The increasing acuity of the acute care patient plausibly warrants more than vital signs assessment; however, our study confirms nurses' physical assessment core skill set is mainly comprised of vital signs. The

  9. Committee Opinion No. 651 Summary: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  10. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 651: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  11. Derivation and Validation of Predictive Factors for Clinical Deterioration after Admission in Emergency Department Patients Presenting with Abnormal Vital Signs Without Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Henning

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Strategies to identify high-risk emergency department (ED patients often use markedly abnormal vital signs and serum lactate levels. Risk stratifying such patients without using the presence of shock is challenging. The objective of the study is to identify independent predictors of in-hospital adverse outcomes in ED patients with abnormal vital signs or lactate levels, but who are not in shock. Methods: We performed a prospective observational study of patients with abnormal vital signs or lactate level defined as heart rate ≥130 beats/min, respiratory rate ≥24 breaths/min, shock index ≥1, systolic blood pressure 4.0mmol/L (OR 5.1, 95% CI [2.1–12.2], age ≥80 yrs (OR 1.9, CI [1.0–3.7], bicarbonate <21mEq/L (OR 2.5, CI [1.3–4.9], and initial HR≥130 (OR 3.1, CI [1.5–6.1]. Conclusion: Patients exhibiting abnormal vital signs or elevated lactate levels without shock had significant rates of deterioration after hospitalization. ED clinical data predicted patients who suffered adverse outcomes with reasonable reliability.

  12. Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

  13. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINATION OF KANGAROO MOTHER CARE METHOD AND LULLABY MUSIC THERAPY ON VITAL SIGN CHANGE IN INFANTS WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuuva Yusuf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo mother care (KMC and lullaby music methods have been considered as the alternative treatment for vital sign changes in low birth weight infants. However, little is known about the combination of the two methods. Objective: To identify effectiveness of combinations of Kangaroo mother care and Lullaby music methods on changes in vital signs in low birth weight infants. Methods: A quasi experiment with non-equivalent control group design. This study was conducted on October– December 2016 at the General Hospital of Ambarawa and General Hospital of Ungaran, Semarang. There were 36 samples selected using consecutive sampling divided into three groups, namely: 1 a group of LBW infants with the combination of KMC and lullaby music, 2 a LBW infant group with the lullaby music intervention, and 3 a control group given standard care in LBW infants by KMC method. Paired t-test and MANOVA test were used to analyzed the data. Results: Findings revealed that there were significant differences between the combination group, lullaby music group, and control group in temperature (p=0.003, pulse (p=0.001, respiration (p=0.001, and oxygen saturation (p=0.014 with significant value of <0.05, which indicated that there was a statistically significant difference in vital sign changes among the three groups. Conclusion: The combination of KMC method and Lullaby music intervention was effective on vital sign changes (temperature, pulse, respiration, and oxygen saturation compared with the lullaby music group alone and control group with KMC method in low birth weight infants. It is suggested that the combination of KMC and Lullaby music methods can be used as an alternative to improve LBW care for mothers in the NICU and at home and to reach the stability of the baby's vital signs.

  14. Effects of different musical stimuli in vital signs and facial expressions in patients with cerebral damage: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana Sofia Fernandes; Ramos, Antonio; Bermejo, Emilia; Casero, Mónica; Corrales, José Manuel; Grantham, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    Along history, music has been used in a variety of ways for therapeutic purposes and has long been recognized for its physiological and psychological effects. Music listening can be an effective nursing intervention, to enhance relaxation, provide distraction, and reduce pain. The aims of this study were to identify changes produced by different musical stimuli in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturations (SpO2) and to verify the influence of music listening on patients' facial expressions with severe cerebral damage. A quasiexperimental study was performed in 26 patients with severe cerebral damage, divided into control and case groups. Patients belonging to the case group were exposed to musical stimuli, radio, classical relaxing music (CRM), and relaxing music with nature sounds (RMNS). Patients were evaluated by measuring vital signs before and after exposure to each musical stimulus, as were the patients within the control group. Patients in the control group were exempt from any musical stimulus. Facial expressions were observed in each patient within the case group during the intervention. The results show that radio produced a slight increase in systolic BP, HR, RR, and SpO2. The CRM induced a decrease of RR and an increase of SpO2 and also produced alterations of the facial expression. When RMNS was played, a decrease was displayed in BP, HR, and RR and an increase was displayed in SpO2. Alterations in facial expression were displayed in each patient. The results of the study suggest that the application of musical stimuli such as CRM and RMNS can be used to provide a state of relaxation in patients with severe cerebral damage.

  15. Signos Vitales de los CDC La actividad física y los adultos con discapacidades (Vital Signs-Physical Activity and Adults with Disabilities)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-06

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Signos Vitales de los CDC de mayo del 2014. Los adultos con discapacidades que no hacen actividad física aeróbica tienen un 50 % más de probabilidades de tener enfermedades cardiacas, accidentes cerebrovasculares, diabetes o cáncer. Sepa qué puede hacer para ayudar.  Created: 5/6/2014 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 5/6/2014.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction: bench-to-bedside optical monitoring of tissue vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Dekel, Nava; Oren, Levi; Deutsch, Assaf; Pewzner, Eliyahu

    2008-02-01

    In normal cell the mitochondria are the major source of energy for cellular functions. They serve as biosensors for oxidative stress and involved also in termination of cell function by apoptosis. The involvement of mitochondria in pathological states such as neurodegenerative diseases, sepsis, stroke and cancer are well documented. The involvement of mitochondrial respiration and function in cancer development, proliferation and possible therapy were initiated 75 years ago by Otto Warburg. Monitoring of NADH fluorescence in vivo as an intracellular oxygen indicator was established in the 1950-1970 by Britton Chance and collaborators. In the last 20 years we developed and used a multiparametric monitoring system enabling real time assessment of mitochondria NADH, microcirculatory blood flow and volume as well as HbO II oxygenation. In order to use this technology in clinical practice the commercial developed device-the "CritiView" was tested in animal models as well as in patients hospitalized in the critical care departments. In patients we tested the viability of the urethral wall (a less-vital tissue) by a 3 way Foley urinary catheter that contains the optical probe. The catheter was introduced to patients underwent open heart by-pass surgery or abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) operations. The monitoring started immediately after the insertion of the catheter to the patient and was stopped when the patient was discharged from the operation room. The results show that monitoring of the vitality of the Urethral wall provides information in correlation to the surgical procedure performed. In the AAA patients the occlusion of the aorta led to severe ischemia developed in the urethral wall and recovery of signals were recorded after the reopening of the aorta. In patients under went heart bypass surgery the urethra vitality was decreased dramatically during the operation and recovery was noted in most patients after the discharge of the patient from the operation room.

  17. Aggregate National Early Warning Score (NEWS) values are more important than high scores for a single vital signs parameter for discriminating the risk of adverse outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Stuart; Kovacs, Caroline; Briggs, Jim; Meredith, Paul; Schmidt, Paul E; Featherstone, Peter I; Prytherch, David R; Smith, Gary B

    2015-02-01

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCPL) National Early Warning Score (NEWS) escalates care to a doctor at NEWS values of ≥5 and when the score for any single vital sign is 3. We calculated the 24-h risk of serious clinical outcomes for vital signs observation sets with NEWS values of 3, 4 and 5, separately determining risks when the score did/did not include a single score of 3. We compared workloads generated by the RCPL's escalation protocol and for aggregate NEWS value alone. Aggregate NEWS values of 3 or 4 (n=142,282) formed 15.1% of all vital signs sets measured; those containing a single vital sign scoring 3 (n=36,207) constituted 3.8% of all sets. Aggregate NEWS values of either 3 or 4 with a component score of 3 have significantly lower risks (OR: 0.26 and 0.53) than an aggregate value of 5 (OR: 1.0). Escalating care to a doctor when any single component of NEWS scores 3 compared to when aggregate NEWS values ≥5, would have increased doctors' workload by 40% with only a small increase in detected adverse outcomes from 2.99 to 3.08 per day (a 3% improvement in detection). The recommended NEWS escalation protocol produces additional work for the bedside nurse and responding doctor, disproportionate to a modest benefit in increased detection of adverse outcomes. It may have significant ramifications for efficient staff resource allocation, distort patient safety focus and risk alarm fatigue. Our findings suggest that the RCPL escalation guidance warrants review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the Prediction of Mortality and the Need for Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients Using Standard Vital Signs With Heart-Rate Variability and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    verified from the patients’ electrocardiograms. Means and standard deviations for vital signs, HRV, HRC, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores were obtained...database. These included demographic data, physical examination results, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and interventions performed on the patients...in milliseconds) (19). Parametric values (N = 200, m = 2, r = 6) were established from previous work (2, 12, 16, 17). In addition, the following

  19. Vital Signs – Cómo hacer el cuidado de salud más seguro (Making Health Care Safer)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-05

    Este podcast se basa en el informe de los CDC Vital Signs de marzo del 2013, que trata sobre las infecciones mortales por enterobacterias resistentes a los carbapenemes o ERC y formas en que los proveedores de atención médica pueden detener dichas infecciones.  Created: 3/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/5/2013.

  20. Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barfod Charlotte

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures. Methods The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, Tvitals, and presenting complaint, Tcomplaint. The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, Tfinal. We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures. Results The covariates, Tvitals, Tcomplaint and Tfinal were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2, respiratory rate (RR, systolic blood pressure (BP and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS. Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5% and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%. More than half of the patients had a Tcomplaint more urgent than Tvitals

  1. Computational Gene Mapping to Analyze Continuous Automated Real-Time Vital Signs Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    conventional clinical thresholds: ICP>20 and >30 mmHg; CPPអ, ឬ, and > 100 mmHg; SBP ៊, < 100 , , and  mmHg; MAPឬ and ា mmHg; BTIə.67...displays of ongoing calculations of Shock Index (SI=systolic blood pressure ( SBP )/heart rate (HR)] and brain trauma index 3 Distribution A: Approved...thresholds of interest in this work were SBP , mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, ICP, CPP, and oxygen saturation (SpO2). 4.0 METHODS 4.1 Data

  2. Delay-bounded semi-reliable vital sign transmission protocol for mobile telemedicine over a CDMA 1x EV-DO network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tong H; Yoo, Sun K

    2008-04-01

    The reliable and instant transmission of vital signs is important for remote time-critical patient care through a telemedicine system. However, sometimes the reliability and instantaneity conditions cannot be satisfied simultaneously under a high-noise mobile network, because they are reciprocal to each other. In this paper, the vital sign transmission protocol (VSTP) running over a CDMA 1x EVDO (Code Division Multiple Access 1x Evolution Data Only) mobile network is proposed to comply with both the reliability and instantaneity requirements. The switching buffer management scheme is combined with a hybrid error control scheme, consisting of forward error correction (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ). The CDMA 1x EVDO mobile network is modeled by two states using the Markov wireless channel model to test transmission performance under diverse network conditions. Throughout the noisy environment simulation, the performance of the VSTP is compared with the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to demonstrate its efficacy over error-prone mobile network.

  3. Optimization and evaluation of the flowchart for collecting and inputting vital signs data%信息系统对生命体征数据采集录入流程的优化及效果*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红珍

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨移动护理信息系统、重症监护信息系统及多参数生命体征监测仪在生命体征数据采集与录入中的效果。方法采用信息系统对本院病人生命体征数据进行采集及录入。记录信息系统使用前后生命体征数据采集录入平均时间。结果信息系统及多参数生命体征监测仪使用后病人生命体征采集与录入时间均较使用前降低,其中移动护理信息系统与重症监护系统联合使用,全院日均可减少24.4 h;移动信息系统、多参数生命体征检测仪、重症监护仪三者联合使用,全院日均可节省约154.1 h。结论采用信息系统对生命体征进行采集录入,可提高护士工作效率,具有良好的临床意义与经济效益。%Objective To evaluate the effect of the optimized flowchart for collecting and inputting the vital signs data using the latest mobile nursing information system,intensive care information system and multiple life parameter monitor.Methods Daily average total time for collecting and inputting vital signs data was calculated by using the working hours measurement and the minimum estimation method.Then the matched-pairs design was used to select 100 patients at random from 4 wards,whose vital signs data were collected and input by the nurses of different working time.The time for collecting and inputting the data before optimizing the flowchart was compared to that after optimizing the flowchart.Results The time for collecting and inputting the data of vital signs before the use of optimized flowchart was significantly shorter than that after using the flowchart.The time was shortened by 24.4 h every day on average if the latest mobile nursing information system was used together with the intensive care information system and the time by 154.1 h if the latest mobile nursing information system was used together with the intensive care information system and multiple life parameter monitor

  4. To Compare Efficacy of Hypnosis and Intravenous Sedation in Controlling of Important Variables of Vital Signs and Evaluate the Patient Anxiety Before and after Topical Anesthesia in Ophthalmic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Behnaz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is one of the most important problems among preoperative patients. In order to reduce these signs and symptoms, some medications are used for patients. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of hypnosis to intravenous sedation on controlling the important variables of vital signs and to evaluate the patient anxiety before and after regional or topical anesthesia in ophthalmic surgery.Materials and Methods: This study was designed as a double-blind stratified randomized clinical trial.  Hypnotism was administered to hypnotism group, and midazolam, fentanyl, and propofol were given intravenously to the IV sedation group. The patients were monitored and the baseline variables consisted of mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation were registered every 15 minutes during surgery. Patient anxiety was measured via Spielbeger`s State Anxiety Index (STAI score before and after surgery.Results: 90 patients were participated in the study, with 50% (n=45 assigned to hypnosis group and 50% (N=45 assigned to IV sedation group. Patients characteristics, including age, gender, and body mass index (BMI duration of surgery were similar among the groups (P>0.05. Spielbeger`s State Anxiety Index (STAI score before and after surgery were not significantly different in both groups (P>0.05. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure were lower among hypnosis group as well as this group had higher O2 saturation during surgery (P<0.05.Conclusion: Hypnosis can be an effective means of controlling vital signs at different intervals of starting the ophthalmic surgery compared to intravenous sedation. In the hypnosis group anxiety was similar to IV sedation group, but O2 saturation was more desirable. 

  5. Ecological thresholds as a basis for defining management triggers for National Park Service vital signs: case studies for dryland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Miller, Mark E.; Belote, R. Travis; Garman, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    protection of resources within the range of desired conditions (Cook and others, 2010). The goal of conservation management for natural resources in the U.S. National Park System is to maintain native species and habitat unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. Achieving this goal requires, in part, early detection of system change and timely implementation of remediation. The recent National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program (NPS I&M) was established to provide early warning of declining ecosystem conditions relative to a desired native or reference system (Fancy and others, 2009). To be an effective tool for resource protection, monitoring must be designed to alert managers of impending thresholds so that preventive actions can be taken. This requires an understanding of the ecosystem attributes and processes associated with threshold-type behavior; how these attributes and processes become degraded; and how risks of degradation vary among ecosystems and in relation to environmental factors such as soil properties, climatic conditions, and exposure to stressors. In general, the utility of the threshold concept for long-term monitoring depends on the ability of scientists and managers to detect, predict, and prevent the occurrence of threshold crossings associated with persistent, undesirable shifts among ecosystem states (Briske and others, 2006). Because of the scientific challenges associated with understanding these factors, the application of threshold concepts to monitoring designs has been very limited to date (Groffman and others, 2006). As a case in point, the monitoring efforts across the 32 NPS I&M networks were largely designed with the knowledge that they would not be used to their full potential until the development of a systematic method for understanding threshold dynamics and methods for estimating key attributes of threshold crossings. This report describes and demonstrates a generalized approach that we implemented to formalize

  6. The San Francisco Community Vital Signs: using web-based tools to facilitate the mobilizing for action through planning and partnerships process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Katz, Mitchell H

    2011-01-01

    A coalition of local public health system stakeholders in San Francisco developed a community assessment and strategic planning tool, the San Francisco Community Vital Signs (SFCVS). The SFCVS builds on the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) model by incorporating Internet-based technology into local public health system evaluation and strengthening. This article describes the overlap between the SFCVS and MAPP processes, the manner in which information technology facilitated the SFCVS process, and a template for infusing a Web-based platform into the MAPP model. Internet-based applications helped to implement many (16 of 41; 39%) of the components of the SFCVS process. Of these 16 process measures, the majority (10; 63%) required the use of Web-based technology. The SFCVS demonstrates that a MAPP-like process can leverage the Internet to augment the functionality of public health activities.

  7. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered. PMID:22203851

  8. Enhancing nursing students' skills in vital signs assessment by using multimedia computer-assisted learning with integrated content of anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveevivitchai, Chularuk; Chuengkriankrai, Benchaporn; Luecha, Yuwadee; Thanooruk, Rujires; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2009-01-01

    Due to constraints of increasing number of nursing students and a disproportionate shortfall of faculty members in nursing schools, it was necessary to supplement traditional lecture or lecture-demonstration with on-line multimedia materials and/or multimedia compact discs for enhancing learning. The authors have developed a computer-assisted learning (CAL) multimedia on vital signs with animation and audio features for teaching in the classroom based on the 5Es inquiry cycle. When the CAL was tried on second-year undergraduates in two comparable schools, all groups of students gained significantly higher performance skills regardless of whether the groups were subjected to CAL/lecture or CAL/lecture/demonstration. However, they did not gain in factual knowledge.

  9. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Vital Signs with an Ambulatory Subject Using Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhelson, Ilya V.

    Finding a subject's heart rate from a distance without any contact is a difficult and very practical problem. This kind of technology would allow more comfortable patient monitoring in hospitals or in home settings. It would also allow another level of security screening, as a person's heart rate increases in stressful situations, such as when lying or hiding malicious intent. In addition, the fact that the heart rate is obtained remotely means that the subject would not have to know he/she is being monitored at all, adding to the efficacy of the measurement. Using millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal can be obtained that contains composite chest wall motion made up of component motions due to cardiac activity, respiration, and interference. To be of use, these components have to be separated from each other by signal processing. To do this, the quadrature and in-phase components of the received signal are analyzed to get a displacement waveform. After that, processing can be done on that waveform in either the time or frequency domains to find the individual heartbeats. The first method is to find the power spectrum of the displacement waveform and to look for peaks corresponding to heartbeats and respiration. Another approach is to examine the signal in the time domain using wavelets for multiresolution analysis. One more method involves studying the statistics of the wavelet-processed signal. The final method uses a heartbeat model along with probabilistic processing to find heartbeats. For any of the above methods to work, the millimeter-wave sensor has to be accurately pointed at the subject's chest. However, even small subject motions can render the rest of the gathered data useless as the antenna may have lost its aim. To combat this, a color and a depth camera are used with a servo-pan/tilt base. My program finds a face in the image and subsequently tracks that face through upcoming frames. The pan/tilt base adjusts the aim of the antenna depending on

  10. Sinais vitais e expressão facial de pacientes em estado de coma Signos vitales y expresión facial de pacientes en estado de coma Vital signs and facial expression of patients in coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Giesbrecht Puggina

    2009-06-01

    induced comas. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial was done. The sample was consisted of 30 patients from Intensive Care Unit, being divided in 2 groups: Group Control (without auditory stimuli and Experimental Group (with auditory stimuli. The patients were submitted to 3 sessions for consecutive days. Significant statistical alterations of the vital signs were noted (oxygen saturation - session 1; oxygen saturation - session 3; respiratory frequency - session 3 during the message playback and with facial expression, session 1, during both music and message. Apparently, the voice message is a stronger stimulus than the music in relation to the capacity of producing suggestive physiological auditory responses.

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of people in the US are getting this disease, which is caused by breathing in small water droplets contaminated with Legionella germs . About 5,000 ... 10. CDC investigations show almost all outbreaks were caused by problems preventable with more effective ... Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks. What causes the Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks that ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet if they have or are at high risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, or cancer. Ask patients if they smoke ... diet if they have or are at high risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, or cancer. Ask patients if they smoke ...

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... – $99 billion – is much higher when crashes with injuries or property damage are also included. Thousands of ... truck drivers who lost work days from a crash in 2012 missed 31 days or more. ... increases risk of injury and death. In research studies, about 1 in ...

  14. Vital Signs - High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    In the U.S., nearly one third of the adult population have high blood pressure, the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke - two of the nation's leading causes of death.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... understand the laws and regulations that control the marketing and sale of alcohol. Collaborate with states and communities to determine whether prevention strategies are working. States and communities can Implement effective ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Secondhand Smoke An Unequal Danger Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... in the US are still exposed to secondhand smoke. Who is most at risk? SHS exposure dropped ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  18. Aging changes in vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for it to slow down afterward. Your highest heart rate with exercise is also lower than it was when you ... including: In organs, tissues, and cells In the heart and blood vessels In the lungs Images ... Effects of age on blood pressure References Chester JG, ...

  19. Providing chronic pain management in the "Fifth Vital Sign" Era: Historical and treatment perspectives on a modern-day medical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Hobelmann, J Greg; Compton, Peggy

    2017-04-01

    Over 100 million Americans are living with chronic pain, and pain is the most common reason that patients seek medical attention. Despite the prevalence of pain, the practice of pain management and the scientific discipline of pain research are relatively new fields compared to the rest of medicine - contributing to a twenty-first century dilemma for health care providers asked to relieve suffering in the "Fifth Vital Sign" era. This manuscript provides a narrative review of the basic mechanisms of chronic pain and history of chronic pain management in the United States - including the various regulatory, health system and provider factors that contributed to the decline of multidisciplinary pain treatment in favor of the predominant opioid treatment strategy seen today. Multiple non-opioid pain treatment strategies are then outlined. The manuscript concludes with three key questions to help guide future research at the intersection of pain and addiction. The assessment and treatment of chronic pain will continue to be one of the most common functions of a health care provider. To move beyond an over reliance on opioid medications, the addiction and pain research communities must unite with chronic pain patients to increase the evidence base supporting non-opioid analgesic strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the Significance of Vital Signs in the Up-Triage of Patients Visiting Emergency Department from Emergency Severity Index Level 3 to 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Nejad, Hooman; Banaie, Mohsen; Seyedhosseini Davarani, Seyed Hossein; Khazaeipour, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is a five-level triage system that has shown promising reliability and validity. According to ESI algorithm, in the presence of danger zone respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR) or Oxygen (O2) saturation, patients should be up-triaged from ESI level 3 to 2 Hence, the current study aimed to investigate the value of the measurement of vital signs in predicting the up-triage of patients from ESI level 3 to 2. Patients who visited the emergency department at Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran, Iran, and were categorized into ESI level 3 were investigated. RR, HR, and O2 saturation were recorded by the triage nurse, and the rates of abnormalities in these three variables were evaluated. Out of 551 cases who were up-triaged from ESI level 3 to 2,489 (88.7%) had an increased RR, and 539 (97.8%) had an increased RR or HR. Only 12 cases (2.2%) had normal RR and HR, who were up-triaged only due to abnormal O2 saturation. Out of these 12 cases, 10 had O2 saturations triaged into ESI level 2 in the first place and 1 could not be located for further investigations. In conclusion, compared to O2 saturation, the abnormal findings during the assessment of RR and HR seem to much more commonly result in the up-triage of patients from ESI level 3 to 2.

  1. Evaluation of the Significance of Vital Signs in the Up-Triage of Patients Visiting Emergency Department from Emergency Severity Index Level 3 to 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Hossein Nejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Emergency Severity Index (ESI is a five-level triage system that has shown promising reliability and validity. According to ESI algorithm, in the presence of danger zone respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR or Oxygen (O2 saturation, patients should be up-triaged from ESI level 3 to 2 Hence, the current study aimed to investigate the value of the measurement of vital signs in predicting the up-triage of patients from ESI level 3 to 2. Patients who visited the emergency department at Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran, Iran, and were categorized into ESI level 3 were investigated. RR, HR, and O2 saturation were recorded by the triage nurse, and the rates of abnormalities in these three variables were evaluated. Out of 551 cases who were up-triaged from ESI level 3 to 2,489 (88.7% had an increased RR, and 539 (97.8% had an increased RR or HR. Only 12 cases (2.2% had normal RR and HR, who were up-triaged only due to abnormal O2 saturation. Out of these 12 cases, 10 had O2 saturations <92% at common health status, 1 had acutely altered mental status and should have been triaged into ESI level 2 in the first place and 1 could not be located for further investigations. In conclusion, compared to O2 saturation, the abnormal findings during the assessment of RR and HR seem to much more commonly result in the up-triage of patients from ESI level 3 to 2.

  2. The effect of intravenous Dexamethasone on post-cesarean section pain and vital signs: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Azar Danesh; Feizi, Awat; Jabalameli, Mitra; Nouri, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Any operation leads to body stress and tissue injury that causes pain and its complications. Glucocorticoids such as Dexamethasone are strong anti-inflammatory agents, which can be used for a short time post-operative pain control in various surgeries. Main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of administration of intravenous (IV) Dexamethasone on reducing the pain after cesarean. Methods: A double-blind prospective randomized clinical trial was performed on 60 patients candidate for elective caesarean section. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: A (treatment: 8 mg IV Dexamethasone) and B (control: 2 mL normal saline). In both groups, variables such as mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pain and vomiting severity (based on visual analog scale) were recorded in different time points during first 24 h after operation. Statistical methods using repeated measure analysis of variances and t-test, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for analyzing data. Findings: The results indicated that within-group comparisons including severity of pain, MAP, RR and HR have significant differences (P < 0.001 for all variables) during the study period. Between group comparisons indicated significant differences in terms of pain severity (P < 0.001), MAP (P = 0.048) and HR (P = 0.078; marginally significant), which in case group were lower than the control group. Conclusion: IV Dexamethasone could efficiently reduce post-operative pain severity and the need for analgesic consumption and improve vital signs after cesarean section. PMID:24991614

  3. Novel textile systems for the continuous monitoring of vital signals: design and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Isabel G; Martins, Frederico; Dias, Rúben; Oliveira, Cristina; Machado da Silva, José

    2015-08-01

    In this article we present a smart textile system for the continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory signals, produced and integrated with an industrial embroidery unit. The design of a T-shirt system, having embedded textile sensors and interconnects and custom designed circuit for data collection and Bluetooth transmission is presented. The performance of skin-contact textile electrodes, having distinctive electrical characteristics and surface morphologies, was characterized by measurements of signal to noise ratio, under dry and moisture conditions. The influence of the electrodes size and the wear resistance were addressed. Results of an electrocardiogram acquisition with a subject wearing the T-shirt and display on a smartphone are also shown. The presented smart textile systems exhibit good performance and versatility for custom demand production.

  4. Microelectrode chip based real time monitoring of vital MCF-7 mamma carcinoma cells by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter; Rothermel, Andrée; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2008-10-15

    Sensorchip based impedance spectroscopy can detect inhibitory effects of human neuropeptide Y (hNPY) on living cells in a non-invasive labelling free way in real time without the need of supporting reagents. Since the discovery that neoplasmatic transformations in breast cancer are correlated with a change of the receptor subtype expression of hNPY in the affected tissue, the hNPY receptor-ligand system has come to the fore of cancer research. Today there are different methods detecting hNPY receptor interactions like fluorescent and radioactive labelling or detecting hNPY-pathway activation like cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-assays. For all these assays it is necessary to either label related proteins with additional substances, which can affect the nature state of the cell, or the need of producing cell lysate which allows only a snapshot of the investigated cells. To overcome these problems we established a new method to detect hNPY-receptor interactions. Therefore, we monitor the complex electric resistance (impedance) of cells attached to a microelectrode over a wide frequency range. Cell alterations are detected as changes in the impedance spectra. After application of the adenylyl cyclase-stimulating reagent forskolin, impedance is decreased at 5 kHz frequency within minutes. This effect can be inhibited by preincubating the cells with hNPY for a time range of 20 min. The inhibitory effect of hNPY can be washed out and the same cells can be stimulated by forskolin again.

  5. Vital improvements to the retrieval of tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasakkers, Joannes D.; Folkert Boersma, K.; Williams, Jason E.; van Geffen, Jos; Vinken, Geert C. M.; Sneep, Maarten; Hendrick, Francois; van Roozendael, Michel; Pepijn Veefkind, J.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play an important role in tropospheric chemistry, they catalyze the production of ozone (O3) and contribute to aerosol formation. NOx is linked to the oxidizing efficiency of the atmosphere since O3 plays an important role in the formation of OH. Satellite observations of NO2 are important for monitoring and studying concentrations of nitrogen oxides, but considerable uncertainties on the accuracy and robustness of the retrievals, and their fitness for model evaluation still persist. These uncertainties pertain to all aspects of the retrieval: (1) spectral fitting, (2) stratospheric background correction, and (3) air mass factor calculation. Here we present a number of relevant improvements to the tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval algorithm from OMI (DOMINO v3). We revisit the 405-465 nm spectral fitting window for the OMI NO2 slant column retrievals, and suggest adaptations to this window to improve agreement with (stratospheric) columns obtained from SCIAMACHY and GOME-2, as validated with independent FTIR NO2 columns observed from the ground at Jungfraujoch. Furthermore, stronger nudging of the stratospheric O3:HNO3 ratios in the TM5 chemistry transport model (used to estimate the stratospheric background NO2) with those observed by the ODIN instrument, enables us to improve stratospheric NO2 simulations with substantial benefits for the assimilation and stratospheric NO2 corrections in the retrieval. A third important innovation is the coupling of the Dutch OMI NO2 retrieval to the TM5 model with a global resolution of 1°×1°. As suggested previously by Boersma et al. [2007] and demonstrated by Heckel et al. [2011], the better resolved a priori profile shapes lead to a much better understanding of pollution gradients observed from space. In addition to the increased resolution, updated chemistry and emissions (improved soil and ship NOx emissions) in TM5 make the OMI retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns

  6. Spectrum-averaged Harmonic Path (SHAPA) algorithm for non-contact vital sign monitoring with ultra-wideband (UWB) radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen; Javaid, Abdul Q; Weitnauer, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Spectrum-averaged Harmonic Path (SHAPA) algorithm for estimation of heart rate (HR) and respiration rate (RR) with Impulse Radio Ultrawideband (IR-UWB) radar. Periodic movement of human torso caused by respiration and heart beat induces fundamental frequencies and their harmonics at the respiration and heart rates. IR-UWB enables capture of these spectral components and frequency domain processing enables a low cost implementation. Most existing methods of identifying the fundamental component either in frequency or time domain to estimate the HR and/or RR lead to significant error if the fundamental is distorted or cancelled by interference. The SHAPA algorithm (1) takes advantage of the HR harmonics, where there is less interference, and (2) exploits the information in previous spectra to achieve more reliable and robust estimation of the fundamental frequency in the spectrum under consideration. Example experimental results for HR estimation demonstrate how our algorithm eliminates errors caused by interference and produces 16% to 60% more valid estimates.

  7. Monitoring Different Phonological Parameters of Sign Language Engages the Same Cortical Language Network but Distinctive Perceptual Ones

    OpenAIRE

    Cardin, Velia; Orfanidou, Eleni; Kästner, Lena; Rönnberg, Jerker; Woll, Bencie; Cheryl M Capek; Rudner, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The study of signed languages allows the dissociation of sensorimotor and cognitive neural components of the language signal. Here we investigated the neurocognitive processes underlying the monitoring of two phonological parameters of sign languages: handshape and location. Our goal was to determine if brain regions processing sensorimotor characteristics of different phonological parameters of sign languages were also involved in phonological processing, with their activity being modulated ...

  8. Monitoring carnivore populations at the landscape scale: occupancy modelling of tigers from sign surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Kota Ullas; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; Kumar, Narayanarao Samba; Vaidyanathan, Srinivas; Nichols, James D.; MacKenzie, Darryl I.

    2011-01-01

    1. Assessing spatial distributions of threatened large carnivores at landscape scales poses formidable challenges because of their rarity and elusiveness. As a consequence of logistical constraints, investigators typically rely on sign surveys. Most survey methods, however, do not explicitly address the central problem of imperfect detections of animal signs in the field, leading to underestimates of true habitat occupancy and distribution. 2. We assessed habitat occupancy for a tiger Panthera tigris metapopulation across a c. 38 000-km2 landscape in India, employing a spatially replicated survey to explicitly address imperfect detections. Ecological predictions about tiger presence were confronted with sign detection data generated from occupancy sampling of 205 sites, each of 188 km2. 3. A recent occupancy model that considers Markovian dependency among sign detections on spatial replicates performed better than the standard occupancy model (ΔAIC = 184·9). A formulation of this model that fitted the data best showed that density of ungulate prey and levels of human disturbance were key determinants of local tiger presence. Model averaging resulted in a replicate-level detection probability [inline image] = 0·17 (0·17) for signs and a tiger habitat occupancy estimate of [inline image] = 0·665 (0·0857) or 14 076 (1814) km2 of potential habitat of 21 167 km2. In contrast, a traditional presence-versus-absence approach underestimated occupancy by 47%. Maps of probabilities of local site occupancy clearly identified tiger source populations at higher densities and matched observed tiger density variations, suggesting their potential utility for population assessments at landscape scales. 4. Synthesis and applications. Landscape-scale sign surveys can efficiently assess large carnivore spatial distributions and elucidate the factors governing their local presence, provided ecological and observation processes are both explicitly modelled. Occupancy

  9. Vital Signs – El VIH en los jóvenes en los Estados Unidos: Cómo proteger a una generación (HIV Among Youth in the US: Protecting a Generation)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-27

    Este podcast se basa en el informe Vital Signs de los CDC de diciembre del 2012, que contiene información acerca del impacto del VIH en los jóvenes y los factores que ponen a la juventud en riesgo de contagiarse con el VIH. También hace un llamado a la prevención a través de los padres, las escuelas y los programas comunitarios dirigidos a los jóvenes.  Created: 11/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/27/2012.

  10. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, M. van; Rövekamp, A.J.M.; Bergman-Agteres, S.N.; Wijsman, L.W.; Ooms, S.J.; Mooijaart, S.P.; Vermeulen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity) and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone appl

  11. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, M. van; Rövekamp, A.J.M.; Bergman-Agteres, S.N.; Wijsman, L.W.; Ooms, S.J.; Mooijaart, S.P.; Vermeulen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity) and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone

  12. CDC Vital Signs- Proteja a los pacientes contra la resistencia a los antibióticos (Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-03-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de marzo del 2016 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Mientras reciben atención médica en un centro hospitalario, los pacientes pueden contraer infecciones graves asociadas a la atención médica. Infórmese sobre cómo prevenir las infecciones asociadas a la atención médica.  Created: 3/3/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/3/2016.

  13. Monitoring Different Phonological Parameters of Sign Language Engages the Same Cortical Language Network but Distinctive Perceptual Ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Velia; Orfanidou, Eleni; Kästner, Lena; Rönnberg, Jerker; Woll, Bencie; Capek, Cheryl M; Rudner, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The study of signed languages allows the dissociation of sensorimotor and cognitive neural components of the language signal. Here we investigated the neurocognitive processes underlying the monitoring of two phonological parameters of sign languages: handshape and location. Our goal was to determine if brain regions processing sensorimotor characteristics of different phonological parameters of sign languages were also involved in phonological processing, with their activity being modulated by the linguistic content of manual actions. We conducted an fMRI experiment using manual actions varying in phonological structure and semantics: (1) signs of a familiar sign language (British Sign Language), (2) signs of an unfamiliar sign language (Swedish Sign Language), and (3) invented nonsigns that violate the phonological rules of British Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language or consist of nonoccurring combinations of phonological parameters. Three groups of participants were tested: deaf native signers, deaf nonsigners, and hearing nonsigners. Results show that the linguistic processing of different phonological parameters of sign language is independent of the sensorimotor characteristics of the language signal. Handshape and location were processed by different perceptual and task-related brain networks but recruited the same language areas. The semantic content of the stimuli did not influence this process, but phonological structure did, with nonsigns being associated with longer RTs and stronger activations in an action observation network in all participants and in the supramarginal gyrus exclusively in deaf signers. These results suggest higher processing demands for stimuli that contravene the phonological rules of a signed language, independently of previous knowledge of signed languages. We suggest that the phonological characteristics of a language may arise as a consequence of more efficient neural processing for its perception and production.

  14. Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagkal Midilli, Tulay; Ciray Gunduzoglu, Nazmiye

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of Reiki on pain and vital signs when applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of the body after cesarean section surgery. The study was single-blinded, randomized, and double-controlled (Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups). Forty-five patients, equalized by age and number of births, were randomly assigned to the Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups. The treatment, which was applied to the patients in these 3 groups, was applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of body in the first 24 and 48 hours after the operation within 4 to 8 hours of the application of standard analgesics. The study data were collected using a patient follow-up form and a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups and times (P Reiki group patients between day 1 pre-tx and after application on the second day (day 2 post-tx) measurements. Mean breathing rate and systolic blood pressure measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups (P Reiki group was observed to use fewer analgesics throughout the study and to need them after a longer time than the sham Reiki and control groups (P Reiki applied for 15 minutes to the incision area after a cesarean operation had the expected effects on pain and the need for the use of analgesics, but it had no effect on vital signs.

  15. Efeitos do Método Mãe Canguru nos sinais vitais de recém-nascidos pré-termo de baixo peso Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on the vital signs of low-weight preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Almeida

    2007-02-01

    saturation (p< 0.05, and a significant decrease in respiration rate (p< 0.05. CONCLUSION: Kangaroo mother care promotes improvement in body temperature, increased peripheral oxygen saturation (thus improving tissue oxygenation, and decreased respiration rate (thus providing greater respiratory comfort for the newborns. This suggests that kangaroo mother care contributes towards beneficial alterations in the low-weight newborns' vital signs.

  16. Monitoring the early signs of cognitive decline in elderly by computer games: an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Sirály

    Full Text Available It is anticipated that current and future preventive therapies will likely be more effective in the early stages of dementia, when everyday functioning is not affected. Accordingly the early identification of people at risk is particularly important. In most cases, when subjects visit an expert and are examined using neuropsychological tests, the disease has already been developed. Contrary to this cognitive games are played by healthy, well functioning elderly people, subjects who should be monitored for early signs. Further advantages of cognitive games are their accessibility and their cost-effectiveness.The aim of the investigation was to show that computer games can help to identify those who are at risk. In order to validate games analysis was completed which measured the correlations between results of the 'Find the Pairs' memory game and the volumes of the temporal brain regions previously found to be good predictors of later cognitive decline.34 healthy elderly subjects were enrolled in the study. The volume of the cerebral structures was measured by MRI. Cortical reconstruction and volumetric segmentation were performed by Freesurfer.There was a correlation between the number of attempts and the time required to complete the memory game and the volume of the entorhinal cortex, the temporal pole, and the hippocampus. There was also a correlation between the results of the Paired Associates Learning (PAL test and the memory game.The results gathered support the initial hypothesis that healthy elderly subjects achieving lower scores in the memory game have increased level of atrophy in the temporal brain structures and showed a decreased performance in the PAL test. Based on these results it can be concluded that memory games may be useful in early screening for cognitive decline.

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child and Teen BMI Calculator About BMI for Children and Teens Overweight and Obesity Breastfeeding Promotion and Support Winnable Battles: Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity On Other Web Sites Let’s Move! ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mothers to community programs for support once they leave the hospital. Hospitals can Implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and work towards achieving Baby-Friendly designation. Use CDC’s Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Today's Heroin Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they are also abusing multiple other substances, especially cocaine and prescription opioid painkillers. As heroin use has increased, so have heroin-related overdose deaths. Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administration - Drugs Information National Institute of Mental Health Mental health medications PDMP Center of Excellence, Brandeis University The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care National Alliance ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of alcohol can be harmful, including all wine and beer. The baby’s brain, body, and organs ... FDA-approved methods of birth control and patient education and counseling as prescribed by a health care ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These are adults with serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs; hearing; seeing; or concentrating, remembering, or making decisions. ... Adults with mobility limitations (serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs) are the least likely to get any aerobic ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov: Obtenga Cobertura, o Mantenga o Cambie Su Plan (Español) A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You (English) Una Guía para Un Mejor Cuidado y Una Vida Más Saludable (Español) Top of Page Get Email ...

  4. Latest framework to improve vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Greater consistency in NHS signage, coupled with the assurance of a high quality, competitively-priced range of signage and wayfinding products and services, are among the benefits promised to estates and facilities teams UK-wide following the NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency's (NHS PASA) recent launch of a new pan-Government signage framework agreement. Jonathan Baillie reports, and talks to several signage suppliers appointed to the framework about their expertise, skills and recent experience.

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... larger image and text description. Top of Page Infographic View larger image and text. Top of Page ... 48 hours after symptoms stop. Foster a work environment that encourages workers to stay home when sick, ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Where's the Sodium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serve food can Consider joining voluntary initiatives to reduce sodium such as the National Salt Reduction Initiative Give choices to consumers to help them reduce sodium in their diet by: Stocking lower sodium foods. ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Safer Food Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trace foods from source to destination. Use store loyalty card and distribution records to help investigators identify what made people sick. Recall products linked to an outbreak and notify customers. Choose only suppliers that use food safety best ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reporting and access, integration with electronic health records, proactive unsolicited reporting, incentives for provider use, and interoperability ... – Office of Diversion Control Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction Prescription Drugs U.S. Food ...

  10. Vital Signs: Seismology of ocean worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Vance, Steven D; Panning, Mark P; Staehler, Simon C; Bills, Bruce G; Lorenz, Ralph D; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Pike, W T; Castillo, Julie C; Lognonne, Philippe; Tsai, Victor C; Rhoden, Alyssa R

    2016-01-01

    Ice covered ocean worlds are probably seismically active. Measuring that activity can provide information about global and local habitability. This article examines the likely seismic activity of known and potential ocean worlds. We describe objectives and possible implementations for icy moon seismology. For currently known ocean worlds, we consider science objectives and technical challenges, and suggest priorities based on feasibility and potential science return. A seismic experiment could be less complex and less susceptible to noise than those implemented on Earth's Moon and planned for Mars. Such an investigation could probe the transport properties and radial structure of ocean worlds, yielding critical constraints on potential redox fluxes, and thus habitability.

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in nearly 11,000 deaths in 2009. Driving drunk is never OK. Choose not to drink and ... interlocks prevent drivers who were convicted of alcohol-impaired driving from operating their vehicles if they have been ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Alcohol Screening and Counseling An effective but underused health service Language: English ... about their drinking. 25% Alcohol screening and brief counseling can reduce the amount consumed on an occasion ...

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Academy of Pediatrics. Graphic design: adapted from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Top of Page What Can Be ... 0:60 seconds] On Other Web Sites National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Parents Central National Highway Traffic Safety ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living HIV / AIDS Injury, Violence & Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco Digital ... coordination between facilities can put patients at increased risk. Now more than ... safety efforts happening across the state. Health care facility ...

  15. Innovative remote monitoring of plant health for environmental applications: A joint effort between EPCOT{reg_sign} and the DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robitaille, H. [Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, FL (United States); Capelle, G.; Di Benedetto, J. [Special Technologies Lab., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    In September of 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology for (OST) and Epcot{reg_sign} in the WALT DISNEY WORLD{reg_sign} Resort (Epcot) signed an agreement to cooperate on the research, development, and public communication and display of environmental technologies. Although Epcot and OST have distinctive missions, certain areas of their respective research and development efforts are common, including the integration of remote sensors with robotics platforms, airborne surveys for environmental characterization and monitoring, and ground based measurements of vegetation stress. The first area of cooperative R&D pursued under the agreement is the evaluation of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI), a technology developed by OST and proven effective for uranium detection. This paper describes the efforts being conducted under the Epcot-OST agreement and presents initial results. An appendix describing LIFI technology is also included.

  16. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    of taking such a unilateral view of what constituted a Vitalist concept of life. It could lead to a misunderstanding of Vitalist way of thinking, Rasch said, if the focus were only set upon the enthusiastic surplus, the worshipping of youth and health. To Vitalists, life is more than that. It is a totality...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...... of the era. The analyses include a further sub-categorisation to capture the different types of Life Force dealt with in the texts. By way of an introduction, Vitalism is discussed within the context of the scientific and social developments of the 19th Century....

  17. Enhancement of absorption and resistance of motion utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to effectively monitor physiological signs during sport exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an effective engineering approach for human vital signs monitoring as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work is to study how to capture critical physiological parameters efficiently through a well-constructed electronic system and a robust multi-channel opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS), together with a wireless communication. A unique design comprising multi-wavelength illumination sources and a rapid response photo sensor with a 3-axis accelerometer enables to recover pulsatile features, compensate motion and increase signal-to-noise ratio. An approved protocol with designated tests was implemented at Loughborough University a UK leader in sport and exercise assessment. The results of sport physiological effects were extracted from the datasets of physical movements, i.e. sitting, standing, waking, running and cycling. t-test, Bland-Altman and correlation analysis were applied to evaluate the performance of the OEPS system against Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha.There was no difference in heart rate measured using OEPS and both Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha (both pfunction.

  18. Biotelemetry Applications for Three Vital Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Juan Ramírez López

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies recently have allowed the complex design of transmission system, and the reception and analysis of biological signal. The monitoring of biological signals and the establishment of a continuous monitoring of different physiological parameters of the patient and the prevention of diseases characterize these kinds of systems. The biotelemetry system due to its complexity and cost has the disadvantage of not being affordable for communities isolated from health services. This reason has caught the attention of researchers of the group TIGUM, who have developed biotelemetry architecture that is functional and operational at short-range. Using Arduino® Mega ADK platform, useful for the diagnosis and prevention of diseases through the data registration and traceability of three vital signs. The architecture uses Bluetooth and ZigBee technologies to facilitate the transmission and the visualization of signals in different electronic devices.

  19. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, G; Ciccarelli, G; Schwartz, S; Hughes, T; Boettcher, T; Barman, R; Langer, R; Swiston, A

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  20. Interventional placement of thin coil shaped implants powered wirelessly for monitoring vital signals and controlling abnormal activities by electro-stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Honda, Masanobu; Takamiya, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Various types of implants are being commonly used for monitoring vital signals and controlling the critically ill patient's condition such as arrhythmia, sick sinus syndrome, etc. For implanting these medical devices under the skin, surgery is inevitable. These days many patients are more willing to accept interventional therapies that are less invasive, especially inserting a catheter into a blood vessel or endoscopy through a natural orifice. To be able to use interventional therapy for implanting medical devices, they will need to be small enough to fit them through a catheter or the forceps channel of an endoscope. We evaluated a wirelessly powered prototype of a thin coil shaped (diameter 0.05 inches) implant for electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring and controlling abnormal heart rhythms. An extracorporeal unit fed power to the sensors and transceiver circuit. We are planning to add sensors for detecting ECG signals and also a pulse generator for transmitting signals to the heart. At 13.6MHz, 10mW was wirelessly transferred from the helical antenna attached to the chest wall of the phantom to the coil's receiving antenna and the power enabled the sensors and circuits to work. Moreover, the coil's receiving antennas worked as stimulating electrodes similar to a pacemaker lead.

  1. Monitoring Australia's Northern Coastline in Advance of Signs from Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzechnik, Marcus P.; Bokor, Ilonka; Urban, David A.; Carpenter, Julia G.; Hirth, Gillian A. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, Victoria, 3084 (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Australia has the third largest marine estate of any nation in the world, with a total area of 3.1 million square kilometres of ocean managed primarily for biodiversity conservation as marine reserves. Regular offshore radiological monitoring of the entire Australian coastline is impractical because of its size, however several projects currently under way at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to target areas where background monitoring of caesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) could be useful. Of particular interest to ARPANSA and the Australian Public are; - Radiological discharges due to the Japanese nuclear accident, 2011, and their potential effects on Australian seas and aquatic wildlife. - Visits to Australia from Nuclear Powered Warships (NPWs). Significant oceanic discharges from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (in excess of 3.6 PBq {sup 137}Cs) are expected to be dispersed over a number of years. For long term global dispersion, a transit time of about 5 years (i.e. arrival in 2016) has been estimated for radioactive material to reach the northern coast of Western Australia, and about 10 to 15 years to reach the eastern coast of Queensland. It is expected that radioactive material from the Japan accident will have been diluted to such a degree that it will be difficult to detect in Australian waters, however there is limited information on current caesium levels in water and biota to use as a background (or baseline) level. This is also the case for the Australian Ports where NPWs have permission to berth. This paper will describe several projects currently underway at ARPANSA aimed at determining background caesium levels in seawater and aquatic wildlife, as well as detailing future monitoring programmes intended to gather information to demonstrate the protection of the Australian public and aquatic environment. Background levels of caesium that have been collated since the project began in 2012 will also

  2. 无心跳脑死亡兔模型的建立及生命体征变化%The changes of vital signs from establishment of gradual onset brain death rabbit model to cardiac death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范晓礼; 叶啟发; 钟自彪; 张远; 乔兵兵; 赵杰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe changes of vital signs from brain death to cardiac death through establishing gradual onset brain death rabbit models.Methods A total of 15 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into control group (group A),brain death 4 h group (group B1),and brain death 8-h group (group B2),with 5 rabbits in each group.In group A Foley balloon catheter was placed in intracalvarium only,and no brain-dead model was established.Brain-dead model was established in group B1 and group B2 by increasing intracranial pressure in a modified,slow,and intermittent way.The changes of mean arterial pressure (MAP),heart rate (HR),radical resection (RR) before pressurization and those of MAP and HR after stopping salvage were observed.Heart living time after stopping salvage was recorded.Results After intracalvarium pressurization,MAP was upgraded (P < 0.01).MAP,HR of brain death group at 0.5,3.0,6.0 min after the salvage was stopped were lower than that of the control,the difference was statistically significant.The cardiac survival time of B1,B2,groups were (16.20 ±5.80) min,(15.20 ±3.11) min after life support withdrew,the difference didn't have statistical significance.Conclusion When gradual onset brain death rabbit models were established,hemodynamics could be kept steady for relatively long time.Cardiac function was not deteriorated with prolongation of time after brain death.MAP and HR were descending gradually after stopping salvage.%目的 建立渐进性颅内加压脑死亡模型,观察撤除抢救措施后脑死亡至心脏死亡过程中的生命体征变化.方法 将新西兰兔15只随机分为实验对照组(A组)、脑死亡4h组(B1组)及脑死亡8h组(B2组),每组5只.A组维持麻醉8h,开颅置入10号Foley球囊导管后不加压,B1、B2组加压复制脑死亡后分别维持4、8h,监测脑死亡建立过程中平均动脉压(MAP)、心率(HR)、呼吸频率(RR)变化及撤除抢救措施后MAP、HR值变化,记录停止抢

  3. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Park, Byung-Kwon; Li, Changzhi; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to obtain vital signs from live soldiers, and use this to prioritize which are in most urgent need of attention. Our team at Kai Sensors, University of Hawaii and University of Florida is developing Doppler radar heart sensing technology that provides the means to detect life signs, respiration and/or heart beat, at a distance, even for subjects lying motionless, e.g., unconscious subjects, wearing body armor, and hidden from direct view. Since this technology can deliver heart rate information with high accuracy, it may also enable the assessment of a subject's physiological and psychological state based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Thus, the degree of a subject's injury may also be determined. The software and hardware developments and challenges for life signs detection and monitoring for battlefield triage will be discussed, including heart signal detection from all four sides of the human body, detection in the presence of body armor, and the feasibility of HRV parameter extraction.

  4. Medical Monitoring During Firefighter Incident Scene Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, David A; Haigh, Craig A; Haller, Jeannie M; Smith, Denise L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate aspects of medical monitoring, including medical complaints, vital signs at entry, and vital sign recovery, in firefighters during rehabilitation following operational firefighting duties. Incident scene rehabilitation logs obtained over a 5-year span that included 53 incidents, approximately 40 fire departments, and more than 530 firefighters were reviewed. Only 13 of 694 cases involved a firefighter reporting a medical complaint. In most cases, vital signs were similar between firefighters who registered a complaint and those who did not. On average, heart rate was 104 ± 23 beats·min(-1), systolic blood pressure was 132 ± 17 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure was 81 ± 12 mmHg, and respiratory rate was 19 ± 3 breaths·min(-1) upon entry into rehabilitation. At least two measurements of heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate were obtained for 365, 383, 376, and 160 cases, respectively. Heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and respiratory rate decreased significantly (p recovery were highly variable. Data from this study indicated that most firefighters recovered from the physiological stress of firefighting without any medical complaint or symptoms. Furthermore, vital signs were within fire service suggested guidelines for release within 10 or 20 minutes of rehabilitation. The data suggested that vital signs of firefighters with medical symptoms were not significantly different from vital signs of firefighters who had an unremarkable recovery.

  5. Sign Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  6. The effect of preoperative psychological intervention on the psychological state and vital signs of patients with breast cancer before surgery%术前心理干预对乳腺癌患者手术前心理状态及生命体征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文静; 段文超

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨心理干预疗法对乳腺癌患者手术前焦虑、抑郁及生命体征的影响.方法将140例乳腺癌患者,随机分为对照组和干预组各70例,干预组患者术前实施支持性心理干预,对照组仅实施常规的术前护理,通过心电监护、焦虑量表及抑郁量表进行测量,比较两组患者焦虑、抑郁及生命体征的变化.结果干预组患者的焦虑、抑郁状态、心率及血压干预前后差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),与对照组比较差异明显.结论心理干预治疗能够缓解乳腺癌患者术前的心理焦虑和抑郁情绪,生命体征接近平稳,使她们在良好的状态下接受手术治疗,对促进术后康复有积极的作用.%Objective To investigate the effect of preoperative psychological intervention on the psychological state and vital signs of patients with breast cancer before surgery. Methods 140 cases of breast cancer patients will be randomly divided into control group and study group 70 patients, the study group patients before the implementation of supportive psychological intervention in the control group had only routine preoperative care, through the ECG, SAS and SDS, compared two groups of anxiety, depression and changes in vital signs. Results Study group of patients with anxiety, depression, heart rate and blood pressure before and after intervention were significantly different (P <0.05), the control group no significant difference. Conclusion Psychological intervention in patients with breast cancer before surgerycan alleviate the psychological anxiety and depression, vital signs close to the stable, in good condition to enable them to accept surgical treatment, to promote a positive role in rehabilitation after surgery.

  7. Vitalism as Pathos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Thomas

    This paper addresses the remarkable longevity (in spite of numerous 'refutations') of the idea of vitalism in the biological sciences and beyond. If there is to be a renewed vitalism today, however, we need to ask - on what kind of original conception of life should it be based? This paper argues that recent invocations of a generalized, processual variety of vitalism in the social sciences and humanities above all, however exciting in their scope, miss much of the basic originality - and interest - of the vitalist perspective itself. The paper argues that any renewed spirit of vitalism in the contemporary era would have to base itself on the normativity of the living organism rather than on any generalized conceptions of process or becoming. In the terms of the paper, such a vitalism would have to be concrete and 'disciplinary' rather than processual or generalized. Such a vitalism would also need to accommodate, crucially, the pathic aspects of life - pathology, sickness, error; in short everything that makes us, as living beings, potentially weak, without power, at a loss. Sources for such a pathic vitalism might be found above all in the work of Georges Canguilhem - and Friedrich Nietzsche - rather than primarily in Bergson, Whitehead or Deleuze.

  8. Design and Development of Patient Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazwanie Azizulkarim, Azra; Jamil, Muhammad Mahadi Abdul; Ambar, Radzi

    2017-08-01

    Patient monitoring system allows continuous monitoring of patient vital signs, support decision making among medical personnel and help enhance patient care. This system can consist of devices that measure, display and record human’s vital signs, including body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure and other health-related criteria. This paper proposes a system to monitor the patient’s conditions by monitoring the body temperature and pulse rate. The system consists of a pulse rate monitoring software and a wearable device that can measure a subject’s temperature and pulse rate only by using a fingertip. The device is able to record the measurement data and interface to PC via Arduino microcontroller. The recorded data can be viewed as a historical file or can be archived for further analysis. This work also describes the preliminary experimental results of the selected sensors to show the usefulness of the sensors for the proposed patient monitoring system.

  9. Vital Signs: Update on Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Megan R; Jones, Abbey M; Petersen, Emily E; Lee, Ellen H; Rice, Marion E; Bingham, Andrea; Ellington, Sascha R; Evert, Nicole; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Oduyebo, Titilope; Brown, Catherine M; Martin, Stacey; Ahmad, Nina; Bhatnagar, Julu; Macdonald, Jennifer; Gould, Carolyn; Fine, Anne D; Polen, Kara D; Lake-Burger, Heather; Hillard, Christina L; Hall, Noemi; Yazdy, Mahsa M; Slaughter, Karnesha; Sommer, Jamie N; Adamski, Alys; Raycraft, Meghan; Fleck-Derderian, Shannon; Gupta, Jyoti; Newsome, Kimberly; Baez-Santiago, Madelyn; Slavinski, Sally; White, Jennifer L; Moore, Cynthia A; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Petersen, Lyle; Boyle, Coleen; Jamieson, Denise J; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Honein, Margaret A

    2017-04-07

    In collaboration with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments, CDC established the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) in early 2016 to monitor pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection and their infants. This report includes an analysis of completed pregnancies (which include live births and pregnancy losses, regardless of gestational age) in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC) with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection reported to the USZPR from January 15 to December 27, 2016. Birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy include brain abnormalities and/or microcephaly, eye abnormalities, other consequences of central nervous system dysfunction, and neural tube defects and other early brain malformations. During the analysis period, 1,297 pregnant women in 44 states were reported to the USZPR. Zika virus-associated birth defects were reported for 51 (5%) of the 972 fetuses/infants from completed pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4%-7%); the proportion was higher when restricted to pregnancies with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection (24/250 completed pregnancies [10%, 95% CI = 7%-14%]). Birth defects were reported in 15% (95% CI = 8%-26%) of fetuses/infants of completed pregnancies with confirmed Zika virus infection in the first trimester. Among 895 liveborn infants from pregnancies with possible recent Zika virus infection, postnatal neuroimaging was reported for 221 (25%), and Zika virus testing of at least one infant specimen was reported for 585 (65%). These findings highlight why pregnant women should avoid Zika virus exposure. Because the full clinical spectrum of congenital Zika virus infection is not yet known, all infants born to women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection during pregnancy should receive postnatal

  10. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  11. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  12. In Search of Vitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens Lohfert; Ebbesen Nielsen, Louise

    2010-01-01

    concepts such as vitalism (Hans Driesch) and degeneration (Max Nordau) can be conceived as different reactions to Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of the Species in the light of bio-power. Even though both Driesch and Nordau use Darwin’s theories to produce positive ideas about respectively the strong...

  13. Mobile Patient Monitoring: The Mobihealth System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halteren, van Aart; Bults, Richard; Wac, Katarzyna; Konstantas, Dimitri; Widya, Ing; Dokovski, Nikolay; Koprinkov, George; Jones, Val; Herzog, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    The forthcoming wide availability of high bandwidth public wireless networks will give rise to new mobile healthcare services. To this end, the MobiHealth project has developed and trialed a highly customisable vital signs monitoring system based on a body area network (BAN) and a mobile-health (m-h

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... younger teens made a reproductive health visit for birth control services in the past year. Doctors and nurses could use this opportunity to discuss advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods and the ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About 31% of people who live below the poverty level smoke. Although the number of teenagers in ... conditions. State and community leaders can: Consider the World Health Organization's MPOWER strategies in efforts to prevent ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Making Food Safer to Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reduce illness caused by Salmonella . Problem Targeting Salmonella Salmonella infection has not declined in 15 years Reducing Salmonella ... new challenges. Change in E. coli O157 and Salmonella infection, 1996–2010 Source: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Seat Belt Use in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up in a seat belt, booster seat, or car seat, whichever is appropriate.* Have all children age 12 and under sit in the back seat. Never seat a child in front of an air bag. Place children in the middle of the back ...

  18. Education Vital Signs. Leadership: The Toughest Job in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Nora

    2003-01-01

    Examines administration, motivation, and compensation among educational leaders. Discusses the high-stakes, high-stress jobs of superintendents, assistant superintendents, subject-area supervisors, principals, and assistant principals. Also looks at the role of school board members and the importance of teamwork in education. (Contains one table…

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods sold and served in schools that will reduce sodium up to 50% by 2022. Reducing sodium intake ... have already made efforts to reduce added sodium. Replace sodium with alternatives like spices, herbs, and vegetables. Shop ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition ...

  1. Comparison between different decorrelation techniques in vital sign detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dell'Aversano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of detecting the breath activities of a human subject is addressed. A CW signal is used to probe the scene and the MUSIC algorithm is exploited to detect frequency doppler modulation introduced by chest movements. For this particular measurement configuration, the correlation matrix results rank deficient. In order to restore the rank, two decorrelation techniques are compared by exploiting numerical data.

  2. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention services and medical care. Identify and track differences in medical care, illness and death across different groups of people. Help meet the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy , including getting all people with HIV into ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crashes, and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in the US—harmful and expensive. What works to prevent crash injuries? Using primary enforcement seat belt laws that cover everyone in the car. A primary enforcement law means a police officer ...

  4. Vital Signs: The State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Theodore L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in institutions of higher education in the United States. Statistics include trends in black enrollment, library resources in historically black colleges, leading foundation grants, blacks in business schools, and comparative analysis of Asian Americans and blacks in higher…

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk about PrEP through health department programs, social marketing campaigns, and other training and technical assistance efforts. ... Control and Prevention , National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Page maintained by: ...

  6. Vital signs: labour shortage holds drilling short of record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunan, D.

    2000-11-06

    At the beginning of the year 2000 the petroleum industry expected to drill 16,000 new wells during the the year. The Petroleum Services Association of Canada is now forecasting a final year-2000 total of less than 15,500 wells. The shortfall reflects continuing difficulties with labour shortages in the field, most especially in experienced drilling personnel. For 2001, the Petroleum Services Association of Canada is forecasting 16,699 completions Canada-wide. Nearly half of Alberta's total of 11,861 are expected to be in the gas-prone southeastern and east-central regions of the province. British Columbia is expected to be up to 899 completions, about 12 per cent over 2000. Although shortage of qualified labour was the principal reason for the reduced number of completions in 2000, unfavourable weather conditions during much of the summer drilling season, plus heated merger and acquisition activity throughout the industry also played a part. Rig utilization was 63 per cent , five per cent below expectations. On the brighter side, even these lower-than-expected figures are up dramatically from 1999 when just 272 rigs in a fleet of 591 were at work, for a dismal rate of only 46 per cent. Oil completions are double of what they were in 1999 (3,304 wells against 1,538) while gas wells are up 26 per cent (at 5,263 completion compared to 4,157 in 1999). Drilling success rate in 2000 was close to 85 per cent, up from 82.4 per cent last year. Non-frontier success rate was highest in Saskatchewan, with close to 93 per cent of wells drilled finding either oil or gas. The rate of success was 83 per cent in Alberta, 78 per cent in Manitoba, and 51 per cent in British Columbia. Average depth of all wells was 1,102 metres, marginally up from 1,084 metres in 1999. Largest well depth increases were experienced in British Columbia (up to 1,583 metres from 1,276 metres) as producers chased progressively deeper natural gas horizons. 2 tabs.

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The three main tests–colonoscopy, FOBT/FIT, and flexible sigmoidoscopy are all effective at finding cancer early. ... Tested for Colorectal Cancer? [PSA - 0:60 seconds] Screen for Life: Meryl Streep/Control [0:60 seconds] ...

  8. Vital Signs: Seismology of Europa and Other Ocean World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, S.; Vance, S.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Banerdt, W. B.; Bills, B. G.; Castillo, J. C.; Huang, H. H.; Jackson, J. M.; Lognonne, P. H.; Lorenz, R. D.; Panning, M. P.; Pike, W. T.; Stähler, S. C.; Tsai, V. C.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic investigations offer the most comprehensive view into the deep interiors of planetary bodies. The InSight mission and concepts for a Europa Lander and a Lunar Geophysical Network present unique opportunies for seismology to play a critical role in constraining interior structure and thermal state. In oceanic icy worlds, measuring the radial depths of compositional interfaces using seismology in a broad frequency range can sharpen inferences of interior structures deduced from gravity and magnetometry studies, such as those planned for NASA's proposed Europa Mission and ESA's JUICE mission. Seismology may also offer information about fluid motions within or beneath ice, which complements magnetic studies; and can record the dynamics of ice layers, which would reveal mechanisms and spatiotemporal occurrence of crack formation and propagation. Investigating these structures and processes in the future calls for detailed modeling of seismic sources and signatures, in order to develop the most suitable instrumentation. We will present results of simulations of plausible seismic sources and wave-field propagation in Europa, with extension to other oceanic icy worlds, building on prior studies (Kovach and Chyba 2001, Lee et al. 2003, Cammarano et al. 2006, Panning et al. 2006, Leighton et al. 2008). We also consider additional sources: gravitationally forced librations, which will create volume-filling turbulent flow, a possible seismic source similar to that seen from turbulent flow in terrestrial rivers; downflow of dense brines from chaos regions on Europa into its underlying ocean, which possibly resemble riverine flows and flows through glacial channels and ocean acoustic signals that couple with the overlying ice to produce seismic waves, by analogy with Earth's ocean-generated seismic hum. Cammarano, F., Lekic, V., Manga, M., Panning, M., and Romanowicz, B. (2006). JGR, E12009:doi:10.1029/2006JE002710. Kovach, R. L. and Chyba, C. F. (2001). Icarus, 150(2):279-287. Lee, S. W., Zanolin, M., Thode, A. M., Pappalardo, R. T., and Makris, N. C. (2003). Icarus, 165(1):144-167. Leighton, T. G., Finfer, D. C., and White, P. R. (2008). Icarus, 193(2):649-652. Panning, M., Lekic, V., Manga, M., and Romanowicz, B. (2006). Journal of Geophysical Research, E12008:doi:10.1029/2006JE002712.

  9. Amniotic fluid as a vital sign for fetal wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubil, Elizabeth A; Magann, Everett F

    2013-05-01

    Introduction: Amniotic fluid, once thought to merely provide protection and room for necessary movement and growth for the fetus, is now understood to be a highly complex and dynamic system that is studied as a data point to interpret fetal wellbeing. Methods: Assessment of amniotic fluid volume is now routine when performing a sonographic evaluation of fetal status and is an important consideration in the assessment and management of perinatal morbidity and mortality.(1)(,)(2) In this review, we will cover the dynamics that affect amniotic fluid volume, review methods for measurement and quantification of volume, review definitions for normative data as related to neonatal outcomes, and provide evidence based guidance on the workup and management options for oligoydramnios and polyhydramnios in singleton and twin pregnancies. Conclusions: When abnormalities of fluid exist, appropriate workup to uncover the underlying etiology should be initiated as adverse fetal outcomes are sometimes associated with these variations from normalcy.

  10. Wireless Vital Sign Sensor Network Simulations for Mass Casualty Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    Casualty, Network Simulation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: Unclassified 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19 19a. NAME OF... security takes priority over medical treatment of the wounded, so it assumed that only two responders are available to provide medical care during...in ZigBee products. Since ZigBee software stacks are widely available and since a standard exists for ZigBee use in healthcare, it is a very

  11. 经鼻蝶垂体瘤切除术前两种方法训练用口呼吸对患者生命体征及心理的影响%Effect of two training Methods of mouth breathing on vital signs and psychology of patients before transsphenoidal pituitary tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马青华; 贾平; 廖天芬; 安莉

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较两种方法训练用口呼吸对经鼻蝶入路垂体瘤切除术患者生命体征、血氧饱和度、心理方面的影响.方法 选取经鼻蝶入路垂体瘤切除患者53例,按手术的先后顺序间断分为对照组(26例)和试验组(27例).对照组术前采取用手捏鼻的方法训练患者用口呼吸;试验组术前采用纱条填塞患者鼻腔训练患者用口呼吸.比较两组患者生命体征变化情况及患者的心理反应.结果 两组患者呼吸频率变化差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);对照组65.4%患者对纱条填塞鼻腔产生焦虑;试验组25.9%患者对纱条填塞鼻腔产生焦虑,差异有统计学意义(x2=8.32,P<0.05).结论 用纱条填塞患者鼻腔来训练患者用口呼吸的方法较传统的捏鼻方法效果佳,值得推广.%Objective To compare the effect of two training methods on the vital signs, saturation of blood oxygen, and psychology of patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary tumor resection. Methods Fifty-three patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary tumor resection were orderly assigned to the experimental group (26 cases) and the control group (27 cases). Patients in control group were trained to hold their nose and breathe by mouth. In experimental group, patients also breathed by mouth and blocked their nasal cavity with gauze. We compared the vital signs and psychic reaction of the patients in two groups. Results There were significant difference between the patients in two groups in breathing frequency (P < 0. 05). In control group,65. 4% of the patients showed anxiety due to nose blocking with gauze,and 25. 9% of the patients in experimental group showed the same problem. There was significant difference between the two groups ( P < 0. 05 ) . Conclusion Gauze leads hand in blocking nasal cavity, which is worth promoting.

  12. The role of neuropsychology on an epilepsy monitoring unit: a peek behind the "do not disturb" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirlin, Kristin A; Locke, Dona E C

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychological services are considered an essential component of specialized epilepsy centers. In such a multidisciplinary setting, neuropsychologists interact regularly with other professionals involved in epilepsy patients' care. For these other professionals, this article provides an overview of the background of neuropsychologists, the services they provide, and how their findings contribute to the evaluation of the epilepsy patient. Two case examples are included to illustrate how neuropsychological evaluations are employed in the epilepsy monitoring unit setting.

  13. 生命体征评估法与早期预警评分法在急诊急救中的对比研究%Comparative study of vital signs assessment method and the MEWS in the emergency treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王连馥; 闫波; 姜正伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of vital signs evaluation method (refers to conscious state, respiratory, blood pressure and pulse, CRBP)and MEWS (modified early warning score) evaluation method in emergency and critical illness. Methods 1819 cases of emergency and critical illness patients from September 1, 2009 to January 28, 2011 in our emergency department were selected. Conscious state, respiratory, blood pressure and pulse were monitored, and CRBP evaluation method was used to evaluate the condition and instruct diagnosis and treatment. Conscious state, systolic pressure, respiratory, temperature and heart rate were monitored, and MEWS evaluation method was used, and the correlations of both methods were studied. Results There were no significant differences between the potential dangerous and ordinary patients with CRBP evaluation methods and the patients ' scores < 5 points with MEWS evaluation method. There were no significant differences between the very dangerous patients with CRBP evaluation methods and the patients ' scores > 9 points with MEWS evaluation method. The correlation coefficient between CRBP evaluation method and MEWS evaluation method was 0. 717 (P < 0. 001 ), there were statistical differences, which indicated that CRBP evaluation method and MEWS evaluation method had positive correlation. Conclusion CRBP evaluation method is simple and fast, which is fit for emergency triage and classification of batch wounded patients. Early identification of potential critical illness in early period is of benefit to emergency patients' management and reasonable usage of medical resources; and is also fit for emergency treatment, which can reflect both the serious degree and the trend of diseases changing; and is fit to predict the prognosis of emergency and critical diseases, and evaluate objectively the dangerous probability of critical patients.%目的 选择意识状态、呼吸、血压和脉搏4项生命体征作为病情严重程度及病

  14. The survival of vital and non-vital deciduous molar teeth following pulpotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M W

    2007-09-01

    There is scant evidence supporting the criteria for establishing the suitability of a deciduous molar for a pulpotomy. Although some criteria, such as patient age, are logical the importance of other factors on tooth survival has not been established. All pulpotomies performed at 20 school dental clinics over a period of 15 months were reported together with date of birth, gender, tooth treated, presenting signs and symptoms, pulp status and date and method of treatment. Operators performed the treatment according to their usual procedures. Data were analysed statistically using Statview 5.0 (SAS Institute). The outcome of pulpotomy of 465 deciduous teeth in 403 patients was evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 7.4 +/- 0.1 years. Two hundred and seventy-two teeth were vital and 193 were non-vital. One hundred and ninety-six teeth were treated with the one-step formocresol method and 269 with the two-step formocresol method. The age and gender of the patients did not differ between the vital and non-vital groups. There was no influence of mode of treatment on the asymptomatic survival of the teeth in the mouth. The median survival times were significantly longer in vital (32.7 +/- 1.4 months) than non-vital teeth (20.4 +/- 3.0 months; p < 0.0001). The only factors significantly influencing the survival of pulpotomized teeth were the age of the patient (p < 0.0001), the non-vitality of the pulp (p < 0.0001) and the presence of a radiolucency (p = 0.031). Both vital and non-vital teeth were able to survive for extended periods following pulpotomy but the presence of an associated radiolucency or a non-vital pulp at the time of treatment is negatively associated with time of survival.

  15. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF "TREATING VITALITY" AND "RESERVING VITALITY"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    "Treating vital ity "and" reserving vital ity"are very important manipulations during acupuncture treatment of diseases. "Treating vitality" comprises adjusting and treating both the acupuncture doctor's and the patient's vitality; while "reserving vitality" demands the acupuncture doctor carefully to experience the sponses, and then perform reducing or reinforcing needling manipulations in accordance with the state of excess- or deficiency- syndrome. "Treating vitality" and "reserving vitality" impenetrate the whole process of acupuncture treatment all along. Through years' clinical practice, the author of the present paper discusses the functions of the two aspects in every stage of acupuncture treatment, including before acupuncture, during needle insertion, during retention and withdrawal of the needle. The purpose of this paper is to explain the clinical significance of treating and reserving vitality and arouse many acupuncture doctors' attention.

  16. Vitalism, purpose and superstition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Saher, Marieke

    2007-02-01

    Developmental studies have shown that children assign purpose to objects more liberally than adults, and that they explain biological processes in terms of vitalistic causality. This study tested the hypothesis that similar misconceptions can be found among superstitious adults. The results from 116 superstitious and 123 sceptical individuals showed that more than sceptics, superstitious individuals attributed purpose to objects, and explained biological processes in terms of organ intentionality and energy transmission. In addition, they thought of energy as a vital force, attributing life and mental properties to it. These conceptual confusions were positively associated to all types of superstitions as well as belief in alternative medicine. The results support the argument that category mistakes and ontological confusions underlie superstitious and vitalistic thinking.

  17. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  18. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  19. Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, H U

    2002-09-01

    Despite all of the medical advances, Babinski sign has proved reliable in precise localization of central nervous system dysfunction. It is well accepted that Babinski sign is indicative of dysfunction of fibers within the pyramidal tract. Joseph François Félix Babinski first described the clinical significance of the reflex in 1896. He showed that the extensor plantar response was indicative of pyramidal dysfunction and that it was absent in hysteria. He also illustrated that it was present in infancy and transiently appeared in epilepsy and strychnine poisoning. Babinski also pointed to the existence of "formes frustes" of his reflex and recognized its occasional absence in patients with other clinical signs of pyramidal lesions. The sign emerges when the dysfunction of the pyramidal tract involves the fibers that project on motoneurons of foot muscles and is mediated by extensor hallucis longus. Babinski sign may not be present acutely after transverse lesions of the spinal cord or acute brain lesions because of temporary inexcitability of spinal motoneurons.

  20. [Lhermitte's sign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moreno, J M; Izquierdo, G

    2002-03-01

    Besides Babinski's, Lhermitte's sign is likely the eponym mostly used in the neurological literature. We review here the history of this eponym as well as recent advances on its pathophysiology and treatment. Lhermitte's phenomenon is, on one hand, a symptom as it is spontaneously explained by patients, and, on the other hand, a sign as it may be triggered by flexion of the nape. Initially described after head and cervical spine trauma, firstly by Marie and then by Babinski, it was Jean Lhermitte who recognized on it an etiological specificity, namely, a demyelinating sign of cervical spinal posterior cords. He also made a pathophysiological interpretation of the phenomenon, namely, a stretching of posterior cords during flexion of the neck. All authors agree that this phenomenon is more common in multiple sclerosis, although it has been descibed in many other conditions. The history of how this sign was hatched, whose pathophysiology remains a mystery, is fascinating. And it is fascinating the fact that patients compare the phenomenon with a current, especially if we bear in mind that few people may have suffered an electrocution, mainly in that time when just a few ones could actually enjoy domestic electricity.

  1. A comparison between vital capacity induction and tidal breathing induction techniques for the induction of anesthesia and compound A production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-jie; LI Yue; SUN Bo; WANG Chang-song; GONG Yu-lei; ZHOU Yan-mei; LI En-you

    2010-01-01

    Background Vital capacity induction and tidal breathing induction are currently administered for inhalation induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane. The aim of this study was to compare them using sevoflurane with respect to induction time,complications of inhalation induction, and compound A production in adult patients.Methods Fifty-one women with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Ⅰ-Ⅱ undergoing mammary gland tumorectomy were randomly assigned to receive either vital capacity induction or tidal breathing induction with 8% sevoflurane at 6 L/min followed by laryngeal mask airway insertion. Induction times, complications of inhalation induction,and vital signs were recorded. Inspired concentrations of compound A were assayed and sofnolime temperatures were monitored at one-minute intervals after sevoflurane administration.Results The time to loss of eyelash reflex was significantly shorter with the vital capacity induction technique than with the tidal breathing induction technique ((43.8±13.4) seconds vs. (70.8±16.4) seconds, respectively; P <0.01).Cardiovascular stability was similar in both groups. The incidence of complications was significantly less with the vital capacity induction technique than with the tidal breathing induction technique (7.7% vs. 32%, respectively; P <0.01).However, the mean and maximum concentrations of compound A during induction were significantly higher in the vital capacity group than those in the tidal breathing group (P <0.05); compound A concentration at the beginning of anesthesia maintenance was (40.73±10.83) ppm in the vital capacity group and (29.45±7.51) ppm in tidal breathing group (P=0.019).Conclusion For inhalation induction of anesthesia, the vital capacity induction was faster and produced fewer complications than that for tidal breathing induction, but increased compound A production in the circuit system.

  2. Human health monitoring technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hyun; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring vital signs from human body is very important to healthcare and medical diagnosis, because they contain valuable information about arterial occlusions, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, autonomous nervous system pathologies, stress level, and obstructive sleep apnea. Existing methods, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) sensor and photoplethysmogram (PPG) sensor, requires direct contact to the skin and it can causes skin irritation and the inconvenience of long-term wearing. For reducing the inconvenience in the conventional sensors, microwave and millimeter-wave sensors have been proposed since 1970s using micro-Doppler effect from one's cardiopulmonary activity. The Doppler radar sensor can remotely detect the respiration and heartbeat up to few meters away from the subject, but they have a multiple subject issue and are not suitable for an ambulatory subject. As a compromise, a noncontact proximity vital sign sensor has been recently proposed and developed. The purpose of this paper is to review the noncontact proximity vital sign sensors for detection of respiration, heartbeat rate, and/or wrist pulse. This sensor basically employs near-field perturbation of radio-frequency (RF) planar resonator due to the proximity of the one's chest or radial artery at the wrist. Various sensing systems based on the SAW filter, phase-locked loop (PLL) synthesizer, reflectometer, and interferometer have been proposed. These self-sustained systems can measure the nearfield perturbation and transform it into DC voltage variation. Consequently, they can detect the respiration and heartbeat rate near the chest of subject and pulse from radial artery at the wrist.

  3. 远红外辐射保温台与婴儿培养箱保暖对早产儿生命体征及体质量的影响%Effect of far-infrared radiation heat preservation and infant incubator to keep warm on the vital signs and body quality of premature infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽妮; 陈慈; 黄巧燕

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of far-infrared radiation heat preservation and infant incu-bator to keep warm on the vital signs and body quality of premature infants.Methods Eighty premature in-fants were chosen who were hospitalized in Shiyan People's Hospital of Baoan District from Jan.2013 to May 2014,and they were randomly divided into two groups:the observation group(40 cases)and the control group(40 cases).Compare the breath,heart rate,milk volume and body quality at different time point of hos-pital stay(on admission,4 d,7 d and 14 d)between the two groups.Results There was no statistical differ-ence in breath and heart rate at different time points(P >0.05).There was no statistical difference in milk volume and body quality on admission between the two groups(P >0.05).After being kept warm by differ-ent methods,the milk volume and body quality in the observation group were significantly higher than the control group on 4 d,7 d and 14 d of admission,and there was statistical difference(P 0.05)。入院时两组患儿奶量及体质量比较差异无统计学意义(P >0.05);入院后经过不同的保暖方式护理,入院4、7、14 d 3个时期观察组奶量及体质量显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论相对于远红外辐射保暖台,婴儿培养箱更适合早产儿保暖护理,可有效提升早产儿呼吸及心率频次,临床效果显著。

  4. Collaborative Processing of Wearable and Ambient Sensor System for Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayuki; Nakamura, Jiro; Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Yamada, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes wireless wearable and ambient sensors that cooperate to monitor a person’s vital signs such as heart rate and blood pressure during daily activities. Each wearable sensor is attached on different parts of the body. The wearable sensors require a high sampling rate and time synchronization to provide a precise analysis of the received signals. The trigger signal for synchronization is provided by the ambient sensors, which detect the user’s presence. The Bluetooth and IEEE 802.15.4 wireless technologies are used for real-time sensing and time synchronization. Thus, this wearable health-monitoring sensor response is closely related to the context in which it is being used. Experimental results indicate that the system simultaneously provides information about the user’s location and vital signs, and the synchronized wearable sensors successfully measures vital signs with a 1 ms resolution. PMID:22163984

  5. Collaborative Processing of Wearable and Ambient Sensor System for Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yamada

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes wireless wearable and ambient sensors that cooperate to monitor a person’s vital signs such as heart rate and blood pressure during daily activities. Each wearable sensor is attached on different parts of the body. The wearable sensors require a high sampling rate and time synchronization to provide a precise analysis of the received signals. The trigger signal for synchronization is provided by the ambient sensors, which detect the user’s presence. The Bluetooth and IEEE 802.15.4 wireless technologies are used for real-time sensing and time synchronization. Thus, this wearable health-monitoring sensor response is closely related to the context in which it is being used. Experimental results indicate that the system simultaneously provides information about the user’s location and vital signs, and the synchronized wearable sensors successfully measures vital signs with a 1 ms resolution.

  6. 基于无线传感网络的可佩戴式生命体征监测系统设计%Design of Wearable Vital Signs Monitoring System Based on Wireless Sensor Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅先进; 杨乐

    2014-01-01

    论文介绍了一种以ATZB-24-A2为核心处理芯片,以ZigBee无线组网技术为通信手段,利用体温、脉搏等传感器实现生命体征测量,并对测量所得生物电信号进行放大、分析、处理、传输,最终实现生命体征数据的中远程无线监测的实现方法.该方法面向单兵的生命体征监测、老年人的看护和医疗机构的生命体监测问题,能够有效弥补传统监测方法上的不足.

  7. Vitalism in naive biological thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S C; Taplin, J E; Gelman, S A

    2000-09-01

    Vitalism is the belief that internal bodily organs have agency and that they transmit or exchange a vital force or energy. Three experiments investigated the use of vitalistic explanations for biological phenomena by 5- and 10-year-old English-speaking children and adults, focusing on 2 components: the notion that bodily organs have intentions and the notion that some life force or energy is transmitted. The original Japanese finding of vitalistic thinking was replicated in Experiment 1 with English-speaking 5-year-olds. Experiment 2 indicated that the more active component of vitalism for these children is a belief in the transfer of energy during biological processes, and Experiment 3 suggested an additional, albeit lesser, role for organ intentionality. A belief in vital energy may serve a causal placeholder function within a naive theory of biology until a more precisely formulated mechanism is known.

  8. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    The shrinking size and weight of electronic circuitry has given rise to a new generation of smart clothing that enables biological data to be measured and transmitted. As the variation in the number and type of deployable devices and sensors increases, technology must allow their seamless integration so they can be electrically powered, operated, and recharged over a digital pathway. Nyx Illuminated Clothing Company has developed a lightweight health monitoring system that integrates medical sensors, electrodes, electrical connections, circuits, and a power supply into a single wearable assembly. The system is comfortable, bendable in three dimensions, durable, waterproof, and washable. The innovation will allow astronaut health monitoring in a variety of real-time scenarios, with data stored in digital memory for later use in a medical database. Potential commercial uses are numerous, as the technology enables medical personnel to noninvasively monitor patient vital signs in a multitude of health care settings and applications.

  9. Towards Proactive Context-Aware Service Selection in the Geographically Distributed Remote Patient Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawar, Pravin; Beijnum, van Bert-Jan; Mei, Hailiang; Hermens, Hermie

    2009-01-01

    In the mobile (M)-health domain, the remote patient monitoring system (RPMS) facilitates continuous collection, transmission and viewing of the patient vital signs data. Furthermore, in case of an emergency it provides context-aware emergency response services (ERSs) such as the doctor, paramedic, a

  10. Signing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    sharp that they cause paper cuts. Stains. If you accidentally spill some food or drink on your clothes, make sure you attempt to remove it as soon as possible and preferably within the same lunar cycle. Some teachers seem to think they should be worn with pride like the stains on a chemistry teacher's white coat. This is a myth. Materials. For scientists continually teaching about the wonder of smart materials, physics teachers are remarkably conservative in their choice of materials for their clothes. Try to break out from the traditional corduroy and tweed and practise what you teach. It is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Steven Chapman Science Year Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science Signing Off takes a humorous and irreverent look at physics education. The views expressed here are those of the author and are not endorsed by the Editorial Board for Physics Education. Can you contribute a zany attitude or humorous anecdote? Please send your offering to ped@iop.org marked Signing Off.

  11. Controversy within Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    1987-01-01

    A review of problems with using such manual communication systems as cued speech, fingerspelling, Signed or Manual English, American Sign Language, and Pidgin Sign provides a rationale for using a combination of American Sign Language and Pidgin Sign and a few markers from Signed English for a Total Communication system. (CB)

  12. Signing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  13. Understanding and Forecasting Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Forecasting of ethnolinguistic vitality can only be done within a well-functioning descriptive and explanatory model of the dynamics of language stability and shift. It is proposed that the Perceived Benefit Model of Language Shift, used with a taxonomy of language shift motivations, provides that model. The model, based on individual language…

  14. Understanding and Forecasting Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Forecasting of ethnolinguistic vitality can only be done within a well-functioning descriptive and explanatory model of the dynamics of language stability and shift. It is proposed that the Perceived Benefit Model of Language Shift, used with a taxonomy of language shift motivations, provides that model. The model, based on individual language…

  15. Vitalism in Naive Biological Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Suzanne C.; Taplin, John E.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Three experiments investigated use of vitalistic explanations for biological phenomena by 5- and 10-year-olds and by adults. Results replicated the original Japanese finding of vitalistic thinking among English-speaking 5-year-olds, identified the more active component of vitalism as a belief in the transfer of energy during biological processes,…

  16. Clinical values and optimal cut-off points of basic vital signs in early identiifcation of critical hand, foot, and mouth disease%基础生命体征对危重型手足口病的早期诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜兴媛; 李英; 邓坤; 温淑媚; 蓝灵利; 侯国祯; 张宝明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical values of basic vital signs in early identiifcation of critical hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). Methods The clinical data of 358 children with severe HFMD [212 cases in stage 2 (central nervous system involvement) and 146 cases in stage 3 (earlier stage of cardiopulmonary failure, critical type)] were reviewed. The diagnostic values of peak temperature and duration of fever, as well as the heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in different age groups, for critical HFMD (stage 3) were analyzed using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results HFMD might progress to critical type in case of HR ≥148.5 beats/minutes, RR ≥36.5 times/minutes, SBP≥95 mm Hg, and DBP≥59 mm Hg among children aged 0-1 year. HR≥142.5 times/minutes, RR≥31.5 times/mintes, SBP≥103 mm Hg, and DBP≥60.5 mm Hg in children aged 1-2 years had a certain diagnostic value for critical HFMD. HFMD might progress to critical type in case of HR ≥139.5 times/minutes, RR ≥29.5 times/minutes, and SBP≥103 mm Hg among children ≥3 years of age. The sensitivity and speciifcity of every indicator were higher than 0.517 and 0.769, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for peak temperature was 0.507 (P=0.816, compared with AUC=0.5). When the duration of fever was≥5.5 days, the sensitivity and speciifcity were 0.589 and 0.571, respectively. Conclusions HR, RR, and BP are good indicators to identify critical HFMD (stage 3) early. The optimal cut-off points conform to the age characteristics of children. DBP in children ≥3 years of age, peak temperature, and duration of fever have a low value in early identiifcation of critical HFMD.%目的:探讨基础生命体征在早期识别危重型手足口病中的诊断价值。方法收集2010年1月至2014年8月358例重症手足口病患儿(2期重型212例,3期危重型146例)的临床资料,

  17. Forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, or inspiratory vital capacity: which is the best measure of vital capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K

    1998-01-01

    Vital capacity can be measured as forced vital capacity (FVC), slow vital capacity (SVC), and inspiratory vital capacity (IVC). Although it is well known that the latter two are generally greater, a systematic comparison of the three in subjects with different degrees of airways obstruction has not been made. Sixty asthmatics and 20 normal subjects performed maneuvers for measurement of FVC, SVC, and IVC on a dry, rolling-seal spirometer. The severity of airways obstruction in asthmatics was classified as mild, moderate, and severe. There was no significant difference between FVC, SVC, and IVC in normal subjects. However, the three measurements of vital capacity were significantly different in all subgroups of asthmatics. FVC was smaller than both SVC and IVC. The differences were more marked in patients with moderate and severe degrees of airways obstruction. The differences between SVC and IVC were small and clinically not important. Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) expressed as percent of FVC, SVC, and IVC, was not different in normals and asthmatics with mild airways obstruction. The ratios were significantly different in asthmatics with moderate and severe airways obstruction. FEV1/IVC ratio was the lowest in both the groups followed by FEV1/SVC and FEV1/FVC. IVC and SVC are greater than FVC in patients with airways obstruction. This difference increases as the degree of obstruction increases. The difference between SVC or IVC and FVC serves as an indicator of air trapping. Both FVC and IVC could be measured and the largest VC used to calculate the FEV1/VC ratio because this increases the sensitivity of spirometry in detecting airways obstruction.

  18. Sign Language Diglossia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokoe, William C., Jr.

    Charles A. Ferguson's concept of "diglossia" (1959, 1964) is used in analyzing sign language. As in Haitian Creole or Swiss German, "two or more varieties" of sign language are "used by the same speakers under different conditions"--these are here called "High" (H) sign language and "Low" (L) sign language. H sign language is formally taught…

  19. Refining the Notion of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that the notion of ethnolinguistic vitality has been used ambiguously in the vitality theory, denoting three distinct theoretical concepts: sustainability (Su), strength (S) and vitality (V). It is hypothesised that sustainability is a group's ability to continue existing as a group while vitality is its ability to act as a…

  20. Professional Vitality: Do You Have It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Tom; Donaldson, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    Examines professional vitality (passion, vigor, facility, and satisfaction) among Maine elementary school principals. Finds three variables related to level of principal vitality: Tenure in the same school (longer tenure results in lower vitality), gender (women have more vitality than men), and support (more faculty and staff support equals…

  1. Physical activity and cognitive vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Voss, Michelle W; Erickson, Kirk I; Kramer, Arthur F

    2015-01-01

    We examine evidence supporting the associations among physical activity (PA), cognitive vitality, neural functioning, and the moderation of these associations by genetic factors. Prospective epidemiological studies provide evidence for PA to be associated with a modest reduction in relative risk of cognitive decline. An evaluation of the PA-cognition link across the life span provides modest support for the effect of PA on preserving and even enhancing cognitive vitality and the associated neural circuitry in older adults, with the majority of benefits seen for tasks that are supported by the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. The literature on children and young adults, however, is in need of well-powered randomized controlled trials. Future directions include a more sophisticated understanding of the dose-response relationship, the integration of genetic and epigenetic approaches, inclusion of multimodal imaging of brain-behavior changes, and finally the design of multimodal interventions that may yield broader improvements in cognitive function.

  2. Plan de mercadeo Vitality Lunch

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Muestra la estructura del plan de mercadeo para la fabricación y comercialización de comidas saludables customizadas para personas que busquen cuidar su salud o para personas que padecen algún tipo de enfermedad que deba ser tratado bajo una dieta alimenticia especial, el plan busca crear la mezcla correcta para dar a conocer, posicionar y comercializar los almuerzos 100% naturales y frescos de Vitality Lunch.

  3. Adapting the "Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test" into American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte J.; Herman, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed…

  4. Predictive monitoring for sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis to prevent shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brynne A; Fairchild, Karen D

    2015-08-01

    Despite vigilant clinical assessment of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), diagnosis of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis often does not occur until an infant has significant hemodynamic compromise. Predictive monitoring involves analysis of vital signs and other clinical data to identify infants at highest risk and to detect early-stage illness, leading to timelier treatment and improved outcomes. The first vital-sign predictive monitoring device developed for sepsis detection in babies in the NICU is the heart rate characteristics index (HeRO) monitor, which continuously analyzes the electrocardiogram signal for low heart rate variability and transient decelerations. Use of this monitor in very low birth weight infants (sepsis and progression to shock, (2) to review efforts toward risk stratification for sepsis shortly after birth based on demographic and physiologic scoring systems, (3) to describe development and implementation of heart rate characteristics monitoring and other important aspects of sepsis early warning systems, and (4) to provide an overview of current research analyzing multiple vital signs and other clinical variables in an attempt to develop even more effective predictive monitoring devices and systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vitality of optical vortices (Presentation)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Roux3_2014.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3018 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Roux3_2014.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Title Vitality of optical vortices F Stef... Roux Presented at Complex Light and Optical Force VIII SPIE Photonics West 2014 Moscone Center, San Francisco, California USA 5 February 2014 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa – p. 1/11 Speckle Amplitude Phase – p. 2/11 Vortex...

  6. Vital phase of space science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, E.N. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Space science began with the indirect phase where the activity in space was inferred from such terrestrial phenomena as geomagnetic storms, ionospheric variations, and fluctuations in the cosmic ray intensity. The direct phase was initiated with spaceflight placing instruments directly in space and permitting the direct observation of UV and X rays, as well as precision observations of solar luminosity variations. The evidence from these many direct studies, together with the historical record of terrestrial conditions, shows that the variations of the luminosity of the Sun affect the terrestrial atmosphere at all levels, with devastating changes in climate tracking the major changes in the activity level and luminosity of the Sun. The quantification and understanding of this vital connection should be the first priority of space science and geophysics, from oceans and atmosphere through the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and all the way to the convective zone of the Sun. It becomes the vital phase of space science, focused on the basic science of the changing habitability of Earth. 13 refs.

  7. Sign Language Tutoring Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Aran, Oya; Benoit, Alexandre; Carrillo, Ana Huerta; Fanard, François-Xavier; Campr, Pavel; Akarun, Lale; Caplier, Alice; Rombaut, Michele; Sankur, Bulent

    2008-01-01

    In this project, we have developed a sign language tutor that lets users learn isolated signs by watching recorded videos and by trying the same signs. The system records the user's video and analyses it. If the sign is recognized, both verbal and animated feedback is given to the user. The system is able to recognize complex signs that involve both hand gestures and head movements and expressions. Our performance tests yield a 99% recognition rate on signs involving only manual gestures and 85% recognition rate on signs that involve both manual and non manual components, such as head movement and facial expressions.

  8. Implantable telemetry capsule for monitoring arterial oxygen saturation and heartbeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, K; Dohi, T; Hashimoto, Y; Matsumoto, K; Shimoyama, I

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have developed an implantable telemetry capsule for monitoring heartbeat. The capsule has three main functions, monitoring vital signs, transmitting the vital signs, and receiving energy for driving the capsule without wires. We used two wavelengths of LEDs and a photodiode sensitive to the two wavelengths for heartbeat sensor. The arterial oxygen saturation is calculated from the amplitude of the heartbeat signal. We fabricated an FM transmitter whose carrier frequency was 80 MHz. Though the GHz range frequency is generally used in transmission, the attenuation in the human body is large. The size of a common linear antenna is about a quarter of its operating wavelength. We employed a coil-based antenna which can reduce size below the quarter of the wavelength. We fabricated a miniaturized transmitter with the coil-based antenna at lower frequency. Our capsule was driven intermittently. We used a rechargeable battery. When the battery ran down, the battery was charged by wireless using the induced electromotive force. This means that the capsule is capable of monitoring vital signs over the long term. We measured the heartbeat from the middle finger of hand in a water tank as a model of a human body.

  9. Vital Stats (Vital Statistics Tables and files- Births, Infant Deaths, Fetal Deaths)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VitalStats: A collection of vital statistics products including tables, data files, and reports that allow users to access and examine vital statistics and...

  10. Automatic sign language identification

    OpenAIRE

    Gebre, B.G.; Wittenburg, P.; Heskes, T.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a Random-Forest based sign language identification system. The system uses low-level visual features and is based on the hypothesis that sign languages have varying distributions of phonemes (hand-shapes, locations and movements). We evaluated the system on two sign languages -- British SL and Greek SL, both taken from a publicly available corpus, called Dicta Sign Corpus. Achieved average F1 scores are about 95% - indicating that sign languages can be identified with high accuracy...

  11. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, James

    2012-08-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some critics of Darwin advocate the teaching of intelligent design theory along with Darwin's theory, and others seek to eliminate even the mention of evolution from science classes altogether. Many of these critics base their objections on the claim that non-living matter cannot give rise to living matter. After considering some of the various meanings assigned to `vitalism' over the years, I argue that a considerable portion of Darwin deniers support a literal version of vitalism that is not scientifically respectable. Their position seems to be that since life cannot arise naturally, Darwin's theory accomplishes nothing: If it can only account for life forms changing from one to another (even this is disputed by some) but not how life arose in the first place, what's the point? I argue that there is every reason to believe that living and non-living matter differ only in degree, not in kind, and that all conversation about Darwinism should start with the assumption that abiogenesis is possible unless or until compelling evidence of its impossibility is presented. That is, I advocate a position that the burden of proof lies with those who claim "Life only comes from life." Until that case is made, little weight should be given to their position.

  12. 46 CFR 169.642 - Vital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vital systems. 169.642 Section 169.642 Shipping COAST... Electrical Piping Systems § 169.642 Vital systems. For the purpose of this part, the following are considered vital systems— (a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival...

  13. Vitalism, complexity and the concept of spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, L R

    2002-01-01

    Vital Force is a concept that has suffered at the hands of the current medical model. An attempt is made to show how it might be possible to explain Vital Force in terms of complexity theory. A metaphor is introduced for the operation of Vital Force in terms of gyroscopic motion.

  14. Monitoring air quality in Southeast Alaska’s National Parks and Forests: Linking atmospheric pollutants with ecological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Schirokauer; L. Geiser; A. Bytnerowicz; M. Fenn; K. Dillman

    2014-01-01

    Air quality and air quality related values are important resources to the National Park Service (NPS) units and Wilderness areas in northern Southeast Alaska. Air quality monitoring was prioritized as a high-priority Vital Sign at the Southeast Alaska Network’s (SEAN) Inventory and Monitoring Program’s terrestrial scoping workshop (Derr and Fastie 2006). Air quality...

  15. Warning Signs of Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to talk to kids about bullying. Respond to Bullying Learn how to respond to bullying . From stopping ... Text Size: A A A Warning Signs for Bullying There are many warning signs that may indicate ...

  16. Clarence Cannon Sign Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Clarence Cannon Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is given as well as a list...

  17. Signed languages and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddinga, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf people who form part of a Deaf community communicate using a shared sign language. When meeting people from another language community, they can fall back on a flexible and highly context-dependent form of communication called international sign, in which shared elements from their own sign

  18. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  19. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  20. [Computerizing the radiological sign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaud, V; Belhadj, I; Dameron, O; Garcelon, N; Hendaoui, L; Marin, F; Duvauferrier, R

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article is to present to the radiologist the different theories of the sign and their consequences for sign representation in computer systems. All the theories of the sign are presented, but the most relevant are highlighted in order to explain the great modeling systems currently in use (such as DICOM-SR or the UMLS). The constructivist approach of the notion of disease, the semiosis process, which starting from signs produces new signs, and the structuralist analysis of sign through language are emphasized. The purpose of this analysis is to end up with a consensual representation of the sign that can be understood by human beings and processed by machines. Such a representation, also known as an ontology, is based on a semantic organization of language, thus allowing medicine to become a truly scientific discipline. It aims at disambiguating the symbols given to machines, which will help us in our reasoning.

  1. Approaching Sign Language Test Construction: Adaptation of the German Sign Language Receptive Skills Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    There is a current need for reliable and valid test instruments in different countries in order to monitor deaf children's sign language acquisition. However, very few tests are commercially available that offer strong evidence for their psychometric properties. A German Sign Language (DGS) test focusing on linguistic structures that are acquired…

  2. Maintaining control is team's vital role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Liz; Frankel, Chris; Johns, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    In an environment where there is an ever-increasing use of reliable electronic control, it is easy to become complacent about the need for in-depth knowledge of how the controls actually work. After all, experts who can diagnose and fix such systems are only a phone call away, and a new unit can easily be fitted. Sometimes this is not the case at Bendigo Health, as we have a number of systems with a "black box" set of controls that can take days, or weeks, to fix, and cannot be fixed locally. To better manage and maintain our infrastructure, the Buildings & Infrastructure Department at Bendigo Health includes a number of employees who concentrate on building management systems (BMS). The BMS group plays a vital role in the complete lifecycle of projects that include control and monitoring of the plant within the hospital setting. A good example of this role was in the design, build, installation and commissioning, of two new negative pressure suites at Bendigo Health. The BMS group's involvement in this particular project included the door interlocking, the air conditioning and exhaust fan control, and a comprehensive alarm panel and overrides, all of which can be monitored centrally via the existing BMS system. The involvement of the BMS group, following the DHS guidelines, resulted in the architect and consulting engineers revisiting their designs and improving them to the benefit of both patient care and staff safety. The advantages of projects such as the negative pressure suites installed by the BMS group include the fact that that the hospital gains facilities that work correctly and according to industry guidelines; and the design, installation, and controls of the plant are understood by the people who will be maintaining the infrastructure. This paper will provide an overview of the work undertaken by the BMS group at Bendigo Health, using the negative pressure suites as an exemplar.

  3. Linking physical monitoring to coho and Chinook salmon populations in the Redwood Creek Watershed, California—Summary of May 3–4, 2012 Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, Mary Ann; Torregrosa, Alicia; Woodward, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    On Thursday, May 3, 2012, a science workshop was held at the Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP) office in Arcata, California, with researchers and resource managers working in RNSP to share data and expert opinions concerning salmon populations and habitat in the Redwood Creek watershed. The focus of the workshop was to discuss how best to synthesize physical and biological data related to the freshwater and estuarine phases of salmon life cycles in order to increase the understanding of constraints on salmon populations. The workshop was hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Status and Trends (S&T) Program National Park Monitoring Project (http://www.fort.usgs.gov/brdscience/ParkMonitoring.htm), which supports USGS research on priority topics (themes) identified by the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program (I&M) and S&T. The NPS has organized more than 270 parks with significant natural resources into 32 Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Networks (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/networks.cfm) that share funding and core professional staff to monitor the status and long-term trends of selected natural resources (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor). All 32 networks have completed vital signs monitoring plans (available at http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor/MonitoringPlans.cfm), containing background information on the important resources of each park, conceptual models behind the selection of vital signs for monitoring the condition of natural resources, and the selection of high priority vital signs for monitoring. Vital signs are particular physical, chemical, and biological elements and processes of park ecosystems that represent the overall health or condition of the park, known or hypothesized effects of stressors, or elements that have important human values (Fancy and others, 2009). Beginning in 2009, the I&M program funded projects to analyze and synthesize the biotic and abiotic data generated by vital signs

  4. Vital soil; function, value and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, P.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Healthy soil, with active soil life, deters long-term soil degradation and ensures that geo-physical processes are undisturbed. Is the vitality of soil under threat due to human civilization? Or is it due to contamination, intensification, and deforestation? Vital Soil aims to look at the effects so

  5. Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article is a review of the book, Vital Soil: Function, Value and Properties. Soil vitality has been defined as the ability of soil ecosystems to stay in balance in a changing world. The soil environment and the life that it supports developed over centuries and millennia, but careless human ac...

  6. Vital exhaustion and risk for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Prescott, Eva;

    2005-01-01

    Vital exhaustion, defined as feelings of depression and fatigue, has previously been investigated mainly as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The authors investigated the association between depressive feelings and fatigue as covered by the concept of vital exhaustion and the risk...

  7. Vital soil; function, value and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, P.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Healthy soil, with active soil life, deters long-term soil degradation and ensures that geo-physical processes are undisturbed. Is the vitality of soil under threat due to human civilization? Or is it due to contamination, intensification, and deforestation? Vital Soil aims to look at the effects

  8. The sandwich sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Mahomed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The sandwich sign refers to the sandwiching of mesenteric vessels and fat by enlarged mesenteric nodes on cross-sectional imaging, commonly occurring in lymphoma, but not specific to lymphoma. The sign is radiologically indistinguishable from post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders. The radiological significance of the sandwich sign is in suggesting the diagnosis of lymphoma so that appropriate treatment may be initiated early as the tumour has a rapid growth pattern.

  9. Traffic Signs Inventory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ružbarský

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on practical application of Cambridge Correlator. The goal is to propose a traffic signs inventory system by using excellent characteristics of correlator in the rapid optical correlation. The proposal of this inventory system includes obtaining of traffic signs to create the database either collecting the GPS coordinates. It is necessary to know the traffic signs position and also to document the entire surface route for later evaluation in offline mode.

  10. The Forbidden Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    is an important addition that offers insight into the hardware requirements for bio-semiosis. As any type of semiosis must be dependent upon Semiotic scaffolds, I recently argued that the process of semiosis has to be divided into two separate processes of sign establishment and sign interpretation....... I also show that biological semiosis offers examples of forbidden signs, where the faulty interpretation of signs may lead to decimation of whole evolutionary lines of organisms. A new concept of Evolutionary memory which is applicable to both human and biological semiosis is explained...

  11. Direct anterior composite veneers in vital and non-vital teeth: A retrospective clinical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelho-de-Souza, F.H.; Goncalves, D.S.; Sales, M.P.; Erhardt, M.C.; Correa, M.B.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Demarco, F.F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This retrospective, longitudinal clinical study investigated the performance of direct veneers using different composites (microfilledxuniversal) in vital or non-vital anterior teeth. METHODS: Records from 86 patients were retrieved from a Dental School clinic, comprising 196 direct vene

  12. Coherent national IT infrastructure for telehomecare - a case of hypertension measurement, treatment and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben; Hoffmann-Petersen, Nikolai; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is affecting almost 20% of the population in many countries. Monitoring and treatment is critical. Mobile, wireless hypertension measurement - as other vital signs - is breaking through but require substantial organisational engineering and management of technology at its best. Well...... defined general repositories eases citizen and professional access to data. By identifying potential datastorage options, and by using a common public infrastructure for making healthcare data secured and available, telehomecare can be realized and barriers between different entities of the healthcare...

  13. Using physiological monitoring data for performance feedback: an initiative using thermoregulation metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görges, Matthias; West, Nicholas C; Whyte, Simon D

    2017-03-01

    Feedback of performance data can improve professional practice and outcomes. Vital signs are not routinely used for quality improvement because of their limited access. Intraoperative hypothermia has been associated with deleterious effects, including surgical site infections and bleeding. We speculated that providing feedback could help keep temperature monitoring and management a priority in the anesthesiologist's mind, thereby improving perioperative temperature management. We hypothesized that feedback on thermoregulation metrics, without changes in policy, could reduce temperature-monitoring delays at the start of scoliosis correction surgery. Although our tertiary pediatric centre does not have an anesthesia information management system, vital signs for all surgical cases are recorded in real time. Temperature data from children undergoing spine surgery are extracted from a vital signs databank and analyzed using MATLAB. Spine team anesthesiologists are provided with both team and individualized feedback regarding two variables: the percentage of time that patients are hypothermic and the time delay from the start of the case to the first temperature monitoring (our primary outcome). These data are shared every six months as run charts for the entire group and as anonymized (coded) box-and-whisker plots for each anesthesiologist. This feedback of temperature-delay data reduced the median [interquartile range] delay from 39.0 [18.7-61.5] min to 14.4 [10.8-22.9] min (median reduction, 21.8 min; 95% confidence interval, 14.9 to 28.2; P thermoregulation management improved both group and individual performances as measured by significant, sustained reductions in temperature-monitoring delays. Thus, intraoperative vital signs data may improve the quality of, and reduce the variability in, anesthetic practice.

  14. Adapting the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test into American sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte J; Herman, Rosalind C

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed language skills. Although researchers have developed some checklists and experimental tests related to American Sign Language (ASL) assessment, at this time a standardized measure of ASL does not exist. There have been tests developed in other signed languages, for example, British Sign Language, that can serve as models in this area. The purpose of this study was to adapt the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test for use in ASL in order to begin the process of developing a standardized measure of ASL skills. The results suggest that collaboration between researchers in different signed languages can provide a valuable contribution toward filling the gap in the area of signed language assessment.

  15. Does Ethnolinguistic Vitality Theory Account for the Actual Vitality of Ethnic Groups? A Critical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, Kutlay

    2011-01-01

    Ethnolinguistic vitality theory asserts that Status, Demographic, Institutional Support and Control factors make up the vitality of ethnolinguistic groups. An assessment of a group's strengths and weaknesses in each of these dimensions provides a rough classification of ethnolinguistic groups into those having low, medium, or high vitality. Low…

  16. 46 CFR 119.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 119.710 Section 119.710... Piping Systems § 119.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems are those systems that are vital to...-vital system. (c) Piping used in a vital system must meet § 56.60 in subchapter F of this...

  17. British Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Jim; Woll, Bencie

    1981-01-01

    The author reports on the use of British Sign Language in the United Kingdom and dispels some myths that surround the language. It is pointed out that there is a low level of interest in deaf people and their method of communication. Research needs in the area of sign language systems are briefly considered. (SB)

  18. Sign Language Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Describes Sign in Education, a pilot program in the United Kingdom that integrated Deaf children and hearing children in a hearing classroom with a culturally Deaf teacher who taught the national curriculum in British Sign Language one afternoon a week. Explores the advantage to the Deaf community, as well as the majority culture of adopting such…

  19. Completely random signed measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar

    Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases.......Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases....

  20. Standardization of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  1. Forms of vitality play in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Español, Silvia; Martínez, Mauricio; Bordoni, Mariana; Camarasa, Rosario; Carretero, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative study based on the constant comparative method to initiate the systematic study of forms of vitality play. This is an unnoticed non-figurative play frame linked to early social play and temporal arts in which child and adult elaborate the dynamics of their own movements and sounds in a repetition-variation form. In the introduction we present the theoretical underpinnings and the sporadic observations we have done in previous studies. Then, by the iterative observations of the recorded material of a longitudinal case study on play during the third year of life, we generated the general category of forms of vitality play and four subcategories of display modes of forms of vitality play (improvised forms of vitality play, ritualized forms of vitality play, forms of vitality play combined with pretend play, and forms of vitality play combined with role playing) which are illustrated with descriptive narratives. We discuss the properties of the developed categories, the limits of the present study, and the need to continue systematizing the research on this playful activity.

  2. Artefactual stripe sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, J. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, (Australia)

    1997-09-01

    Full text: The stripe sign consist of `the presence on the perfusion image of a VQ lung scan of a stripe of perfused lung tissue between a perfusion defect and the adjacent pleural surface`. In the revised PIOPED criteria, it is predictive of the absence of pulmonary embolism in the area of the sign. This case study involved a 71-year-old woman who presented with left-sided pleuritic chest pain. The perfusion lung scan demonstrated a perfusion defect involving the left posterior and superior basal segments with an associated stripe sign. A repeat LPO view at a more posterior angle and tomography of the lungs failed to demonstrate the stripe. In this case, the stripe sign was an artefact, perhaps `shine through` from the underlying lung. This evidence suggests that before the stripe sign is used to diagnose a patient, it should be apparent on at least two views of differing angles or on tomography.

  3. Fiber optic based multiparametric spectroscopy in vivo: Toward a new quantitative tissue vitality index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutai-Asis, Hofit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Deutsch, Assaf; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2006-02-01

    In our previous publication (Mayevsky et al SPIE 5326: 98-105, 2004) we described a multiparametric fiber optic system enabling the evaluation of 4 physiological parameters as indicators of tissue vitality. Since the correlation between the various parameters may differ in various pathophysiological conditions there is a need for an objective quantitative index that will integrate the relative changes measured in real time by the multiparametric monitoring system into a single number-vitality index. Such an approach to calculate tissue vitality index is critical for the possibility to use such an instrument in clinical environments. In the current presentation we are reporting our preliminary results indicating that calculation of an objective tissue vitality index is feasible. We used an intuitive empirical approach based on the comparison between the calculated index by the computer and the subjective evaluation made by an expert in the field of physiological monitoring. We used the in vivo brain of rats as an animal model in our current studies. The rats were exposed to anoxia, ischemia and cortical spreading depression and the responses were recorded in real time. At the end of the monitoring session the results were analyzed and the tissue vitality index was calculated offline. Mitochondrial NADH, tissue blood flow and oxy-hemoglobin were used to calculate the vitality index of the brain in vivo, where each parameter received a different weight, in each experiment type based on their significance. It was found that the mitochondrial NADH response was the main factor affected the calculated vitality index.

  4. Impaired vitality form recognition in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Magali J; Veroni, Vania; Bruschweiler-Stern, Nadia; Pieraccini, Cinzia; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Barthélémy, Catherine; Malvy, Joëlle; Sinigaglia, Corrado; Stern, Daniel N; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2013-08-01

    Along with the understanding of the goal of an action ("what" is done) and the intention underlying it ("why" it is done), social interactions largely depend on the appraisal of the action from the dynamics of the movement: "how" it is performed (its "vitality form"). Do individuals with autism, especially children, possess this capacity? Here we show that, unlike typically developing individuals, individuals with autism reveal severe deficits in recognizing vitality forms, and their capacity to appraise them does not improve with age. Deficit in vitality form recognition appears, therefore, to be a newly recognized trait marker of autism.

  5. Vitalism and vital normativeness: Hahnemann and Canguilhem Vitalismo y normatividad vital: Hahnemann and Canguilhem Vitalismo e normatividade vital: Hahnemann and Canguilhem

    OpenAIRE

    Luz,Madel T; Denise Scofano

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reviews Vitalism as the basis for S. Hahnemann’s initial formulation of Homeopathy through the lens of the notions of Vitalism and vital normativeness formulated in the 20th century by French physician and historian of science Georges Canguilhem. Hahnemann described disease as a disarrangement of the organism as a whole, carrying the mark of the individual affected. Similarly, Canguilhem stated that symptoms only have meaning within their specific context and express...

  6. Monitoring vital instability in patients outside high care facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, K. van

    2017-01-01

    Complications that are associated with surgery and hospitalization cannot be entirely ruled out. To prevent patients from experiencing addi­tional harm, it is essential that complications during hospitalization are recognized and treated adequately. A patient’s respiratory sta­tus can provide us wit

  7. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) Mortality data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 to 2013. NVSS is a secure, web-based data management system that collects and disseminates the Nation's official vital statistics. Data for this dataset has...

  8. Vital directions for mathematics education research

    CERN Document Server

    Leatham, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    In this book, experts discuss vital issues in mathematics education and what they see as viable directions for research in mathematics education to address them. Their recommendations take the form of overarching principles and ideas that cut across the field.

  9. Vitality and storage condition of Syringa pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOULi; LUOFeng-xia; DAILi-min; ZHANGHui-hua

    2003-01-01

    The fresh pollen vitality,the effect of different storage conditions on the pollen vitality,and the difference of vitality among the species of seven species of Syringa were determined in Shenyang,China.The results indicated that the pollen vitality (81.5%) of Syringa villosa was the highest among the seven tested species,followed by S.microphylla and S.meyeri,and that of S.oblata var.affinis was the lowest.The low temperature was the best condition for storage of pollen of Syringa,and the most proper temperature for the storage was 0-2℃.The storability of S.microphylla was the best of all,and it could be stored over 60 days at the temperature of 0-2℃,next was S.villosa and S.meyeri.

  10. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  11. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings.

  12. Vital Signs Changes in Post-Operative Corrective Surgery for Cyanotic and Noncyanotic Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Amoozegar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post open cardiac surgery is associated with rises in fever, blood pressure and heart rate. The objective of the present study was to determine the changes in temperature, blood pressure and heart rate in first week after open cardiac surgery of non-complicated cyanotic and noncyanotic congenital heart diseases.Patients and Methods: Temperature, blood pressure and heart rate were obtained from 100 patients with different congenital heart disease after open cardiac surgery. The patients divided in two groups, 40 cyanotic CHD and 60 noncyanotic CHD.Result: Half of patients had fever in first day after surgery. Cyanotic patients became afebrile earlier than noncyanotic group. Cyanotic patients had higher heart rate and lower blood pressure than noncyanotic group.Conclusion: The study suggests that post open heart surgery body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate are different in patients with cyanotic and non cyanotic congenital heart diseases.

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multi-drug resistant pseudomonas, and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter . Progress has been made in preventing HAIs, including a 50% decrease in central line-associated blood stream infections from 2008 to 2014, but more work is ...

  14. Vital signs: melanoma incidence and mortality trends and projections - United States, 1982-2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Gery P; Thomas, Cheryll C; Thompson, Trevor; Watson, Meg; Massetti, Greta M; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-06-05

    Melanoma incidence rates have continued to increase in the United States, and risk behaviors remain high. Melanoma is responsible for the most skin cancer deaths, with about 9,000 persons dying from it each year. CDC analyzed current (2011) melanoma incidence and mortality data, and projected melanoma incidence, mortality, and the cost of treating newly diagnosed melanomas through 2030. Finally, CDC estimated the potential melanoma cases and costs averted through 2030 if a comprehensive skin cancer prevention program was implemented in the United States. In 2011, the melanoma incidence rate was 19.7 per 100,000, and the death rate was 2.7 per 100,000. Incidence rates are projected to increase for white males and females through 2019. Death rates are projected to remain stable. The annual cost of treating newly diagnosed melanomas was estimated to increase from $457 million in 2011 to $1.6 billion in 2030. Implementation of a comprehensive skin cancer prevention program was estimated to avert 230,000 melanoma cases and $2.7 billion in initial year treatment costs from 2020 through 2030. If additional prevention efforts are not undertaken, the number of melanoma cases is projected to increase over the next 15 years, with accompanying increases in health care costs. Much of this morbidity, mortality, and health care cost can be prevented. Substantial reductions in melanoma incidence, mortality, and cost can be achieved if evidence-based comprehensive interventions that reduce ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure and increase sun protection are fully implemented and sustained.

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... had at least one patient with a CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) infection during the first half of ... almost all antibiotics, including last-resort drugs called carbapenems. These resistant germs are called CRE. Almost all ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Blood Pressure Control -- Helping Patients Take Their Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ISPOR medication adherence and persistence special interest group. Journal of Behavioral Medicine – Blood pressure outcomes of medication adherence interventions: systematic review and ...

  17. Customer service, access and capacity: vital signs for developing a marketing plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendycki, N; Zeroske, J

    1994-01-01

    Marketing plans that do not include an analysis of customer service, access and capacity issues are incomplete documents. Unresolved customer service, access and capacity issues can undermine an otherwise well-designed marketing plan. The medical and administrative leadership of the group practice or clinical department must work together to identify customer service, access and capacity issues which are affecting the practice's ability to respond to the needs of the marketplace. Someone with marketing expertise can provide valuable input to this process. The resulting solutions need to be developed which are realistic and in keeping with the general marketing direction of the practice.

  18. Sleep stage classification by non-contact vital signs indices using Doppler radar sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Suzumura, Kazuki; Matsui, Takemi

    2016-08-01

    Disturbed sleep has become more common in recent years. To improve the quality of sleep, undergoing sleep observation has gained interest as a means to resolve possible problems. In this paper, we evaluate a non-restrictive and non-contact method for classifying real-time sleep stages and report on its potential applications. The proposed system measures heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body movements, and respiratory signals of a sleeping person using two 24-GHz microwave radars placed beneath the mattress. We introduce a method that dynamically selects the window width of the moving average filter to extract the pulse waves from the radar output signals. The Pearson correlation coefficient between two HR measurements derived from the radars overnight, and the reference polysomnography was the average of 88.3% and the correlation coefficient for HRV parameters was the average of 71.2%. For identifying wake and sleep periods, the body-movement index reached sensitivity of 76.0%, and a specificity of 77.0% with 10 participants. Low-frequency (LF) components of HRV and the LF/HF ratio had a high degree of contribution and differed significantly across the three sleep stages (REM, LIGHT, and DEEP; p sleep stages (p > 0.05). We applied a canonical discriminant analysis to identify wake or sleep periods and to classify the three sleep stages with leave-one-out cross validation. Classification accuracy was 66.4% for simply identifying wake and sleep, 57.1% for three stages (wake, REM, and NREM) and 34% for four stages (wake, REM, LIGHT, and DEEP). This is a novel system for measuring HRs, HRV, body movements, and respiratory intervals and for measuring high sensitivity pulse waves using two radar signals. It simplifies measurement of sleep stages and may be employed at nursing care facilities or by the general public to improve sleep quality.

  19. Investigation of Sternal Photoplethysmography – Design of a Vital Sign Patch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chreiteh, Shadi

    %). In the second study, sternal PPG recording was conducted from 30 admitted patients with either asthma or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). We compared the SpO2 levels simultaneously obtained from the sternal PPG recording and a conventional finger pulse oximeter. The Pearson correlation between...... to 36 breaths/min the Pearson correlation was 0.93 (p

  20. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs Identified Patients with Substantial Bleeding Prior to Hospital Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    threatening bleeding may be effectively treated when surgery and blood resuscitation are provided sufficiently quickly after injury [1, 2]. Standard...survive. Protocols for substantial bleeding , typically activated after the patient’s arrival in a hospital, are known to improve trauma outcomes. Early...

  1. Effects of prayer on the vital signs of patients with chronic kidney disease: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Thaila Oliveira Zatiti; Prado, Andressa Anunciação de Oliveira; Assis, Bianca Bacelar de; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Lima, Rogério Silva; Chaves, Erika de Cassia Lopes

    2017-07-20

    To assess the effect of prayer on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in patients with chronic kidney disease and learn their perception of the intervention. A randomized controlledtrial, double blind with a sample of volunteers, randomized into an intervention group (n=42) and a control group (n=37). Questionnaires addressing socio-demographic, clinical and spiritual characteristics and the Duke University Religious Index were applied. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were measured. The prayer was conducted at three different moments on alternating weeks. The qualitative data were organized and analyzed through Thematic Analysis. The sample consisted of 95 randomized volunteers. In the intra-group analysis, a statistically significant reduction (Pvalores de pressão arterial, frequência cardíaca e respiratória em todas as análises das pessoas que receberam a prece. Aanálise qualitativa resultou nos temasA Prece em um "Lugar de Sofrimento" e Avaliação Positiva e nos subtemas Alívio do Sofrimento, Esperança de Superação, Enfrentamento do Tratamento Hemodialítico. A prece reduziu os valores da pressão arterial, frequência cardíaca e respiratória de pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica e a avaliação dos voluntários em relação à intervenção foi positiva. Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clínicos: RBR-2zv39y.

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking a Serious, Under-Recognized Problem Among Women and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can seriously affect the health of women and girls. Drinking too much can seriously affect the health ... those recommended by the Community Guide. Women and girls can Avoid binge drinking. If you choose to ...

  3. The Use of Postural Vital Signs in the Assessment of Fluid Volume Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Jane Corrigan

    1990-01-01

    Blood pressure and pulse are measured in supine and upright positions, and certain differences between the values are said to indicate fluid volume disturbance. Most discussions of this "orthostatic test" do not explain how it should be done, and they differ from what has been observed in a practice setting. (MLW)

  4. Building a Data-Driven Vital Sign Indicator for an Economically Optimized Component Replacement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Jardine & Tsang, 2013). The optimization of replacement decision policy based on component failure predictions has been critical in the area of...PROGNOSTICS AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT SOCIETY 2014 2 (Banjevic, Jardine , Makis, & Ennis, 2001)( Jardine , Banjevic, Montgomery, & Pak, 2008). In practice, the...of the American Statistical Association, 101(473). Banjevic, D., Jardine , A., Makis, V., & Ennis, M. (2001). A control-limit policy and software for

  5. Vital Signs – Presión arterial alta (High Blood Pressure)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    En los EE. UU. casi un tercio de la población adulta tiene presión arterial alta, el principal factor de riesgo de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares, dos de las principales causas de muerte en el país.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  6. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2011-12: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. APPA's Information and Research Committee's goal for this year was to enhance the…

  7. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2012-13: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This paper features an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. "The Facilities Performance Indicators Report" is designed for survey…

  8. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in higher education, offering: the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index; statistics that measure racial inequality; states in which black college enrollments are expected to grow over the next 15 years; and differences among the states in their percentages of low-income…

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kit Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Problem Children aren't Eating Enough Fruit or Vegetables Children are eating more fruit but not enough. ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 26% fewer of these deadly diarrheal infections. These antibiotics include fluoroquinolones, β-lactams with β−lactamase inhibitors, and extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Patients getting powerful antibiotics that treat a broad range of infections are ...

  11. Vital Signs: Preparing for Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus--United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Widespread Zika virus transmission in the Region of the Americas since 2015 has heightened the urgency of preparing for the possibility of expansion of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus during the 2016 mosquito season. CDC and other U.S. government agencies have been working with state and local government partners on prevention and early detection of Zika virus infection and will increase these activities during April as part of their preparation for the anticipated emergence of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus in the continental United States.

  12. Influence on Calculated Blood Pressure of Measurement Posture for the Development of Wearable Vital Sign Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhei Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a wearable blood pressure sensor using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor, which is a highly accurate strain sensor. This sensor is installed at the pulsation point of the human body to measure the pulse wave signal. A calibration curve is built that calculates the blood pressure by multivariate analysis using the pulse wave signal and a reference blood pressure measurement. However, if the measurement height of the FBG sensor is different from the reference measurement height, an error is included in the reference blood pressure. We verified the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation with respect to the measurement height difference and the posture of the subject. As the difference between the measurement height of the FBG sensor and the reference blood pressure measurement increased, the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation decreased. When the measurement height was identical and only posture was changed, good accuracy was achieved. In addition, when calibration curves were built using data measured in multiple postures, the blood pressure of each posture could be calculated from a single calibration curve. This will allow miniaturization of the necessary electronics of the sensor system, which is important for a wearable sensor.

  13. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2010-11: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    APPA's Information and Research Committee's goal for this year was to enhance the survey and report tools by making them both more navigable, user friendly, and accurate. Significant progress has been made with all of these initiatives. APPA also automated many of the internal processes for the survey and report, which resulted in a…

  14. Patient Prognosis from Vital Sign Time Series: Combining Convolutional Neural Networks with a Dynamical Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Li-wei; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Snoek, Jasper; Nemati, Shamim

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a stacked switching vector-autoregressive (SVAR)-CNN architecture to model the changing dynamics in physiological time series for patient prognosis. The SVAR-layer extracts dynamical features (or modes) from the time-series, which are then fed into the CNN-layer to extract higher-level features representative of transition patterns among the dynamical modes. We evaluate our approach using 8-hours of minute-by-minute mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from over 450 patients in the MIMIC-II database. We modeled the time-series using a third-order SVAR process with 20 modes, resulting in first-level dynamical features of size 20×480 per patient. A fully connected CNN is then used to learn hierarchical features from these inputs, and to predict hospital mortality. The combined CNN/SVAR approach using BP time-series achieved a median and interquartile-range AUC of 0.74 [0.69, 0.75], significantly outperforming CNN-alone (0.54 [0.46, 0.59]), and SVAR-alone with logistic regression (0.69 [0.65, 0.72]). Our results indicate that including an SVAR layer improves the ability of CNNs to classify nonlinear and nonstationary time-series. PMID:27790623

  15. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meet our Partners How to Get Involved Donate Dermatomyositis (DM) Share print email share facebook twitter google ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? For many decades, DM was considered “ polymyositis with ...

  16. Signs of Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Signs of Overload Page Content Article Body Although stress is a ... 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  17. Pertussis Signs & Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs) Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... not for as long as 3 weeks. Early Symptoms In those who have been vaccinated: In most ...

  18. The Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M; Reilly, Mary M

    2011-10-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932), a French neurologist of Polish descent, was the first person to describe extension of the big toe following stimulation of the sole of the foot on 22 February 1896 (Babinski, 1896). He referred to the sign as 'phénomène des orteils' (toes phenomenon) but it is now usually referred to eponymously as the 'Babinski sign' or descriptively as the extensor plantar response.

  19. CONTEMPOPARY VIEWS TO SIGN LANGUAGE OF HEARING IMPAIRED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojka TATAREVA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The place of the sign language in education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden.Hearing impaired people ought to have a possibility of access to vital information, so they can move step by step, to live as useful members of society.Sign language is nonverbal communication which appears as a kind of compensation of the language lack, a means of development of that activity an opinion of unlimited human communicative nature.Mimic sign language in the system of education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden take a primary place. The school with Hearing impaired children are bilingual. In the schools sign language is taken as a training language and it is available to every child.Contemporary views and practice tell us that teaching of hearing impaired children with sign language is more effective and more available.

  20. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution a key policy `tool' used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice, is analysed using a form of reflexive monitoring and evaluation. The example focuses on a multi-stakeholder learning process around the transformation of a somewhat sterile pre-school playground into an intergenerational green place suitable for play, discovery and engagement. Our analysis of the policy-framework and the case leads us to pointing out the importance of critical interventions at so-called tipping points within the transformation process and a discussion of the potential of hybrid learning in vital coalitions in strengthening ecological mindfulness. This paper does not focus on establishing an evidence base for the causality between this type of learning and a change in behavior or mindfulness among participants as a result contributing to a vital coalition but rather focusses on the conditions, processes and interventions that allow for such learning to take place in the first place.

  1. Skin wounds vitality markers in forensic pathology: An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, Jean-Matthieu; Martrille, Laurent; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Gauchotte, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Wound age evaluation is one of the most challenging issues in forensic pathology. In the first minutes or hours, standard histological examination may not determine whether the wound was inflicted in the pre- or post-mortem period. While red blood cell infiltration is classically considered as a sign of vital reaction, several studies have shown that extravasation of blood cells may also occur after death and cannot be used as a reliable marker in the diagnosis of wound vitality. Numerous studies about wound vitality are available in the literature. They have evaluated markers involved in coagulation or inflammation, using various methods such as enzymology, molecular biology or immunohistochemistry. In this update, we first introduce some methodological principles. Then, we review the main studies available in the literature. Immunohistochemistry seems to be the most valuable method, given its easy application and the possibility to analyse the localization of the molecules of interest. Some markers are promising, such as CD15, TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β, TGFα or TGFβ1. Prior to their application in daily practice, these early results need to be confirmed with other studies, conducted by independent teams and integrating multiple controls. Most notably, the antibodies have to be tested in numerous post-mortem wounds. Indeed, a critical risk of overexpression in post-mortem wounds is present. Some promising markers have been later invalidated because of post-mortem false positivity. Finally, optimal sensitivity and specificity values could probably be reached by combining several markers, validated by large groups of pre- and post-mortem wounds.

  2. 46 CFR 182.710 - Piping for vital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for vital systems. 182.710 Section 182.710... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Piping Systems § 182.710 Piping for vital systems. (a) Vital systems are... section is a non-vital system. (c) Piping used in a vital system must: (1) Be composed of...

  3. An Examination of the Validity of the Subjective Vitality Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jessica R.; Barker, Valerie; Giles, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The concept of group "vitality" was developed over 30 years ago to assist in understanding of power relations between language groups. However, vitality has also been an important consideration when attempting to understand intergroup relations more generally. Vitality researchers distinguish "subjective" vitality from "objective" vitality. This…

  4. Vitality and time course of wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M

    2004-09-10

    The term "wound" describes the morphologic-functional disruption of the continuity of a tissue structure. A wound can be inflicted during life--when the cardiovascular and respiratory system is still intact--or after death, i.e. after cardiac and respiratory arrest. Traumatization during life triggers vital reactions that do not occur in postmortem wounds. Three types of vital reactions in wound healing can be distinguished: Reactions of the scavenger type, which are almost exclusively mediated by blood cells. Reactions by complex signal transduction pathways, which involves cascade-like release of chemokines, cytokines and adhesion molecules and may influence type 1 and type 3 reactions. Reactions of the scarring type, which involve the final repair of the damaged tissue and are carried out primarily by cells residing at the wound edges, i.e. partly concerning mesenchymal cells and partly tissue-specific cells dependent on the involved organ system. The three different types of reaction follow roughly parallel temporal courses that include cascade-like interactions among themselves. Whereas demonstration of a vital reaction suffices to differentiate an intravital wound from a postmortem wound, the vital reactions themselves follow strictly temporal courses. The regular time-dependent occurrence of each phenomenon allows--in limits--a reliable temporal classification of wound healing. A review will be given especially demonstrating the actual German scientific research in vitality and in skin wound timing as well as in timing of mechanical injury of the brain.

  5. From Vitality to Vital Exhaustion and Other States of "Tense Tiredness": A New Biopsychosocial Risk Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan; Cohen, Randy

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue is a common prodromal symptom for various medical conditions, including acute myocardial infarction. Fatigue is also the core component of vital exhaustion, which consists of a specific triad: excessive fatigue, increased irritability, and feelings of demoralization. In this issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, Frestad and Prescott present a meta-analysis of 16 studies, involving 53,337 participants, which found vital exhaustion to be associated with an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and recurrent cardiac events among individuals with established CHD. After discussing methodological limitations of the studies included in this meta-analysis, we describe these findings in terms of a larger genre of risk that is biopsychosocial in origin and tied to two types of tiredness: "calm tiredness" and "tense tiredness." The former is regenerative, while the latter enhances disease risk. We propose that besides vital exhaustion, other symptoms of negative affect may combine with tiredness to produce increased clinical risk, such as the presence of depressed mood, an inability to relax or recover after work, and symptoms of burnout. We further propose that vital exhaustion can be considered as part of a larger paradigm, ranging from a positive state of vitality to a negative state of exhaustion of vitality. We conclude this editorial by emphasizing the importance of improving vitality and the need to clarify biobehavioral mechanisms that play a role in the association between vital exhaustion and adverse CHD outcomes. New interventions are needed that target reducing exhaustion and improving vitality for individuals at high risk of CHD.

  6. Development of a fully automated network system for long-term health-care monitoring at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoi, K; Kubota, S; Ikarashi, A; Nogawa, M; Tanaka, S; Nemoto, T; Yamakoshi, K

    2007-01-01

    Daily monitoring of health condition at home is very important not only as an effective scheme for early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases, but also for prevention and control of such diseases. From this point of view, we have developed a prototype room for fully automated monitoring of various vital signs. From the results of preliminary experiments using this room, it was confirmed that (1) ECG and respiration during bathing, (2) excretion weight and blood pressure, and (3) respiration and cardiac beat during sleep could be monitored with reasonable accuracy by the sensor system installed in bathtub, toilet and bed, respectively.

  7. TESTING OF PULP VITALITY BY PULSOXIMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela CIOBANU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The methods applied for diagnosing the health condition of the pulp tissue are numerous, however, nowadays, an increasingly higher number of conventional tests are replaced by some objective, non-invasive, painless and reliable tests. Among them, pulse oximetry is a method for the investigation of pulp vitality based on oxygen saturation (SaO2 of the hemoglobin from the blood present in the pulp vascular bed, as a means of differentiating among the vital and the non-vital teeth. In the present study, registrations were made on a group of 120 frontal maxillary teeth, in patients with ages between 20 and 40 years, on using a digital sensor modified by the pulse oximeter with which the pulse and the values of oxygen saturation were measured at the level of both teeth and right hand finger. The mean SaO2 value in the pulp blood of the vital teeth was of 83.30% for the central incisor, of 78.51% for the lateral one and of 84.56%, respectively, for the canine; the value recorded at finger level was of 97%. In the non-vital teeth, the SaO2 value measured on the pulse oximeter was of 0%. Pulse registration showed mean values of 70.56 beatings/min at tooth level and of 70.88 beatings/min, respectively, at finger level. The results of the present study may confirm that pulse oximetry represents a simple, non-traumatic, efficient and objective method for testing the vitality condition of the dental pulp.

  8. [Evaluation of vital constants. 18th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez González, Natividad; Ortega Martínez, Carmen

    2002-05-01

    The evaluation of patients' vital statistics is part of health care and in many cases this is the first step in knowing what is the health status of a patient. Therefore, we are interested in analysing what knowledge nurses had regarding these vital statistics during the 18th century, how they evaluated these statistics and what treatment they applied in order to maintain or balance them whenever they became unstable. A manual written by a nurse in the 18th century in order to aid her colleagues in their treatment of patients is the source of the authors' research material.

  9. Computational triadic algebras of signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadrozny, W. [T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present a finite model of Peirce`s ten classes of signs. We briefly describe Peirce`s taxonomy of signs; we prove that any finite collection of signs can be extended to a finite algebra of signs in which all interpretants are themselves being interpreted; and we argue that Peirce`s ten classes of signs can be defined using constraints on algebras of signs. The paper opens the possibility of defining multimodal cognitive agents using Peirce`s classes of signs, and is a first step towards building a computational logic of signs based on Peirce`s taxonomies.

  10. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... be an effective guidance tool. However, “signs in place” offer alternative or additional guidelines to help people with their journey. This paper, first, seeks to understand road traffic signs in terms of mobility in everyday life. It, then, attempts to distinguish the different perspectives of mobility...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  11. Signs in Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting, however it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can also influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... be an effective guidance tool. However, “signs in place” offer alternative or additional guidelines to help people with their journey. This paper firstly seeks to understand road traffic signs in terms of mobility in everyday life. It then attempts to distinguish the different perspectives of mobility...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below....

  12. Cyclostationary Approach for Heart and Respiration Rates Monitoring with Body Movement Cancellation Using Radar Doppler System

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Somayeh; Amindavar, Hamidreza; Li, Changzhi

    2013-01-01

    Heart and respiration rate measurement using Doppler radar is a non-contact and non-obstructive way for remote thorough-clothing monitoring of vital signs. The modulated back-scattered radar signal in the presence of high noise and interference is non-stationary with hidden periodicities, which cannot be detected by ordinary Fourier analysis. In this paper we propose a cyclostationary approach for such signals and show that by using non-linear transformation and then Fourier analysis of the radar signal, the hidden periodicities can be accurately obtained. Numerical results show that the vital signs can be extracted as cyclic frequencies, independent of SNR and without any filtering or phase unwrapping.

  13. Babinski and Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, C

    1995-12-01

    Babinski's sign probably is the best known neurologic eponym, referring to dorsiflexion of the great toe with or without fanning of the other toes and withdrawal of the leg. This follows plantar stimulation in patients with pyramidal tract dysfunction. Although the plantar reflex already had been described, Babinski--a French neurologist of Polish descent and a pupil of Charcot--was the first to differentiate between a normal and pathologic response of the toes and recognize its clinical implication. Despite the continuing controversy over its pathophysiologic interpretation, the clinical utility of Babinski's sign remains unchanged almost 100 years after its description.

  14. Objective Local Vitality and Linguistic Networks as Predictors of Perceived Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, László; Harwood, Jake

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the relationship between objective ethnolinguistic vitality, individual networks of linguistic contacts (INLCs) and perceived vitality among German-speaking (N = 415) and Italian-speaking (N = 379) adolescents in South Tyrol, Italy. Supporting our hypothesis, we found that INLC has a greater effect on perceived…

  15. Toward the Ideal Signing Avatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Adamo-Villani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses ongoing research on the effects of a signing avatar's modeling/rendering features on the perception of sign language animation. It reports a recent study that aimed to determine whether a character's visual style has an effect on how signing animated characters are perceived by viewers. The stimuli of the study were two polygonal characters presenting two different visual styles: stylized and realistic. Each character signed four sentences. Forty-seven participants with experience in American Sign Language (ASL viewed the animated signing clips in random order via web survey. They (1 identified the signed sentences (if recognizable, (2 rated their legibility, and (3 rated the appeal of the signing avatar. Findings show that while character's visual style does not have an effect on subjects' perceived legibility of the signs and sign recognition, it has an effect on subjects' interest in the character. The stylized signing avatar was perceived as more appealing than the realistic one.

  16. 命门探究%Vital Traceability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 戴小华; 孙孟林

    2012-01-01

    On vital gate, documented different opinions, there are prostate theory, gonads theory , brain theory, the sinus node theory, adrenal theory, the control system theory, the endocrine system theory, the vital and kidney one theory,the innate instinct vigor hypothesis , the world and yin and yang of the human body bipolar hypothesis, and so on. In this paper, regardless of anatomical localization, physiological functions and pathological features, vital gate and the adrenal surprisingly similar, so we speculated that adrenal may be known as the vital gate.%关于命门,文献记载不一,众说纷纭,有前列腺论、生殖腺论、脑论、窦房结论、肾上腺论、调控系统论、内分泌系统论、命门与肾一体论、先天本能活力假说、人体内天地阴阳两极假说等多种理论.作者研究发现命门不论是在解剖定位上,还是在生理功能及病理特征上,都与肾上腺有惊人的相似,因此我们推测肾上腺很可能就是所说的命门.

  17. The Economic Vitality Formula of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopnicki, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    An economic vitality formula of success can be accomplished by creating partnerships between local career and technical education (CTE), and workforce development and economic development entities. Student industry certifications; dynamic partnerships; programs and projects focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); and…

  18. "A Vital Role in Uncertain Times"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    The adult learning and skills sector is a diverse world, encompassing adult and community learning, apprenticeships, Train to Gain, and contracted employment programmes. The learning and skills sector plays a vital role in uncertain times by giving greater opportunities for social mobility, for example by supporting progression to further and…

  19. Entrepreneurship Education: A Vital Instrument for Youth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    of entrepreneurial education as a vital tool for youth empowerment in Nigeria to ... one is at the apex of one's physical strength, undergoing significant changes in ... of processes through which disenfranchised social groups work to change ... to social cohesion and democratic values, EE must be seen as is a crucial tool for.

  20. The Economic Vitality Formula of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopnicki, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    An economic vitality formula of success can be accomplished by creating partnerships between local career and technical education (CTE), and workforce development and economic development entities. Student industry certifications; dynamic partnerships; programs and projects focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); and…

  1. The ivy sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Mahomed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ivy sign refers to diffuse bilateral leptomeningeal enhancement on post- contrastT1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and increased signal intensity in bilateralsubarachnoid spaces and perivascular spaces on T2-weighted fluid attenuation inversionrecovery (FLAIR MRI sequences in patients with moyamoya disease.

  2. Flemish Sign Language Standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herreweghe, Mieke; Vermeerbergen, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the Flemish Deaf community officially rejected standardisation of Flemish Sign Language. It was a bold choice, which at the time was not in line with some of the decisions taken in the neighbouring countries. In this article, we shall discuss the choices the Flemish Deaf community has made in this respect and explore why the Flemish Deaf…

  3. Signing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  4. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  5. Derivative Sign Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  6. Derivative Sign Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  7. Sign Language Web Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  8. The Sign of Love

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司亮

    2009-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 Mr Rabbit and Mr Wolf are neighbors.Mr Rabbit has many friends,but Mr Wolf has none.One day Mr Wolf wants to know the truth.He asks a lot of anitmals and finds the secret:it is a red paper heart.They all call it"the sign of love".

  9. These signs here now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    1995-01-01

    Hallidays (1984) formulations of systemic-functional linguistics together with Hodge and Kress' (1988) social semiotics share the assumption that signs are not arbitrary: People make choices out of a web of possible constructions or expressions, and those choices can be shown to be motivated...

  10. Monitoring Heart Disease and Diabetes with Mobile Internet Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mulvaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A telemedicine system is described for monitoring vital signs and general health indicators of patients with cardiac and diabetic conditions. Telemetry from wireless sensors and readings from other instruments are combined into a comprehensive set of measured patient parameters. Using a combination of mobile device applications and web browser, the data can be stored, accessed, and displayed using mobile internet communications to the central server. As an extra layer of security in the data transmission, information embedded in the data is used in its verification. The paper highlights features that could be enhanced from previous systems by using alternative components or methods.

  11. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  12. Study on road sign recognition in LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2016-02-01

    Road and traffic sign identification is a field of study that can be used to aid the development of in-car advisory systems. It uses computer vision and artificial intelligence to extract the road signs from outdoor images acquired by a camera in uncontrolled lighting conditions where they may be occluded by other objects, or may suffer from problems such as color fading, disorientation, variations in shape and size, etc. An automatic means of identifying traffic signs, in these conditions, can make a significant contribution to develop an Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) that continuously monitors the driver, the vehicle, and the road. Road and traffic signs are characterized by a number of features which make them recognizable from the environment. Road signs are located in standard positions and have standard shapes, standard colors, and known pictograms. These characteristics make them suitable for image identification. Traffic sign identification covers two problems: traffic sign detection and traffic sign recognition. Traffic sign detection is meant for the accurate localization of traffic signs in the image space, while traffic sign recognition handles the labeling of such detections into specific traffic sign types or subcategories [1].

  13. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  14. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  15. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  16. The Integral Sign Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith

    2007-07-01

    We will observe the unusual warped disk galaxy known as the Integral Sign Galaxy, UGC 3697, with a small two-position WFPC2 mosaic. Observations will be obtained in three broad band filters and the resulting image will be released on the 19th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on ~April 24, 2009. Multidrizzled mosaics will be made available through the archive.

  17. Hot and Cold Ethnicities: Modes of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the summary of the special issue of "JMMD" "Ethnolinguistic vitality". The volume shows convincingly that ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions as measured by standard methodology such as the Subjective Ethnolinguistic Vitality Questionnaires (SEVQ) are not reliable indicators of actual vitality. Evidence that ethnolinguistic…

  18. Computer analysis of slow vital capacity spirograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, F P; Bacevice, A E; Lough, M D; Doershuk, C F

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a digital computer program which evaluates the vital capacity and its subdivisions, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity. The algorithm examines the multibreath spirogram, a continuous record of quiet breathing interspersed among repeated slow, large volume maneuvers. Quiet breaths are recognized by comparing features of each breath to the respective average and variation of these features for all breaths. A self-scaling, iterative procedure is used to identify those end-tidal points that most likely represent the subject's functional residual capacity. A least-squared error baseline is then fit through these points to partition the vital capacity. Twenty-three spirograms from patients with documented pulmonary disease were independently analyzed by the computer, a pulmonary function technician, and the laboratory supervisor. No practical differences were found among the results. However, the computer's values, in contrast to those of the technician, were reproducible on repeated trials and free of computational and transcriptional errors.

  19. Ansiedad y acontecimientos vitales en adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moreno

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se examina la posible relación entre acontecimientos vitales (AV y ansiedad en población adolescente. Para la evaluación de AV se ha usado el AV.I.A (Inventarlo de Acontecimeintos Vitales en Infancia y Adolescencia (adaptado de P. Morató y para la evaluación de la ansiedad, el S.T.A.I.C. (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory of Children (Spielberger, 1973. La muestra consta de 695 adolescentes de 14 a 15 años de edad. Los resultados muestran que un mayor número de AV negativos repercute en la elevación de las tasas de ansiedad.

  20. Vital nodes identification in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Linyuan; Chen, Duanbing; Ren, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Real networks exhibit heterogeneous nature with nodes playing far different roles in structure and function. To identify vital nodes is thus very significant, allowing us to control the outbreak of epidemics, to conduct advertisements for e-commercial products, to predict popular scientific publications, and so on. The vital nodes identification attracts increasing attentions from both computer science and physical societies, with algorithms ranging from simply counting the immediate neighbors to complicated machine learning and message passing approaches. In this review, we clarify the concepts and metrics, classify the problems and methods, as well as review the important progresses and describe the state of the art. Furthermore, we provide extensive empirical analyses to compare well-known methods on disparate real networks, and highlight the future directions. In spite of the emphasis on physics-rooted approaches, the unification of the language and comparison with cross-domain methods would trigger interdisciplinary solutions in the near future.

  1. Vital nodes identification in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Linyuan; Ren, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Real networks exhibit heterogeneous nature with nodes playing far different roles in structure and function. To identify vital nodes is thus very significant, allowing us to control the outbreak of epidemics, to conduct advertisements for e-commercial products, to predict popular scientific publications, and so on. The vital nodes identification attracts increasing attentions from both computer science and physical societies, with algorithms ranging from simply counting the immediate neighbors to complicated machine learning and message passing approaches. In this review, we clarify the concepts and metrics, classify the problems and methods, as well as review the important progresses and describe the state of the art. Furthermore, we provide extensive empirical analyses to compare well-known methods on disparate real networks, and highlight the future directions. In despite of the emphasis on physics-rooted approaches, the unification of the language and comparison with cross-domain methods would trigger int...

  2. Digital literacy: A vital competence for 2010?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; People are living in a fast changing world today in both their business and personal lives. With the rate of change in technology continuing at Gordon Moore's 1965 predictions [1], what competencies are needed to take full advantage of today's Knowledge Society? The EU has recognised the need for digital literacy and has included this in the definition of eInclusion [2]. This paper defines digital literacy as a competence which is vital for all citizens, examines the c...

  3. Characterizing System Failure Curves with Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Salinger et al. (2006). ⎤ ⎥ (2) The vitality model based on Eq. (2) assumes all individuals are initially identical, which is in fact violated...coefficients The coefficients in Eq. (4) can be estimated with maximum likelihood techniques developed by Salinger et al. (2003) and modified by Li...with special reference to chronic radiation mortality. Radiology, 76, 250–257. Salinger , D. H., J. J. Anderson, and O. S. Hamel, 2003: A parameter

  4. The Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The entries of the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary have four sections:  Entry header: In this section the sign headword is shown as a photo and a gloss. The first occurring location and handshape of the sign are shown as icons.  Video window: By default the base form of the sign headword...... forms of the sign (only for classifier entries). In addition to this, frequent co-occurrences with the sign are shown in this section. The signs in the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary can be looked up through:  Handshape: Particular handshapes for the active and the passive hand can be specified...... to find signs that are not themselves lemmas in the dictionary, but appear in example sentences.  Topic: Topics can be chosen as search criteria from a list of 70 topics....

  5. Green's Theorem for Sign Data

    OpenAIRE

    Louis M. Houston

    2012-01-01

    Sign data are the signs of signal added to noise. It is well known that a constant signal can be recovered from sign data. In this paper, we show that an integral over variant signal can be recovered from an integral over sign data based on the variant signal. We refer to this as a generalized sign data average. We use this result to derive a Green's theorem for sign data. Green's theorem is important to various seismic processing methods, including seismic migration. Results in this paper ge...

  6. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system.

  7. Ubiquitous Mobile Health Monitoring System for Elderly (UMHMSE)

    CERN Document Server

    Bourouis, Abderrahim; Bouchachia, Abdelhamid

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in ubiquitous computing uses technologies of Body Area Networks (BANs) to monitor the person's kinematics and physiological parameters. In this paper we propose a real time mobile health system for monitoring elderly patients from indoor or outdoor environments. The system uses a bio- signal sensor worn by the patient and a Smartphone as a central node. The sensor data is collected and transmitted to the intelligent server through GPRS/UMTS to be analyzed. The prototype (UMHMSE) monitors the elderly mobility, location and vital signs such as Sp02 and Heart Rate. Remote users (family and medical personnel) might have a real time access to the collected information through a web application.

  8. UBIQUITOUS MOBILE HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM FOR ELDERLY (UMHMSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim BOUROUIS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in ubiquitous computing uses technologies of Body Area Networks (BANs to monitor the person's kinematics and physiological parameters. In this paper we propose a real time mobile health system for monitoring elderly patients from indoor or outdoor environments. The system uses a biosignal sensor worn by the patient and a Smartphone as a central node. The sensor data is collected and transmitted to the intelligent server through GPRS/UMTS to be analyzed. The prototype (UMHMSE monitors the elderly mobility, location and vital signs such as Sp02 and Heart Rate. Remote users (family and medical personnel might have a real time access to the collected information through a web application.

  9. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

    2009-02-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

  10. Sign Language Comprehension: The Case of Spanish Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Ortiz, I. R.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were…

  11. Sign language typology: The contribution of rural sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Vos; R. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the field of sign language typology has shown that sign languages exhibit typological variation at all relevant levels of linguistic description. These initial typological comparisons were heavily skewed toward the urban sign languages of developed countries, mostly in the Western w

  12. American Sign Language and Pidgin Sign English: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Judy; McIntire, Marina L.

    1980-01-01

    The differences between Pidgin Sign English and American Sign Language in simultaneity, or the visible presence of two or more linguistic units (manual or nonmanual) co-occurring, are demonstrated. Differences are exemplified in handshape-classifier pronouns, directional verbs, co-occurring manual signs, and nonmanual behavior. (PMJ)

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 addit

  14. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917

  15. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (Yongmei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (Yongmei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  17. Refuting the lipstick sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Bean, Betsey R; Greenhouse, Alyssa R; Yu, Henry H; Arrington, Edward D; Friedman, Richard J; Eichinger, Josef K

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic examination of the tendon has been described as the "gold standard" for diagnosis of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps (LHB). An arthroscopic finding of an inflamed and hyperemic LHB within the bicipital groove has been described as the "lipstick sign." Studies evaluating direct visualization in diagnosis of LHB tendinitis are lacking. During a 1-year period, 363 arthroscopic shoulder procedures were performed, with 16 and 39 patients prospectively selected as positive cases and negative controls, respectively. All positive controls had groove tenderness, positive Speed maneuver, and diagnostic ultrasound-guided bicipital injection. Negative controls had none of these findings. Six surgeons reviewed randomized deidentified arthroscopic pictures of enrolled patients The surgeons were asked whether the images demonstrated LHB tendinitis and if the lipstick sign was present. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 49% and 66%, respectively, for detecting LHB tendinitis and 64% and 31%, respectively, for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for interobserver reliability ranged from 0.042 to 0.419 (mean, 0.215 ± 0.116) for tendinitis and from 0.486 to 0.835 (mean, 0.680 ± 0.102) for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.264 to 0.854 (mean, 0.615) for tendinitis and from 0.641 to 0.951 (mean, 0.783) for erythema. The presence of the lipstick sign performed only moderately well in a rigorously designed level III study to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity. There is only fair agreement among participating surgeons in diagnosing LHB tendinitis arthroscopically. Consequently, LHB tendinitis requiring tenodesis remains a clinical diagnosis that should be made before arthroscopic examination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  19. Puusepp's sign--clinical significance of a forgotten pyramidal sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacik, Pawel; Krasnianski, M; Zierz, S

    2009-12-01

    The pyramidal signs in the lower extremity can be divided into three groups: (1) Babinski's group characterised by dorsoflexion of the great toe, (2) pyramidal signs marked by plantar flexion of the toes (e.g. Rossolimo's sign), and (3) synkinetic movements such as Strümpell's phenomenon. Puusepp's sign described by the Estonian neurologist and neurosurgeon Ludvig Puusepp belongs to none of these three groups. Its eliciting does not differ from that of Babinski's sign. The response, however, is different and consists of a tonic slow abduction of the little toe. We showed its relevance on the basis of clinical examination of six patients: four females aged 29, 50, 43 and 57 years and two males aged 42 and 49 years. The diagnoses were as follows: a new relapse of multiple sclerosis, a secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, a left middle cerebral artery stroke, a lumbago resulting in L3-L4 fusion surgery, an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a left intracerebral haemorrhage respectively. Puusepp's sign was the only elicitable pyramidal sign in all the patients but two. The 50-year-old female patient revealed on neurological examination Babinski's sign on the left side and Puusepp's sign on the right side. The testing of pyramidal signs in the 57-year-old woman displayed a bilateral Strümpell's sign and a left Puusepp's sign. These six cases showed that although rarely recognized in the clinical practice Puusepp's sign contributed to establishing the diagnosis of a central motor neuron involvement in the case of an absent Babinski's sign. Thus, its testing does not differ from that of Babinski's sign which requires only a little attention from the examiner, but provides an important piece of clinical information.

  20. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...