WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitor progressive damage

  1. Monitoring of Progressive Damage in Buildings Using Laser Scan Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, I.; Lindenbergh, R.; Van Natijne, A.; Esposito, R.; Schipper, R.

    2018-05-01

    Vulnerability of buildings to natural and man-induced hazards has become a main concern for our society. Ensuring their serviceability, safety and sustainability is of vital importance and the main reason for setting up monitoring systems to detect damages at an early stage. In this work, a method is presented for detecting changes from laser scan data, where no registration between different epochs is needed. To show the potential of the method, a case study of a laboratory test carried out at the Stevin laboratory of Delft University of Technology was selected. The case study was a quasi-static cyclic pushover test on a two-story high unreinforced masonry structure designed to simulate damage evolution caused by cyclic loading. During the various phases, we analysed the behaviour of the masonry walls by monitoring the deformation of each masonry unit. First a plane is fitted to the selected wall point cloud, consisting of one single terrestrial laser scan, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Second, the segmentation of individual elements is performed. Then deformations with respect to this plane model, for each epoch and specific element, are determined by computing their corresponding rotation and cloud-to-plane distances. The validation of the changes detected within this approach is done by comparison with traditional deformation analysis based on co-registered TLS point clouds between two or more epochs of building measurements. Initial results show that the sketched methodology is indeed able to detect changes at the mm level while avoiding 3D point cloud registration, which is a main issue in computer vision and remote sensing.

  2. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in KEVLAR® 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Andrade, E.; Saulsberry, R. L.

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar® 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio <1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  3. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  4. [Progressive damage monitoring of corrugated composite skins by the FBG spectral characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bang-Feng; Lu, Ji-Yun; Gu, Li-Li; Su, Yong-Gang

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, a method of monitoring progressive damage of composite structures by non-uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflection spectrum is proposed. Due to the finite element analysis of corrugated composite skins specimens, the failure process under tensile load and corresponding critical failure loads of corrugated composite skin was predicated. Then, the non-uniform reflection spectrum of FBG sensor could be reconstructed and the corresponding relationship between layer failure order sequence of corrugated composite skin and FBG sensor reflection spectrums was acquired. A monitoring system based on FBG non-uniform reflection spectrum, which can be used to monitor progressive damage of corrugated composite skins, was built. The corrugated composite skins were stretched under this FBG non-uniform reflection spectrum monitoring system. The results indicate that real-time spectrums acquired by FBG non-uniform reflection spectrum monitoring system show the same trend with the reconstruction reflection spectrums. The maximum error between the corresponding failure and the predictive value is 8.6%, which proves the feasibility of using FBG sensor to monitor progressive damage of corrugated composite skin. In this method, the real-time changes in the FBG non-uniform reflection spectrum within the scope of failure were acquired through the way of monitoring and predicating, and at the same time, the progressive damage extent and layer failure sequence of corru- gated composite skin was estimated, and without destroying the structure of the specimen, the method is easy and simple to operate. The measurement and transmission section of the system are completely composed of optical fiber, which provides new ideas and experimental reference for the field of dynamic monitoring of smart skin.

  5. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Nichols, C. T.; Wentzel, D. J.; Saulsberry R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band modal acoustic emission (AE) data was used to characterize micromechanical damage progression in uniaxial IM7 and T1000 carbon fiber-epoxy tows and an IM7 composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) subjected to an intermittent load hold tensile stress profile known to activate the Felicity ratio (FR). Damage progression was followed by inspecting the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) associated with acoustic emission events. FFT analysis revealed the occurrence of cooperative micromechanical damage events in a frequency range between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Evidence was found for the existence of a universal damage parameter, referred to here as the critical Felicity ratio, or Felicity ratio at rupture (FR*), which had a value close to 0.96 for the tows and the COPV tested. The implications of using FR* to predict failure in carbon/epoxy composite materials and related composite components such as COPVs are discussed. Trends in the FFT data are also discussed; namely, the difference between the low and high energy events, the difference between early and late-life events, comparison of IM7 and T1000 damage progression, and lastly, the similarity of events occurring at the onset of significant acoustic emission used to calculate the FR.

  6. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Tows and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Lucero, Ralph; Nichols, Charles T.; Wentzel, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    ASTM-based ILH methods were found to give a reproducible, quantitative estimate of the stress threshold at which significant accumulated damage began to occur. a) FR events are low energy (300 kHz) d) FR events show a consistent hierarchy of cooperative damage for composite tow, and for the COPV tested, regardless of applied load. Application of ILH or related stress profiles could lead to robust pass/fail acceptance criteria based on the FR. Initial application of FR and FFT analysis of AE data acquired on COPVs is promising.

  7. Adaptive measurement selection for progressive damage estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenfan; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Peralta, Pedro

    2011-04-01

    Noise and interference in sensor measurements degrade the quality of data and have a negative impact on the performance of structural damage diagnosis systems. In this paper, a novel adaptive measurement screening approach is presented to automatically select the most informative measurements and use them intelligently for structural damage estimation. The method is implemented efficiently in a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) setting using particle filtering. The noise suppression and improved damage estimation capability of the proposed method is demonstrated by an application to the problem of estimating progressive fatigue damage in an aluminum compact-tension (CT) sample using noisy PZT sensor measurements.

  8. Estrogens and progression of diabetic kidney damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Lupia, Enrico; Catanuto, Paola; Elliot, Sharon J

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that estrogens affect and modulate the development and progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) not related to diabetes. Clinical studies have indeed demonstrated that the severity and rate of progression of renal damage tends to be greater among men, compared with women. Experimental studies also support the notion that female sex is protective and male sex permissive, for the development of CKD in non-diabetics, through the opposing actions of estrogens and testosterone. However, when we consider diabetes-induced kidney damage, in the setting of either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the contribution of gender to the progression of renal disease is somewhat uncertain. Previous studies on the effects of estrogens in the pathogenesis of progressive kidney damage have primarily focused on mesangial cells. More recently, data on the effects of estrogens on podocytes, the cell type whose role may include initiation of progressive diabetic renal disease, became available. The aim of this review will be to summarize the main clinical and experimental data on the effects of estrogens on the progression of diabetes-induced kidney injury. In particular, we will highlight the possible biological effects of estrogens on podocytes, especially considering those critical for the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney damage.

  9. Monitoring Students' Academic & Disciplinary Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Fred; Kellogg, Larry J.

    This document outlines the objectives and procedures of a program at a New Mexico school district whose purpose is to enable school personnel to systematically monitor students' academic and disciplinary progression. The objectives of the program are to diagnose academic or disciplinary problems and prescribe remedies, to establish an oncampus…

  10. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  11. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eBenn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent fMRI while playing a game that involved monitoring progress towards either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress towards a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring.

  12. Progress on clustered DNA damage in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Li'na; Zhang Hong; Di Cuixia; Zhang Qiuning; Wang Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage which caused by high LET heavy ion radiation can lead to mutation, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Promoting apoptosis of cancer cells is always the basis of cancer treatment. Clustered DNA damage has been the hot topic in radiobiology. The detect method is diversity, but there is not a detail and complete protocol to analyze clustered DNA damage. In order to provide reference for clustered DNA damage in the radiotherapy study, the clustered DNA damage characteristics, the latest progresses on clustered DNA damage and the detecting methods are reviewed and discussed in detail in this paper. (authors)

  13. Geothermal progress monitor report No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part II of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

  14. A data fusion approach for progressive damage quantification in reinforced concrete masonry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanniamparambil, Prashanth Abraham; Carmi, Rami; Kontsos, Antonios; Bolhassani, Mohammad; Khan, Fuad; Bartoli, Ivan; Moon, Franklin L; Hamid, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a data fusion approach based on digital image correlation (DIC) and acoustic emission (AE) to detect, monitor and quantify progressive damage development in reinforced concrete masonry walls (CMW) with varying types of reinforcements. CMW were tested to evaluate their structural behavior under cyclic loading. The combination of DIC with AE provided a framework for the cross-correlation of full field strain maps on the surface of CMW with volume-inspecting acoustic activity. AE allowed in situ monitoring of damage progression which was correlated with the DIC through quantification of strain concentrations and by tracking crack evolution, visually verified. The presented results further demonstrate the relationships between the onset and development of cracking with changes in energy dissipation at each loading cycle, measured principal strains and computed AE energy, providing a promising paradigm for structural health monitoring applications on full-scale concrete masonry buildings. (paper)

  15. Damage pattern and damage progression on breakwater roundheads under multidirectional waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comola, F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Martinelli, L.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental model test study is carried out to investigate damage pattern and progression on a rock armoured breakwater roundhead subjected to multidirectional waves. Concerning damage pattern, the most critical sector is observed to shift leeward with increasing wave period. Taking angles...... over the roundhead is developed. Thus the formula also considers the shifting of the critical sector due to increasing wave period which existing formulae do not include. Finally, analysing the damage produced by double peaked spectra, it is shown that the armour may be designed by the formula when...

  16. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  17. Geothermal Progress Monitor: Report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 14th since its inception in 1980, highlights the anticipated rapid growth in the use of geothermal heat pumps and documents the continued growth in the use of geothermal energy for power generation, both in this country and abroad. In countries with a relatively large demand for new generation capacity, geothermal, if available, is being called on as a preferable alternative to the use of domestic or imported oil. On the other hand, in this country where current demand for new capacity is less, geothermal energy is commonly being put to use in small power generation units operating on the hot water resource.

  18. Geothermal Progress Monitor. Report No. 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Two themes dominate this issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 15th since its inception in 1980. The first of these is the significance of the government/industry partnership role in geothermal development. This joint effort is reflected in the continued, measured growth in the use of geothermal energy, for both power generation and direct use applications, in this country and abroad, as well as in the development of new, innovative technologies to ensure a bright future for the resource. The second theme is the growing popularity of geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) among utilities, their customers, and federal agencies, all with disparate interests in the technology.

  19. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGugan, Malcolm; Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will b......The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation...

  20. Fatigue damage monitoring of structural aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.Р. Ігнатович

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  Results of the experiments directed on creation of a new tool method of fatigue damage diagnostics and an estimation of a residual life of aviation designs are presented. It is shown, that the defo rmation relief formed on a surface of cladding  layer of sheets of constructional alloys Д-16АТ, 2024-Т3, 7075-Т6  can be considered as the metal damage indicator  under cyclically repeating loadings.

  1. Structural damage monitoring of harbor caissons with interlocking condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thanh Canh; Lee, So Young; Nauyen, Khac Duy; Kim, Jeong Tae [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study is to monitor the health status of harbor caissons which have potential foundation damage. To obtain the objective, the following approaches are performed. Firstly, a structural damage monitoring(SDM) method is designed for interlocked multiple caisson structures. The SDM method utilizes the change in modal strain energy to monitor the foundation damage in a target caisson unit. Secondly, a finite element model of a caisson system which consists of three caisson units is established to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. In the finite element simulation, the caisson units are constrained each other by shear key connections. The health status of the caisson system against various levels of foundation damage is monitored by measuring relative modal displacements between the adjacent caissons.

  2. Structural damage monitoring of harbor caissons with interlocking condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, Thanh Canh; Lee, So Young; Nauyen, Khac Duy; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to monitor the health status of harbor caissons which have potential foundation damage. To obtain the objective, the following approaches are performed. Firstly, a structural damage monitoring(SDM) method is designed for interlocked multiple caisson structures. The SDM method utilizes the change in modal strain energy to monitor the foundation damage in a target caisson unit. Secondly, a finite element model of a caisson system which consists of three caisson units is established to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. In the finite element simulation, the caisson units are constrained each other by shear key connections. The health status of the caisson system against various levels of foundation damage is monitored by measuring relative modal displacements between the adjacent caissons

  3. Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to integrated luminosity 5.6 fb$^{-1}$ is presented along with a comparison to the theoretical model.

  4. A Progressive Damage Model for Predicting Permanent Indentation and Impact Damage in Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhaojie; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a progressive damage model was established on the basis of ABAQUS software for predicting permanent indentation and impact damage in composite laminates. Intralaminar and interlaminar damage was modelled based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in the finite element model. For the verification of the model, low-velocity impact tests of quasi-isotropic laminates with material system of T300/5228A were conducted. Permanent indentation and impact damage of the laminates were simulated and the numerical results agree well with the experiments. It can be concluded that an obvious knee point can be identified on the curve of the indentation depth versus impact energy. Matrix cracking and delamination develops rapidly with the increasing impact energy, while considerable amount of fiber breakage only occurs when the impact energy exceeds the energy corresponding to the knee point. Predicted indentation depth after the knee point is very sensitive to the parameter μ which is proposed in this paper, and the acceptable value of this parameter is in range from 0.9 to 1.0.

  5. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  6. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGugan, M; Pereira, G; Sørensen, B F; Toftegaard, H; Branner, K

    2015-02-28

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Shin, Jae Ha [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  8. Geothermal Progress Monitor. Report No. 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The near-term challenges of the US geothermal industry and its long-range potential are dominant themes in this issue of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Progress Monitor which summarizes calendar-year 1996 events in geothermal development. Competition is seen as an antidote to current problems and a cornerstone of the future. Thus, industry's cost-cutting strategies needed to increase the competitiveness of geothermal energy in world markets are examined. For example, a major challenge facing the US industry today is that the sales contracts of independent producers have reached, or soon will, the critical stage when the prices utilities must pay them drop precipitously, aptly called the cliff. However, Thomas R. Mason, President and CEO of CalEnergy told the DOE 1996 Geothermal Program Review XIV audience that while some of his company's plants have ''gone over the cliff, the world is not coming to an end.'' With the imposition of severe cost-cutting strategies, he said, ''these plants remain profitable... although they have to be run with fewer people and less availability.'' The Technology Development section of the newsletter discusses enhancements to TOUGH2, the general purpose fluid and heat flow simulator and the analysis of drill cores from The Geysers, but the emphasis is on advanced drilling technologies.

  9. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) is the 11th since the inception of the publication in 1980. It continues to synthesize information on all aspects of geothermal development in this country and abroad to permit identification and quantification of trends in the use of this energy technology. In addition, the GPM is a mechanism for transferring current information on geothermal technology development to the private sector, and, over time, provides a historical record for those interested in the development pathway of the resource. In sum, the Department of Energy makes the GPM available to the many diverse interests that make up the geothermal community for the multiple uses it may serve. This issue of the GPM points up very clearly how closely knit many of those diverse interests have become. It might well be called an international issue'' since many of its pages are devoted to news of geothermal development abroad, to the efforts of the US industry to participate in overseas development, to the support given those efforts by federal and state agencies, and to the formation of the International Geothermal Association (IGA). All of these events indicate that the geothermal community has become truly international in character, an occurrence that can only enhance the future of geothermal energy as a major source of energy supply worldwide. 15 figs.

  10. Monitoring tensile damage evolution in Nextel 312/BlackglasTM composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeongguk; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Tensile damage evolution was monitored with the aid of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Several NDE methods, such as ultrasonic testing (UT), infrared (IR) thermography, and acoustic emission (AE) techniques, were employed to analyze damage evolution during tensile testing of Nextel 312/Blackglas TM composites. Prior to tensile testing, UT was used to characterize the initial defect distribution of the samples. During tensile testing, AE sensors and an IR camera were used for in situ monitoring of the progressive damage of the samples. AE provided the amounts of damage evolution in terms of the AE intensity and/or energy, and the IR camera was used to obtain the temperature changes during the test. Microstructural characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to investigate the fracture mechanisms and modes of Nextel 312/Blackglas TM samples. Moreover, SEM characterization was used to document failure behavior, and to show comparable results with NDE signatures

  11. Progressive damage to rat skin induced by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Beatriz L.; Saint-Martin, Maria L.G.; Bernaola, Omar A.; Duran, Hebe; Policastro, Lucia L.; O'Connor, Silvia E.; Palmieri, Monica; Davidson, Miguel; Davidson, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Wistar rats were locally irradiated with proton beams. Dorsal portions of the skin were irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy employing a plastic wedge as a variable thickness energy degrader. The animals were sacrificed 2,5,6,7,and 9 days post-irradiation. The doses were monitored with a transmission camera. Solid track detectors (Makrofold E) were placed on the area to be irradiated to determine spatial correlation with the dose. Tissue reactions were clearly observed and were quantitatively assessed as a function of dose. Track detectors proved to be valuable to determine the correlation between the dose and tissue damage . This biological experimental model proved useful to analyze the response of tissues to a gradient of doses yielded by a proton beam. (author)

  12. Geothermal Progress Monitor, report No. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Issue No. 13 documents that most related factors favor the growth and geographic expansion of the US geothermal industry and that the industry is being technologically prepared to meet those challenges into the next century. It is the function of GPM to identify trends in the use of this resource and to provide a historical record of its development pathway. The information assembled for this issue of GPM indicates that trends in the use of geothermal energy in this country and abroad continue to be very positive. Favorable sentiments as well as pertinent actions on the part of both government and industry are documented in almost every section. The FEDERAL BEAT points up that the National Energy Strategy (NES) developed at the highest levels of the US government recognizes the environmental and energy security advantages of renewable energy, including geothermal, and makes a commitment to substantial diversification'' of US sources of energy. With the announcement of the construction of several new plants and plant expansions, the INDUSTRY SCENE illustrates industry's continued expectation tha the use of geothermal energy will prove profitable to investors. In DEVELOPMENT STATUS, spokesmen for both an investor-owned utility and a major geothermal developer express strong support for geothermal power, particularly emphasizing its environmental advantages. DEVELOPMENT STATUS also reports that early successes have been achieved by joint DOE/industry R D at The Geysers which will have important impacts on the future management of this mature field. Also there is increasing interest in hot dry rock. Analyses conducted in support of the NES indicate that if all the postulated technology developments occur in this field, the price of energy derived from hot dry rock in the US could drop.

  13. Monitoring Moisture Damage Propagation in GFRP Composites Using Carbon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Sabagh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP composites are widely used in infrastructure applications including water structures due to their relatively high durability, high strength to weight ratio, and non-corrosiveness. Here we demonstrate the potential use of carbon nanoparticles dispersed during GFRP composite fabrication to reduce water absorption of GFRP and to enable monitoring of moisture damage propagation in GFRP composites. GFRP coupons incorporating 2.0 wt % carbon nanofibers (CNFs and 2.0 wt % multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated in order to study the effect of moisture damage on mechanical properties of GFRP. Water absorption tests were carried out by immersing the GFRP coupons in a seawater bath at two temperatures for a time period of three months. Effects of water immersion on the mechanical properties and glass transition temperature of GFRP were investigated. Furthermore, moisture damage in GFRP was monitored by measuring the electrical conductivity of the GFRP coupons. It was shown that carbon nanoparticles can provide a means of self-sensing that enables the monitoring of moisture damage in GFRP. Despite the success of the proposed technique, it might not be able to efficiently describe moisture damage propagation in GFRP beyond a specific threshold because of the relatively high electrical conductivity of seawater. Microstructural investigations using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR explained the significance of seawater immersion time and temperature on the different levels of moisture damage in GFRP.

  14. Decision-Making Accuracy of CBM Progress-Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, John M.; Wells, Craig S.; Marcotte, Amanda M.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the diagnostic accuracy associated with decision making as is typically conducted with curriculum-based measurement (CBM) approaches to progress monitoring. Using previously published estimates of the standard errors of estimate associated with CBM, 20,000 progress-monitoring data sets were simulated to model student reading…

  15. Composite Beam Theory with Material Nonlinearities and Progressive Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fang

    Beam has historically found its broad applications. Nowadays, many engineering constructions still rely on this type of structure which could be made of anisotropic and heterogeneous materials. These applications motivate the development of beam theory in which the impact of material nonlinearities and damage on the global constitutive behavior has been a focus in recent years. Reliable predictions of these nonlinear beam responses depend on not only the quality of the material description but also a comprehensively generalized multiscale methodology which fills the theoretical gaps between the scales in an efficient yet high-fidelity manner. The conventional beam modeling methodologies which are built upon ad hoc assumptions are in lack of such reliability in need. Therefore, the focus of this dissertation is to create a reliable yet efficient method and the corresponding tool for composite beam modeling. A nonlinear beam theory is developed based on the Mechanics of Structure Genome (MSG) using the variational asymptotic method (VAM). The three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear continuum problem is rigorously reduced to a one-dimensional (1D) beam model and a two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional analysis featuring both geometric and material nonlinearities by exploiting the small geometric parameter which is an inherent geometric characteristic of the beam. The 2D nonlinear cross-sectional analysis utilizes the 3D material models to homogenize the beam cross-sectional constitutive responses considering the nonlinear elasticity and progressive damage. The results from such a homogenization are inputs as constitutive laws into the global nonlinear 1D beam analysis. The theoretical foundation is formulated without unnecessary kinematic assumptions. Curvilinear coordinates and vector calculus are utilized to build the 3D deformation gradient tensor, of which the components are formulated in terms of cross-sectional coordinates, generalized beam strains, unknown warping

  16. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

  17. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Onboard monitoring of fatigue damage rates in the hull girder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2011-01-01

    Most new advanced ships have extensive data collection systems to be used for continuous monitoring of engine and hull performance, for voyage performance evaluation etc. Such systems could be expanded to include also procedures for stress monitoring and for decision support, where the most...... critical wave-induced ship extreme responses and fatigue damage accumulation can be estimated for hypothetical changes in ship course and speed in the automatically estimated wave environment.The aim of this paper is to outline a calculation procedure for fatigue damage rate prediction in hull girders...... taking into account whipping stresses. It is conceptually shown how such a method, which integrates onboard estimation of sea states, can be used to deduce decision support with respect to the accumulated fatigue damage in the hull girder.The paper firstly presents a set of measured full-scale wave...

  19. Recent progress in online ultrasonic process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Szu-Sheng L.; Chen, Tzu-Fang; Ramos-Franca, Demartonne; Nguyen, Ky T.; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Ihara, Ikuo; Derdouri, A.; Garcia-Rejon, Andres

    1998-03-01

    On-line ultrasonic monitoring of polymer co-extrusion and gas-assisted injection molding are presented. During the co- extrusion of high density polyethylene and Santoprene ultrasonic sensors consisting of piezoelectric transducers and clad ultrasonic buffer rods are used to detect the interface between these two polymers and the stability of the extrusion. The same ultrasonic sensor also measures the surface temperature of the extruded polymer. The results indicate that temperature measurements using ultrasound have a faster response time than those obtained by conventional thermocouple. In gas-assisted injection molding the polymer and gas flow front positions are monitored simultaneously. This information may be used to control the plunger movement.

  20. Ultrasonic Monitoring of the Progress of Lactic Acid Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Kimura, Akihiro; Ohdaira, Etsuzo

    2003-05-01

    Promotion of lactic acid fermentation by ultrasonic irradiation has been attempted. It is possible to determine the progress of fermentation and production of a curd, i.e., yoghurt and or kefir, by measuring acidity using a pH meter. However, this method is inconvenient and indirect for the evaluation of the progress of lactic acid fermentation under anaerobic condition. In this study, an ultrasonic monitoring method for evaluating the progress of lactic acid fermentation was examined.

  1. Monitoring the Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5x10^{33} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented.

  2. Monitoring the radiation damage of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5×10 33 cm −2 s −1 , results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented

  3. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  4. Monitoring radiation damage in the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Quadt, Arnulf; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  5. CSF inflammation and axonal damage are increased and correlate in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Börnsen, Lars; Khademi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism underlying disease progression in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is uncertain. Pathological studies found widespread inflammation in progressive MS brains correlating with disease progression and axonal damage. OBJECTIVES: To study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers...... and clarify whether inflammation and axonal damage are associated in progressive MS. METHODS: Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analysed CSF from 40 secondary progressive (SPMS), 21 primary progressive (PPMS), and 36 relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and 20 non-inflammatory neurological disease...... (NIND) patients. Twenty-two of the SPMS patients participated in an MBP8298 peptide clinical trial and had CSF follow-up after one year. RESULTS: Compared to NIND patients, inflammatory biomarkers osteopontin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) were increased in all MS patients while CXCL13...

  6. Progress study of the cardiac damage in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscular disease with rapid progression in children. Most patients die of respiratory and circulatory failure before the age of 20 if there is no systematic treatment. Now the heart problem in this disease has become increasingly prominent, and is thought to be closely associated with certain dystrophin exon deletion. We would like to review the epidemiology, relevance of dystrophin, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and pathological features, as well as early prevention and treatment of DMD.

  7. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  8. Progressive Damage and Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ashith P. K.

    Composite materials are widely used in various industries for making structural parts due to higher strength to weight ratio, better fatigue life, corrosion resistance and material property tailorability. To fully exploit the capability of composites, it is required to know the load carrying capacity of the parts made of them. Unlike metals, composites are orthotropic in nature and fails in a complex manner under various loading conditions which makes it a hard problem to analyze. Lack of reliable and efficient failure analysis tools for composites have led industries to rely more on coupon and component level testing to estimate the design space. Due to the complex failure mechanisms, composite materials require a very large number of coupon level tests to fully characterize the behavior. This makes the entire testing process very time consuming and costly. The alternative is to use virtual testing tools which can predict the complex failure mechanisms accurately. This reduces the cost only to it's associated computational expenses making significant savings. Some of the most desired features in a virtual testing tool are - (1) Accurate representation of failure mechanism: Failure progression predicted by the virtual tool must be same as those observed in experiments. A tool has to be assessed based on the mechanisms it can capture. (2) Computational efficiency: The greatest advantages of a virtual tools are the savings in time and money and hence computational efficiency is one of the most needed features. (3) Applicability to a wide range of problems: Structural parts are subjected to a variety of loading conditions including static, dynamic and fatigue conditions. A good virtual testing tool should be able to make good predictions for all these different loading conditions. The aim of this PhD thesis is to develop a computational tool which can model the progressive failure of composite laminates under different quasi-static loading conditions. The analysis

  9. Repair of postirradiation damage to colorectum: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, E.M.; Johnston, W.D.; Patwardhan, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of 21 operations for repair of rectovaginal fistula and/or stricture secondary to irradiation for pelvic cancer are presented. The operations rely on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon with normal blood supply for effecting the repair. In patients having had a previous colostomy, it is possible to use the proximal end of the bypassed colon for this purpose. There is minimal dissection of the rectal ampulla and the presacral space is never entered. Continuity is established by anastomosis to the anterior rectal wall via an abdominal approach alone, or by a combined abdominovaginal or abdominoperineal approach. It has been found that nonirradiated colon of normal vascularity can be expected to heal to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making the extensive resections associated with correction of these abnormalities unnecessary. The functional result in 18 of 19 patients who underwent this procedure was satisfactory to excellent. One patient had a poor result because of partial rectal incontinence. Two operations out of the 21 were total failures and one of these patients died of complications secondary to irradiation damage to the small intestine. One patient has not yet had final colostomy closure. The results are considered promising enough to warrant continued trial

  10. Self-Calibrating Ultrasonic Methods for In-Situ Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Mi, B.; Cobb, A.C.; Michaels, T.E.; Stobbe, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors permanently affixed to aluminum coupons are used to monitor progression of damage during fatigue testing with the long term goal of structural health monitoring for diagnostics and prognostics. Necessary for success are proper design of the ultrasonic testing methods, robust transducer mounting techniques, and real-time signal processing for determining the state of the structure. It is also highly desirable for the overall system to be self-calibrating with built-in diagnostics in order to detect and compensate for sensor degradation or failure. Self-calibrating ultrasonic techniques are applied for monitoring of cracks initiating and propagating from the inaccessible inner diameters of rivet holes where the transducers are mounted on the accessible specimen surface. Angle beam ultrasonic methods are utilized that are suitable for detecting small defects in critical local regions of high stress. Results are presented for aluminum coupons subjected to low cycle fatigue and demonstrate ultrasonic tracking of crack growth

  11. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  12. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  13. Progression of structural damage is not related to rituximab serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Maria; Teng, Onno; Thurlings, Rogier; Bijlsma, Johannes; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom; Vos, Koen; Stapel, Steven; Wolbink, Gertjan; Tekstra, Janneke; van Laar, Jaap; Tak, Paul P.

    2013-01-01

    The most cost-effective dosing regimen for rituximab treatment in RA is currently unknown. The objective of this study is to determine whether low rituximab serum levels are associated with progression of structural damage in RA patients. Sixty-two RA patients were treated with rituximab in three

  14. Recent Progress in Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Celine I L; Duarte, Armando C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P

    2017-12-15

    The environmental monitoring has been one of the priorities at the European and global scale due to the close relationship between the environmental pollution and the human health/socioeconomic development. In this field, the biosensors have been widely employed as cost-effective, fast, in situ, and real-time analytical techniques. The need of portable, rapid, and smart biosensing devices explains the recent development of biosensors with new transduction materials, obtained from nanotechnology, and for multiplexed pollutant detection, involving multidisciplinary experts. This review article provides an update on recent progress in biosensors for the monitoring of air, water, and soil pollutants in real conditions such as pesticides, potentially toxic elements, and small organic molecules including toxins and endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  15. Global Monitoring of the CTBT: Progress, Capabilities and Plans (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbo, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), established in 1996, is tasked with building up the verification regime of the CTBT. The regime includes a global system for monitoring the earth, the oceans and the atmosphere for nuclear tests, and an on-site inspection (OSI) capability. More than 80% of the 337 facilities of the International Monitoring System (IMS) have been installed and are sending data to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria for processing. These IMS data along with IDC processed and reviewed products are available to all States that have signed the Treaty. Concurrent with the build-up of the global monitoring networks, near-field geophysical methods are being developed and tested for OSIs. The monitoring system is currently operating in a provisional mode, as the Treaty has not yet entered into force. Progress in installing and operating the IMS and the IDC and in building up an OSI capability will be described. The capabilities of the monitoring networks have progressively improved as stations are added to the IMS and IDC processing techniques refined. Detection thresholds for seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide events have been measured and in general are equal to or lower than the predictions used during the Treaty negotiations. The measurements have led to improved models and tools that allow more accurate predictions of future capabilities and network performance under any configuration. Unplanned tests of the monitoring network occurred when the DPRK announced nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, and 2013. All three tests were well above the detection threshold and easily detected and located by the seismic monitoring network. In addition, noble gas consistent with the nuclear tests in 2006 and 2013 (according to atmospheric transport models) was detected by stations in the network. On-site inspections of these tests were not conducted as the Treaty has not entered

  16. Analysis of severe core damage accident progression for the heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Lili; Yuan Kai; Yuan Jingtian; Cao Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the severe accident progression analysis of generic Canadian deuterium uranium reactor 6 was preliminarily provided using an integrated severe accident analysis code. The selected accident sequences were multiple steam generator tube rupture and large break loss-of-coolant accidents because these led to severe core damage with an assumed unavailability for several critical safety systems. The progressions of severe accident included a set of failed safety systems normally operated at full power, and initiative events led to primary heat transport system inventory blow-down or boil off. The core heat-up and melting, steam generator response,fuel channel and calandria vessel failure were analyzed. The results showed that the progression of a severe core damage accident induced by steam generator tube rupture or large break loss-of-coolant accidents in a CANDU reactor was slow due to heat sinks in the calandria vessel and vault. (authors)

  17. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwilsky, Klaus M.

    1979-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to Section II, Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DOE/ET-0032/2), of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program Plan so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1 and 2 report topics which are generic to all of the DAFS Program: DAFS Task Group Activities and Irradiation Test Facilities, respectively. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 report the work that is specific to each of the subtasks around which the program is structured: A) Environmental Characterization, B) Damage Production, and C) Damage Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior.

  18. Roller Bearing Monitoring by New Subspace-Based Damage Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gautier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A frequency-band subspace-based damage identification method for fault diagnosis in roller bearings is presented. Subspace-based damage indicators are obtained by filtering the vibration data in the frequency range where damage is likely to occur, that is, around the bearing characteristic frequencies. The proposed method is validated by considering simulated data of a damaged bearing. Also, an experimental case is considered which focuses on collecting the vibration data issued from a run-to-failure test. It is shown that the proposed method can detect bearing defects and, as such, it appears to be an efficient tool for diagnosis purpose.

  19. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  20. Critical and subcritical damage monitoring of bonded composite repairs using innovative non-destructive techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Aggelis, D. G.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Infrared Thermography (IrT) has been shown to be capable of detecting and monitoring service induced damage of repair composite structures. Full-field imaging, along with portability are the primary benefits of the thermographic technique. On-line lock-in thermography has been reported to successfully monitor damage propagation or/and stress concentration in composite coupons, as mechanical stresses in structures induce heat concentration phenomena around flaws. During mechanical fatigue, cyclic loading plays the role of the heating source and this allows for critical and subcritical damage identification and monitoring using thermography. The Electrical Potential Change Technique (EPCT) is a new method for damage identification and monitoring during loading. The measurement of electrical potential changes at specific points of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRPs) under load are reported to enable the monitoring of strain or/and damage accumulation. Along with the aforementioned techniques Finally, Acoustic Emission (AE) method is well known to provide information about the location and type of damage. Damage accumulation due to cyclic loading imposes differentiation of certain parameters of AE like duration and energy. Within the scope of this study, infrared thermography is employed along with AE and EPCT methods in order to assess the integrity of bonded repair patches on composite substrates and to monitor critical and subcritical damage induced by the mechanical loading. The combined methodologies were effective in identifying damage initiation and propagation of bonded composite repairs.

  1. Structural Health Monitoring: Numerical Damage Predictor for Composite Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lannamann, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    .... Wide use of composites is found in aircraft, armored vehicles, ships and civil structures This present research demonstrates the ability to numerically detect damage in a composite sandwich structure...

  2. Damage Detection Using Lamb Waves for Structural Health Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crider II, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    .... This study evaluates Lamb wave approaches used to detect simulated cracks in laboratory experiments on thin plates to detect more realistic damage in a test article representing the complex geometry...

  3. A methodology for the analysis of damage progression in rubble mound breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Duque, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, risk based designs as well as reliable rehabilitation and maintenance strategies are essential when dealing with coastal structures. In this sense, the probability of failure due to instability of the armour layer is one of the main issues in rubble mound breakwaters, and so is improving the knowledge on its deterioration rate. Both stability and damage progression on rubble mound breakwaters have been studied for more than 80 years, using different approaches, under regular/irregul...

  4. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlei Liu

    Full Text Available A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading. Keywords: Laser irradiation, Multiscale analysis, Bridge model, Thermal-mechanical

  5. Assessment of Intralaminar Progressive Damage and Failure Analysis Using an Efficient Evaluation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Imran; Schaefer, Joseph; Justusson, Brian; Wanthal, Steve; Leone, Frank; Rose, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the timeline for development and certification for composite structures has been a long standing objective of the aerospace industry. This timeline can be further exacerbated when attempting to integrate new fiber-reinforced composite materials due to the large number of testing required at every level of design. computational progressive damage and failure analysis (PDFA) attempts to mitigate this effect; however, new PDFA methods have been slow to be adopted in industry since material model evaluation techniques have not been fully defined. This study presents an efficient evaluation framework which uses a piecewise verification and validation (V&V) approach for PDFA methods. Specifically, the framework is applied to evaluate PDFA research codes within the context of intralaminar damage. Methods are incrementally taken through various V&V exercises specifically tailored to study PDFA intralaminar damage modeling capability. Finally, methods are evaluated against a defined set of success criteria to highlight successes and limitations.

  6. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwilsky, Klaus M.

    1979-05-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title (to be published) so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to the Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1 and 2 report topics which are generic to all of the DAFS Program: DAFS Task Group Activities and Irradiation Test Facilities, respectively. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 report the work that is specific to each of the subtasks around which the program is structured: A) Environmental Characterization, B) Damage Production, and C) Damage Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior.

  7. Monitoring of fatigue damage in composite lap-joints using guided waves and FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Khomenko, Anton; Koricho, Ermias; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2016-02-01

    Adhesive bonding is being increasingly employed in many applications as it offers possibility of light-weighting and efficient multi-material joining along with reduction in time and cost of manufacturing. However, failure initiation and progression in critical components like joints, specifically in fatigue loading is not well understood, which necessitates reliable NDE and SHM techniques to ensure structural integrity. In this work, concurrent guided wave (GW) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor measurements were used to monitor fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints. In the present set-up, one FBG sensor was strategically embedded in the adhesive bond-line of a lap-joint, while two other FBGs were bonded on the surface of the adherends. Full spectral responses of FBG sensors were collected and compared at specific intervals of fatigue loading. In parallel, guided waves were actuated and sensed using PZT wafers mounted on the composite adherends. Experimental results demonstrated that time-of-flight (ToF) of the fundamental modes transmitted through the bond-line and spectral response of FBG sensors were sensitive to fatigue loading and damage. Combination of guided wave and FBG measurements provided the desired redundancy and synergy in the data to evaluate the degradation in bond-line properties. Measurements taken in the presence of continuously applied load replicated the in-situ/service conditions. The approach shows promise in understanding the behavior of bonded joints subjected to complex loading.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  9. Using expectations to monitor robotic progress and recover from problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Unmesh; Lebiere, Christian; Stentz, Anthony; Hebert, Martial

    2013-05-01

    How does a robot know when something goes wrong? Our research answers this question by leveraging expectations - predictions about the immediate future - and using the mismatch between the expectations and the external world to monitor the robot's progress. We use the cognitive architecture ACT-R (Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational) to learn the associations between the current state of the robot and the world, the action to be performed in the world, and the future state of the world. These associations are used to generate expectations that are then matched by the architecture with the next state of the world. A significant mismatch between these expectations and the actual state of the world indicate a problem possibly resulting from unexpected consequences of the robot's actions, unforeseen changes in the environment or unanticipated actions of other agents. When a problem is detected, the recovery model can suggest a number of recovery options. If the situation is unknown, that is, the mismatch between expectations and the world is novel, the robot can use a recovery solution from a set of heuristic options. When a recovery option is successfully applied, the robot learns to associate that recovery option with the mismatch. When the same problem is encountered later, the robot can apply the learned recovery solution rather than using the heuristics or randomly exploring the space of recovery solutions. We present results from execution monitoring and recovery performed during an assessment conducted at the Combined Arms Collective Training Facility (CACTF) at Fort Indiantown Gap.

  10. Detailed Post-Soft Impact Progressive Damage Assessment for Hybrid Structure Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Aaron; Bayandor, Javid; Celestina, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, certification of engine designs for resistance to bird strike is reliant on physical tests. Predictive modeling of engine structural damage has mostly been limited to evaluation of individual forward section components, such as fan blades within a fixed frame of reference, to direct impact with a bird. Such models must be extended to include interactions among engine components under operating conditions to evaluate the full extent of engine damage. This paper presents the results of a study aim to develop a methodology for evaluating bird strike damage in advanced propulsion systems incorporating hybrid composite/metal structures. The initial degradation and failure of individual fan blades struck by a bird were investigated. Subsequent damage to other fan blades and engine components due to resultant violent fan assembly vibrations and fragmentation was further evaluated. Various modeling parameters for the bird and engine components were investigated to determine guidelines for accurately capturing initial damage and progressive failure of engine components. Then, a novel hybrid structure modeling approach was investigated and incorporated into the crashworthiness methodology. Such a tool is invaluable to the process of design, development, and certification of future advanced propulsion systems.

  11. Monitoring elastic strain and damage by neutron and synchrotron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale neutron and synchrotron X-ray facilities have been providing important information for physicists and chemists for many decades. Increasingly, materials engineers are finding that they can also provide them with important information non-destructively. Highly penetrating neutron and X-ray synchrotron beams provide the materials engineer with a means of obtaining information about the state of stress and damage deep within materials. In this paper the principles underlying the elastic strain measurement and damage characterization techniques are introduced. (orig.)

  12. Estimating Cone and Seed Production and Monitoring Pest Damage in Southern Pine Seed Orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl W. Fatzinger; H. David Muse; Thomas Miller; Helen T. Bhattacharyya

    1988-01-01

    Field sampling procedures and computer programs are described for monitoring seed production and pest damage in southern pine seed orchards. The system estimates total orchard yields of female strobili and seeds, quantifies pest damage, determines times of year when losses occur, and produces life tables for female strobili. An example is included to illustrate the...

  13. Crucial Component Damage Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers an on-board structural health-monitoring (SHM) system with embedded sensors that sense mechanical impedance deviations to flag incipient...

  14. Monitoring the progress of non-enzymatic glycation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Crabbe, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The progress of in vitro non-enzymatic glycation of bovine serum albumin was followed by using 14 C-glucose and a nitroblue tetrazolium assay, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS gel electrophoresis and protease digestion. The number of adducts detectable using both 14 C-tracers and a fructosamine assay remained low at physiological glucose concentrations, fewer than five adducts being detectable. When glucose concentrations > 1.0 M were used the number of adducts was found to greatly exceed the number of lysyl residues available in BSA, indicative of cross-linking between Maillard products. Incubation of BSA with glucose concentrations of up to 160 mM for one month produced no observable increase in molecular weight by SDS gel electrophoresis, showing that at physiological glucose concentrations, increases in molecular weight were minimal for short incubation periods. Increases in absorption were proportial to both the glucose concentration and the incubation time. Several absorption peaks, at 370, 488 and 554 nm, were consistent in appearance throughout the course of each incubation. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the modified proteins showed a disappearance of the fluorescence associated with peptide bonds and aromatic residues and the appearance of a broad peak at longer wavelengths due to the wide range of absorptive/fluorescent wavelengths of the developing Maillard products. Protease digestion gave similar patterns with non-glycated and glycated protein, suggesting that glycation did not block digestion sites, and that partial digestion did not cause significant further exposure of susceptible sites. Our results show that while glycation ultimately results in protein conformational changes and the formation of large molecular weight species, these occur at a relatively late stage in the maturation of protein Maillard products, after ≥ nine months of incubation with glucose concentration of ≥ 20 mM. Monitoring of AGE maturation in vitro is better

  15. Fuselage Versus Subcomponent Panel Response Correlation Based on ABAQUS Explicit Progressive Damage Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis performed in this study substantiates the need for high fidelity vehicle level progressive damage analyses (PDA) structural models for use in the verification and validation of proposed sub-scale structural models and to support required full-scale vehicle level testing. PDA results are presented that capture and correlate the responses of sub-scale 3-stringer and 7-stringer panel models and an idealized 8-ft diameter fuselage model, which provides a vehicle level environment for the 7-stringer sub-scale panel model. Two unique skin-stringer attachment assumptions are considered and correlated in the models analyzed: the TIE constraint interface versus the cohesive element (COH3D8) interface. Evaluating different interfaces allows for assessing a range of predicted damage modes, including delamination and crack propagation responses. Damage models considered in this study are the ABAQUS built-in Hashin procedure and the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage procedure implemented through a VUMAT user subroutine using the ABAQUS/Explicit code.

  16. Does monitoring goal progress promote goal attainment? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Benjamin; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Prestwich, Andrew; Conner, Mark; Kellar, Ian; Benn, Yael; Sheeran, Paschal

    2016-02-01

    Control theory and other frameworks for understanding self-regulation suggest that monitoring goal progress is a crucial process that intervenes between setting and attaining a goal, and helps to ensure that goals are translated into action. However, the impact of progress monitoring interventions on rates of behavioral performance and goal attainment has yet to be quantified. A systematic literature search identified 138 studies (N = 19,951) that randomly allocated participants to an intervention designed to promote monitoring of goal progress versus a control condition. All studies reported the effects of the treatment on (a) the frequency of progress monitoring and (b) subsequent goal attainment. A random effects model revealed that, on average, interventions were successful at increasing the frequency of monitoring goal progress (d+ = 1.98, 95% CI [1.71, 2.24]) and promoted goal attainment (d+ = 0.40, 95% CI [0.32, 0.48]). Furthermore, changes in the frequency of progress monitoring mediated the effect of the interventions on goal attainment. Moderation tests revealed that progress monitoring had larger effects on goal attainment when the outcomes were reported or made public, and when the information was physically recorded. Taken together, the findings suggest that monitoring goal progress is an effective self-regulation strategy, and that interventions that increase the frequency of progress monitoring are likely to promote behavior change. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Optimal filter design with progressive genetic algorithm for local damage detection in rolling bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecki, Jacek; Michalak, Anna; Zimroz, Radoslaw

    2018-03-01

    Harsh industrial conditions present in underground mining cause a lot of difficulties for local damage detection in heavy-duty machinery. For vibration signals one of the most intuitive approaches of obtaining signal with expected properties, such as clearly visible informative features, is prefiltration with appropriately prepared filter. Design of such filter is very broad field of research on its own. In this paper authors propose a novel approach to dedicated optimal filter design using progressive genetic algorithm. Presented method is fully data-driven and requires no prior knowledge of the signal. It has been tested against a set of real and simulated data. Effectiveness of operation has been proven for both healthy and damaged case. Termination criterion for evolution process was developed, and diagnostic decision making feature has been proposed for final result determinance.

  18. Increased DNA damage in progression of COPD: a response by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Oit-Wiscombe

    Full Text Available Chronic oxidative stress (OS, a major mechanism of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, may cause significant damage to DNA. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 is rapidly activated by OS-induced DNA lesions. However, the degree of DNA damage along with the evolution of COPD is unclear. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smoking individuals, non-obstructive smokers, patients with COPD of all stages and those with COPD exacerbation, we evaluated DNA damage, PARP activity and PARP-1 mRNA expression using Comet Assay IV, biotinylated-NAD incorporation assay and qRT-PCR, respectively and subjected results to ordinal logistic regression modelling. Adjusted for demographics, smoking-related parameters and lung function, novel comet parameters, tail length/cell length ratio and tail migration/cell length ratio, showed the greatest increase along the study groups corresponding to the evolution of COPD [odds ratio (OR 7.88, 95% CI 4.26-14.57; p<0.001 and OR 3.91, 95% CI 2.69-5.66; p<0.001, respectively]. Analogously, PARP activity increased significantly over the groups (OR = 1.01; 95%; p<0.001. An antioxidant tetrapeptide UPF17 significantly reduced the PARP-1 mRNA expression in COPD, compared to that in non-obstructive individuals (p = 0.040. Tail length/cell length and tail migration/cell length ratios provide novel progression-sensitive tools for assessment of DNA damage. However, it remains to be elucidated whether inhibition of an elevated PARP-1 activity has a safe enough potential to break the vicious cycle of the development and progression of COPD.

  19. Towards mechanisms-guided resistivity-based monitoring of damage evolution in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2013-04-05

    A convenient health monitoring technique for detecting degradation in laminated composite is to monitor the change of electrical resistance along multiple conduction paths within the structure. Yet, the relations between the global modification of resistivity and the exact underlying damage map is still unclear that makes diffcult to interpret these nondestructive-testing results. The challenge is then to be able to reconstruct from these global observation the underlying damage map. This is even more diffcult due to the numerous underlying damage mechanisms that can take place either at the inter laminar of intra laminar level. This paper intends to provide some preliminary insights about strategies to recover the damage state based only on global measurements. We focus here on transverse cracking detection. We introduce the homogenization process that defines at the meso scale an equivalent homogeneous ply that is energetically equivalent to the cracked one. This can be used as a first tool to reconstruct damage maps based on global resistivity measurements.

  20. Automatic progressive damage detection of rotor bar in induction motor using vibration analysis and multiple classifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Vega, Israel; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in developing reliable condition monitoring and fault diagnosis systems of machines like induction motors; such interest is not only in the final phase of the failure but also at early stages. In this paper, several levels of damage of rotor bars under different load conditions are identified by means of vibration signals. The importance of this work relies on a simple but effective automatic detection algorithm of the damage before a break occurs. The feature extraction is based on discrete wavelet analysis and auto- correlation process. Then, the automatic classification of the fault degree is carried out by a binary classification tree. In each node, com- paring the learned levels of the breaking off correctly identifies the fault degree. The best results of classification are obtained employing computational intelligence techniques like support vector machines, multilayer perceptron, and the k-NN algorithm, with a proper selection of their optimal parameters.

  1. Automatic progressive damage detection of rotor bar in induction motor using vibration analysis and multiple classifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Vega, Israel; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde [Santa María Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2017-06-15

    There is an increased interest in developing reliable condition monitoring and fault diagnosis systems of machines like induction motors; such interest is not only in the final phase of the failure but also at early stages. In this paper, several levels of damage of rotor bars under different load conditions are identified by means of vibration signals. The importance of this work relies on a simple but effective automatic detection algorithm of the damage before a break occurs. The feature extraction is based on discrete wavelet analysis and auto- correlation process. Then, the automatic classification of the fault degree is carried out by a binary classification tree. In each node, com- paring the learned levels of the breaking off correctly identifies the fault degree. The best results of classification are obtained employing computational intelligence techniques like support vector machines, multilayer perceptron, and the k-NN algorithm, with a proper selection of their optimal parameters.

  2. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compressio...

  3. A Progressive Damage Model for unidirectional Fibre Reinforced Composites with Application to Impact and Penetration Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaum, M.; Hopmann, C.

    2016-06-01

    The computationally efficient simulation of the progressive damage behaviour of continuous fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenging task with currently available computer aided engineering methods. This paper presents an original approach for an energy based continuum damage model which accounts for stress-/strain nonlinearities, transverse and shear stress interaction phenomena, quasi-plastic shear strain components, strain rate effects, regularised damage evolution and consideration of load reversal effects. The physically based modelling approach enables experimental determination of all parameters on ply level to avoid expensive inverse analysis procedures. The modelling strategy, implementation and verification of this model using commercially available explicit finite element software are detailed. The model is then applied to simulate the impact and penetration of carbon fibre reinforced cross-ply specimens with variation of the impact speed. The simulation results show that the presented approach enables a good representation of the force-/displacement curves and especially well agreement with the experimentally observed fracture patterns. In addition, the mesh dependency of the results were assessed for one impact case showing only very little change of the simulation results which emphasises the general applicability of the presented method.

  4. Monitoring Progress in Child Poverty Reduction: Methodological Insights and Illustration to the Case Study of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Jose Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Important steps have been taken at international summits to set up goals and targets to improve the wellbeing of children worldwide. Now the world also has more and better data to monitor progress. This paper presents a new approach to monitoring progress in child poverty reduction based on the Alkire and Foster adjusted headcount ratio and an…

  5. Behavioral-Progress Monitoring Using the Electronic Daily Behavioral Report Card (e-DBRC) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mack D.; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an overview of a Web-based electronic system for behavioral-progress monitoring. Behavioral-progress monitoring is necessary to evaluate responsiveness to behavioral interventions, the effects of positive behavioral support, and the attainment of individualized education program goals and objectives. The…

  6. Monitoring radiation damage in the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Graverini, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of LHCb is to search for indirect evidence of new physics in decays of heavy hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer with precise silicon-strip detectors in the regions with highest particle occupancies. The non-uniform exposure of the LHCb sensors makes it an ideal laboratory to study radiation damage effects in silicon detectors. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is composed of an upstream tracker, the TT, and of the inner part of the downstream tracker (IT). Dedicated scans are regularly taken, which allow a precise measurement of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the calibration of the operational voltages. The measured evolution of the effective depletion voltage $V_{depl}$ is shown, and compared with the Hamburg model prediction. The magnitudes of the sensor leakage current are also analysed and compared to their expected evolution according to phenomenological models. Our results prove that both the TT and the IT will withstand normal operation until the end of the L...

  7. A Hybrid Change Detection Approach for Damage Detection and Recovery Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis Pitts, Dilkushi; Wieland, Marc; Wang, Shifeng; So, Emily; Pittore, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Following a disaster, change detection via pre- and post-event very high resolution remote sensing images is an essential technique for damage assessment and recovery monitoring over large areas in complex urban environments. Most assessments to date focus on detection, destruction and recovery of man-made objects that facilitate shelter and accessibility, such as buildings, roads, bridges, etc., as indicators for assessment and better decision making. Moreover, many current change-detection mechanisms do not use all the data and knowledge which are often available for the pre-disaster state. Recognizing the continuous rather than dichotomous character of the data-rich/data-poor distinction permits the incorporation of ancillary data and existing knowledge into the processing flow. Such incorporation could improve the reliability of the results and thereby enhance the usability of robust methods for disaster management. This study proposes an application-specific and robust change detection method from multi-temporal very high resolution multi-spectral satellite images. This hybrid indicator-specific method uses readily available pre-disaster GIS data and integrates existing knowledge into the processing flow to optimize the change detection while offering the possibility to target specific types of changes to man-made objects. The indicator-specific information of the GIS objects is used as a series of masks to treat the GIS objects with similar characteristics similarly for better accuracy. The proposed approach is based on a fusion of a multi-index change detection method based on gradient, texture and edge similarity filters. The change detection index is flexible for disaster cases in which the pre-disaster and post-disaster images are not of the same resolution. The proposed automated method is evaluated with QuickBird and Ikonos datasets for abrupt changes soon after disaster. The method could also be extended in a semi-automated way for monitoring

  8. Damage monitoring in historical murals by speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsch, Klaus D.; Gulker, Gerd; Joost, Holger

    2003-11-01

    In the conservation of historical murals it is important to identify loose plaster sections that threaten to fall off. Electronic speckle interferometry in combination with acoustic excitation of the object has been employed to monitor loose areas. To avoid disadvantages of high sound irradiation of the complete building a novel directional audio-sound source based on nonlinear mixing of ultrasound has been introduced. The optical system was revised for optimum performance in the new environment. Emphasis is placed on noise suppression to increase sensitivity. Furthermore, amplitude and phase data of object response over the frequency-range inspected are employed to gain additional information on the state of the plaster or paint. Laboratory studies on sample specimen supplement field campaigns at historical sites.

  9. Modelling Pre-eruptive Progressive Damage in Basaltic Volcanoes: Consequences for the Pre-eruptive Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got, J. L.; Amitrano, D.; Carrier, A.; Marsan, D.; Jouanne, F.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    At Grimsvötn volcano, high-quality earthquake and continuous GPS data were recorded by the Icelandic Meteorological Office during its 2004-2011 inter-eruptive period and exhibited remarkable patterns : acceleration of the cumulated earthquake number, and a 2-year exponential decrease in displacement rate followed by a 4-year constant inflation rate. We proposed a model with one magma reservoir in a non-linear elastic damaging edifice, with incompressible magma and a constant pressure at the base of the magma conduit. We first modelled seismicity rate and damage as a function of time, and show that Kachanov's elastic brittle damage law may be used to express the decrease of the effective shear modulus with time. We then derived simple analytical expressions for the magma reservoir overpressure and the surface displacement as a function of time. We got a very good fit of the seismicity and surface displacement data by adjusting only three phenomenological parameters and computed magma reservoir overpressure, magma flow and strain power as a function of time. Overpressure decrease is controlled by damage and shear modulus decrease. Displacement increases, although overpressure is decreasing, because shear modulus decreases more than overpressure. Normalized strain power reaches a maximum 0.25 value. This maximum is a physical limit, after which the elasticity laws are no longer valid, earthquakes cluster, cumulative number of earthquakes departs from the model. State variable extrema provide four reference times that may be used to assess the mechanical state and dynamics of the volcanic edifice. We also performed the spatial modelling of the progressive damage and strain localization around a pressurized magma reservoir. We used Kachanov's damage law and finite element modelling of an initially elastic volcanic edifice pressurized by a spherical magma reservoir, with a constant pressure in the reservoir and various external boundary conditions. At each node of the

  10. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Laurence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Qu, Jisnmin [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wall, Joe [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  11. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor - a sensor that can continuously monitor a material's damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks

  12. Hierarchical fiber-optic-based sensing system: impact damage monitoring of large-scale CFRP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Banshoya, Hidehiko; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsukamoto, Haruka

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a novel fiber-optic-based hierarchical sensing concept for monitoring randomly induced damage in large-scale composite structures. In a hierarchical system, several kinds of specialized devices are hierarchically combined to form a sensing network. Specifically, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with an optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed devices detect damage, and the fiber-optic network gathers the damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of a hierarchical sensing system through comparison with existing fiber-optic-based systems, and an impact damage detection system was then proposed to validate the new concept. The sensor devices were developed based on comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM), and Brillouin-based distributed strain measurement was utilized to identify damaged areas. Verification tests were conducted step-by-step, beginning with a basic test using a single sensor unit, and, finally, the proposed monitoring system was successfully verified using a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fuselage demonstrator. It was clearly confirmed that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and a wider monitorable area compared to existing systems

  13. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level.

  14. Damage detection with streamlined structural health monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-04-15

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems' capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level.

  15. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation Via AC-29-2C Using Damage Progression Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the results of spiral bevel gear rig tests performed under a NASA Space Act Agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to support validation and demonstration of rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for maintenance credits via FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 29-2C, Section MG-15, Airworthiness Approval of Rotorcraft (HUMS) (Ref. 1). The overarching goal of this work was to determine a method to validate condition indicators in the lab that better represent their response to faults in the field. Using existing in-service helicopter HUMS flight data from faulted spiral bevel gears as a "Case Study," to better understand the differences between both systems, and the availability of the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig, a plan was put in place to design, fabricate and test comparable gear sets with comparable failure modes within the constraints of the test rig. The research objectives of the rig tests were to evaluate the capability of detecting gear surface pitting fatigue and other generated failure modes on spiral bevel gear teeth using gear condition indicators currently used in fielded HUMS. Nineteen final design gear sets were tested. Tables were generated for each test, summarizing the failure modes observed on the gear teeth for each test during each inspection interval and color coded based on damage mode per inspection photos. Gear condition indicators (CI) Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS), +/- 1 Sideband Index (SI1) and +/- 3 Sideband Index (SI3) were plotted along with rig operational parameters. Statistical tables of the means and standard deviations were calculated within inspection intervals for each CI. As testing progressed, it became clear that certain condition indicators were more sensitive to a specific component and failure mode. These tests were clustered together for further analysis. Maintenance actions during testing were also documented. Correlation coefficients were

  16. Fatigue Damage Monitoring of a Composite Step Lap Joint Using Distributed Optical Fibre Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leslie; Chowdhury, Nabil; Wang, John; Chiu, Wing Kong; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a considerable interest in the use of distributed optical fibre sensors (DOFS) for structural health monitoring of composite structures. In aerospace-related work, health monitoring of the adhesive joints of composites has become more significant, as they can suffer from cracking and delamination, which can have a significant impact on the integrity of the joint. In this paper, a swept-wavelength interferometry (SWI) based DOFS technique is used to monitor the fatigue in a flush step lap joint composite structure. The presented results will show the potential application of distributed optical fibre sensor for damage detection, as well as monitoring the fatigue crack growth along the bondline of a step lap joint composite structure. The results confirmed that a distributed optical fibre sensor is able to enhance the detection of localised damage in a structure. PMID:28773496

  17. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1980-09-01

    In this project several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and a series of experiments detailed utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. Under current investigation are irradiated systems of DNA constituents which may shed light on indirect effects. In addition, studies of radiation effects on lipids have been undertaken which will shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane. Studies completed during the past year are: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by attack of oxidizing radicals; (2) INDO studies of radicals produced in peptides and carboxylic acid model compounds; (3) electron reactions with carboxylic acids, ketones and aldehydes; and (4) γ-irradiation of esters and triglycerides. Progress has been made this year in a study of radicals generated in model compounds for the sugar-phosphate backbone

  18. Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 2, January/February 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the following aspects of the program: electrical uses; direct-heat uses; leases; outreach and technical assistance; general activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; and reports and publications. (MHR)

  19. Damage Detection Sensitivity of a Vehicle-based Bridge Health Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Yabe, Akito; Lúcio, Válter J. G.

    2017-05-01

    As one solution to the problem for condition assessment of existing short and medium span (10-30m) reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges, a new monitoring method using a public bus as part of a public transit system (called “Bus monitoring system”) was proposed, along with safety indices, namely, “characteristic deflection”, which is relatively free from the influence of dynamic disturbances due to such factors as the roughness of the road surface, and a structural anomaly parameter. In this study, to evaluate the practicality of the newly developed bus monitoring system, it has been field-tested over a period of about four years by using an in-service fixed-route bus operating on a bus route in the city of Ube, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. In here, although there are some useful monitoring methods for short and medium span bridges based on the qualitative or quantitative information, the sensitivity of damage detection was newly discussed for safety assessment based on long term health monitoring data. The verification results thus obtained are also described in this paper, and also evaluates the sensitivity of the “characteristic deflection”, which is a bridge (health) condition indicator used by the bus monitoring system, in damage detection. Sensitivity of “characteristic deflection” is verified by introducing artificial damage into a bridge that has ended its service life and is awaiting removal. Furthermore, the sensitivity of “characteristic deflection” is verified by 3D FEM analysis.

  20. Piezoelectric dynamic strain monitoring for detecting local seismic damage in steel buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Masahiro; Li, Xiaohua; Fujita, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Mayako

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a methodology for damage detection along with a sensing system for monitoring seismic damage in steel buildings. The system extracts the location and extent of local damage, such as fracture at a beam–column connection, from changes in the bending moment distribution in a steel moment-resisting frame. We developed a dynamic strain-based sensing system utilizing piezoelectric film sensors and wireless sensing techniques to estimate the bending moments resisted by individual structural members under small amplitude loadings such as ambient vibrations and minor earthquakes. We introduce a new damage index that extracts local damage information from the comparative study of the dynamic strain responses of the structural members before and after a large earthquake event. The damage detection scheme was examined both analytically and numerically using a simple frame example. Then, the entire local damage detection scheme was verified through a series of vibration tests using a one-quarter-scale steel testbed that simulated seismic damage at member ends. (paper)

  1. Progress and lessons learned from water-quality monitoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Donna N.; Ludtke, Amy S.

    2017-01-01

    Stream-quality monitoring networks in the United States were initiated and expanded after passage of successive federal water-pollution control laws from 1948 to 1972. The first networks addressed information gaps on the extent and severity of stream pollution and served as early warning systems for spills. From 1965 to 1972, monitoring networks expanded to evaluate compliance with stream standards, track emerging issues, and assess water-quality status and trends. After 1972, concerns arose regarding the ability of monitoring networks to determine if water quality was getting better or worse and why. As a result, monitoring networks adopted a hydrologic systems approach targeted to key water-quality issues, accounted for human and natural factors affecting water quality, innovated new statistical methods, and introduced geographic information systems and models that predict water quality at unmeasured locations. Despite improvements, national-scale monitoring networks have declined over time. Only about 1%, or 217, of more than 36,000 US Geological Survey monitoring sites sampled from 1975 to 2014 have been operated throughout the four decades since passage of the 1972 Clean Water Act. Efforts to sustain monitoring networks are important because these networks have collected information crucial to the description of water-quality trends over time and are providing information against which to evaluate future trends.

  2. Individual aircraft life monitoring: An engineering approach for fatigue damage evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui JIAO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual aircraft life monitoring is required to ensure safety and economy of aircraft structure, and fatigue damage evaluation based on collected operational data of aircraft is an integral part of it. To improve the accuracy and facilitate the application, this paper proposes an engineering approach to evaluate fatigue damage and predict fatigue life for critical structures in fatigue monitoring. In this approach, traditional nominal stress method is applied to back calculate the S-N curve parameters of the realistic structure details based on full-scale fatigue test data. Then the S-N curve and Miner’s rule are adopted in damage estimation and fatigue life analysis for critical locations under individual load spectra. The relationship between relative small crack length and fatigue life can also be predicted with this approach. Specimens of 7B04-T74 aluminum alloy and TA15M titanium alloy are fatigue tested under two types of load spectra, and there is a good agreement between the experimental results and analysis results. Furthermore, the issue concerning scatter factor in individual aircraft damage estimation is also discussed. Keywords: Fatigue damage, Fatigue monitoring, Fatigue test, Scatter factor, S-N curve

  3. Damage tolerance modeling and validation of a wireless sensory composite panel for a structural health monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagani, Mohamad R.; Abdi, Frank; Saravanos, Dimitris; Chrysohoidis, Nikos; Nikbin, Kamran; Ragalini, Rose; Rodov, Irena

    2013-05-01

    The paper proposes the diagnostic and prognostic modeling and test validation of a Wireless Integrated Strain Monitoring and Simulation System (WISMOS). The effort verifies a hardware and web based software tool that is able to evaluate and optimize sensorized aerospace composite structures for the purpose of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The tool is an extension of an existing suite of an SHM system, based on a diagnostic-prognostic system (DPS) methodology. The goal of the extended SHM-DPS is to apply multi-scale nonlinear physics-based Progressive Failure analyses to the "as-is" structural configuration to determine residual strength, remaining service life, and future inspection intervals and maintenance procedures. The DPS solution meets the JTI Green Regional Aircraft (GRA) goals towards low weight, durable and reliable commercial aircraft. It will take advantage of the currently developed methodologies within the European Clean sky JTI project WISMOS, with the capability to transmit, store and process strain data from a network of wireless sensors (e.g. strain gages, FBGA) and utilize a DPS-based methodology, based on multi scale progressive failure analysis (MS-PFA), to determine structural health and to advice with respect to condition based inspection and maintenance. As part of the validation of the Diagnostic and prognostic system, Carbon/Epoxy ASTM coupons were fabricated and tested to extract the mechanical properties. Subsequently two composite stiffened panels were manufactured, instrumented and tested under compressive loading: 1) an undamaged stiffened buckling panel; and 2) a damaged stiffened buckling panel including an initial diamond cut. Next numerical Finite element models of the two panels were developed and analyzed under test conditions using Multi-Scale Progressive Failure Analysis (an extension of FEM) to evaluate the damage/fracture evolution process, as well as the identification of contributing failure modes. The comparisons

  4. Investigation progress of imaging techniques monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; An Rui

    2006-01-01

    Recently stem cell therapy has showed potential clinical application in diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumor and trauma. Efficient techniques of non-invasively monitoring stem cell transplants will accelerate the development of stem cell therapies. This paper briefly reviews the clinical practice of stem cell, in addition, makes a review of monitoring methods including magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging which have been used in stem cell therapy. (authors)

  5. Propagation of damage in the rat brain following sarin exposure: Differential progression of early processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, Shlomi; Egoz, Inbal; Brandeis, Rachel; Chapman, Shira; Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Grauer, Ettie

    2016-01-01

    Sarin is an irreversible organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor and a highly toxic warfare agent. Following the overt, dose-dependent signs (e.g. tremor, hyper secretion, seizures, respiratory depression and eventually death), brain damage is often reported. The goal of the present study was to characterize the early histopathological and biochemical events leading to this damage. Rats were exposed to 1LD50 of sarin (80 μg/kg, i.m.). Brains were removed at 1, 2, 6, 24 and 48 h and processed for analysis. Results showed that TSPO (translocator protein) mRNA increased at 6 h post exposure while TSPO receptor density increased only at 24 h. In all brain regions tested, bax mRNA decreased 1 h post exposure followed by an increase 24 h later, with only minor increase in bcl2 mRNA. At this time point a decrease was seen in both anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and pro-apoptotic Bax, followed by a time and region specific increase in Bax. An immediate elevation in ERK1/2 activity with no change in JNK may indicate an endogenous “first response” mechanism used to attenuate the forthcoming apoptosis. The time dependent increase in the severity of brain damage included an early bi-phasic activation of astrocytes, a sharp decrease in intact neuronal cells, a time dependent reduction in MAP2 and up to 15% of apoptosis. Thus, neuronal death is mostly due to necrosis and severe astrocytosis. The data suggests that timing of possible treatments should be determined by early events following exposure. For example, the biphasic changes in astrocytes activity indicate a possible beneficial effects of delayed anti-inflammatory intervention. - Highlights: • The severity of brain damage post 1LD50 sarin exposure is time dependent. • Sarin induce differential progression of early processes in the rat brain. • Potential treatments should be timed according to early events following exposure. • The biphasic astrocytes activity suggests a delay in anti-inflammatory intervention.

  6. Propagation of damage in the rat brain following sarin exposure: Differential progression of early processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, Shlomi; Egoz, Inbal; Brandeis, Rachel; Chapman, Shira; Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Grauer, Ettie, E-mail: ettieg@iibr.gov.il

    2016-11-01

    Sarin is an irreversible organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor and a highly toxic warfare agent. Following the overt, dose-dependent signs (e.g. tremor, hyper secretion, seizures, respiratory depression and eventually death), brain damage is often reported. The goal of the present study was to characterize the early histopathological and biochemical events leading to this damage. Rats were exposed to 1LD50 of sarin (80 μg/kg, i.m.). Brains were removed at 1, 2, 6, 24 and 48 h and processed for analysis. Results showed that TSPO (translocator protein) mRNA increased at 6 h post exposure while TSPO receptor density increased only at 24 h. In all brain regions tested, bax mRNA decreased 1 h post exposure followed by an increase 24 h later, with only minor increase in bcl2 mRNA. At this time point a decrease was seen in both anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and pro-apoptotic Bax, followed by a time and region specific increase in Bax. An immediate elevation in ERK1/2 activity with no change in JNK may indicate an endogenous “first response” mechanism used to attenuate the forthcoming apoptosis. The time dependent increase in the severity of brain damage included an early bi-phasic activation of astrocytes, a sharp decrease in intact neuronal cells, a time dependent reduction in MAP2 and up to 15% of apoptosis. Thus, neuronal death is mostly due to necrosis and severe astrocytosis. The data suggests that timing of possible treatments should be determined by early events following exposure. For example, the biphasic changes in astrocytes activity indicate a possible beneficial effects of delayed anti-inflammatory intervention. - Highlights: • The severity of brain damage post 1LD50 sarin exposure is time dependent. • Sarin induce differential progression of early processes in the rat brain. • Potential treatments should be timed according to early events following exposure. • The biphasic astrocytes activity suggests a delay in anti-inflammatory intervention.

  7. Building damage related to Amsterdam subway : Comparison of traditional monitoring with satellite monitoring results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korff, M.; Maccabiani, J

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of the monitoring data obtained from the construction of the North/South Line, a new subway line crossing the historic center of Amsterdam. During construction of the line (2003-2014), building deformations were monitored with Robotic Total Stations and with

  8. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  9. Continuous dynamic monitoring of a lively footbridge for serviceability assessment and damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Hua; Moutinho, Carlos; Caetano, Elsa; Magalhães, Filipe; Cunha, Álvaro

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims at analyzing the feasibility of applying a vibration based damage detection approach, based on Principal Components Analysis (PCA), to eliminate environmental effects using the large amount of high quality data continuously collected by the dynamic monitoring system of Pedro e Inês footbridge since 2007. Few works describe real data, regularly collected along several years by reliable continuous dynamic monitoring systems in bridge structures. One main contribution is to show a large difference between making academic research based on numerical simulations or limited experimental samples, and making validity tests of innovative procedures using large high quality databases collected in real structures. The monitoring system, installed with the only initial objective of checking the efficiency of vibration control devices used to mitigate lateral and vertical vibrations, was therefore further developed for research purposes by implementing LabVIEW based automated signal processing and output-only modal identification routines, that enabled the analysis of the correlation of modal estimates with the temperature and the vibration level, as well as the automatic tracking of modal parameters along several years. With the final purpose of detecting potential structural damage at an early stage, the Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed to effectively eliminate temperature effects, whereas Novelty Analysis on the residual errors of the PCA model was used to provide a statistical indication of damage. The efficiency of this vibration based damage detection approach was verified using 3 years of measurements at Pedro e Inês footbridge under operational conditions and simulating several realistic damage scenarios affecting the boundary conditions. It is demonstrated that such a dynamic monitoring system, apart from providing relevant instantaneous dynamic information, working as an alert system associated to the verification of vibration

  10. Marine litter monitoring by northern fulmars: progress report 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.; Meijboom, A.

    2003-01-01

    An earlier pilot study on litter contents in stomachs of Fulmars indicated that this seabird can be used as a suitable indicator for levels of marine litter pollution on the North Sea off the Dutch coast. This progress report updates the existing dataset with data on Fulmar stomach contents in the

  11. Damage assessment using flexibility and flexibility-based curvature for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catbas, F N; Gul, M; Burkett, J L

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in sensors, information technologies and material science, a considerable amount of research has been conducted in the area of smart infrastructures. While there are many important components of a smart infrastructure, an automated and continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) system is a critical one. SHM is typically used to track and evaluate the performance of a structure, symptoms of operational incidents, anomalies due to deterioration and damage during regular operation as well as after an extreme event. Successful health monitoring applications can be achieved by integrating experimental, analytical and information technologies on real-life operating structures. However, real-life investigations must be backed up by laboratory benchmark studies for validating theory, concepts, and new technologies. For this reason, a physical bridge model is developed to implement SHM methods and technologies. In this study, different aspects of model development are outlined in terms of design considerations, instrumentation, finite element modeling, and simulating damage scenarios. Different damage detection methods are evaluated using the numerical and the physical models. Modal parameter estimation studies are carried out to reliably identify the eigenvalues, eigenvectors and modal scaling from the measurement data. To assess the simulated damage, modal flexibility-based displacements and curvatures are employed. Structural behavior after damage is evaluated by inspecting the deflected shapes obtained using modal flexibility. More localized damage simulations such as stiffness reduction at a joint yield a very subtle stiffness decrease. In this case, the writers use a baseline to identify damage and also investigate the use of curvature as a complementary index. Curvature is advantageous for certain cases where the displacement results do not provide substantial changes. Issues related to using curvature as a damage identification

  12. Design of a piezoelectric-based structural health monitoring system for damage detection in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2002-07-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents the conclusions of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage detection in composite structures. Experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis and Lamb wave techniques to quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy test specimens containing representative damage. Piezoelectric patches were used as actuators and sensors for both sets of experiments. Modal analysis methods were reliable for detecting small amounts of global damage in a simple composite structure. By comparison, Lamb wave methods were sensitive to all types of local damage present between the sensor and actuator, provided useful information about damage presence and severity, and present the possibility of estimating damage type and location. Analogous experiments were also performed for more complex built-up structures. These techniques are suitable for structural health monitoring applications since they can be applied with low power conformable sensors and can provide useful information about the state of a structure during operation. Piezoelectric patches could also be used as multipurpose sensors to detect damage by a variety of methods such as modal analysis, Lamb wave, acoustic emission and strain based methods simultaneously, by altering driving frequencies and sampling rates. This paper present guidelines and recommendations drawn from this research to assist in the design of a structural health monitoring system for a vehicle. These systems will be an important component in future designs of air and spacecraft to increase the feasibility of their missions.

  13. Novel Damage Detection Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring Using a Hybrid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a technique for detecting fatigue cracks based on a hybrid sensor monitoring system consisting of a combination of intelligent coating monitoring (ICM and piezoelectric transducer (PZT sensors. An experimental procedure using this hybrid sensor system was designed to monitor the cracks generated by fatigue testing in plate structures. A probability of detection (POD model that quantifies the reliability of damage detection for a specific sensor or the nondestructive testing (NDT method was used to evaluate the weight factor for the ICM and PZT sensors. To estimate the uncertainty of model parameters in this study, the Bayesian method was employed. Realistic data from fatigue testing was used to validate the overall method, and the results show that the novel damage detection technique using a hybrid sensor can quantify fatigue cracks more accurately than results obtained by conventional sensor methods.

  14. Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3(NOTE: Part II A item 1 indicates ''PAPER'', but a report is attached electronically)

  15. R and D non-destructive damage monitoring and diagnosing system for civil infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Weixin; Abu Bakar Mohamad Diah; Cheng Hao

    1998-01-01

    Since civil infrastructures serve as the underpinnings of our highly industrialized society, and much of them are now decaying, it is the time to consider how to maintain these widely spread infrastructures in order to prevent potential catastrophic events. Changes in use and the need to maintain an ageing system require improvements in instrumentation for sensing and recording, data acquisition for diagnosing the possible damage, and algorithm for identifying and monitoring the changes in structural characteristics. Researching and developing a real-time, in-serve health detection and monitoring system has drawn a worldwide attention recently for various types of structures. The paper conceives an integrated non-destructive damage monitoring and diagnosing system for civil infrastructures. The system is a high technology and high-commercialised industrial integrated product involved in research and development. The research activities of the system cover three core parts: structural modelling, structural system identification and damage criterion establishment. The development activities of the system include experimental measurements, data acquisition and processing, instrumentation set-up, computer visualisation, and software development. The state-of -the art theories and practices are systematically merged and integrated in the development of the system, and the system will be verified through the real world application for civil infrastructures. Our research results on the damage criterion based on the changes in structural dynamic properties are also reported in the paper. (Author)

  16. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Jesse; Laugier, Elise Jakoby

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  17. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Casana

    Full Text Available Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  18. A new qualitative acoustic emission parameter based on Shannon's entropy for damage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Mengyu; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Duan, Quan

    2018-02-01

    An important objective of acoustic emission (AE) non-destructive monitoring is to accurately identify approaching critical damage and to avoid premature failure by means of the evolutions of AE parameters. One major drawback of most parameters such as count and rise time is that they are strongly dependent on the threshold and other settings employed in AE data acquisition system. This may hinder the correct reflection of original waveform generated from AE sources and consequently bring difficulty for the accurate identification of the critical damage and early failure. In this investigation, a new qualitative AE parameter based on Shannon's entropy, i.e. AE entropy is proposed for damage monitoring. Since it derives from the uncertainty of amplitude distribution of each AE waveform, it is independent of the threshold and other time-driven parameters and can characterize the original micro-structural deformations. Fatigue crack growth test on CrMoV steel and three point bending test on a ductile material are conducted to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed parameter. The results show that the new parameter, compared to AE amplitude, is more effective in discriminating the different damage stages and identifying the critical damage.

  19. FY09 PROGRESS: MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Laspe, Amy R.; Ward, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    Model and experimental estimates of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor performance for determining burnup after dissolution and acid concentration during solvent extraction steps during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are presented. Modern industrial reprocessing techniques, including the PUREX and UREX+ family of separations technologies, are based on solvent extraction between organic and aqueous phases. In these bi-phase systems, product (actinide) and contaminant (fission and activation products) elements are preferentially driven (thermodynamically) to opposite phases, with small amounts of each remaining in the other phase. The distribution of each element, between the organic and aqueous phases, is determined by major process variables such as acid concentration, organic ligand concentration, reduction potential, and temperature. Hence, for consistent performance of the separation process, the distribution of each element between the organic and aqueous phases should be relatively constant. During 'normal' operations the pattern of elements distributing into the product and waste streams at each segment of the facility should be reproducible, resulting in a statistically significant signature of the nominal process conditions. Under 'abnormal' conditions, such as those expected under some protracted diversion scenarios, patterns of elements within the various streams would be expected to change measurably. The MIP monitoring approach utilizes changes in the concentrations of gamma-emitting elements as evidence of changes to the process chemistry. It exploits a suite of gamma emitting isotopes to track multiple chemical species and behaviors simultaneously, thus encompassing a large array of elements that are affected by chemical and physical changes. In-process surveillance by the MIP monitor is accomplished by coupling the gamma spectrometry of the streams with multivariate techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is a chemometrics tool

  20. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  1. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  2. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting Novel Radiation -Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report Distribution...assess the effects of ionizing radiation on at least three classes of electromagnetic materials. The proposed approach for radiation detection was...that was desired to be monitored remotely. Microwave or low millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation would be used to interrogate the device

  3. Development and validation of rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging inflammation thresholds associated with lack of damage progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine thresholds for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging scores (RAMRIS) associated with a low risk of structural damage progression. Methods MRI of the dominant hand was performed and RAMRIS scores determined at weeks 0, 24, and 52. X-rays were performed and van...

  4. Uncovering the fatigue damage initiation and progression in uni-directional non-crimp fabric reinforced polyester composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Glud, Jens A.; Zangenberg, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The current work studies the fatigue damage initiation and progression in a quasi-unidirectional non-crimp fabric based fibre composite used for wind turbine blades. This is done by combining in situ transilluminated white light imagining (TWLI) with ex-situ X-ray computed tomography (CT) experim...

  5. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    In this project we have proposed a mechanism for radiation damage to DNA and detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In this past year several investigations have been completed or are nearing completion. These investigations are an ESR study of the N 1 -substituted thymine π-cation radicals; studies of electron reactions with amino acid anhydrides; and ESR and pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions. Studies which we have made significant progress on in this past year are positive ion radicals of the dinucleoside phosphates, and reactions of the π-cations of thymine derivatives. In the first study the spin density distribution in the cation radicals of thymidine and thymidine-5 1 -monophosphate have been elucidated. Couplings are found to the ribose group in these radicals. It is believed that these results will aid the identification of cation radicals in DNA. In study 2, the results indicate that these cyclic anhydrides can undergo reductive deamination. In study 3, the results show the order of electron affinities of the DNA bases to be thymine approximately equal to cytosine greater than adenine approximately equal to guanine

  6. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    Several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA are proposed, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms are detailed. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which have been completed during the past year include: (1) studies of γ-irradiated N-acetyl amino acids and peptide solutions at 77 0 K; and (2) studies of barriers to hindered rotation in peptide radicals. Studies in which progress has been made in this past year include: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by hydroxyl radical attack; and (2) studies of spin transfer in γ-Irradiated nucleoside-peptide solutions. These studies have shown that: (1) frozen aqueous solutions provide a suitable matrix for γ irradiation studies; (2) γ-irradiated peptides in frozen aqueous solutions follow chemistry expected from previous studies; and (3) π cations of DNA base can be produced by hydroxyl radical attack

  7. Optical monitoring of spinal cord subcellular damage after acute spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Fong, Allan; Streijger, Femke; Macnab, Andrew; Kwon, Brian K.

    2018-02-01

    Introduction: Sudden physical trauma to the spinal cord results in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), leading to spinal cord (SC) tissue destruction, acute inflammation, increased SC intraparenchymal pressure, and tissue ischemia, hypoxia, and cellular necrosis. The ability to monitor SC tissue viability at subcellular level, using a real-time noninvasive method, would be extremely valuable to clinicians for estimating acute SCI damage, and adjusting and monitoring treatment in the intensive care setting. This study examined the feasibility and sensitivity of a custommade near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor to monitor the oxidation state of SC mitochondrial cytochrome aa3 (CCO), which reflects the subcellular damage of SC tissue in an animal model of SCI. Methods: Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were studied using a custom-made multi-wavelength NIRS system with a miniaturized optical sensor applied directly on the surgically exposed SC at T9. The oxidation states of SC tissue hemoglobin and CCO were monitored before, during and after acute SCI, and during mean arterial pressure alterations. Results: Non-invasive NIRS monitoring reflected changes in SC tissue CCO, simultaneous but independent of changes in hemoglobin saturation following acute SCI. A consistent decrease in SC tissue CCO chromophore concentration (-1.98 +/- 2.1 ab, pElevation of mean arterial pressure can reduce SC tissue damage as suggested by different researchers and observed by significant increase in SC tissue CCO concentration (1.51 +/- 1.7 ab, p<0.05) in this study. Conclusions: This pilot study indicates that a novel miniaturized multi-wave NIRS sensor has the potential to monitor post-SCI changes of SC cytochrome aa3 oxygenation state in real time. Further development of this method may offer new options for improved SCI care.

  8. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Combining Test Rig Damage Progression Data with Fielded Rotorcraft Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of three reports published on the results of this project. In the first report, results were presented on nineteen tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig on spiral bevel gear sets designed to simulate helicopter fielded failures. In the second report, fielded helicopter HUMS data from forty helicopters were processed with the same techniques that were applied to spiral bevel rig test data. Twenty of the forty helicopters experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears, while the other twenty helicopters had no known anomalies within the time frame of the datasets. In this report, results from the rig and helicopter data analysis will be compared for differences and similarities in condition indicator (CI) response. Observations and findings using sub-scale rig failure progression tests to validate helicopter gear condition indicators will be presented. In the helicopter, gear health monitoring data was measured when damage occurred and after the gear sets were replaced at two helicopter regimes. For the helicopters or tails, data was taken in the flat pitch ground 101 rotor speed (FPG101) regime. For nine tails, data was also taken at 120 knots true airspeed (120KTA) regime. In the test rig, gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed while gear health monitoring data and operational parameters were measured and tooth damage progression documented. For the rig tests, the gear speed was maintained at 3500RPM, a one hour run-in was performed at 4000 in-lb gear torque, than the torque was increased to 8000 in-lbs. The HUMS gear condition indicator data evaluated included Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1(DA1), + 3 Sideband Index (SI3) and + 1 Sideband Index (SI1). These were selected based on their sensitivity in detecting contact fatigue damage modes from analytical, experimental and historical helicopter data. For this report, the helicopter dataset was reduced to

  9. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-01-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along...

  10. An Intelligent Sensor System for Monitoring Fatigue Damage in Welded Steel Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, B.; Gaydecki, P.; Burdekin, F. Michael

    2005-04-01

    A system for monitoring fatigue damage in steel components is described. The sensor, a thin steel sheet with a pre-crack in it, is attached to the component. Its crack length increases by fatigue in service and is recorded using a microcontroller. Measurement is accomplished using conductive tracks in a circuit whose output voltage changes when the crack propagates past a track. Data stored in memory can be remotely downloaded using Bluetooth™ technology to a PC.

  11. An Intelligent Sensor System for Monitoring Fatigue Damage in Welded Steel Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, B.; Gaydecki, P.; Burdekin, F. Michael

    2005-01-01

    A system for monitoring fatigue damage in steel components is described. The sensor, a thin steel sheet with a pre-crack in it, is attached to the component. Its crack length increases by fatigue in service and is recorded using a microcontroller. Measurement is accomplished using conductive tracks in a circuit whose output voltage changes when the crack propagates past a track. Data stored in memory can be remotely downloaded using Bluetooth TM technology to a PC

  12. Monitoring of Damage in Sunflower and Maize Parcels Using Radar and Optical Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Surek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to monitor the temporal behaviour of geometrical structural change of cropland affected by four different types of damage: weed infection, Western Corn Rootworm (WCR, storm damage, and drought by time series of different type of optical and quad-pol RADARSAT2 data. Based on our results it is established that ragweed infection in sunflower can be well identified by evaluation of radar (mid-June and optical (mid-August satellite images. Effect of drought in sunflower is well recognizable by spectral indices derived from optical as well as “I”-component of Shannon entropy (SEI from radar satellite images acquired during the first decade of July. Evaluation of radar and optical satellite images acquired between the last decade of July and mid-August proven to be the most efficient for detecting damages in maize fields caused by either by WCR or storm. Components of Shannon entropy are proven to have significant role in identification. Our project demonstrates the potential in integrated usage of polarimetric radar and optical satellite images for monitoring several types of agricultural damage.

  13. Damage assessment and progression in a polyisocyanurate-based continuous swirl mat composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Darwell Carlton, II

    This research conducted in conjunction with Oak Ridge National Laboratories and the Automotive Composite Consortium, ACC, was motivated by the desire to reduce vehicle weight for increased efficiency. At present, there are no databases of failure mechanisms, experimental procedures to study failure, mathematical expressions for empirical or theoretical prediction of properties of a continuous swirl mat composite, CSMC. Therefore, to contribute to the increased utilization of this class of materials the following research was performed. This research enabled the failure mechanism to be formulated, development of a method to quantify failure based on ultrasonic attenuation maps, and the prediction of the fracture toughness parameter KIC. The use of scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and real-time tensile loading showed that the CSMC failed in a brittle mode. These techniques also provided imaging information as to how a dominant crack propagates in the presence of a continuously swirled E-glass mat reinforcement and voids. This evaluation enabled a reconstruction of failure in order to demonstrate a possible failure mechanism. The aforementioned techniques revealed that the dominant crack follows the fiber/matrix interface, but may be influenced by the presence of voids. Voids have the tendency of luring the growing crack away from the interface. A growing crack would, however, return to a fiber/matrix interface until complete failure occurred. Another aspect of this work was the quantification of progressive damage using ultrasound. Comparisons were made between ultrasonic attenuation maps for unloaded and sequentially loaded specimens. The sequential loads were applied at different percentages of the ultimate tensile strength, UTS. This technique provided attenuation maps for a series of specimens with a controlled degree of damage, which showed an increase in attenuation with an increase in percent UTS. Fracture toughness experiments yielded an

  14. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  15. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 3, March-April 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the following areas: electric uses; direct heat uses; drilling activities; exploration; leases; outreach and technical assistance; feasibility studies and application demonstrations; geothermal loan guarantee program; general activities; R and D activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; environmental activities; and state, local, and private sector activities. Also included are a list of reports and publications and a directory of individuals in the geothermal community. (MHR)

  16. Progress report of the critical equipment monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantis, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Philadelphia Electric Company has contracted with Energy Data Systems to develop a Critical Equipment Monitoring System for its Peach Bottom Nuclear Plant. This computerized system is designed to acquire and maintain accurate and timely status information on plant equipment. It will provide auditable record of plant and equipment transactions. Positive equipment identification and location will be provided. Errors in complex logical checking will be minimized. This system should reduce operator loading and improve operator communicatin with the plant personnel. Phase I of this system was installed at Peach Bottom Nuclear Station May 1982. It provides the necessary hardware and software to do check-off lists on critical plant systems. This paper describes some of the start-up and operational problems encountered

  17. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  18. A simplified baseline prediction model for joint damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Punder, Yvonne M R; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    To compare the performance of an extended model and a simplified prognostic model for joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) based on 3 baseline risk factors: anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), erosions, and acute-phase reaction. Data were used from the Nijmegen early RA cohort. An extended model and a simplified baseline prediction model were developed to predict joint damage progression between 0 and 3 years. Joint damage progression was assessed using the Ratingen score. In the extended model, prediction factors were positivity for anti-CCP and/or rheumatoid factor, the level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the quantity of erosions. The prediction score was calculated as the sum of the regression coefficients. In the simplified model, the prediction factors were dichotomized and the number of risk factors was counted. Performances of both models were compared using discrimination and calibration. The models were internally validated using bootstrapping. The extended model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 5.6 with an area under the receiver-operation characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77 (95% CI 0.72-0.81). The simplified model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 3. This model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (95% CI 0.70-0.80). In internal validation, the 2 models showed reasonably well the agreement between observed and predicted probabilities for joint damage progression (Hosmer-Lemeshow test p > 0.05 and calibration slope near 1.0). A simple prediction model for joint damage progression in early RA, by only counting the number of risk factors, has adequate performance. This facilitates the translation of the theoretical prognostic models to daily clinical practice.

  19. CSF inflammatory biomarkers responsive to treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis capture residual inflammation associated with axonal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Komori, Mika; von Essen, Marina Rode; Ratzer, Rikke; Börnsen, Lars; Bielekova, Bibi; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2018-05-01

    Development of treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is challenged by the lack of sensitive and treatment-responsive biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation. To validate the responsiveness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory biomarkers to treatment with natalizumab and methylprednisolone in progressive MS and to examine the relationship between CSF inflammatory and tissue damage biomarkers. CSF samples from two open-label phase II trials of natalizumab and methylprednisolone in primary and secondary progressive MS. CSF concentrations of 20 inflammatory biomarkers and CSF biomarkers of axonal damage (neurofilament light chain (NFL)) and demyelination were analysed using electrochemiluminescent assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In all, 17 natalizumab- and 23 methylprednisolone-treated patients had paired CSF samples. CSF sCD27 displayed superior standardised response means and highly significant decreases during both natalizumab and methylprednisolone treatment; however, post-treatment levels remained above healthy donor reference levels. Correlation analyses of CSF inflammatory biomarkers and NFL before, during and after treatment demonstrated that CSF sCD27 consistently correlates with NFL. These findings validate CSF sCD27 as a responsive and sensitive biomarker of intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS, capturing residual inflammation after treatment. Importantly, CSF sCD27 correlates with NFL, consistent with residual inflammation after anti-inflammatory treatment being associated with axonal damage.

  20. An intelligent stand-alone ultrasonic device for monitoring local structural damage: implementation and preliminary experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsch, Alexander; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wang, Yang; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2011-01-01

    Continuous structural health monitoring has the potential to significantly improve the safety management of aged, in-service civil structures. In particular, monitoring of local damage growth at hot-spot areas can help to prevent disastrous structural failures. Although ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) has proved to be effective in monitoring local damage growth, conventional equipment and devices are usually bulky and only suitable for scheduled human inspections. The objective of this research is to harness the latest developments in embedded hardware and wireless communication for developing a stand-alone, compact ultrasonic device. The device is directed at the continuous structural health monitoring of civil structures. Relying on battery power, the device possesses the functionalities of high-speed actuation, sensing, signal processing, and wireless communication. Integrated with contact ultrasonic transducers, the device can generate 1 MHz Rayleigh surface waves in a steel specimen and measure response waves. An envelope detection algorithm based on the Hilbert transform is presented for efficiently determining the peak values of the response signals, from which small surface cracks are successfully identified

  1. Construction Condition and Damage Monitoring of Post-Tensioned PSC Girders Using Embedded Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Joon; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Kim, Yun Yong; Kim, Jae-Min; Park, Seunghee; Lee, Hwanwoo

    2017-08-10

    The potential for monitoring the construction of post-tensioned concrete beams and detecting damage to the beams under loading conditions was investigated through an experimental program. First, embedded sensors were investigated that could measure pre-stress from the fabrication process to a failure condition. Four types of sensors were installed on a steel frame, and the applicability and the accuracy of these sensors were tested while pre-stress was applied to a tendon in the steel frame. As a result, a tri-sensor loading plate and a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor were selected as possible candidates. With those sensors, two pre-stressed concrete flexural beams were fabricated and tested. The pre-stress of the tendons was monitored during the construction and loading processes. Through the test, it was proven that the variation in thepre-stress had been successfully monitored throughout the construction process. The losses of pre-stress that occurred during a jacking and storage process, even those which occurred inside the concrete, were measured successfully. The results of the loading test showed that tendon stress and strain within the pure span significantly increased, while the stress in areas near the anchors was almost constant. These results prove that FBG sensors installed in a middle section can be used to monitor the strain within, and the damage to pre-stressed concrete beams.

  2. Monitoring the Damage State of Fiber Reinforced Composites Using an FBG Network for Failure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Selim Kocaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A structural health monitoring (SHM study of biaxial glass fibre-reinforced epoxy matrix composites under a constant, high strain uniaxial fatigue loading is performed using fibre Bragg grating (FBG optical sensors embedded in composites at various locations to monitor the evolution of local strains, thereby understanding the damage mechanisms. Concurrently, the temperature changes of the samples during the fatigue test have also been monitored at the same locations. Close to fracture, significant variations in local temperatures and strains are observed, and it is shown that the variations in temperature and strain can be used to predict imminent fracture. It is noted that the latter information cannot be obtained using external strain gages, which underlines the importance of the tracking of local strains internally.

  3. Damage-Based Time-Dependent Modeling of Paraglacial to Postglacial Progressive Failure of Large Rock Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Amitrano, David; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    Large alpine rock slopes undergo long-term evolution in paraglacial to postglacial environments. Rock mass weakening and increased permeability associated with the progressive failure of deglaciated slopes promote the development of potentially catastrophic rockslides. We captured the entire life cycle of alpine slopes in one damage-based, time-dependent 2-D model of brittle creep, including deglaciation, damage-dependent fluid occurrence, and rock mass property upscaling. We applied the model to the Spriana rock slope (Central Alps), affected by long-term instability after Last Glacial Maximum and representing an active threat. We simulated the evolution of the slope from glaciated conditions to present day and calibrated the model using site investigation data and available temporal constraints. The model tracks the entire progressive failure path of the slope from deglaciation to rockslide development, without a priori assumptions on shear zone geometry and hydraulic conditions. Complete rockslide differentiation occurs through the transition from dilatant damage to a compacting basal shear zone, accounting for observed hydraulic barrier effects and perched aquifer formation. Our model investigates the mechanical role of deglaciation and damage-controlled fluid distribution in the development of alpine rockslides. The absolute simulated timing of rock slope instability development supports a very long "paraglacial" period of subcritical rock mass damage. After initial damage localization during the Lateglacial, rockslide nucleation initiates soon after the onset of Holocene, whereas full mechanical and hydraulic rockslide differentiation occurs during Mid-Holocene, supporting a key role of long-term damage in the reported occurrence of widespread rockslide clusters of these ages.

  4. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2018-04-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  5. Artificial immune pattern recognition for damage detection in structural health monitoring sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Zang, Chuanzhi

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents an artificial immune pattern recognition (AIPR) approach for the damage detection and classification in structures. An AIPR-based Structure Damage Classifier (AIPR-SDC) has been developed by mimicking immune recognition and learning mechanisms. The structure damage patterns are represented by feature vectors that are extracted from the structure's dynamic response measurements. The training process is designed based on the clonal selection principle in the immune system. The selective and adaptive features of the clonal selection algorithm allow the classifier to generate recognition feature vectors that are able to match the training data. In addition, the immune learning algorithm can learn and remember various data patterns by generating a set of memory cells that contains representative feature vectors for each class (pattern). The performance of the presented structure damage classifier has been validated using a benchmark structure proposed by the IASC-ASCE (International Association for Structural Control - American Society of Civil Engineers) Structural Health Monitoring Task Group. The validation results show a better classification success rate comparing to some of other classification algorithms.

  6. Optoacoustic monitoring of cutting efficiency and thermal damage during laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Erwin; Douplik, Alexandre; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Successful laser surgery is characterized by a precise cut and effective hemostasis with minimal collateral thermal damage to the adjacent tissues. Consequently, the surgeon needs to control several parameters, such as power, pulse repetition rate, and velocity of movements. In this study we propose utilizing optoacoustics for providing the necessary real-time feedback of cutting efficiency and collateral thermal damage. Laser ablation was performed on a bovine meat slab using a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (532 nm, 4 kHz, 18 W). Due to the short pulse duration of 7.6 ns, the same laser has also been used for generation of optoacoustic signals. Both the shockwaves, generated due to tissue removal, as well as the normal optoacoustic responses from the surrounding tissue were detected using a single broadband piezoelectric transducer. It has been observed that the rapid reduction in the shockwave amplitude occurs as more material is being removed, indicating decrease in cutting efficiency, whereas gradual decrease in the optoacoustic signal likely corresponds to coagulation around the ablation crater. Further heating of the surrounding tissue leads to carbonization accompanied by a significant shift in the optoacoustic spectra. Our results hold promise for real-time monitoring of cutting efficiency and collateral thermal damage during laser surgery. In practice, this could eventually facilitate development of automatic cut-off mechanisms that will guarantee an optimal tradeoff between cutting and heating while avoiding severe thermal damage to the surrounding tissues.

  7. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  8. Damage detection monitoring applications in self-healing concrete structures using embedded piezoelectric transducers and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaiskos, G; Tsangouri, E; Aggelis, D G; Van Hemelrijck, D; Deraemaeker, A

    2015-01-01

    The ageing, operational and ambient loadings have a great impact in the operational and maintenance cost of concrete structures. Their service life prolongation is of utmost importance and this can be efficiently achieved by using reliable and low-cost monitoring and self-healing techniques. In the present study, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method using embedded small-size and low-cost piezoelectric PZT (lead zirconate titanate) ceramic transducers in concrete with self-healing properties is implemented for monitoring not only the setting and hardening phases of concrete since casting time, but also for the detection of damage initiation, propagation and recovery of integrity after healing. A couple of small-scale notched unreinforced concrete beams are subjected to mode-I fracture through three-point bending tests. After a 24-hour healing agent curing period, the beams are reloaded using the same loading scenario. The results demonstrate the excellent performance of the proposed monitoring technique during the hydration, damage generation and recovery periods. (paper)

  9. Study on severe fuel damage and in-vessel melt progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Sang Baik; Lee, Gyu Jung

    1992-06-01

    In-vessel core melt progression describes the progression of the state of a reactor core from core uncovery up to reactor vessel melt through in uncovered accidents or through temperature stabilization in accidents recovered by core reflooding. Melt progression can be thought as two parts; early melt progression and late melt progression. Early phase of core melt progression includes the progression of core material melting and relocation, which mostly consist of metallic materials. On the other hand, the late phase of core melt progression involves ceramic material melt and relocation to the lower plenum and heat-up the reactor vessel lower head. A large number of information are available for the early melt progression through experiments such as SFD, DF, FLHT test and utilized in the severe accident analysis codes. However, understanding of the late phase melt progression phenomenology is based primary on TMI-2 core examinations and not much experimental information is available. Especilally, the great uncertainties exist in vessel failure mode, melt composition, mass, and temperature. Further research is planned to perform to reduce the uncertainties in understanding of core melt down accidents as parts of long term melt progression research program. A study on the core melt progression at KAERI has been being performed through the Severe Accident Research Program with USNRC. KAERI staff had participated in the PBF SFD experiments at INEL and analyses of experiments were performed using SCDAP code. Experiments of core melt program have not been carried out at KAERI yet. It is planned that further research on core melt down accidents will be performed, which is related to design of future generations of nuclear reactors as parts of long-term project for improvement of nuclear reactor safety. (Author)

  10. Seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines - challenges after three decades of progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Najafi, Mohammand [U. OF TEXAS

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution over the past three decades of seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines and identifies some challenges for future research studies on the subject. The first section of this paper presents a chronological description of the evolution since the mid-1970s of pipeline fragility relations - the most common tool for pipeline damage estimation - and follows with a careful analysis of the use of several ground motion parameters as pipeline damage indicators. In the second section of the paper, four gaps on the subject are identified and proposed as challenges for future research studies. The main conclusion of this work is that enhanced fragility relations must be developed for improving pipeline damage estimation, which must consider relevant parameters that could influence the seismic response of pipelines.

  11. Diffuse damage to central nervous system in progressive rheumatoid arthritis complicated by cerebral hermorrhage after radioisotope cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnowska-Dziduszko, E.; Lazarowicz, J.

    1980-01-01

    Presented case reveals unusual reaction of central nervous system in the course of progressive rheumatoid arthritis and cerebral hemorrhage as a rare complication after radioisotope investigation of cerebro-spinal fluid spaces. Female, 58 years old which was treated for 22 years for progressive rheumatoid arthritis developed during last 3 years of life a psychoorganic syndrome with temporal epilepsy and slight left sided hemiparesis. After radioisotope cisternography appeared decerebration followed by death. On autopsy the hemorrhagic foci were found in left cerebral hemisphere and in the brain stem. Histological finding was generalized severe damage to interstitial vessels diagnosed as fibrinotic, necrotizing degeneration of capillary and arteriolar wall, significant proliferation of microglia in the white matter and brain stem. Chronic inflammatory infiltrates were present in leptomeninges. Pathogenesis of findings in connection with progressive rheumatoid arthritis and complications due to cisternography is discussed. (author)

  12. Irradiation induced modest changes in murine cardiac function despite progressive structural damage to the myocardium and microvasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ingar; Gabriels, Karen; Visser, Nils L.; Hoving, Saske; Poele, Johannes A. te; Pol, Jeffrey F.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Janssen, Ben J.; Leeuwen, Fijs W. van; Daemen, Mat J.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors increases the long-term risk of cardiotoxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Methods: Single doses of 2, 8, or 16 Gy were delivered to the hearts of mice and damage was evaluated at 20, 40, and 60 weeks, relative to age matched controls. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ultrasound were used to measure cardiac geometry and function, which was related to histo-morphology and microvascular damage. Results: Gated SPECT/CT and ultrasound demonstrated decreases in end diastolic and systolic volumes, while the ejection fraction was increased at 20 and 40 weeks after 2, 8, and 16 Gy. Cardiac blood volume was decreased at 20 and 60 weeks after irradiation. Histological examination revealed inflammatory changes at 20 and 40 weeks after 8 and 16 Gy. Microvascular density in the left ventricle was decreased at 40 and 60 weeks after 8 and 16 Gy, with functional damage to remaining microvasculature manifest as decreased alkaline phosphatase (2, 8, and 16 Gy), increased von Willebrand Factor and albumin leakage from vessels (8 and 16 Gy), and amyloidosis (16 Gy). 16 Gy lead to sudden death between 30 and 40 weeks in 38% of mice. Conclusions: Irradiation with 2 and 8 Gy induced modest changes in murine cardiac function within 20 weeks but this did not deteriorate further, despite progressive structural and microvascular damage. This indicates that heart function can compensate for significant structural damage, although higher doses, eventually lead to sudden death.

  13. "Work in progress" : the hidden dimensions of monitoring and planning in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkma, W.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The study argues that monitoring systems for large numbers of projects constituting public sector development programmes such as found in Pakistan, are built on the positivist premise that progress can be summarised objectively and in a few concise statements or indicators. Theory and

  14. Using Parents and Teachers to Monitor Progress among Children with ASD: A Review of Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Sara E.; Nasamran, Amy; Parikh, Purvi J.; Schmitt, Heather A.; Clinton, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing knowledge of the effectiveness of various interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is never clear whether a particular intervention will be effective for a specific child with ASD. Careful monitoring of an individual child's progress is necessary to know whether an intervention is effective. In this…

  15. Costing Household Surveys for Monitoring Progress Toward Ending Extreme Poverty and Boosting Shared Prosperity

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, Talip; Serajuddin, Umar; Uematsu, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    On October 15, 2015, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim announced the World Bank Group’s commitment to support the 78 poorest countries to implement a multi-topic household survey every three years between 2016 and 2030, for monitoring progress toward ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. This paper estimates the resource requirements to achieve the objectives of impl...

  16. Prediction of UV spectra and UV-radiation damage in actual plasma etching processes using on-wafer monitoring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Fukuda, Seiichi; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation during plasma processing affects the surface of materials. Nevertheless, the interaction of UV photons with surface is not clearly understood because of the difficulty in monitoring photons during plasma processing. For this purpose, we have previously proposed an on-wafer monitoring technique for UV photons. For this study, using the combination of this on-wafer monitoring technique and a neural network, we established a relationship between the data obtained from the on-wafer monitoring technique and UV spectra. Also, we obtained absolute intensities of UV radiation by calibrating arbitrary units of UV intensity with a 126 nm excimer lamp. As a result, UV spectra and their absolute intensities could be predicted with the on-wafer monitoring. Furthermore, we developed a prediction system with the on-wafer monitoring technique to simulate UV-radiation damage in dielectric films during plasma etching. UV-induced damage in SiOC films was predicted in this study. Our prediction results of damage in SiOC films shows that UV spectra and their absolute intensities are the key cause of damage in SiOC films. In addition, UV-radiation damage in SiOC films strongly depends on the geometry of the etching structure. The on-wafer monitoring technique should be useful in understanding the interaction of UV radiation with surface and in optimizing plasma processing by controlling UV radiation.

  17. A time reversal damage imaging method for structure health monitoring using Lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Cao Ya-Ping; Sun Xiu-Li; Chen Xian-Hua; Yu Jian-Bo

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the Lamb wave imaging method combining time reversal for health monitoring of a metallic plate structure. The temporal focusing effect of the time reversal Lamb waves is investigated theoretically. It demonstrates that the focusing effect is related to the frequency dependency of the time reversal operation. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the time reversal behaviour of Lamb wave modes under broadband and narrowband excitations. The results show that the reconstructed time reversed wave exhibits close similarity to the reversed narrowband tone burst signal validating the theoretical model. To enhance the similarity, the cycle number of the excited signal should be increased. Experiments combining finite element model are then conducted to study the imaging method in the presence of damage like hole in the plate structure. In this work, the time reversal technique is used for the recompression of Lamb wave signals. Damage imaging results with time reversal using broadband and narrowband excitations are compared to those without time reversal. It suggests that the narrowband excitation combined time reversal can locate and determine the size of structural damage more precisely, but the cycle number of the excited signal should be chosen reasonably

  18. Damage Characterization and Real-Time Health Monitoring of Aerospace Materials Using Innovative NDE Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikas, Theodore E.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the damage and monitor in real-time aging structural components used in aerospace applications by means of advanced nondestructive evaluation techniques. Two novel experimental methodologies are used in this study, based on ultrasonic microscopy and nonlinear acoustics. It is demonstrated in this work that ultrasonic microscopy can be successfully utilized for local elastic property measurement, crack-size determination as well as for interfacial damage evaluation in high-temperature materials, such as metal matrix composites. Nonlinear acoustics enables real-time monitoring of material degradation in aerospace structures. When a sinusoidal ultrasonic wave of a given frequency and of sufficient amplitude is introduced into a nonharmonic solid, the fundamental wave distorts as it propagates, and therefore the second and higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated. Measurements of the amplitude of these harmonics provide information on the coefficient of second- and higher-order terms of the stress-strain relation for a nonlinear solid. It is shown in this article that the material bulk nonlinear parameter for metallic alloy samples at different fatigue levels exhibits large changes compared to linear ultrasonic parameters, such as velocity and attenuation.

  19. Vibration based structural health monitoring of an arch bridge: From automated OMA to damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, F.; Cunha, A.; Caetano, E.

    2012-04-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of approaches based on modal parameters tracking for structural health monitoring of bridges, in September of 2007, a dynamic monitoring system was installed in a concrete arch bridge at the city of Porto, in Portugal. The implementation of algorithms to perform the continuous on-line identification of modal parameters based on structural responses to ambient excitation (automated Operational Modal Analysis) has permitted to create a very complete database with the time evolution of the bridge modal characteristics during more than 2 years. This paper describes the strategy that was followed to minimize the effects of environmental and operational factors on the bridge natural frequencies, enabling, in a subsequent stage, the identification of structural anomalies. Alternative static and dynamic regression models are tested and complemented by a Principal Components Analysis. Afterwards, the identification of damages is tried with control charts. At the end, it is demonstrated that the adopted processing methodology permits the detection of realistic damage scenarios, associated with frequency shifts around 0.2%, which were simulated with a numerical model.

  20. Recent progress of hydrogen isotope behavior studies for neutron or heavy ion damaged W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Yasuhisa, E-mail: syoya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Hatano, Yuji [University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 939-8555 (Japan); Shimada, Masashi [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Merrill, Brad [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Alimov, Vladimir Kh. [University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 939-8555 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • This paper reviews recent results pertaining to hydrogen isotope behavior in neutron and heavy ion damaged W. • Accumulation of damage in W creates stable trapping sites for hydrogen isotopes, thereby changing the observed desorption behavior. • The distribution of defects throughout the sample also changes the shape of TDS spectrum. • Experimental results show that production of Re by nuclear reaction of W with neutrons reduces the density of trapping sites, though no remarkable retention enhancement is observed. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent results pertaining to hydrogen isotope behavior in neutron and heavy ion damaged W. Accumulation of damage in W creates stable trapping sites for hydrogen isotopes, thereby changing the observed desorption behavior. In particular, the desorption temperature shifts higher as the defect concentration increases. In addition, the distribution of defects throughout the sample also changes the shape of TDS spectrum. Even if low energy traps were distributed in the bulk region, the D diffusion toward the surface requires additional time for trapping/detrapping during surface-to-bulk transport, contributing to a shift of desorption peaks toward higher temperatures. It can be said that both of distribution of damage (e.g. hydrogen isotope trapping sites) and their stabilities would have a large impact on desorption. In addition, transmutation effects should be also considered for an actual fusion environment. Experimental results show that production of Re by nuclear reaction of W with neutrons reduces the density of trapping sites, though no remarkable retention enhancement is observed.

  1. Recent progress of hydrogen isotope behavior studies for neutron or heavy ion damaged W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji; Shimada, Masashi; Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Merrill, Brad; Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Alimov, Vladimir Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper reviews recent results pertaining to hydrogen isotope behavior in neutron and heavy ion damaged W. • Accumulation of damage in W creates stable trapping sites for hydrogen isotopes, thereby changing the observed desorption behavior. • The distribution of defects throughout the sample also changes the shape of TDS spectrum. • Experimental results show that production of Re by nuclear reaction of W with neutrons reduces the density of trapping sites, though no remarkable retention enhancement is observed. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent results pertaining to hydrogen isotope behavior in neutron and heavy ion damaged W. Accumulation of damage in W creates stable trapping sites for hydrogen isotopes, thereby changing the observed desorption behavior. In particular, the desorption temperature shifts higher as the defect concentration increases. In addition, the distribution of defects throughout the sample also changes the shape of TDS spectrum. Even if low energy traps were distributed in the bulk region, the D diffusion toward the surface requires additional time for trapping/detrapping during surface-to-bulk transport, contributing to a shift of desorption peaks toward higher temperatures. It can be said that both of distribution of damage (e.g. hydrogen isotope trapping sites) and their stabilities would have a large impact on desorption. In addition, transmutation effects should be also considered for an actual fusion environment. Experimental results show that production of Re by nuclear reaction of W with neutrons reduces the density of trapping sites, though no remarkable retention enhancement is observed.

  2. A sonographic lesion index for Crohn's disease helps monitor changes in transmural bowel damage during therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Francesca; Stasi, Elisa; Bevivino, Gerolamo; Scarozza, Patrizio; Biancone, Livia; Zuzzi, Sara; Rossi, Carla; Pallone, Francesco; Calabrese, Emma

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) are effective in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Mucosal healing is a surrogate marker of efficacy, but little is known about the effects of anti-TNF agents on structural damage in the intestine. Small-intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a valuable tool for assessing CD lesions. A new sonographic quantitative index (the sonographic lesion index for CD [SLIC]) was developed to quantify changes in CD lesions detected by SICUS. We explored whether the SLIC can be used to monitor transmural bowel damage in CD patients during anti-TNF therapy. We performed a prospective study of 29 patients with ileal or ileocolonic CD treated with anti-TNF agents; patients underwent SICUS before and after scheduled induction and maintenance therapy. To determine whether changes that can be detected by SICUS occur independently of anti-TNF therapy, 7 patients with ileal CD treated with mesalamine were enrolled as controls. A clinical response was defined as steroid-free remission, with CD activity index scores less than 150. We observed significant improvements in SLIC scores and subscores after induction and maintenance therapy with anti-TNFs, compared with before therapy. SLIC scores and subscores and index classes were improved significantly in patients with vs without clinical responses. Controls had no improvements in terms of CD activity index or SLIC scores, or index classes. Sonographic assessment using the quantitative index SLIC can be used to monitor changes in transmural bowel damage during anti-TNF therapy for CD. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures.

  4. Use of the Progressive Aphasia Severity Scale (PASS) in monitoring speech and language status in PPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapolsky, Daisy; Domoto-Reilly, Kimiko; Dickerson, Bradford C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a devastating neurodegenerative syndrome involving the gradual development of aphasia, slowly impairing the patient’s ability to communicate. Pharmaceutical treatments do not currently exist and intervention often focuses on speech-language behavioral therapies, although further investigation is warranted to determine how best to harness functional benefits. Efforts to develop pharmaceutical and behavioral treatments have been hindered by a lack of standardized methods to monitor disease progression and treatment efficacy. Aims Here we describe our current approach to monitoring progression of PPA, including the development and applications of a novel clinical instrument for this purpose, the Progressive Aphasia Severity Scale (PASS). We also outline some of the issues related to initial evaluation and longitudinal monitoring of PPA. Methods & Procedures In our clinical and research practice we perform initial and follow-up assessments of PPA patients using a multi-faceted approach. In addition to standardized assessment measures, we use the PASS to rate presence and severity of symptoms across distinct domains of speech, language, and functional and pragmatic aspects of communication. Ratings are made using the clinician’s best judgment, integrating information from patient test performance in the office as well as a companion’s description of routine daily functioning. Outcomes & Results Monitoring symptom characteristics and severity with the PASS can assist in developing behavioral therapies, planning treatment goals, and counseling patients and families on clinical status and prognosis. The PASS also has potential to advance the implementation of PPA clinical trials. Conclusions PPA patients display heterogeneous language profiles that change over time given the progressive nature of the disease. The monitoring of symptom progression is therefore crucial to ensure that proposed treatments are appropriate at

  5. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report: third new contract year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress for 1979-1980 is reported. Projects discussed include the process of radiation-induced repair, Weigle-reactivation, induced radioresistance, the induction of the recA gene product, uv mutagenesis, and the induction of lambda

  6. Recent progress of applying mesenchymal stem cells in therapy of urgent radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian; Duan Zhikai

    2010-01-01

    At present, Cytokine therapy is the main strategy capable of preventing and reducing the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). With the problem of difficult match and severe graft versus host disease, haemopoietic stem cells can be used to find some effective approaches to treat acute radiation damage. Mesenchymal stem cells are of great therapeutic potential due to their particular characteristics including secretion of hematopoietic cytokine, reconstruction hemopoietic microenvironment, poor-immunogenicity, ease of reception ectogenic gene transfection and expression. This paper is to summarize the studies of biological characteristics of MSC and its application prospects in urgent radiation damage. (authors)

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10{approx}40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  8. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10∼40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  9. ESR study of radiation damage in pyrimidines. Progress report, August 1, 1975--April 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, B.W.

    1976-04-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop general mechanisms for radiation damage to biomolecules using substituted pyrimidines as a model system. Results this year include a single crystal ESR study of 5-ethyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid, development of the k-band microwave bridge, dose response measurements on methylated barbituric acid derivatives, and synthesis of several specifically deuterated uracil derivatives

  10. Damage progression in silicon nitride undergoing non-conforming hybrid cyclic contact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raga, R.; Khader, I.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kailer, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, DEC (2017), s. 97-110 ISSN 0142-1123 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 263476 - ROLICER Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Silicon nitride * Cyclic contact fatigue * Surface and subsurface damage Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  11. Approach for investigations of progressive fatigue damage in 3D in fibre composites using X-ray tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Jespersen, Kristine Munk

    (Jespersen & Mikkelsen, 2016) has been performed. An ex-situ study where it has been important to design a good gripping strategy inside the scanning machine. Doing this, it has been possible to scan the same region multiple times. Thereby, a progressive fatigue damage evolution has been observed.......Understanding fatigue damage initiation and evolution in the load carrying laminates inside wind turbine blade plays a key factor designing longer and lighter turbine blades. Thereby, it is possible to lower the Cost of Energy for the wind energy based electricity production either by simply...... building larger wind turbines or by upgrading existing turbines for lower wind classes’ . In the presented work, a Zeiss Xradia Versa 520 scanner has been used in connection with ex-situ fatigue testing with the purpose of identifying fibre failure during the fatigue loading. The load carrying laminates...

  12. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year's work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA's hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year's work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation

  13. Assessment of the progressive nature of cell damage in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Covolan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced (320 mg/kg, ip status epilepticus (SE in adult (2-3 months male Wistar rats results in extensive neuronal damage in limbic structures. Here we investigated whether the induction of a second SE (N = 6 would generate damage and cell loss similar to that seen after a first SE (N = 9. Counts of silver-stained (indicative of cell damage cells, using the Gallyas argyrophil III method, revealed a markedly lower neuronal injury in animals submitted to re-induction of SE compared to rats exposed to a single episode of pilocarpine-induced SE. This effect could be explained as follows: 1 the first SE removes the vulnerable cells, leaving behind resistant cells that are not affected by the second SE; 2 the first SE confers increased resistance to the remaining cells, analogous to the process of ischemic tolerance. Counting of Nissl-stained cells was performed to differentiate between these alternative mechanisms. Our data indicate that different neuronal populations react differently to SE induction. For some brain areas most, if not all, of the vulnerable cells are lost after an initial insult leaving only relatively resistant cells and little space for further damage or cell loss. For some other brain areas, in contrast, our data support the hypothesis that surviving cells might be modified by the initial insult which would confer a sort of excitotoxic tolerance. As a consequence of both mechanisms, subsequent insults after an initial insult result in very little damage regardless of their intensity.

  14. Explicit modeling the progressive interface damage in fibrous composite: Analytical vs. numerical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, V.I.; Shmegera, S.V.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    of the multiple inclusion problem by means of complex potentials. The second, finite element model of FRC is based on the cohesive zone model of interface. Simulation of progressive debonding in FRC using the many-fiber models of composite has been performed. The advantageous features and applicability areas...... of both models are discussed. It has been shown that the developed models provide detailed analysis of the progressive debonding phenomena including the interface crack cluster formation, overall stiffness reduction and induced anisotropy of the effective elastic moduli of composite....

  15. Ice crystallization in porous building materials: assessing damage using real-time 3D monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Maxim; De Kock, Tim; De Schutter, Geert; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-04-01

    a correct assessment of the acting damage processes. Natural building stones tend to have an accessible open pore structure, whereas concrete is significantly less permeable and has large gel pores. Three sedimentary rocks (Bentheimer sandstone, Savonnières limestone and a classic Turkish travertine) and two types of concrete with a different water-cement ratio (0.6 and 0.5) are included in this research. With X-ray CT two approaches can be considered. First, an attempt directly to monitor the transition of water into ice can be performed. Secondly, the location of the induced micro-cracks within the pores or pore throats can possibly indicate which mechanism has caused them. Moreover, the retrieved CT data will be compared to different proxies for ice formation, such as length and temperature changes during freezing. This research is supported by FWO, project 3G004115. References: De Kock, T., et al. (2015). A Pore-Scale Study of Fracture Dynamics in Rock Using X-ray Micro- CT Under Ambient Freeze-Thaw Cycling. Environ. Sci. Technol. 49, 2867-2874. Everett, D.H. (1961). The thermodynamics of frost damage to porous solids. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 1541. Hirschwald, J. (1908). Die Prüfung der natürlichen Bausteine auf ihre Verwitterungsbeständigkeit. Verlag Wilhelm Ernst & Sohn, Berlin. Powers, T., Hemuth, R. (1953). Theory of volume chances in hardened portland-cement paste during freezing. Highway Research Board Proceedings, 32. Scherer, G. W. (1999). Crystallization in pores. Cem. Concr. Res., 29, 1347-1358. Ruedrich, J., Kirchner, D., Siegesmund, S. (2011). Physical weathering of building stones induced by freeze-thaw action: a laboratory long-term study. Environmental Earth Sciences, 63, 1573-1586.

  16. Dynamics of the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, C.C.

    1975-01-01

    A study, begun in 1971, has been undertaken to determine the environmental factors which affect the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation. A sampling technique was developed on Amchitka Island to allow the rapid acquisition of data on species presence and frequency across areas disturbed at various times and in various ways. Attempts were made to sample across all examples of aspect, slope steepness and exposure. The data were analyzed and we concluded that there was no directional secondary succession on the Amchitka tundra, although there was vigorous recovery on organic soils. The study led to recommendations which resulted in a smaller effort than planned to reclaim damaged areas by seeding and fertilizing at a considerable financial saving and without further biological perturbation. Because of the increasing activity on tundra landscape, whether for energy production, or military or other reasons, we are expanding our sampling to other tundra areas. Immediate plans include sampling at Adak Island and Barrow, Alaska. (U.S.)

  17. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) irradiation test facilities, (2) dosimetry and damage parameters, (3) fundamental mechanical behavior, and (4) correlation methodology. Some of the main topics considered are the following: helium generation cross sections for fast neutrons, the effect of irradiation on the order/disorder transformation in Cu Pb, effects of heavy ion irradiation on the phase stability of a Cu-3.4 at. % Be alloy, damage development and hardening in 14-MeV neutron irradiation of Cu alloys at 25 0 C, crack propagation characteristics in He-irradiated stainless steel-316, tensile properties of 20% cold-worked 316 SS, dose and helium injection rate dependence of swelling on dual ion irradiated 316 SS, comparison of swelling and microstructure/microchemical evolution of 316 SS, effects of solid transmutation products on swelling in 316 SS, and the inclusion of transmutant effects on development of fission-fusion correlations

  18. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  19. Monitoring Progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using Ultrasound Morpho-Textural Muscle Biomarkers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Payá, Jacinto J; Ríos-Díaz, José; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Vázquez-Costa, Juan F; Del Baño-Aledo, María Elena

    2018-01-01

    The need is increasing for progression biomarkers that allow the loss of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to be monitored in clinical trials. In this prospective longitudinal study, muscle thickness, echointensity, echovariation and gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features are examined as possible progression ultrasound biomarkers in ALS patients during a 5-mo follow-up period. We subjected 13 patients to 3 measurements for 20 wk. They showed a significant loss of muscle, an evident tendency to loss of thickness and increased echointensity and echovariation. In regard to textural parameters, muscle heterogeneity tended to increase as a result of the neoformation of non-contractile tissue through denervation. Considering some limitations of the study, the quantitative muscle ultrasound biomarkers evaluated showed a promising ability to monitor patients affected by ALS. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of damage in ceramic matrix composites: Effects of weaves and feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Mordasky, Matt; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a class of high temperature materials with better damage tolerance properties compared to monolithic ceramics. The improved toughness is attributed to weak interface coating between the fiber and the matrix that allows for crack deflection and fiber pull-out. Thus, CMCs have gained consideration over monolithic materials for high temperature applications such as in gas turbines. The current standard fiber architecture for CMCs is a harness satin (HS) balanced weave (5HS and 8HS); however, other architectures such as uni-weave materials (tape layup) are now being considered due to fiber placement control and higher fiber volume fraction in the tensile loading direction. Engineering components require additional features in the CMC laminates, such as holes for attachments. Past work has shown that acoustic emission could differentiate the effect of changing interface conditions due to heat treatment effects. The focus of the present work is to investigate the effects of different weaves and the presence of a feature on damage behavior of CMCs as observed via acoustic emission technique. The results of the tensile testing with acoustic emission monitoring will be presented and discussed.

  1. Uncertainty Evaluation in the Design of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Damage Detection†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schubert Kabban

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The validation of structural health monitoring (SHM systems for aircraft is complicated by the extent and number of factors that the SHM system must demonstrate for robust performance. Therefore, a time- and cost-efficient method for examining all of the sensitive factors must be conducted. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of using the simulation modeling environment to determine the SHM sensitive factors that must be considered for subsequent experiments, in order to enable the SHM validation. We demonstrate this concept by examining the effect of SHM system configuration and flaw characteristics on the response of a signal from a known piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS in an aluminum plate, using simulation models of a particular hot spot. We derive the signal responses mathematically and through the statistical design of experiments, we determine the significant factors that affect the damage indices that are computed from the signal, using only half the number of runs that are normally required. We determine that the transmitter angle is the largest source of variation for the damage indices that are considered, followed by signal frequency and transmitter distance to the hot spot. These results demonstrate that the use of efficient statistical design and simulation may enable a cost- and time-efficient sequential approach to quantifying sensitive SHM factors and system validation.

  2. Transducer Placement Option of Lamb Wave SHM System for Hotspot Damage Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentius Ewald

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated transducer placement strategies for detecting cracks in primary aircraft structures using ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring (SHM. The approach developed is for an expected damage location based on fracture mechanics, for example fatigue crack growth in a high stress location. To assess the performance of the developed approach, finite-element (FE modelling of a damage-tolerant aluminum fuselage has been performed by introducing an artificial crack at a rivet hole into the structural FE model and assessing its influence on the Lamb wave propagation, compared to a baseline measurement simulation. The efficient practical sensor position was determined from the largest change in area that is covered by reflected and missing wave scatter using an additive color model. Blob detection algorithms were employed to determine the boundaries of this area and to calculate the blob centroid. To demonstrate that the technique can be generalized, the results from different crack lengths and from tilted crack are also presented.

  3. Glaucoma Monitoring in a Clinical Setting Glaucoma Progression Analysis vs Nonparametric Progression Analysis in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Heeg, Govert P.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    Objective: To compare prospectively 2 perimetric progression detection algorithms for glaucoma, the Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial algorithm (glaucoma progression analysis [GPA]) and a nonparametric algorithm applied to the mean deviation (MD) (nonparametric progression analysis [NPA]). Methods:

  4. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  5. Coordinated subprojects of the Austrian forest damage monitoring system; Koordinierte Teilprojekte des Oesterr. Waldschaden-Beobachtungssystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollanschuetz, J

    1993-12-31

    Any actions to preserve nature as the base of our survival needs to rely on knowledge about the condition of ecosystems and their `evolutionary` trends. A monitoring system ensuring timely detection of a critical `evolution` of forests as sensitive bio-indicators is an absolute must when addressing the global threat to our living environment. The Austrian forest damage monitoring system addresses this task. It involves subprojects and interdisciplinary studies integrated within this biomonitoring system to enhance our knowledge about and detection capabilities for forest diseases and injuries. (orig.) [Deutsch] Massnahmen zur Bewahrung der Natur als Lebensgrundlage setzen das Wissen ueber den Zustand der Oekosysteme und Kenntnisse ueber deren Entwicklung voraus. Ein Ueberwachungssystem das rechtzeitig kritische Entwicklung am sensiblen Bioindikator Wald erkennen laesst, ist angesichts der Anzeichen einer globalen Bedrohung der belebten Umwelt eine zwingende Selbstverstaendlichkeit. Mit dem Waldschaden-Beobachtungssystem wird diesen Aufgabenstellungen Rechnung getragen. Durch die in diesem Biomonitoring-System integrierten Teilprojekte und interdisziplinaeren Untersuchungen wird auch ein wesentlicher Beitrag zur Erkennung von Ursachen fuer Waldschaeden und Waldkrankheiten geleistet. (orig.)

  6. Spatio-temporal progression of grey and white matter damage following contusion injury in rat spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Joakim Ek

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms of secondary damage progression following spinal cord injury remain unclear. We have studied the extent of tissue damage from 15 min to 10 weeks after injury using morphological and biochemical estimates of lesion volume and surviving grey and white matter. This has been achieved by semi-quantitative immunocytochemical methods for a range of cellular markers, quantitative counts of white matter axonal profiles in semi-thin sections and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis, together with behavioural tests (BBB scores, ledged beam, random rung horizontal ladder and DigiGait analysis. We have developed a new computer-controlled electronic impactor based on a linear motor that allows specification of the precise nature, extent and timing of the impact. Initial (15 min lesion volumes showed very low variance (1.92+/-0.23 mm3, mean+/-SD, n=5. Although substantial tissue clearance continued for weeks after injury, loss of grey matter was rapid and complete by 24 hours, whereas loss of white matter extended up to one week. No change was found between one and 10 weeks after injury for almost all morphological and biochemical estimates of lesion size or behavioural methods. These results suggest that previously reported apparent ongoing injury progression is likely to be due, to a large extent, to clearance of tissue damaged by the primary impact rather than continuing cell death. The low variance of the impactor and the comprehensive assessment methods described in this paper provide an improved basis on which the effects of potential treatment regimes for spinal cord injury can be assessed.

  7. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    We are studying damages that have been shown to be stable radiolysis products found in x-irradiation DNA and thus products that have potential biological consequences. Four thymine ring saturation or fragmentation products were chosen as models for pyrimidine radiolysis products. The first product we synthesized and to which antibodies were elicited was thymine glycol. Thymine glycols are the major stable radiolysis products produced in DNA x-radiation in vitro. Although they retain base pairing characteristics, the stacking properties of thymine glycols are altered due to the saturation of the 5.6 double bond. Thymine glucol is also a useful model because alternative assay proceudres are available and they can selectively be produced in DNA by osmium tetroxide oxidation allowing the development of standards for subsequent measurement of DNA damage in x-irradiated DNA. We have also raised antibodies to dihydrothymine, a major radiolysis product produced in NDA under anaerobic conditions, to 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantoin, the second most predominant stable radiolysis product producted under aerobic conditions, and to urea, a totally non-instructive DNA fragmentation product of thymine hydroperoxides. 29 refs., 2 figs

  8. Screening human populations for chromosome damage. Progress report, March 1982-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The micronuclear counts in 73 relatively young and healthy patients obtained in previous studies were examined. The natural logarithm of the micronuclear counts (LMNC) was approximately normally distributed so we have tested the effects of age, sex, and medical x-ray exposure on the counts. The results show a clear dependence of micronuclear counts on age, and demonstrate that studies of chromosome damage in radiation workers or in other populations exposed to radiation may be misinterpreted if the effects of age and medical x-ray examinations are not controlled. The results also show that the variability in LNMC among the individuals examined cannot be accounted for totally by the factors of age, sex, or medical x-rays. There are at least two other important sources of variation: counting statistics and degree of lymphocyte proliferation. A single set of harlequin stained cells may be sufficient for estimating micronuclear yields, the degree of lymphocyte proliferation, and possibly the frequency of chromosome aberrations. These results point to the usefulness of the micronucleus assay for screening human populations for chromosome damage

  9. Characterization of ionizing radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, May 1, 1975--April 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this research is the characterization and quantitative assay of ionizing radiation-induced damage in DNA and nucleoprotein. Two lines of investigation have been pursued. The first is aimed at detection and assay of DNA to protein covalent cross linkage in coliphage T7. Protein and DNA are labeled with 14 C and 32 P, respectively. Cross linkage is assessed from the amount of labeled protein distributing like DNA and labeled DNA distributing like protein on a phenol-water countercurrent distribution system. It has been found that damage involving cross linkage occurs by two modes of radiation action in phage irradiated with 60 Co γ rays in .001M histidine medium. Indirect effects play a large role in one mode and direct effects play a large role in the other. In the second line of investigation, the hydrodynamic and viscoelastic properties of DNA from irradiated phage and cells will be examined to determine the extent to which DNA to DNA cross linkage and points of altered flexibility are introduced by radiation. An instrument for viscoelastic measurements has been constructed in preparation for these studies

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA, Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1978-06-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which we have completed during the past year are: π-cation radicals in DNA and dinucleoside phosphates, and conformational effects on the ESR Spectra of amino acids and peptides. Studies of γ-Irradiated Peptide Solutions at 77 0 K, and studies of spin transfer in γ-irradiated nucleoside--peptide solutions were also conducted

  11. Dynamics of the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundsen, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A study, begun in 1971, continues to document the environmental factors which affect the recovery of damaged tundra landscapes. A measurement technique was developed on Amchitka Island to allow the rapid acquisition of data on species presence and frequency across areas disturbed at various times and in various ways. Samples across all examples of aspect, slope steepness and exposure are taken. Studies now include Adak Island and the Point Barrow area. We have concluded that there was no directional secondary succession on the Aleutian tundra, although there was vigorous recovery on organic soils. Our study led to recommendations which resulted in less intensive reclamation management at a considerable financial saving and without further biological perturbation. Because of the increasing activity on tundra landscapes, for energy extraction, transportation or production, military or other reasons, we have expanded our sampling to other tundra areas where landscape disruption is occurring or is predicted.

  12. A discussion on the merits and limitations of using drive-by monitoring to detect localised damage in a bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    Given the large number of bridges that currently have no instrumentation, there are obvious advantages in monitoring the condition of a bridge by analysing the response of a vehicle crossing it. As a result, the last two decades have seen a rise in the research attempting to solve the problem of identifying damage in a bridge from vehicle measurements. This paper examines the theoretical feasibility and practical limitations of a drive-by system in identifying damage associated to localised stiffness losses. First, the nature of the damage feature that is sought within the vehicle response needs to be characterized. For this purpose, the total vehicle response is considered to be made of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the bridge has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. Understanding the nature of this 'damage' component is crucial to have an informed discussion on how damage can be identified and localised. Leveraging this new understanding, the authors propose a wavelet-based drive-by algorithm. By comparing the effect of the 'damage' component to other key effects defining the measurements such as 'vehicle speed', the 'road profile' and 'noise' on a wavelet contour plot, it is possible to establish if there is a frequency range where drive-by can be successful. The algorithm uses then specific frequency bands to improve the sensitivity to damage with respect to limitations imposed by Vehicle-Bridge vibrations. Recommendations on the selection of the mother wavelet and frequency band are provided. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of noise and road profile on the ability of the approach to identify damage and how periodic measurements can be effective at monitoring localised stiffness changes.

  13. Damaging role of neutrophilic infiltration in a mouse model of progressive tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Elena; Vilaplana, Cristina; Tapia, Gustavo; Diaz, Jorge; Garcia, Vanessa; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis was studied using an experimental model based on the C3HeB/FeJ mouse strain, which mimics the liquefaction of caseous necrosis occurring during active disease in immunocompetent adults. Mice were intravenously infected with 2 × 10(4) Colony Forming Units of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and their histopathology, immune response, bacillary load, and survival were evaluated. The effects of the administration of drugs with anti-inflammatory activity were examined, and the C3H/HeN mouse strain was also included for comparative purposes. Massive intra-alveolar neutrophilic infiltration led to rapid granuloma growth and coalescence of lesions into superlesions. A central necrotic area appeared showing progressive cellular destruction, the alveoli cell walls being initially conserved (caseous necrosis) but finally destroyed (liquefactive necrosis). Increasing levels of pro-inflammatory mediators were detected in lungs. C3HeB/FeJ treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and C3H/HeN animals presented lower levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-17, IL-6 and CXCL5, a lower bacillary load, better histopathology, and increased survival compared with untreated C3HeB/FeJ. The observation of massive neutrophilic infiltration suggests that inflammation may be a key factor in progression towards active tuberculosis. On the basis of our findings, we consider that the C3HeB/FeJ mouse model would be useful for evaluating new therapeutic strategies against human tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Discrete Element Method Approach to Progressive Localization of Damage in Granular Rocks and Associated Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, H.; Morgan, J.

    2017-12-01

    Brittle failure in rock under confined biaxial conditions is accompanied by release of seismic energy, known as acoustic emissions (AE). The objective our study is to understand the influence of elastic properties of rock and its stress state on deformation patterns, and associated seismicity in granular rocks. Discrete Element Modeling is used to simulate biaxial tests on granular rocks of defined grain size distribution. Acoustic Energy and seismic moments are calculated from microfracture events as rock is taken to conditions of failure under different confining pressure states. Dimensionless parameters such as seismic b-value and fractal parameter for deformation, D-value, are used to quantify seismic character and distribution of damage in rock. Initial results suggest that confining pressure has the largest control on distribution of induced microfracturing, while fracture energy and seismic magnitudes are highly sensitive to elastic properties of rock. At low confining pressures, localized deformation (low D-values) and high seismic b-values are observed. Deformation at high confining pressures is distributed in nature (high D-values) and exhibit low seismic b-values as shearing becomes the dominant mode of microfracturing. Seismic b-values and fractal D-values obtained from microfracturing exhibit a linear inverse relationship, similar to trends observed in earthquakes. Mode of microfracturing in our simulations of biaxial compression tests show mechanistic similarities to propagation of fractures and faults in nature.

  15. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1974--July 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for radiation damage to DNA and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanism is described. Investigations completed or nearing completion are: studies of electron transfer reactions in dinucleoside phosphates; studies of the anions of 5-nitropyrimidines and their reactions; and studies of protonation reactions at carbon sites in anion radicals of certain model compounds and aromatic amino acids. In the first study, the relative electron affinities of the DNA bases were determined in a model system of the DNA strand. In addition, study of the reactions of these anions showed that the thymine anion is the most reactive of the DNA bases in this model system. In the second study anisotropic and isotropic spectra of the anion radicals of 5-nitropyrimidines were characterized by newly developed computer simulation programs. Several of the anions were found to react to form iminoxy radicals. The third study showed that protonation reactions at carbon sites in anions are reactions which are general for molecules with unsaturated linkages. Thus, this mechanism is of significance to the radiolysis of many biological molecules, including DNA. (U.S.)

  16. Characterization of ionizing radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, May 1, 1974--April 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this research is the characterization and quantitative assay of ionizing radiation induced damage in DNA and nucleoprotein. Two lines of investigation have been pursued. The first is aimed at detection and assay of the amount of DNA to protein covalent cross linkage in coliphage T7. Protein and DNA are labeled with 14 C and 32 P, respectively. Cross linkage is assessed from the amount of labeled protein remaining with DNA after efforts to separate the two components by countercurrent distribution in a phenol-water system. It has been found that cross linkage occurs in phage irradiated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation while in dilute neutral aqueous solutions of phosphate buffer and phosphate buffer plus 1-histidine. Cross linkage is largely due to indirect effects and accompanied by protein and DNA fragmentation. The second line of investigation is a study of the hydrodynamic and viscoelastic properties of dilute solution of DNA from irradiated bacteriophage and cells. A device for this purpose, which will measure the elastic retardation time of DNA solutions, is being constructed. (U.S.)

  17. Development of a wireless, self-sustaining damage detection sensor system based on chemiluminescence for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, K. S. C.

    2014-03-01

    A novel application of chemiluminescence resulting from the chemical reaction in a glow-stick as sensors for structural health monitoring is demonstrated here. By detecting the presence of light emitting from these glow-sticks, it is possible to develop a low-cost sensing device with the potential to provide early warning of damage in a variety of engineering applications such as monitoring of cracks or damage in concrete shear walls, detecting of ground settlement, soil liquefaction, slope instability, liquefaction-related damage of underground structure and others. In addition, this paper demonstrates the ease of incorporating wireless capability to the sensor device and the possibility of making the sensor system self-sustaining by means of a renewable power source for the wireless module. A significant advantage of the system compared to previous work on the use of plastic optical fibre (POF) for damage detection is that here the system does not require an electrically-powered light source. Here, the sensing device, embedded in a cement host, is shown to be capable of detecting damage. A series of specimens with embedded glow-sticks have been investigated and an assessment of their damage detection capability will be reported. The specimens were loaded under flexure and the sensor responses were transmitted via a wireless connection.

  18. Active-sensing based damage monitoring of airplane wings under low-temperature and continuous loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jun Young; Jung, Hwee Kwon; Park, Gyu Hae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Seok; Park, Chan Yik [7th R and D Institute, Agency for Denfense Development, Yuseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As aircrafts are being operated at high altitude, wing structures experience various fatigue loadings under cryogenic environments. As a result, fatigue damage such as a crack could be develop that could eventually lead to a catastrophic failure. For this reason, fatigue damage monitoring is an important process to ensure efficient maintenance and safety of structures. To implement damage detection in real-world flight environments, a special cooling chamber was built. Inside the chamber, the temperature was maintained at the cryogenic temperature, and harmonic fatigue loading was given to a wing structure. In this study, piezoelectric active-sensing based guided waves were used to detect the fatigue damage. In particular, a beam forming technique was applied to efficiently measure the scattering wave caused by the fatigue damage. The system was used for detection, growth monitoring, and localization of a fatigue crack. In addition, a sensor diagnostic process was also applied to ensure the proper operation of piezoelectric sensors. Several experiments were implemented and the results of the experiments demonstrated that this process could efficiently detect damage in such an extreme environment.

  19. Application of Addenbrooke's cognitive examination to diagnosis and monitoring of progressive primary aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Cristian E; Hornberger, Michael; Mioshi, Eneida; Hodges, John R

    2010-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) comprises 2 main variants: semantic dementia (SD) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) has become widely used for the diagnosis of dementias. Less information, however, is available about its ability to detect and monitor changes in cognition in PPA. We aimed to analyse the sensitivity and longitudinal changes of ACE scores in 2 subforms of PPA. We included 63 SD and 45 PNFA cases, all of whom had at least 2 assessments. Sensitivity levels, annualised rates of change and difference in scores over time on repeated ACE measurements were calculated. A cut-off of 88 points detected 95% of the PNFA and SD cases. Longitudinal analysis showed an average annual decline of 10 points per year, with no significant difference between groups. The ACE is a useful tool for detecting and tracking the evolution of PPA. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. A Framework for (Tele-) Monitoring of the Rehabilitation Progress in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, V.; Haller, M.; Kotzian, S.; Hofmann, M.; Schlossarek, S.; Eichholzer, K.; Winkler, M.; Frohner, M.; Reichel, M.; Mayr, W.; Rafolt, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preservation of mobility in conjunction with an independent life style is one of the major goals of rehabilitation after stroke. Objectives The Rehab@Home framework shall support the continuation of rehabilitation at home. Methods The framework consists of instrumented insoles, connected wirelessly to a 3G ready tablet PC, a server, and a web-interface for medical experts. The rehabilitation progress is estimated via automated analysis of movement data from standardized assessment tests which are designed according to the needs of stroke patients and executed via the tablet PC application. Results The Rehab@Home framework’s implementation is finished and ready for the field trial (at five patients’ homes). Initial testing of the automated evaluation of the standardized mobility tests shows reproducible results. Conclusions Therefore it is assumed that the Rehab@Home framework is applicable as monitoring tool for the gait rehabilitation progress in stroke patients. PMID:26767068

  1. Later Onset Fabry Disease, Cardiac Damage Progress in Silence: Experience With a Highly Prevalent Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ting-Rong; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chang, Fu-Pang; Yu, Wen-Chung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Dzhagalov, Ivan; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chu, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Han-Jui; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Chang, Sheng-Kai; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Liao, Tsan-Chieh; Lee, Pi-Chang; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Yang, An-Hang; Ho, Hui-Chen; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Desnick, Robert J; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-13

    Recently, several studies revealed a much higher prevalence of later onset Fabry disease (FD) than previously expected. It suggested that later onset FD might present as an important hidden health issue in certain ethnic or demographic populations in the world. However, the natural history of its phenotype has not been systemically investigated, especially the cardiac involvement. The study analyzed a large-scale newborn screening program for FD to understand the natural course of later onset FD. To date, 916,383 newborns have been screened for FD in Taiwan, including more than 1,200 individuals with the common, later onset IVS4+919G>A (IVS4) mutation. Echocardiography was performed in 620 adults with the IVS4 mutation to analyze the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 129 patients with FD, including 100 IVS4 adults. LVH was observed in 67% of men and 32% of women older than 40 years. Imaging evidenced significant late gadolinium enhancement in 38.1% of IVS4 men and 16.7% of IVS4 women with the IVS4 mutation but without LVH. Seventeen patients underwent endomyocardial biopsies, which revealed significant globotriaosylceramide substrate accumulation in their cardiomyocytes. Significant cardiomyocyte substrate accumulation in IVS4 patients led to severe and irreversible cardiac fibrosis before development of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations. Thus, it might be too late to start enzyme replacement therapy after the occurrence of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations in patients with later onset FD. This study also indicated the importance of newborn screening for early detection of the insidious, ongoing, irreversible cardiac damage in patients with later onset FD. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Haseem, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan...... the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans...

  3. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Annual progress report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes progress during 1987 of five Hanford Site ground water monitoring projects. Four of these projects are being conducted according to regulations based on the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the state Hazardous Waste Management Act. The fifth project is being conducted according to regulations based on the state Solid Waste Management Act. The five projects discussed herein are: 300 Area Process Trenches; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins; 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds; Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill; Solid Waste Landfill. For each of the projects, there are included, as applicable, discussions of monitoring well installations, water-table measurements, background and/or downgradient water quality and results of chemical analysis, and extent and rate of movement of contaminant plumes. 14 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  4. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-07-26

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker-induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress.

  5. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  6. DNA damage, repair monitoring and epigenetic DNA methylation changes in seedlings of Chernobyl soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Mariyana; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study was carried out to assess the effect of radio-contaminated Chernobyl environment on plant genome integrity 27 years after the accident. For this purpose, nuclei were isolated from root tips of the soybean seedlings harvested from plants grown in the Chernobyl area for seven generations. Neutral, neutral-alkaline, and methylation-sensitive comet assays were performed to evaluate the induction and repair of primary DNA damage and the epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation mechanisms. An increased level of single and double strand breaks in the radio-contaminated Chernobyl seedlings at the stage of primary root development was detected in comparison to the controls. However, the kinetics of the recovery of DNA breaks of radio-contaminated Chernobyl samples revealed that lesions were efficiently repaired at the stage of cotyledon. Methylation-sensitive comet assay revealed comparable levels in the CCGG methylation pattern between control and radio-contaminated samples with a slight increase of approximately 10% in the latter ones. The obtained preliminary data allow us to speculate about the onset of mechanisms providing an adaptation potential to the accumulated internal irradiation after the Chernobyl accident. Despite the limitations of this study, we showed that comet assay is a sensitive and flexible technique which can be efficiently used for genotoxic screening of plant specimens in natural and human-made radio-contaminated areas, as well as for safety monitoring of agricultural products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of impact damage on thermal protection systems using thin-film piezoelectric sensors for integrated structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jeong K.; Kuhr, Samuel J.; Jata, Kumar V.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) can be subjected to impact damage during flight and/or during ground maintenance and/or repair. AFRL/RXLP is developing a reliable and robust on-board sensing/monitoring capability for next generation thermal protection systems to detect and assess impact damage. This study was focused on two classes of metallic thermal protection tiles to determine threshold for impact damage and develop sensing capability of the impacts. Sensors made of PVDF piezoelectric film were employed and tested to evaluate the detectability of impact signals and assess the onset or threshold of impact damage. Testing was performed over a range of impact energy levels, where the sensors were adhered to the back of the specimens. The PVDF signal levels were analyzed and compared to assess damage, where digital microscopy, visual inspection, and white light interferometry were used for damage verification. Based on the impact test results, an assessment of the impact damage thresholds for each type of metallic TPS system was made.

  8. Is the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist a Useful Tool for Monitoring Progress in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiati, I.; Moss, J.; Yates, R.; Charman, T.; Howlin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There are few well validated brief measures that can be used to assess the general progress of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) over time. In the present study, the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC) was used as part of a comprehensive assessment battery to monitor the progress of 22 school-aged children…

  9. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  10. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  11. Photorepair of UV damage to DNA: purification and properties of DNA photolyase (the DNA-photoreactivating enzyme). Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werbin, H.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: separation of photolyase subunits by sucrose gradient sedimentation; determination of whether fluorescent material is the chromophore for photolyase; studies on tryptophane and lysine residues to determine whether these are involved in the binding and photolytic steps; nmr spectrum of activator of photolyase; damage to pea chromatin by solar near uv and repair of damage; tryptophan residues in yeast DNA photolyase; photolyase in pea seedlings; and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of purified activator

  12. Teacher Progress Monitoring of Instructional and Behavioral Management Practices: An Evidence-Based Approach to Improving Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    In the era of teacher evaluation and effectiveness, assessment tools that identify and monitor educators' instruction and behavioral management practices are in high demand. The Classroom Strategies Scale (CSS) Observer Form is a multidimensional teacher progress monitoring tool designed to assess teachers' usage of instructional and behavioral…

  13. Gender differences in the progression of target organ damage in patients with increased insulin resistance: the LOD-DIABETES study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel Ángel; Recio-Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Gómez-Sánchez, Leticia; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Rodríguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Maderuelo-Fernandez, JoseAngel; Gomez-Sanchez, Marta; García-Ortiz, Luís

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the evolution of vascular, cardiac and renal target organ damage (TOD) in patients with increased insulin resistance over a 3.5 year follow-up and to investigate gender difference and factors that influence its progression. We performed a prospective observational study involving 112 patients (71 men, 41 women) who were followed for 3.5 years. Measurements included blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, smoking, body mass index (BMI) and HOMA-Ir Vascular TOD included carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle/brachial index (ABI). Cardiac TOD included Cornell voltage-duration product and Sokolow. Renal TOD included creatinine, glomerular filtration and albumin/creatinine ratio. The IMT increased in both genders. Each year, the IMT increased 0.005 mm in men and 0.011 in women and the PWV 0.024 and 0.020 m/sec, respectively. The highest increase was in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who had an increase in TOD carotid (40%), PWV (24%) and renal TOD (20 %). Multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for age and gender, showed a negative association between duration since diabetes diagnosis and ABI (β = -0.006; p = 0.017) and between BMI and glomerular filtration (β = -0.813; p = 0.014). HbA1c was positively associated with PWV (β = 0.501; p = 0.014). This study showed that the progression of vascular and renal TOD differs by gender. The increase in vascular and renal TOD was higher in women, especially in diabetic women. The PWV increase showed a positive association with mean HbA1c levels during the follow-up. Glomerular filtration was associated with BMI and the ABI was associated with duration since type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier NCT01065155.

  14. Monitoring Poisson's ratio of glass fiber reinforced composites as damage index using biaxial Fiber Bragg Grating sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Çağatay; Yilmaz, Cagatay; Akalın, Çağdaş; Akalin, Cagdas; Kocaman, Esat Selim; Suleman, A.; Yıldız, Mehmet; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Damage accumulation in Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composites is monitored based on Poisson's ratio measurements for three different fiber stacking sequences subjected to both quasi-static and quasi-static cyclic tensile loadings. The sensor systems utilized include a dual-extensometer, a biaxial strain gage and a novel embedded-biaxial Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor. These sensors are used concurrently to measure biaxial strain whereby the evolution of Poisson's ratio as a functi...

  15. Ultrasonic sounding and monitoring of the excavation damaged zone in a soft supported gallery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balland, Cyrille; Souley, Mountaka; Morel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Under high in situ stresses and high anisotropic stress ratios, the excavation of underground openings generally causes the creation of a disturbed (EdZ: Excavation disturbed Zone) and/or damaged (EDZ: Excavation Damaged Zone) zone, resulting from the initiation and growth of cracks and fractures and by a redistribution and rearrangement of the initial stresses. Due to the modifications of mechanical and hydro-mechanical properties in the EdZ/EDZ, the latter constitute a potential risk for the efficiency of the geologic and/or engineered barriers. To estimate the performance of a site of radioactive waste storage, it is essential to know the geometry, the extensions of the EdZ/EDZ, the density of cracks, their connectivity and the variations of permeability which can result from it. In particular, their extension depends on numerous factors among which the nature of the rock, the pre-existent fractures and their reactivation, the initial stress field (magnitudes and/or rate of anisotropy), the time, the geometry and the techniques of excavations etc.. In addition, the evolution of EdZ/EDZ properties in the medium term is little or poorly known, particularly under the influence of environmental conditions such as the re-confining by near field rock creep in contact with a rigid structural support or the evolution of hydric conditions (desaturation and re-saturation). Ultrasonic experimentation under the OHZ experiment has been implemented to characterize the EDZ extension and its evolution in time according to the structural support type (soft or rigid) and the environmental conditions present in the laboratory. This study consists of two experimental components: (1) the prior auscultation of the sole and face of the gallery by ultrasonic transmission tomography, (2) the monitoring the EDZ and the analysis of measurable changes in the propagation of ultrasonic waves in the medium term. Mechanical modelling of the

  16. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

  17. Aquatic Toxic Analysis by Monitoring Fish Behavior Using Computer Vision: A Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Video tracking based biological early warning system achieved a great progress with advanced computer vision and machine learning methods. Ability of video tracking of multiple biological organisms has been largely improved in recent years. Video based behavioral monitoring has become a common tool for acquiring quantified behavioral data for aquatic risk assessment. Investigation of behavioral responses under chemical and environmental stress has been boosted by rapidly developed machine learning and artificial intelligence. In this paper, we introduce the fundamental of video tracking and present the pioneer works in precise tracking of a group of individuals in 2D and 3D space. Technical and practical issues suffered in video tracking are explained. Subsequently, the toxic analysis based on fish behavioral data is summarized. Frequently used computational methods and machine learning are explained with their applications in aquatic toxicity detection and abnormal pattern analysis. Finally, advantages of recent developed deep learning approach in toxic prediction are presented.

  18. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Injury ProgressionIn the Rat Cerebellar Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eOrdek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI. The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing and mossy fibers. Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI. A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEA. Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs were analyzed on a daily basis for one week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72±4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 hours of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24% were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47±0.1 to 0.35±0.04, p<0.001 along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels.

  19. Towards mechanisms-guided resistivity-based monitoring of damage evolution in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles; Nouri, Hedi; Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    A convenient health monitoring technique for detecting degradation in laminated composite is to monitor the change of electrical resistance along multiple conduction paths within the structure. Yet, the relations between the global modification

  20. Application of monitoring to dynamic characterization and damage detection in bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The field of bridge monitoring is one of rapid development. Advances in sensor technologies, in data communication and processing algorithms all affect the possibilities of Structural Monitoring in Bridges. Bridges are a very critical part of a country’s infrastructure, they are expensive to build and maintain, and many uncertainties surround important factors determining their serviceability and deterioration state. As such, bridges are good candidates for monitoring. Monitoring can extend t...

  1. Understanding Climate Adaptation on Public Lands in the Upper Midwest: Implications for Monitoring and Tracking Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhalt-Depies, Christine M.; Knoot, Tricia Gorby; Rissman, Adena R.; Sharp, Anthony K.; Martin, Karl J.

    2016-05-01

    There are limited examples of efforts to systematically monitor and track climate change adaptation progress in the context of natural resource management, despite substantial investments in adaptation initiatives. To better understand the status of adaptation within state natural resource agencies, we utilized and problematized a rational decision-making framework to characterize adaptation at the level of public land managers in the Upper Midwest. We conducted in-depth interviews with 29 biologists and foresters to provide an understanding of managers' experiences with, and perceptions of, climate change impacts, efforts towards planning for climate change, and a full range of actions implemented to address climate change. While the majority of managers identified climate change impacts affecting their region, they expressed significant uncertainty in interpreting those signals. Just under half of managers indicated planning efforts are underway, although most planning is remote from local management. Actions already implemented include both forward-looking measures and those aimed at coping with current impacts. In addition, cross-scale dynamics emerged as an important theme related to the overall adaptation process. The results hold implications for tracking future progress on climate change adaptation. Common definitions or measures of adaptation (e.g., presence of planning documents) may need to be reassessed for applicability at the level of public land managers.

  2. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  3. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A, E-mail: davide.masera@polito.it [Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering - Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2011-07-19

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  4. A study of two unsupervised data driven statistical methodologies for detecting and classifying damages in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaduiza, D.-A.; Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Mujica, L. E.; Rodellar, J.; Fritzen, C.-P.

    2013-12-01

    This article is concerned with the practical use of Multiway Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Squared Prediction Error (SPE) measures and Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) to detect and classify damages in mechanical structures. The formalism is based on a distributed piezoelectric active sensor network for the excitation and detection of structural dynamic responses. Statistical models are built using PCA when the structure is known to be healthy either directly from the dynamic responses or from wavelet coefficients at different scales representing Time-frequency information. Different damages on the tested structures are simulated by adding masses at different positions. The data from the structure in different states (damaged or not) are then projected into the different principal component models by each actuator in order to obtain the input feature vectors for a SOM from the scores and the SPE measures. An aircraft fuselage from an Airbus A320 and a multi-layered carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate are used as examples to test the approaches. Results are presented, compared and discussed in order to determine their potential in structural health monitoring. These results showed that all the simulated damages were detectable and the selected features proved capable of separating all damage conditions from the undamaged state for both approaches.

  5. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  6. Task and Progress of Iaeg-Sdgs Wggi in Monitoring Sdgs Through a `GEOGRAPHIC Location' Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, W.; Chen, J.; Zhang, H. P.; Xu, K.

    2018-04-01

    In September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations (UN) unanimously adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), aiming to transform the world over the next 15 years (ESDN, 2016). To meet the ambitions and demands of the 2030 Agenda, it is necessary for the global indicator framework to adequately and systematically address the issue of alternative data sources and methodologies, including geospatial information and Earth observations in the context of geographic location (UN-GGIM, 2016). For this purpose, the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicator (IAEG-SDGs) created the Working Group on Geospatial Information (IAEG-SDGs: WGGI) to give full play to the role of geospatial data in SDGs measurement and monitoring. The Working Group reviewed global indicators through a `geographic location' lens to pick out those which geospatial information can significantly support the production, and analyzed the methodological and measurements issues. This paper has discussed the progress in monitoring SDGs ever since the establishment of IAEG-SDGs: WGGI, as well as the existing problems, appropriate solutions and plans for the next stage of work.

  7. Developing Dynamic Digital Image Correlation Technique to Monitor Structural Damage of Old Buildings under External Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of buildings to resist external excitation is an important factor to consider for the structural design of buildings. When subject to external excitation, a building may suffer a certain degree of damages, and its residual capacity to resist external excitation cannot be evaluated. In this research, dynamic digital image correlation method combined with parameter evaluation available in system identification is used to evaluate the structural capacity to resist external excitation. The results reveal possible building latent safety problems so that timely structural reinforcement or dismantling of the building can be initiated to alleviate further damages. The results of experiments using the proposed method conform to the results obtained using the conventional method, but this method is more convenient and rapid than the latter in the subsequent procedure of data processing. If only the frequency change is used, the damages suffered by the building can be detected, but the damage location is not revealed. The interstory drift mode shape (IDMS based on the characteristic of story drift has higher sensitivity than the approximate story damage index (ADSI method based on modal frequency and vibration type; however, both indices can be used to determine the degree and location of building damages.

  8. Damage mapping in structural health monitoring using a multi-grid architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, V. John [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This paper presents a multi-grid architecture for tomography-based damage mapping of composite aerospace structures. The system employs an array of piezo-electric transducers bonded on the structure. Each transducer may be used as an actuator as well as a sensor. The structure is excited sequentially using the actuators and the guided waves arriving at the sensors in response to the excitations are recorded for further analysis. The sensor signals are compared to their baseline counterparts and a damage index is computed for each actuator-sensor pair. These damage indices are then used as inputs to the tomographic reconstruction system. Preliminary damage maps are reconstructed on multiple coordinate grids defined on the structure. These grids are shifted versions of each other where the shift is a fraction of the spatial sampling interval associated with each grid. These preliminary damage maps are then combined to provide a reconstruction that is more robust to measurement noise in the sensor signals and the ill-conditioned problem formulation for single-grid algorithms. Experimental results on a composite structure with complexity that is representative of aerospace structures included in the paper demonstrate that for sufficiently high sensor densities, the algorithm of this paper is capable of providing damage detection and characterization with accuracy comparable to traditional C-scan and A-scan-based ultrasound non-destructive inspection systems quickly and without human supervision.

  9. Structural health monitoring using DOG multi-scale space: an approach for analyzing damage characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Xu, Zili

    2018-03-01

    Measurement noise is inevitable in practice; thus, it is difficult to identify defects, cracks or damage in a structure while suppressing noise simultaneously. In this work, a novel method is introduced to detect multiple damage in noisy environments. Based on multi-scale space analysis for discrete signals, a method for extracting damage characteristics from the measured displacement mode shape is illustrated. Moreover, the proposed method incorporates a data fusion algorithm to further eliminate measurement noise-based interference. The effectiveness of the method is verified by numerical and experimental methods applied to different structural types. The results demonstrate that there are two advantages to the proposed method. First, damage features are extracted by the difference of the multi-scale representation; this step is taken such that the interference of noise amplification can be avoided. Second, a data fusion technique applied to the proposed method provides a global decision, which retains the damage features while maximally eliminating the uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to validate that the proposed method has a higher accuracy in damage detection.

  10. Methods Developed by the Tools for Engine Diagnostics Task to Monitor and Predict Rotor Damage in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Smith, Kevin; Raulerson, David; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Brasche, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Tools for Engine Diagnostics is a major task in the Propulsion System Health Management area of the Single Aircraft Accident Prevention project under NASA s Aviation Safety Program. The major goal of the Aviation Safety Program is to reduce fatal aircraft accidents by 80 percent within 10 years and by 90 percent within 25 years. The goal of the Propulsion System Health Management area is to eliminate propulsion system malfunctions as a primary or contributing factor to the cause of aircraft accidents. The purpose of Tools for Engine Diagnostics, a 2-yr-old task, is to establish and improve tools for engine diagnostics and prognostics that measure the deformation and damage of rotating engine components at the ground level and that perform intermittent or continuous monitoring on the engine wing. In this work, nondestructive-evaluation- (NDE-) based technology is combined with model-dependent disk spin experimental simulation systems, like finite element modeling (FEM) and modal norms, to monitor and predict rotor damage in real time. Fracture mechanics time-dependent fatigue crack growth and damage-mechanics-based life estimation are being developed, and their potential use investigated. In addition, wireless eddy current and advanced acoustics are being developed for on-wing and just-in-time NDE engine inspection to provide deeper access and higher sensitivity to extend on-wing capabilities and improve inspection readiness. In the long run, these methods could establish a base for prognostic sensing while an engine is running, without any overt actions, like inspections. This damage-detection strategy includes experimentally acquired vibration-, eddy-current- and capacitance-based displacement measurements and analytically computed FEM-, modal norms-, and conventional rotordynamics-based models of well-defined damages and critical mass imbalances in rotating disks and rotors.

  11. Monitoring of DNA and cytogenetic damage in lymphocytes from persons with skin cancer diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Dyga, W.; Krasnowolski, S.; Wierzewska, A.; Budzanowska, E.

    1999-01-01

    There is a lot of interest in the studies that would help to understand whether there is a casual association between cancer and various types of molecular or cytogenetic damage detected in human cells. One major oncogenesis process is activation of proto-oncogenes by point mutations or chromosomal translocation. There are substantial evidence that indicates that the loss of heterozygosity of certain chromosomes is involved in human cancerogenesis. Our study aimed to elicit the possible association between cancer and DNA and cytogenetic abnormalities induced in lymphocytes of people bearing various categories of skin cancer cells. Fresh blood was collected by venipuncture from 25 individuals (including nine prior to cancer treatment). All patients were nonsmoking males, however 42.3 % of them were former smokers. Blood samples were divided into two parts and in the first part of samples cytogenetic studies were performed immediately, while from the second part lymphocytes were isolated and stored at -70 o C for further studies in vitro. In the later one a single cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE) known as a Comet assay was performed to study individual susceptibility to the induction of DNA damage by UV or radiation and to estimate variability in cellular repair capabilities. An average of 220 per sample of good metaphase spreads in the first mitotic division, and 100 per sample in the second division, were accepted for analysis of cytogenetic damage. Chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were scored in the cells in the first mitosis and expressed as total aberration frequency including gaps and excluding gaps. Sister chromatid exchanges, high frequency cells and proliferative rate index were screened and evaluated in the second mitosis. Each of the patient revealed exceeding in at least one of the cytogenetic biomarkers level from the biomarker's level detected in a reference group. In order to estimate susceptibility of people to environmentally induced

  12. Seismic Monitoring To Assess Performance Of Structures In Near-Real Time: Recent Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Earlier papers have described how observed data from classical accelerometers deployed in structures or from differential GPS with high sampling ratios deployed at roofs of tall buildings can be configured to establish seismic health monitoring of structures. In these configurations, drift ratios 1 are the main parametric indicator of damage condition of a structure or component of a structure.Real-time measurement of displacements are acquired either by double integration of accelerometer time-series data, or by directly using GPS. Recorded sensor data is then related to the performance level of a building. Performance-based design method stipulates that for a building the amplitude of relative displacement of the roof of a building (with respect to its base) indicates its performance.Usually, drift ratio is computed using relative displacement between two consecutive floors. When accelerometers are used, a specific software is used to compute displacements and drift ratios in realtime by double integration of accelerometer data from several floors. However, GPS-measured relative displacements are limited to being acquired only at the roof with respect to its reference base. Thus, computed drift ratio is the average drift ratio for the whole building. Until recently, the validity of measurements using GPS was limited to long-period structures (T>1 s) because GPS systems readily available were limited to 10-20 samples per seconds (sps) capability. However, presently, up to 50 sps differential GPS systems are available on the market and have been successfully used to monitor drift ratios [1,2]--thus enabling future usefulness of GPS to all types of structures. Several levels of threshold drift ratios can be postulated in order to make decisions for inspections and/or occupancy.Experience with data acquired from both accelerometers and GPS deployments indicates that they are reliable and provide pragmatic alternatives to alert the owners and other authorized parties

  13. Monitoring of DNA and cytogenetic damage in lymphocytes in patients with skin cancer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Dyga, W.; Krasnowolski, S.; Wierzewska, A.; Budzanowska, E.

    1999-01-01

    One major oncogenesis process is activation of proto-oncogenes by point mutations or chromosomal translocations. There is substantial evidence that indicates that human carcinogenesis involves loss of heterozygosity of certain chromosomes. Our study aimed at searching the possible association between cancer and DNA and cytogenetic abnormalities induced in lymphocytes of people with various categories of skin cancer cells. Fresh blood was collected by venepuncture from 25 individuals (including nine prior to cancer treatment). All patients were nonsmoking males, however 42.3% of them were former smokers. Blood samples were divided into two parts; in the first part of samples cytogenetic studies were performed immediately, while lymphocytes from the other part were isolated and stored at -70 0C for further studies in vitro. A single cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE), known as a Comet assay, was performed on them to study individual susceptibility to the induction of DNA damage by UV or radiation and to estimate variability in cellular repair capabilities. On average 220 good metaphase spreads per sample in the first mitotic division, and 100 spreads per sample in the second division were accepted for analysis of the cytogenetic damage. Chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were scored in the cells in the first mitosis, and expressed as total aberration frequency including and excluding gaps. Sister chromatid exchanges , high frequency cells and proliferating rate index were screened and evaluated in the second mitosis. Each patient showed a level exceeding (in at least one of the cytogenetic biomarker) the biomarker level in a reference group. In order to estimate susceptibility of people to environmentally induced damage, the isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 2 Gy dose of X-rays or 6 J/m 2 of UV radiation, and the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE assay) was performed. To compare various individual capabilities to repair the induced damage

  14. A novel nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation effect for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a theoretical model able to predict the generation of nonlinear elastic effects associated to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the steady-state nonlinear response of local defect resonance (LDR). The LDR effect is used in nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy to enhance the excitation of the material damage at its local resonance, thus to dramatically increase the vibrational amplitude of material nonlinear phenomena. The main result of this work is to prove both analytically and experimentally the generation of novel nonlinear elastic wave effects, here named as nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation, which correspond to a nonlinear intermodulation between the driving frequency and the LDR one. Beside this intermodulation effect, other nonlinear elastic wave phenomena such as higher harmonics of the input frequency and superharmonics of LDR frequency were found. The analytical model relies on solving the nonlinear equation of motion governing bending displacement under the assumption of both quadratic and cubic nonlinear defect approximation. Experimental tests on a damaged composite laminate confirmed and validated these predictions and showed that using continuous periodic excitation, the nonlinear structural phenomena associated to LDR could also be featured at locations different from the damage resonance. These findings will provide new opportunities for material damage detection using nonlinear ultrasounds.

  15. Structural health monitoring and damage assessment using measured FRFs from multiple sensors. Part II. Decision making with RBF networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, C.; Friswell, M.I. [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Univ. of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Imregun, M. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This paper is the second of two papers concerned with structural health monitoring and damage assessment using measured FRFs from multiple sensors, and discusses the decision making technique with radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. In PART 1 of the paper, the correlation criteria showed their capability to indicate various changes to the structure's state. PART 2, presented here, develops the methodology of decision theory to identify precisely all of the structure states. Although, the statistical approach can be used for classification, interpreting the information is difficult. Neural network techniques have been proven to possess many advantages for classification due to their learning ability and good generalization. In this paper, the radial basis function neural network is applied for function approximation and recognition. The key idea is to partition the input space (the indicators of the correlation criteria) into a number of subspaces that are in the form of hyper spheres. Then, the widely used k-mean clustering algorithm was selected as a logical approach to detecting the structure states. A bookshelf structure with measured frequency responses from 24 accelerometers was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The results show the successful classification of all structure states, for instance, the undamaged and damage states, damage locations and damage levels, and the environmental variability. (orig.)

  16. Monitoring of total body water to examine the progress of acclimatization of runners at varying altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Semerád

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our pilot study was to find out if total body water (TBW changes could objectively modify the course of adaptation during training for elite runners at different altitudes. The aim of this pilot study is to summarize the indication of the progress of acclimatization at high altitudes (1000–2700 meters above sea level during alpine conditioning. In three training camps at various altitudes the TBW of elite runners (F = 3, M = 1; n = 4; age 23 } 0.9 was monitored, in order to check the progress of acclimatization. We used BIA measurement methods (Bodystat 1500 at different high altitude running camps at the Czech Republic, Morocco and Ethiopia. Changes in TBW were used to check the progress of acclimatization. We discovered that the retention peaks of TBW corresponded with critical days (p ≤ 0.04; Cohen’s d. The highest measured increases of TBW at an altitude of 1000 m were for runner 1, 1.7 litres and for runner 2, 2.1 litres with retention peaks for both occurring on the 5th day. At an altitude of 1770 m runner 1 reached an increase of TBW of 6.3 litres, with a retention peak on the 11th day, and runner 3 had an increase of 5.1 litres with a peak on the 8th day. In the acclimatization phase we found two critical periods, from the 4th–6th day, and after the 10th–12th day. For runner 4 in altitude 2700m who completed the camp at a higher altitude, the situation is more complicated because there were fluctuations of the content of TBW in the range of 1.25 litres, with the highest depression on the 5th and then again an unsettled rise and reaching a maximum on the 12th, when she nearly returned to the initial value. Detected retention peaks reflected different levels of altitude (5th–12th days.We can conclude that the measuring of changes in TBW during camps at higher altitudes may be one of the biomarkers during acclimatization to altitude.

  17. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomachot, C.; Matsuoka, N.; Kuchitsu, N.; Morii, M.

    2005-07-01

    Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan) exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  18. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thomachot

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  19. In-situ monitoring of undercoating corrosion damage by Direct Optical Interrogation (DOI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garrity, Meng

    An approach referred to as "Direct Optical Interrogation" (DOI) has been developed as an extension of the thin film pitting approach developed and used by Frankel and others. Samples were prepared by depositing Al and Al-Cu alloy metallizations about 800 nm thick on glass substrates. These metallizations were then coated with various coatings and coating systems. Samples were introduced to aggressive environments and the progression of corrosion of the metallization under the coating was monitored in situ using low power videography. Because metallizations were thin, corrosion quickly penetrated through the metal layer to the glass substrate and then spread laterally. Measurement of the lateral spread of corrosion enabled non-electrochemical assessment of the corrosion kinetics. In Al-Cu thin films, both aged and as-deposited, corrosion sites are irregularly shaped because there is not enough cathodic current to propagate the entire corrosion site margin at equal rates. In a number of cases, corrosion propagates with a filamentary morphology resembling filiform corrosion. Cu played a strong role in determining under coating corrosion morphology and growth kinetics in experiments with Al-Cu thin films substrates. As-deposited Al-Cu metallizations were more corrosion resistant than aged metallization and both were more corrosion resistant than pure Al. Cu-rich dendrites were formed on the corrosion front. Corrosion rate (current density) was calculated using Faraday's law by collecting corrosion site perimeter and bottom area. Systematic exploration of the effects of a chromate and chromate-free conversion coatings, chromate and chromate-free primer coatings and the presence or absence of a polyurethane topcoat confirmed the extraordinary corrosion protection by chromates. A commercial praseodymium-pigmented primer coating was not particularly effective in retarding undercoating corrosion site growth unless paired with a chromate conversion coating. The presence of a

  20. Catastrophic optical mirror damage in diode lasers monitored during single-pulse operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegler, M.; Tomm, J.W.; Reeber, D.

    2009-01-01

    is achieved. The thermal runaway process is unambiguously related to the occurrence of a “thermal flash.” A one-by-one correlation between nearfield, thermal flash, thermal runaway, and structural damage is observed. The single-pulse excitation technique allows for controlling the propagation...

  1. Large hoisting machinery local damage acoustic emission monitoring of optical information acquisition research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AE technology, an advanced fault diagnosis technique,is impacted by environmental noise during monitoring equipment. The occurrence of interfere noise,the fashion of interfere and the effect to the system in the AE automatic online monitoring system is analyzed. At present, most of the acoustic emission signal transmission by cable, this way of transmission has a limited transmission distance, shortcomings and so on signal easily disturbed. Is proposed in this paper based on the optical fiber transmission technology, designed and developed a information collection system based on optical fiber acoustic emission monitoring.This way has the advantages of long distance transmission, strong anti-jamming capability.

  2. Progress Monitoring Change in Children's Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Functioning: Advancing the State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Julie Sarno; Evans, Steven W.

    2018-01-01

    The studies in this special series examine the effectiveness of direct behavior ratings (DBRs) for use as a progress monitoring tool. In this article, we comment on the findings of the studies in the context of the broader school-based assessment movement and discuss areas for future inquiry within this line of research.

  3. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  4. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: A potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  5. Curriculum-Based Measurement of Reading: An Evaluation of Frequentist and Bayesian Methods to Model Progress Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Theodore J.; Desjardins, Christopher David

    2018-01-01

    Curriculum-Based Measurement of Oral Reading (CBM-R) is often used to monitor student progress and guide educational decisions. Ordinary least squares regression (OLSR) is the most widely used method to estimate the slope, or rate of improvement (ROI), even though published research demonstrates OLSR's lack of validity and reliability, and…

  6. Development of the monitoring technique on the damage of piles using the biggest shaking table "E-defense"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Hachimori, Wataru; Kaneda, Shogo; Tamura, Shuji; Saito, Taiki

    2017-10-01

    In case of earthquake damage to buildings, the damage to a superstructure is visible, but the damage to a foundation structure, e.g. the underground pile, is difficult to detect. In this study, the authors aim to develop a monitoring technique for pile damage due to earthquakes. The world's biggest shaking table, E-Defense, was used to reproduce damage to RC pile models embedded in the soil inside a large scale shear box (8m in diameter and 6.5m in height). The diameter of the RC pile model was 154mm. It consisted of mortar (27.2N/mm2 in compressive strength), 6 main reinforcements (6.35mm in diameter) and shear reinforcement hard steel wire (2mm in diameter at intervals of 20mm). The natural period of the superstructure above the pile models is around 0.12sec. The soil consisted of 2 layers. The lower layer is Albany sand of 80% relative density while the upper layer is only 2m from the surface ground and is Kaketsu sand of 60% relative density. Primary four excitations were scaled from JMA Kobe waves in notification at different amplitudes. The maximum acceleration of each wave is 31gal, 67gal, 304gal, and 458gal, respectively. In the test result, reinforcing steels at the pile head of the RC model yielded when the maximum acceleration was 304gal. After that, mortar of the pile head peeled off and a bending shear failure occurred when the maximum acceleration was 458gal. The peak frequency of rotational spectrum on the foundation did not change in elastic range in the piles. However, the peak frequency fell after the plastic hinge occurred.

  7. Time-Lapse Monitoring of DNA Damage Colocalized With Particle Tracks in Single Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Flint, David B. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Asaithamby, Aroumougame [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Understanding the DNA damage and repair induced by hadron therapy (HT) beams is crucial for developing novel strategies to maximize the use of HT beams to treat cancer patients. However, spatiotemporal studies of DNA damage and repair for beam energies relevant to HT have been challenging. We report a technique that enables spatiotemporal measurement of radiation-induced damage in live cells and colocalization of this damage with charged particle tracks over a broad range of clinically relevant beam energies. The technique uses novel fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy in the beam line to visualize particle track traversals within the subcellular compartments of live cells within seconds after injury. Methods and Materials: We designed and built a portable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for use in the beam path, coated fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescent-tagged live cells (HT1080 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to XRCC1, a single-strand break repair protein), placed the entire assembly into a proton therapy beam line, and irradiated the cells with a fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2}. Results: We successfully obtained confocal images of proton tracks and foci of DNA single-strand breaks immediately after irradiation. Conclusions: This technique represents an innovative method for analyzing biological responses in any HT beam line at energies and dose rates relevant to therapy. It allows precise determination of the number of tracks traversing a subcellular compartment and monitoring the cellular damage therein, and has the potential to measure the linear energy transfer of each track from therapeutic beams.

  8. Building Construction Progress Monitoring Using Unmanned Aerial System (uas), Low-Cost Photogrammetry, and Geographic Information System (gis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognot, J. R.; Candido, C. G.; Blanco, A. C.; Montelibano, J. R. Y.

    2018-05-01

    Monitoring the progress of building's construction is critical in construction management. However, measuring the building construction's progress are still manual, time consuming, error prone, and impose tedious process of analysis leading to delays, additional costings and effort. The main goal of this research is to develop a methodology for building construction progress monitoring based on 3D as-built model of the building from unmanned aerial system (UAS) images, 4D as-planned model (with construction schedule integrated) and, GIS analysis. Monitoring was done by capturing videos of the building with a camera-equipped UAS. Still images were extracted, filtered, bundle-adjusted, and 3D as-built model was generated using open source photogrammetric software. The as-planned model was generated from digitized CAD drawings using GIS. The 3D as-built model was aligned with the 4D as-planned model of building formed from extrusion of building elements, and integration of the construction's planned schedule. The construction progress is visualized via color-coding the building elements in the 3D model. The developed methodology was conducted and applied from the data obtained from an actual construction site. Accuracy in detecting `built' or `not built' building elements ranges from 82-84 % and precision of 50-72 %. Quantified progress in terms of the number of building elements are 21.31% (November 2016), 26.84 % (January 2017) and 44.19 % (March 2017). The results can be used as an input for progress monitoring performance of construction projects and improving related decision-making process.

  9. DNA Damage during G2 Phase Does Not Affect Cell Cycle Progression of the Green Alga Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is a threat to genomic integrity in all living organisms. Plants and green algae are particularly susceptible to DNA damage especially that caused by UV light, due to their light dependency for photosynthesis. For survival of a plant, and other eukaryotic cells, it is essential for an organism to continuously check the integrity of its genetic material and, when damaged, to repair it immediately. Cells therefore utilize a DNA damage response pathway that is responsible for sensing, reacting to and repairing damaged DNA. We have studied the effect of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, zeocin, caffeine and combinations of these on the cell cycle of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda. The cells delayed S phase and underwent a permanent G2 phase block if DNA metabolism was affected prior to S phase; the G2 phase block imposed by zeocin was partially abolished by caffeine. No cell cycle block was observed if the treatment with zeocin occurred in G2 phase and the cells divided normally. CDKA and CDKB kinases regulate mitosis in S. quadricauda; their kinase activities were inhibited by Wee1. CDKA, CDKB protein levels were stabilized in the presence of zeocin. In contrast, the protein level of Wee1 was unaffected by DNA perturbing treatments. Wee1 therefore does not appear to be involved in the DNA damage response in S. quadricauda. Our results imply a specific reaction to DNA damage in S. quadricauda, with no cell cycle arrest, after experiencing DNA damage during G2 phase. PMID:21603605

  10. DNA damage during G2 phase does not affect cell cycle progression of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hlavová

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a threat to genomic integrity in all living organisms. Plants and green algae are particularly susceptible to DNA damage especially that caused by UV light, due to their light dependency for photosynthesis. For survival of a plant, and other eukaryotic cells, it is essential for an organism to continuously check the integrity of its genetic material and, when damaged, to repair it immediately. Cells therefore utilize a DNA damage response pathway that is responsible for sensing, reacting to and repairing damaged DNA. We have studied the effect of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, zeocin, caffeine and combinations of these on the cell cycle of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda. The cells delayed S phase and underwent a permanent G2 phase block if DNA metabolism was affected prior to S phase; the G2 phase block imposed by zeocin was partially abolished by caffeine. No cell cycle block was observed if the treatment with zeocin occurred in G2 phase and the cells divided normally. CDKA and CDKB kinases regulate mitosis in S. quadricauda; their kinase activities were inhibited by Wee1. CDKA, CDKB protein levels were stabilized in the presence of zeocin. In contrast, the protein level of Wee1 was unaffected by DNA perturbing treatments. Wee1 therefore does not appear to be involved in the DNA damage response in S. quadricauda. Our results imply a specific reaction to DNA damage in S. quadricauda, with no cell cycle arrest, after experiencing DNA damage during G2 phase.

  11. Monitoring Biological Damage on Paper-based Documents in the Historical Archive of the Palermo Astronomical Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Bella

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Libraries and archives house a wide variety of documents made of materials of vegetal and animal origin: unbound papers and books, manuscripts and printed books, photographs (negative and positive, prints, maps, available to the public for reading needs, study and information. These materials are often subject to fluctuations in environmental and micro-environmental parameters. For this reason, it is essential to implement constant monitoring and control of environmental conditions and potential deteriogens in order to slow down deterioration processes.The monitoring of the microbial degradation of paper documents in the Historical Archives of Palermo Astronomical Observatory has revealed microorganisms (bacteria and fungi that may be considered responsible for damaging the items examined, thus enabling an evaluation of the real risks and the proper methodologies to use to avoid future recolonization.

  12. Real-time optical monitoring of permanent lesion progression in radiofrequency ablated cardiac tissue (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapies for atrial fibrillation, success rates have been hampered by an inability to intraoperatively characterize the extent of permanent injury. Insufficient lesions can elusively create transient conduction blockages that eventually reconduct. Prior studies suggest significantly greater met-myoglobin (Mmb) concentrations in the lesion core than those in the healthy myocardium and may serve as a marker for irreversible tissue damage. In this work, we present real-time monitoring of permanent injury through spectroscopic assessment of Mmb concentrations at the catheter tip. Atrial wedges (n=6) were excised from four fresh swine hearts and submerged under pulsatile flow of warm (37oC) phosphate buffered saline. A commercial RFA catheter inserted into a fiber optic sheath allowed for simultaneous measurement of tissue diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra (500-650nm) during application of RF energy. Optical measurements were continuously acquired before, during, and post-ablation, in addition to healthy neighboring tissue. Met-myoglobin, oxy-myoglobin, and deoxy-myoglobin concentrations were extracted from each spectrum using an inverse Monte Carlo method. Tissue injury was validated with Masson's trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Time courses revealed a rapid increase in tissue Mmb concentrations at the onset of RFA treatment and a gradual plateauing thereafter. Extracted Mmb concentrations were significantly greater post-ablation (p<0.0001) as compared to healthy tissue and correlated well with histological assessment of severe thermal tissue destruction. On going studies are aimed at integrating these findings with prior work on near infrared spectroscopic lesion depth assessment. These results support the use of spectroscopy-facilitated guidance of RFA therapies for real-time permanent injury estimation.

  13. On-line monitoring on thermal shock damage of ceramics using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Sang Hun

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the degree of the thermal shock damage on alumina ceramic using acoustic emission technique. For this purpose, alumina ceramic specimen was heated in the elastic furnace and then was quenched into the water tank. When the specimen was quenched into water tank, a lot of micro-cracks were generated on the surface of specimen due to the thermal shock damage. In this study, acoustic emission technique was used to evaluate the elastic waves generated by the crack initiation and propagation on the surface of specimen. It was found that when the micro-crack was initiated on the surface of specimen, AE signals were the higher in amplitude than those of bubbling effect and crack propagation. A lot of AE events were generated at the first thermal shock, the number of AE events decreased gradually as the thermal shock cycle increased.

  14. New oil condition monitoring system, Wearsens® enables continuous, online detection of critical operating conditions and wear damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Mauntz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new oil sensor system is presented for the continuous, online measurement of the wear in turbines, industrial gears, generators, hydraulic systems and transformers. Detection of change is much earlier than existing technologies such as particle counting, vibration measurement or recording temperature. Thus targeted, corrective procedures and/or maintenance can be carried out before actual damage occurs. Efficient machine utilization, accurately timed preventive maintenance, increased service life and a reduction of downtime can all be achieved. The presented sensor system effectively controls the proper operation conditions of bearings and cogwheels in gears. The online diagnostics system measures components of the specific complex impedance of oils. For instance, metal abrasion due to wear debris, broken oil molecules, forming acids or oil soaps, result in an increase of the electrical conductivity, which directly correlates with the degree of contamination of the oil. For additivated lubricants, the stage of degradation of the additives can also be derived from changes in the dielectric constant. The determination of impurities or reduction in the quality of the oil and the quasi continuous evaluation of wear and chemical aging follow the holistic approach of a real-time monitoring of an alteration in the condition of the oil-machine system. Once the oil condition monitoring sensors are installed on the wind turbine, industrial gearbox and test stands, the measuring data can be displayed and evaluated elsewhere. The signals are transmitted to a web-based condition monitoring system via LAN, WLAN or serial interfaces of the sensor unit. Monitoring of the damage mechanisms during proper operation below the tolerance limits of the components enables specific preventive maintenance independent of rigid inspection intervals.

  15. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Health Monitoring and Materials Damage Prognosis for Metallic Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    50 signals were used from Figure 24. Fatigue damage classification in an aluminum lug joint specimen using PZT sensor data without and with...modeling, the single fatigue crack is assumed to be non-breathing during the deformation of the beam. The surface-bonded piezoceramic ( PZT ) actuator...25. Beam with a single fatigue crack under PZT actuation and temperature variations. 20 beam through material expansionis negligible compared

  16. Model-Based Structural Health Monitoring of Fatigue Damage Test-Bed Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    the hull welds or notches along component edges are good initial candidates for the hypothetical damage initiation areas. The branching process adds...to it off-center. The base plate and the stiffener plate are rigidly welded by a tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) weld . Three different crack paths...shown in Figure 9(a), an 18 in long stiffener plate has been welded to each of the tested plates with 0.625 in long discrete TIG welds at 5 locations

  17. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius

    2011-01-01

    a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  18. Multi-site damage localization in anisotropic plate-like structures using an active guided wave structural health monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, J; Schulte, R T; Fritzen, C-P; Hartmann, B; Nelles, O

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for structural health monitoring using guided waves in plate-like structures has been developed. In contrast to previous approaches, which mainly focused on isotropic or quasi-isotropic plates, the proposed algorithm does not assume any simplifications regarding anisotropic wave propagation. Thus, it can be used to improve the probability of detection. In this paper the mathematical background for damage localization in anisotropic plates will be introduced. This is an extension of the widely known ellipse method. The formalism is based on a distributed sensor network, where each piezoelectric sensor acts in turn as an actuator. The automatic extraction of the onset time of the first waveform in the differential signal in combination with a statistical post-processing via a two-dimensional probability density function and the application of the expectation-maximization algorithm allows a completely automatic localization procedure. Thus, multiple damages can be identified at the same time. The present study uses ultrasonic signals provided by the spectral element method. This simulation approach shows good agreement with experimental measurements. A local linear neural network is used to model the nonlinear dispersion curves. The benefit of using a neural network approach is to increase the angular resolution that results from the sparse sensor network. Furthermore, it can be used to shorten the computational time for the damage localization procedure

  19. Progress in using real-time GPS for seismic monitoring of the Cascadia megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeliga, W. M.; Melbourne, T. I.; Santillan, V. M.; Scrivner, C.; Webb, F.

    2014-12-01

    We report on progress in our development of a comprehensive real-time GPS-based seismic monitoring system for the Cascadia subduction zone. This system is based on 1 Hz point position estimates computed in the ITRF08 reference frame. Convergence from phase and range observables to point position estimates is accelerated using a Kalman filter based, on-line stream editor. Positions are estimated using a short-arc approach and algorithms from JPL's GIPSY-OASIS software with satellite clock and orbit products from the International GNSS Service (IGS). The resulting positions show typical RMS scatter of 2.5 cm in the horizontal and 5 cm in the vertical with latencies below 2 seconds. To facilitate the use of these point position streams for applications such as seismic monitoring, we broadcast real-time positions and covariances using custom-built streaming software. This software is capable of buffering 24-hour streams for hundreds of stations and providing them through a REST-ful web interface. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we have developed a Java-based front-end that provides a real-time visual display of time-series, vector displacement, and contoured peak ground displacement. We have also implemented continuous estimation of finite fault slip along the Cascadia megathrust using an NIF approach. The resulting continuous slip distributions are combined with pre-computed tsunami Green's functions to generate real-time tsunami run-up estimates for the entire Cascadia coastal margin. This Java-based front-end is available for download through the PANGA website. We currently analyze 80 PBO and PANGA stations along the Cascadia margin and are gearing up to process all 400+ real-time stations operating in the Pacific Northwest, many of which are currently telemetered in real-time to CWU. These will serve as milestones towards our over-arching goal of extending our processing to include all of the available real-time streams from the Pacific rim. In addition

  20. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 1. Technical Report # 0919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grade 1. These measures, available as part of easyCBM [TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from schools…

  1. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Kindergarten. Technical Report # 0921

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in kindergarten. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from…

  2. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 3. Technical Report # 09-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  3. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 5. Technical Report # 09-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  4. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 2. Technical Report # 0920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  5. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 7. Technical Report 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  6. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 4. Technical Report # 09-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  7. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 8. Technical Report # 09-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  8. Lipoprotein subclasses in the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study (MARS). Treatment effects and relation to coronary angiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, W J; Krauss, R M; Hodis, H N

    1996-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contribute to coronary artery disease. Using data from the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study, an angiographic trial of middle-aged men and women randomized to lovastatin or placebo, we investigated relationships between lipoprotein subclasses and progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Coronary artery lesion progression was determined by quantitative coronary angiography in low-grade ( or = 50% diameter stenosis), and all coronary artery lesions in 220 baseline/2-year angiogram pairs. Analytical ultracentrifugation was used to measure lipoprotein masses that were statistically evaluated for treatment group differences and relationships to progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis. All low density lipoprotein (LDL), intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) masses were significantly lowered and all high density lipoprotein (HDL) masses were significantly raised with lovastatin therapy. The mass of smallest LDL (Svedberg flotation rate [Sf] 0 to 3), IDL (Sf 12 to 20), all VLDL subclasses (Sf 20 to 60, Sf 60 to 100, and Sf 100 to 400), and peak LDL flotation rate were significantly related to the progression of coronary artery lesions, specifically low-grade lesions. Greater baseline levels of HDL3, were related to a lower likelihood of coronary artery lesion progression. In multivariate analyses, small VLDL (Sf 20 to 60) and HDL3 mass were the most important correlates of coronary artery lesion progression. These results provide further evidence for the importance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the progression of coronary artery disease. In addition, these results present new evidence for the possible protective role of HDL3 in the progression of coronary artery lesions. More specific information on coronary artery lesion progression may be obtained through the study of specific apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins.

  9. Investigation of microscopic radiation damage in waste forms using ODNMR and AEM techniques. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.

    1998-01-01

    'This project seeks to understand the microscopic effects of radiation damage in nuclear waste forms. The authors approach to this challenge encompasses studies of crystals and glass containing short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting actinides with electron microscopy, laser spectroscopy, and computational modeling and simulation. Much of the initial effort has focused on alpha-decay induced microscopic damage in 17-year old samples of crystalline yttrium and lutetium orthophosphates and thorium dioxide that initially contained ∼1% of the alpha-emitting isotope Cm-244 (18.1 y half life) or the beta-emitting isotope Bk-249 (0.88 y half life). Studies will also be conducted on borosilicate glasses that contain Cm-244 or Am-241, respectively. The goal is to gain clear insight into accumulated radiation damage and the influence of aging on such damage, which are critical factors in the long-term performance of high-level nuclear waste forms. Amorphization previously has been thought to be the most important effect of radiation damage in crystalline and ceramic materials. The studies show that for alpha-emitting actinide ions in certain crystalline phosphates, amorphization is not a significant effect of radiation damage. Instead, formation of microscopic cavities (bubbles) is an important consequence of alpha-decay events. This amorphization-resistant property makes orthophosphates a very attractive high level nuclear waste form. However, aggregation and mobilization of cavities (bubbles) might increase the leach rate of radionuclides and influence the long-term stability of the waste forms. Further research is needed before the authors can draw a final conclusion on the long-term effects of radiation damage in high level waste forms.'

  10. Seismogeodetic monitoring techniques for tsunami and earthquake early warning and rapid assessment of structural damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, J. S.; Bock, Y.; Saunders, J. K.; Goldberg, D.; Restrepo, J. I.

    2016-12-01

    As part of an effort to promote the use of NASA-sponsored Earth science information for disaster risk reduction, real-time high-rate seismogeodetic data are being incorporated into early warning and structural monitoring systems. Seismogeodesy combines seismic acceleration and GPS displacement measurements using a tightly-coupled Kalman filter to provide absolute estimates of seismic acceleration, velocity and displacement. Traditionally, the monitoring of earthquakes and tsunamis has been based on seismic networks for estimating earthquake magnitude and slip, and tide gauges and deep-ocean buoys for direct measurement of tsunami waves. Real-time seismogeodetic observations at subduction zones allow for more robust and rapid magnitude and slip estimation that increase warning time in the near-source region. A NASA-funded effort to utilize GPS and seismogeodesy in NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers in Alaska and Hawaii integrates new modules for picking, locating, and estimating magnitudes and moment tensors for earthquakes into the USGS earthworm environment at the TWCs. In a related project, NASA supports the transition of this research to seismogeodetic tools for disaster preparedness, specifically by implementing GPS and low-cost MEMS accelerometers for structural monitoring in partnership with earthquake engineers. Real-time high-rate seismogeodetic structural monitoring has been implemented on two structures. The first is a parking garage at the Autonomous University of Baja California Faculty of Medicine in Mexicali, not far from the rupture of the 2011 Mw 7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake enabled through a UCMexus collaboration. The second is the 8-story Geisel Library at University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The system has also been installed for several proof-of-concept experiments at the UCSD Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) Large High Performance Outdoor Shake Table. We present MEMS-based seismogeodetic observations from the 10 June

  11. Progress for on-line acoustic emission monitoring of cracks in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Friesel, M.A.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    This paper reviews FY1985 accomplishments and FY1986 plans for the NRC sponsored research program concerned with ''Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Boundaries''. The objective of the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring program is to develop and validate the use of AE methods for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect flaw growth. Topics discussed include testing AE monitoring on reactors, refinement of an AE signal identification relationship, study of slow crack growth rate effects on AE generation, and activity to produce an ASTM standard for AE monitoring and to gain ASME code acceptance of AE monitoring

  12. Ion implantation damage annealing in 4H-SiC monitored by scanning spreading resistance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchodolskis, A.; Hallen, A.; Linnarsson, M.K.; Osterman, J.; Karlsson, U.O.

    2006-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the damage annealing process and dopant defect incorporation and activation we have implanted epitaxially grown 4H-SiC layers with high doses of Al + ions. Cross-sections of the samples are investigated by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) using a commercial atomic force microscopy (AFM). The defects caused by the implanted ions compensate for the doping and decrease the charge carrier mobility. This causes the resistivity to increase in the as-implanted regions. The calculated profile of implanted ions is in good agreement with the measured ones and shows a skewed Gaussian shape. Implanted samples are annealed up to 400 deg. C. Despite these low annealing temperatures we observe a clear improvement of the sample conductivity in the as-implanted region

  13. RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual progress report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruland, R.M.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress during 1988 of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 16 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility (the Solid Waste Landfill). Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 21 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Reference manual on the IAEA JRQ correlation monitor steel for irradiation damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report is to provide information on the mechanical properties of the ASTM A533 grade B class 1 steel that was designated as 'JRQ reference steel' and for many years served as a radiation/mechanical property correlation monitor in a number of international and national studies of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel. This report provides the most comprehensive listing of material test data obtained on the JRQ manufacturing history and material properties in the initial, and as delivered condition during the implementation of two IAEA co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) on behaviour of reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation

  15. Quantitative muscle MRI as an assessment tool for monitoring disease progression in LGMD2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Tracey A; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Coombs, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Outcome measures for clinical trials in neuromuscular diseases are typically based on physical assessments which are dependent on patient effort, combine the effort of different muscle groups, and may not be sensitive to progression over short trial periods in slow-progressing diseases. We hypoth...

  16. A simulation of 'schedule-cost' progress monitoring system in nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haitao; Huang Zhongping; Zhang Zemin; Wang Zikai

    2010-01-01

    The objective of project management is to find the optimal balance between progress and cost according to the project requirements. Traditional method always manages progress and cost separately. However, domestic and international experience indicated that the interactions between these two factors are crucial in the project implementation. Modern project managers have to manage and maintain a 'Progress - Cost' joint control framework. Such a model is applied into a sub-project of a nuclear power project using Simulink in this paper. It helps to identify and correct the deviations of the project. Earned Value Management is used by the project manager to quantify the cost of the project and progress of implementation. The budget plan value, actual value, earned value are three important parameters to measure cost and progress of the project. The experimental results illustrated that the method gives a more comprehensive performance evaluation of the project. (authors)

  17. Pump Coupling & Motor bearing damage detection using Condition Monitoring at DTPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, H. M.; Deshpande, A. A.; Jalkote, P. S.; Patil, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper shares a success story out of the implementation of Co-ordinated Condition Monitoring techniques at DTPS, wherein imminent Mis-alignment of HT auxiliary BFP - 1B and Motor bearing failure of ID FAN - 1B was diagnosed. On 30/12/2010, Booster Pump DE horizontal reading increased from 4.8 to 5.1 and then upto 5.9 mm/sec. It was suspected that Booster pump was mis-aligned with Motor. To confirm misalignment, Phase Analysis was also done which showed that Coupling phase difference was 180 Degrees. Vibration & Phase Analysis helped in diagnosing the exact root cause of abnormity in advance, saving plant from huge losses which could have caused total cost of £ 104,071. On 06/01/2011, ID fan 1B Motor NDE & DE horizontal vibration readings deviated from 0.5 to 0.8 and 0.6 to 0.8 mm/sec (RMS) respectively. Noise level increased from 99.1 to 101.9 db. It was suspected that Motor bearings had loosened over the shaft. Meanwhile, after opening of Motor, Inner race of NDE side was found cracked and loosened over the shaft. Vibration Analysis & Noise Monitoring helped in diagnosing the exact root cause of abnormity in advance, saving plant from huge losses which could have caused total cost of £ 308,857.

  18. Progress of optical sensor system for health monitoring of bridges at Chongqing University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Fu, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Huang, S.

    2005-02-01

    With decades of research experience on optical sensors, Optoelectronic Technology Lab of Chongqing University (OTLCU) has studied on a variety of sensors system designed for practical use in health monitoring. In OTLCU, embedded and surface mounted fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor has been developed for monitoring the local strain of both concrete and steel truss bridge. Optoelectronic deflect meter, with a group of optical level sensor in a series connected pipe, was developed for deflection monitoring and line shape monitoring of the bridges. Laser deflect meter, with a laser pointer and a sensors array, has been also developed for a dynamic deflection monitoring of the bridges. To monitoring the 2-Dimentional displacement of the bridge, a self-calibrating imaging system was developed. All these sensor systems have been applied in different bridges successfully. This paper briefly describes principle of these optical sensing systems, and also gives some representative results of the system in practical application of bridges.

  19. Flood monitoring and damage assessment using water indices: A case study of Pakistan flood-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Ali Memon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI of McFeeters (1996, Water Index (WI introduced by Rogers and Kearney (2004, referred to as Red and Short Wave Infra-Red (RSWIR and WI suggested as the best by Ji et al. (2009, referred to as Green and Short Wave Infra-Red (GSWIR for delineating and mapping of surface water using MODIS (Terra near real time images during 2012 floods in Pakistan. The results from above indices have been compared with Landsat ETM+ classified images aiming to assess the accuracy of the indices. Accuracy assessment has been performed using spatial statistical techniques and found NDWI, RSWIR and GSWIR with kappa coefficient (κ of 46.66%, 70.80% and 60.61% respectively. It has been observed using statistical analysis and visual interpretation (expert knowledge gained by past experience that the NDWI and GSWIR have tendencies to underestimate and overestimate respectively the inundated area. Keeping in view the above facts, RSWIR has proved to be the best of the three indices. In addition, assessment of the damages has been carried out considering accumulated flood extent obtained from RSWIR. The information derived proved to be essential and valuable for disaster management plan and rehabilitation.

  20. Use of sapphire as a neutron damage monitor for pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pells, G.P.; Fudge, A.J.; Murphy, M.J.; Watt, S.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystal α-Al 2 O 3 (sapphire) has been neutron irradiated over a range of dose, dose rate and neutron energy spectra at temperatures from 60 to 310 0 C. Values of optical absorption at 400 nm, the peak of the aluminum vacancy absorption band, were plotted against damage dose expressed in terms of dpa of Al in sapphire obtained from measurements of induced radio-activity in activation foils irradiated with the sapphires and from calculation of the neutron energy spectrum at the irradiation position. The neutron energy spectrum was calculated using modern neutron transport computer codes and adjusted in the light of measurements obtained from multiple foil activation experiments. A simple response curve was obtained for all sapphires irradiated at temperatures between 220 to 310 0 C and for sapphires irradiated below 200 0 C which had been annealed at 290 0 C irrespective of dose rate or neutron beam energy spectrum. The single response curve for irradiations performed in a variety of neutron energy spectra validate the neutron energy spectrum computational procedures

  1. Sulforaphane enhances irradiation effects in terms of perturbed cell cycle progression and increased DNA damage in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Naumann

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN, an herbal isothiocyanate enriched in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower, has gained popularity for its antitumor effects in cell lines such as pancreatic cancer. Antiproliferative as well as radiosensitizing properties were reported for head and neck cancer but little is known about its effects in pancreatic cancer cells in combination with irradiation (RT.In four established pancreatic cancer cell lines we investigated clonogenic survival, analyzed cell cycle distribution and compared DNA damage via flow cytometry and western blot after treatment with SFN and RT.Both SFN and RT show a strong and dose dependent survival reduction in clonogenic assays, an induction of a G2/M cell cycle arrest and an increase in γH2AX protein level indicating DNA damage. Effects were more pronounced in combined treatment and both cell cycle perturbation and DNA damage persisted for a longer period than after SFN or RT alone. Moreover, SFN induced a loss of DNA repair proteins Ku 70, Ku 80 and XRCC4.Our results suggest that combination of SFN and RT exerts a more distinct DNA damage and growth inhibition than each treatment alone. SFN seems to be a viable option to improve treatment efficacy of chemoradiation with hopefully higher rates of secondary resectability after neoadjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  2. A framework for data compression and damage detection in structural health monitoring applied on a laboratory three-story structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Afonso Pereira de Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Structural Health Monitoring (SHM is an important technique used to preserve many types of structures in the short and long run, using sensor networks to continuously gather the desired data. However, this causes a strong impact in the data size to be stored and processed. A common solution to this is using compression algorithms, where the level of data compression should be adequate enough to allow the correct damage identification. In this work, we use the data sets from a laboratory three-story structure to evaluate the performance of common compression algorithms which, then, are combined with damage detection algorithms used in SHM. We also analyze how the use of Independent Component Analysis, a common technique to reduce noise in raw data, can assist the detection performance. The results showed that Piecewise Linear Histogram combined with Nonlinear PCA have the best trade-off between compression and detection for small error thresholds while Adaptive PCA with Principal Component Analysis perform better with higher values.

  3. Strain sensors optimal placement for vibration-based structural health monitoring. The effect of damage on the initially optimal configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutas, T. H.; Bourikas, A.

    2017-12-01

    We revisit the optimal sensor placement of engineering structures problem with an emphasis on in-plane dynamic strain measurements and to the direction of modal identification as well as vibration-based damage detection for structural health monitoring purposes. The approach utilized is based on the maximization of a norm of the Fisher Information Matrix built with numerically obtained mode shapes of the structure and at the same time prohibit the sensorization of neighbor degrees of freedom as well as those carrying similar information, in order to obtain a satisfactory coverage. A new convergence criterion of the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) norm is proposed in order to deal with the issue of choosing an appropriate sensor redundancy threshold, a concept recently introduced but not further investigated concerning its choice. The sensor configurations obtained via a forward sequential placement algorithm are sub-optimal in terms of FIM norm values but the selected sensors are not allowed to be placed in neighbor degrees of freedom providing thus a better coverage of the structure and a subsequent better identification of the experimental mode shapes. The issue of how service induced damage affects the initially nominated as optimal sensor configuration is also investigated and reported. The numerical model of a composite sandwich panel serves as a representative aerospace structure upon which our investigations are based.

  4. A Case Study of Damage Energy Analysis and an Early Warning by Microseismic Monitoring for Large Area Roof Caving in Shallow Depth Seams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Like Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow depth coal seams are widely spread in Shendong mining area, which is located in the Northwestern region of China. When working face is advanced out of concentrated coal pillar in upper room and pillar goaf, strong strata behaviors often cause support crushing accidents, and potentially induce large area residual pillars instability and even wind blast disaster. In order to predict the precise time when the accident happens, guaranteeing life-safety of miner, microseismic monitoring system was for the first time applied in shallow coal seam. Based on damage mechanics correlation theory, the damage energy model is established to describe relationship between damage level and cumulative energy of microseismic events. According to microseismic monitoring data of two support crushing accidents, the damage energy model is verified and an effective early warning method of these accidents is proposed. The field application showed that the early warning method had avoided miners suffering from all support crushing accidents in Shigetai coal mine.

  5. Continuous A.E. monitoring of nuclear systems: some feasibility studies now in-progress in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roget, J.; Germain, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous A.E. monitoring of Nuclear systems can give some unique information about abnormal behaviour (leak appearance...) or crack initiation or propagation. Some feasibility studies have been undertaken in France in this field and this paper presents the results we have got in two cases. The study showed that an A.E. surveillance of pressurized safety valves indicates the appearance or the presence of a leak. Functioning noise is not a problem in this case. Secondly a large study have been undertaken to test the resistance of the pipe inner sleeve to thermal fatigue. An A.E. monitoring showed that it is possible to separate A.E. due to Crack extension from other signals by a location method in spite of high noise level. A.E. seems applicable for continuous monitoring. So, complementary tests are in progress to confirm and improve these results

  6. Baseline extent of damage predicts spinal radiographic progression in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with golimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Tae Hwan; Chung, Won Tae; Lee, Seung Geun; Park, Sung Hwan; Song, Gwan Gyu; Yu, Dae Young; Xu, Stephen; Lee, Eun Young

    2018-05-01

    For patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), golimumab has consistent efficacy in controlling disease activity over 5 years but its benefit in preventing radiographic progression was less clear at 4 years. To predict radiographic progression, we analyzed the baseline characteristics of AS patients in a Korean population. Sixty-eight Korean patients with AS participated in the phase 3, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (GO-RAISE) which has previously been described. Baseline modified stoke AS spine score (mSASSS) and change in mSASSS from baseline (ΔmSASSS) until week 208 were analyzed in the Korean patients enrolled in the GO-RAISE study. Although Korean patients had lower baseline mSASSS compared to non-Korean patients and received active management, radiographic progression was not prevented. Korean patients who did not undergo radiographic progression of spinal lesions of AS were younger and had shorter symptomatic duration, lower Bath AS functional and metrology indices, better chest expansion, and lower baseline mSASSS. The baseline mSASSS and ΔmSASSS were positively correlated in Korean AS patients ( p baseline mSASSS > 10 and less common (13.0%) with baseline mSASSS = 0. In Korean AS patients, radiographic progression of the spine after 4 years was predicted effectively by the initial severity of the spinal lesion(s) in patients treated with golimumab.

  7. Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Progress Report February 1, 2007 - January 31, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    River stocks of steelhead and spring/summer Chinook salmon still have significant natural reproduction and thus are the focal species for this project's investigations. The overall goal is to monitor the abundance, productivity, distribution, and stock-specific life history characteristics of naturally produced steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in Idaho (IDFG 2007). We have grouped project tasks into three objectives, as defined in our latest project proposal and most recent statement of work. The purpose of each objective involves enumerating or describing individuals within the various life stages of Snake River anadromous salmonids. By understanding the transitions between life stages and associated controlling factors, we hope to achieve a mechanistic understanding of stock-specific population dynamics. This understanding will improve mitigation and recovery efforts. Objective 1. Measure 2007 adult escapement and describe the age structure of the spawning run of naturally produced spring/summer Chinook salmon passing Lower Granite Dam. Objective 2. Monitor the juvenile production of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout for the major population groups (MPGs) within the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins. Objective 3. Evaluate life cycle survival and the freshwater productivity/production of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon. There are two components: update/refine a stock-recruit model and estimate aggregate smolt-to-adult survival. In this annual progress report, we present technical results for work done during 2007. Part 2 contains detailed results of INPMEP aging research and estimation of smolt-to-adult return rates for wild and naturally produced Chinook salmon (Objectives 1 and 3). Part 3 is a report on the ongoing development of a stock-recruit model for the freshwater phase of spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin (Objective 3). Part 4 is a summary of the parr density data (Objective 2) collected in 2007 using the new site selection

  8. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October-December 1985. Volume 5, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Rabatin, K.; Cohen, L.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1985. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  9. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, October--December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; NcNamara, N.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1988. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 4 tabs

  10. Studies in iodine metabolism: Monitoring of animal thyroids: Final progress report, April 1983 through March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains the results of monitoring radioiodine and radiocesium levels in both domestic and wild animals. Included are thyroids of cattle and sheep before and after the Chernobyl accident, monitoring of thyroids from deer kills on the Oak Ridge Plantation and the Savannah River Reserve. (DT)

  11. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  12. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  13. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  14. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone with or without adalimumab effectively reduces MRI synovitis, osteitis and tenosynovitis and halts structural damage progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Eshed, Iris; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular glucocorticosteroid injections suppresses MRI inflammation and halts structural damage progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), and whether adalimumab provides an additional effect....

  16. Positron lifetime measurements as a non-destructive technique to monitor fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.G.

    1975-09-01

    In the fatigue cycling of initially hard copper, self consistent positron lifetime and x-ray particle size measurements followed the softening process and revealed a new feature which may be the final development of microvoids before fracture. In the cyclic fatigue of initially soft 4340 steel closely spaced concurrent measurements of these parameters are now in progress. For initially hard 4340 steel fatigue softening was revealed with a large positron lifetime decrease. In hydrogen embrittlement studies positron lifetime was found to be sensitive to hydrogen in an interesting way, i.e., if a specimen is already at its maximum defect density, hydrogen is trapped at some of the defects, reduce their attraction for positrons and hence cause a decrease in positron lifetime; conversely in a soft specimen, hydrogen generates more dislocation length than it can trap at (thus cancelling) hence a positron lifetime increase occurs. In electron irradiated and annealed single crystal copper 4 annealing peaks were seen at 125, 270, 400, and 650 0 K. A clear correlation between decreasing positron lifetime and increasing percent porosity in α alumina was established. This behavior is quite []he opposite to that in metals. (auth)

  17. Research progress of on-line automatic monitoring of chemical oxygen demand (COD) of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Youfa; Fu, Xing; Gao, Xiaolu; Li, Lianyin

    2018-02-01

    With the increasingly stricter control of pollutant emission in China, the on-line automatic monitoring of water quality is particularly urgent. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) is a comprehensive index to measure the contamination caused by organic matters, and thus it is taken as one important index of energy-saving and emission reduction in China’s “Twelve-Five” program. So far, the COD on-line automatic monitoring instrument has played an important role in the field of sewage monitoring. This paper reviews the existing methods to achieve on-line automatic monitoring of COD, and on the basis, points out the future trend of the COD on-line automatic monitoring instruments.

  18. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers-Schoene, L.; Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T.

    1993-01-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants

  19. Prediction of ultraviolet-induced damage during plasma processes in dielectric films using on-wafer monitoring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Yasushi; Katoh, Yuji; Okigawa, Mitsuru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2005-01-01

    We measured electron-hole pairs generated in dielectric film using our developed on-wafer monitoring technique to detect electrical currents in the film during the plasma etching processes. The electron-hole pairs were generated by plasma induced ultraviolet (UV) photons, and the number of electron-hole pairs depends on the UV wavelength. In SiO 2 film, UV light, which has a wavelength of less than 140 nm, generates electron-hole pairs, because the band gap energy of the film is 8.8 eV. On the other hand, in Si 3 N 4 film, which has a band gap energy level of 5.0 eV, UV light below 250 nm induces the electron-hole pairs. Additionally, we evaluated the fluorocarbon gas plasma process that induces UV radiation damage using multilayer sensors that consisted of both SiO 2 and Si 3 N 4 stacked films. In these cases, electron-hole pair generation depended on the dielectric film structure. There were more electron-hole pairs generated in the SiO 2 deposited on the Si 3 N 4 film than in the Si 3 N 4 deposited on the SiO 2 film. As a result, our developed on-wafer monitoring sensor was able to predict electron-hole pair generation and the device characteristics

  20. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Incipient in Journal Bearings - Part I : Detectability and measurement for bearing damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Oh Yang; Chung, Min Hwa; Kim, Kyung Woong

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the machinery using rolling element bearings, systems with journal bearings generally operate in large scale and under severe loading condition such as steam generator turbines and internal combustion engines. Failure of the bearings in these machinery can result in the system breakdown. To avoid the time consuming repair and considerable economic loss, the detection of incipient failure in journal bearings becomes very important. In this experimental approach, acoustic emission monitoring is applied to the detection of incipient failure caused by several types of abnormal operating condition most probable in the journal bearing systems. It has been known that the intervention of foreign materials, insufficient lubrication and misassembly etc. are principal factors to cause bearing failure and distress. The experiment was conducted under such designed conditions as hard particles in the lubrication layer, insufficient lubrication, and metallic contact in the simulated journal bearing system. The results showed that acoustic emission could be an effective tool to detect the incipient failure in journal bearings

  1. Monitoring of long-range transported air pollutants and precipitation. Monitoring programme for forest damage. Abstract of annual reports 1996; Overvaaking av langtransportert forurenset luft og nedboer. Overvaakingsprogram for skogskader. Sammendrag av aarsrapporter 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report sums up the results for 1996 of two monitoring programmes: `` Norwegian Monitoring Programme for Long-Range Transported Air Pollutants`` and ``Norwegian forest monitoring programme``. The atmospheric pollution is monitored by measurements of chemical main components in the air and in precipitation. The effects of the pollutants on water quality are followed by monitoring of rivers, lakes and field research areas. The effects on fish are followed by regional investigations on benthic organisms, zooplankton and fish populations in rivers and lakes. Water chemical samples are taken each month from 16 rivers and acid material is monitored at seven field research areas. Samples are also taken from 200 lakes every autumn. The biological monitoring programme comprises fish in lakes and streams and benthic animals in lakes. The monitoring of forest damage uses three nation-wide areas from which registrations have been taken over a period of ten years. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Incorporating Structural Health Monitoring in the Design of Slip Formed Concrete Wind Turbine Towers - Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Mads Knude

    , the project combines many different engineering disciplines and thus the report displays a variety of content. The reliability theory ties the different disciplines together, and the focus is chosen on the dominant uncertainties of the modal damage detection as a consequence barrier (risk reduction...... by decision rule), as the initial studies in the project indicated this as an interesting and innovative approach...

  3. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: coordinate induction of mutagenesis, radioresistance, and inhibition of post-radiation DNA degradation; radioinduced filamentation; action spectrum for induction of K12 lambda phage; effects of uv radiation on cells in the frozen state; dependence of mutagenesis on wavelength of uv; and w-reactivation of x-irradiated phage lambda

  4. Characterization and monitoring of the excavation damaged zone in fractured gneisses of the Roselend tunnel, French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, J.; Sabroux, J. C.; Pontreau, S.; Bondiguel, S.; Guillon, S.; Richon, P.; Pili, E.

    2011-04-01

    The Roselend dead-end tunnel was excavated in the last fifties by blasting in the Méraillet crystalline rock mass located on the shore of an artificial reservoir lake in the French Alps. Successive emptying and filling of the reservoir lake induce mechanical deformation of the rock mass. Thus, this tunnel is an exceptional place to study the evolution of the damaged zone (due to the excavation, and named EDZ) under a periodic mechanical or hydraulic loading. From the perspective of radioactive waste isolation in deep geological strata, the EDZ transport properties, and their evolution with time, are of major importance. The purpose of this study is, on the one hand, to quantify the transport properties of the EDZ of the Roselend tunnel through permeability measurements and drill core observations; on the other hand, to monitor the response of the EDZ to external solicitations via borehole pressure measurements. The air permeability has been deduced from pneumatic tests performed along several boreholes. The permeability profiles and the observation of drill cores lead to an estimation of the extent of the EDZ, of about 1 m around the tunnel. The response of the EDZ to barometric pumping has been observed through borehole pressure monitoring. Time-lag and attenuation of the barometric signal that propagates into the EDZ have been measured at a metric scale. The identification of potential time-lag and attenuation variations needs further investigations, the long time series of borehole pressure monitoring shows pressure increase probably due to percolating water during successive snow cover and thawing periods as observed in the Roselend area during winter.

  5. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, January-March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first quarter of 1988

  6. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the second quarter of 1988

  7. 15. Internal symposium on recent progress of nondestructive inspection and monitoring technologies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    At the symposium, lectures were given on the recent development of the nondestructive inspection technology for nuclear power plants, the trend regarding the nondestructive inspection in foreign countries (Japan-Germany atomic energy seminar), the present state and subjects of the monitoring technology in BWR plants, the present state and subjects of the monitoring technology in PWR plants, and the present state and the subjects for hereafter of the defect evaluation method in the equipment of light water reactors. The data on the ultrasonic flaw detection in aluminum alloy welded joints were obtained. The German inspection technology is similar to that in Japan and other countries. The research on the plant synthetic monitoring and diagnosis system is reported. The monitoring systems for abnormal state in operation, troubles and the secular change of equipment are reported. The evaluation of the flaws in nuclear piping is reported. The summaries of the lectures are collected in this book. (K.I.)

  8. National rural drinking water monitoring: progress and challenges with India's IMIS database

    OpenAIRE

    Wescoat, James; Fletcher, Sarah Marie; Novellino, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    National drinking water programs seek to address monitoring challenges that include self-reporting, data sampling, data consistency and quality, and sufficient frequency to assess the sustainability of water systems. India stands out for its comprehensive rural water database known as Integrated Management Information System (IMIS), which conducts annual monitoring of drinking water coverage, water quality, and related program components from the habitation level to the district, state, and n...

  9. Progress on health physics monitoring systems at the French Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimont, B.; Joffre, H.; Leblanc, P.

    1977-01-01

    The need for health physics protection on nuclear plants or laboratory (nuclear power plant, fuel processing plant, etc) leads to data measurement and monitoring centralisation. This paper reviews the systems used for that purpose: old monobloc electronic systems, mini computer system, recent microprocessor-based system, it shows the impact of new methods on the system performances : standardization of measurements and alarms level for irradiation and contamination, reliability, peripherals devices (typewriters, CRT) availability for easy and efficient monitoring, and hardware compactness [fr

  10. Evaluation and monitoring of wild/natural steelhead trout production: project progress report, 1996; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leth, Brian D.; Holubetz, Terry; Nemeth, Doug

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to provide additional, and more definitive, information regarding wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations in Idaho. Important streams for wild steelhead production were identified and selected for monitoring. Monitoring activities employed among streams varied, but generally included: aerial redd counts, placement of adult weirs, enumeration of juveniles through mask and snorkel counts, and emigrant trapping. This report details activities during the 1996 field season

  11. Radiological air monitoring and sample analysis research and development progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Sponsored by a Department Of Energy (DOE) research and development grant, the State of Idaho INEL Oversight Program (OP) personnel designed an independent air monitoring system that provides detection of the presence of priority airborne contaminants potentially migrating beyond INEL boundaries. Initial locations for off-site ambient air monitoring stations were chosen in consultation with: DOE and NOAA reports; Mesodif modeling; review of the relevant literature; and communication with private contractors and experts in pertinent fields. Idaho State University (ISU) has initiated an Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP). The EMP provides an independent monitoring function as well as a training ground for students. Students learn research techniques dedicated to environmental studies and learn analytical skills and rules of compliance related to monitoring. ISU-EMP assisted OP in specific aspects of identifying optimum permanent monitoring station locations, and in selecting appropriate sample collection equipment for each station. The authorization to establish, prepare and install sampling devices on selected sites was obtained by OP personnel in conjunction with ISU-EMP personnel. All samples described in this program are collected by OP or ISU-EMP personnel and returned to the ISU for analysis. This report represents the summary of results of those samples collected and analyzed for radioactivity during the year of 1992

  12. Frontal lobe damage impairs process and content in semantic memory: evidence from category-specific effects in progressive non-fluent aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jamie; Rodriguez, Amy D; Peelle, Jonathan E; Grossman, Murray

    2011-06-01

    Portions of left inferior frontal cortex have been linked to semantic memory both in terms of the content of conceptual representation (e.g., motor aspects in an embodied semantics framework) and the cognitive processes used to access these representations (e.g., response selection). Progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive atrophy of left inferior frontal cortex. PNFA can, therefore, provide a lesion model for examining the impact of frontal lobe damage on semantic processing and content. In the current study we examined picture naming in a cohort of PNFA patients across a variety of semantic categories. An embodied approach to semantic memory holds that sensorimotor features such as self-initiated action may assume differential importance for the representation of manufactured artifacts (e.g., naming hand tools). Embodiment theories might therefore predict that patients with frontal damage would be differentially impaired on manufactured artifacts relative to natural kinds, and this prediction was borne out. We also examined patterns of naming errors across a wide range of semantic categories and found that naming error distributions were heterogeneous. Although PNFA patients performed worse overall on naming manufactured artifacts, there was no reliable relationship between anomia and manipulability across semantic categories. These results add to a growing body of research arguing against a purely sensorimotor account of semantic memory, suggesting instead a more nuanced balance of process and content in how the brain represents conceptual knowledge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  13. Personalized biomarkers to monitor disease progression in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with icotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gaoguang; Liu, Yujie; Wang, Yanying; Ren, Guanjun; Guo, Shuai; Ren, Junling; Zhang, Li; Li, Zhili

    2015-02-02

    Disease-specific humoral immune response-related protein complexes in blood are associated with disease progression. Thirty-one patients with stage IIIB and IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were administered with oral dose of icotinib hydrochloride (150 mg twice daily or 125 mg 3 times daily) for a 28-continuous-day cycle until diseases progressed or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The levels of immunoinflammation-related protein complexes (IIRPCs) in a series of plasma samples from 31 NSCLC patients treated with icotinib hydrochloride were determined by an optimized native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three characteristic patterns of the IIRPCs, named as patterns a, b, and c, respectively, were detected in plasma samples from 31 patients. Prior to the treatment, there were 18 patients in pattern a consisting of 5 IIRPCs, 9 in pattern b consisting of six IIRPCs, and 4 in pattern c without the IIRPCs. The levels of the IIRPCs in 27 patients were quantified. Our results indicate that the time length of humoral immune and inflammation response (TLHIIR) was closely associated with disease progression, and the median TLHIIR was 22.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval: 16.2 to 33.0 weeks, with a lead time of median 11 weeks relative to clinical imaging evidence confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (the median progression-free survival, 34.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval: 27.9 to 49.0 weeks). The complex relationships between humoral immune response, acquired resistance, and disease progression existed. Personalized IIRPCs could be indicators to monitor the disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  15. Unsupervised progressive elastic band exercises for frail geriatric inpatients objectively monitored by new exercise-integrated technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Bandholm, T.; Spaich, Erika Geraldina

    2017-01-01

    the amount of supervised training, and unsupervised training could possibly supplement supervised training thereby increasing the total exercise dose during admission. A new valid and reliable technology, the BandCizer, objectively measures the exact training dosage performed. The purpose was to investigate...... feasibility and acceptability of an unsupervised progressive strength training intervention monitored by BandCizer for frail geriatric inpatients. Methods: This feasibility trial included 15 frail inpatients at a geriatric ward. At hospitalization, the patients were prescribed two elastic band exercises...... of 2-min pauses and a time-under-tension of 8 s. The feasibility criterion for the unsupervised progressive exercises was that 33% of the recommended number of sets would be performed by at least 30% of patients. In addition, patients and staff were interviewed about their experiences...

  16. A Framework for (Tele-) Monitoring of the Rehabilitation Progress in Stroke Patients: eHealth 2015 Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagos, H; David, V; Haller, M; Kotzian, S; Hofmann, M; Schlossarek, S; Eichholzer, K; Winkler, M; Frohner, M; Reichel, M; Mayr, W; Rafolt, D

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of mobility in conjunction with an independent life style is one of the major goals of rehabilitation after stroke. The Rehab@Home framework shall support the continuation of rehabilitation at home. The framework consists of instrumented insoles, connected wirelessly to a 3G ready tablet PC, a server, and a web-interface for medical experts. The rehabilitation progress is estimated via automated analysis of movement data from standardized assessment tests which are designed according to the needs of stroke patients and executed via the tablet PC application. The Rehab@Home framework's implementation is finished and ready for the field trial (at five patients' homes). Initial testing of the automated evaluation of the standardized mobility tests shows reproducible results. Therefore it is assumed that the Rehab@Home framework is applicable as monitoring tool for the gait rehabilitation progress in stroke patients.

  17. An Evaluation of the Word Triad Method for Monitoring Spelling Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig; Wang, Ze

    2018-01-01

    Although spelling skill progress has typically been studied within the context of students' responses to written story starters (Deno, Marsten, & Mirkin, 1982; Fuchs & Fuchs, 2011; Hosp, Hosp, & Howell, 2007; Shinn & Shinn, 2002), there has been little research conducted within a curriculum-based measurement framework that has…

  18. Studies in iodine metabolism: monitoring of animal thyroids. Progress report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1986-01-01

    This progress report briefly summarizes the counting and re-counting of domestic or wild animal thyroids from the United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany, the reservation of the Savannah River Plant, or from the DOE reservation at Oak Ridge. The possible effect that a mycotoxin may have an iodine deficiency was investigated. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (DT)

  19. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG ampersand G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support

  20. Curcumin ameliorates liver damage and progression of NASH in NASH-HCC mouse model possibly by modulating HMGB1-NF-κB translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rejina; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Rahman, Azizur; Wahed, Mir Imam Ibne; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Suzuki, Kenji; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, has a wide spectrum of therapeutic effects such as antitumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and so on. The study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of curcumin to protect liver damage and progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in a novel NASH-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mouse model. To induce this model neonatal C57BL/6J male mice were exposed to low-dose streptozotocin and were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) from the age of 4weeks to 14weeks. Curcumin was given at 100mg/kg dose daily by oral gavage started at the age of 10weeks and continued until 14weeks along with HFD feeding. We found that curcumin improved the histopathological changes of the NASH liver via reducing the level of steatosis, fibrosis associated with decreasing serum aminotransferases. In addition, curcumin treatment markedly reduced the hepatic protein expression of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines including interferon (IFN) γ, interleukin-1β and IFNγ-inducible protein 10, in NASH mice. Furthermore, curcumin treatment significantly reduced the cytoplasmic translocation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and the protein expression of toll like receptor 4. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was also dramatically attenuated by the curcumin in NASH liver. Curcumin treatment effectively reduced the progression of NASH to HCC by suppressing the protein expression of glypican-3, vascular endothelial growth factor, and prothrombin in the NASH liver. Our data suggest that curcumin reduces the progression of NASH and liver damage, which may act via inhibiting HMGB1-NF-κB translocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical monitoring of tooth wear progression in patients over a period of one year using CAD/CAM

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Khaled E.; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S. Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N.; Murray, Colin A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clinically monitor the progression of tooth wear over a period of 1 year in a cohort of referred tooth wear patients through the use of a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) scanner and a standardized scanning/assessment methodology. Materials and Methods: Polyether impressions were made of 11 participants (130 teeth) at baseline and at 1 year. Impressions were poured in type IV dental stone and the anterior teeth were 3D scanne...

  2. Progress toward acoustic emission characterization for continuous monitoring of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in an operating reactor vessel using acoustic emission (AE) data. A preliminary AE-flaw growth relationship has been developed encompassing six variables. This model relates AE count and energy to fatigue crack driving force ΔK. Pattern recognition has been examined as a means of distinguishing crack growth AE from other acoustic signals with encouraging results. The program is moving into hardware implementation of relationships for testing and refinement by monitoring tests in heavy section specimens and subscale structures. The hardware system will become a reactor monitor prototype. (orig.) [de

  3. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 5, No. 2. Progress report, April-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Kramaric, M.; Cohen, L.

    1985-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network provides continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. The Network is intended to measure radiation levels during routine facility operations and to establish background radiation levels used to assess the radiological impact of an unusual condition, such as an accident. This report presents the radiation levels measured around all facilities in the Network for the second quarter of 1985. A complete listing of the site facilities monitored is included

  4. Blind test results - measure of incessant progress in personnel monitoring services at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jashi, K.B.; Ashok Kumar, A.; Pandaram, P.

    2018-01-01

    Personnel Monitoring Services (PMS) at Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) laboratory, Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) involve monitoring of about 1500 radiation workers of KKNPP for external radiation exposure on monthly basis. Quality assurance in PMS provides an overall estimate of accuracy which depends not only upon the dosimeter quality and reader performance but also on data interpretation, applicable software and the system. Therefore it measures the effectiveness of quality control mechanism. Blind test is an effective tool to check the performance of the processor without their knowledge during routine processing of the service cards

  5. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 55 NRC-licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first half of 1981. The program objectives, scope, and methodology are given. The TLD system, dosimeter location, data processing scheme, and quality assurance program are outlined

  6. A Step-by-Step Guide to Tier 2 Behavioral Progress Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Allison L.; McDaniel, Sara C.; Rila, Ashley; Estrapala, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Students who are at risk for or show low-intensity behavioral problems may need targeted, Tier 2 interventions. Often, Tier 2 problem-solving teams are charged with monitoring student responsiveness to intervention. This process may be difficult for those who are not trained in data collection and analysis procedures. To aid practitioners in these…

  7. A framework for prospectively defining progression rules for internal pilot studies monitoring recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lisa V; Williamson, Paula R; Wilby, Martin J; Jaki, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Just over half of publicly funded trials recruit their target sample size within the planned study duration. When recruitment targets are missed, the funder of a trial is faced with the decision of either committing further resources to the study or risk that a worthwhile treatment effect may be missed by an underpowered final analysis. To avoid this challenging situation, when there is insufficient prior evidence to support predicted recruitment rates, funders now require feasibility assessments to be performed in the early stages of trials. Progression criteria are usually specified and agreed with the funder ahead of time. To date, however, the progression rules used are typically ad hoc. In addition, rules routinely permit adaptations to recruitment strategies but do not stipulate criteria for evaluating their effectiveness. In this paper, we develop a framework for planning and designing internal pilot studies which permit a trial to be stopped early if recruitment is disappointing or to continue to full recruitment if enrolment during the feasibility phase is adequate. This framework enables a progression rule to be pre-specified and agreed upon prior to starting a trial. The novel two-stage designs stipulate that if neither of these situations arises, adaptations to recruitment should be made and subsequently evaluated to establish whether they have been successful. We derive optimal progression rules for internal pilot studies which minimise the expected trial overrun and maintain a high probability of completing the study when the recruitment rate is adequate. The advantages of this procedure are illustrated using a real trial example.

  8. Evaluation of contact resistance between carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminate and printed silver electrode for damage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Eun Beom; Kim, Hak Sung; Takahashi, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    An addressable conducting network (ACN) makes it possible to monitor the condition of a structure using the electrical resistance between electrodes on the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structure. To improve the damage detection reliability of the ACN, the contact resistances between the electrodes and CFRP laminates needs to be minimized. In this study, silver nanoparticle electrodes were fabricated via printed electronics techniques on a CFRP composite. The contact resistance between the silver electrodes and CFRP were measured with respect to various fabrication conditions such as the sintering temperature of the silver nano-ink and the surface roughness of the CFRP laminates. The interfaces between the silver electrode and carbon fibers were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on this study, it was found that the lowest contact resistance of 0.3664Ω could be achieved when the sintering temperature of the silver nano-ink and surface roughness were 120 degree C and 0.230 a, respectively.

  9. Volcano Monitoring in Ecuador: Three Decades of Continuous Progress of the Instituto Geofisico - Escuela Politecnica Nacional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M. C.; Yepes, H. A.; Hall, M. L.; Mothes, P. A.; Ramon, P.; Hidalgo, S.; Andrade, D.; Vallejo Vargas, S.; Steele, A. L.; Anzieta, J. C.; Ortiz, H. D.; Palacios, P.; Alvarado, A. P.; Enriquez, W.; Vasconez, F.; Vaca, M.; Arrais, S.; Viracucha, G.; Bernard, B.

    2014-12-01

    In 1988, the Instituto Geofisico (IG) began a permanent surveillance of Ecuadorian volcanoes, and due to activity on Guagua Pichincha, SP seismic stations and EDM control lines were then installed. Later, with the UNDRO and OAS projects, telemetered seismic monitoring was expanded to Tungurahua, Cotopaxi, Cuicocha, Chimborazo, Antisana, Cayambe, Cerro Negro, and Quilotoa volcanoes. In 1992 an agreement with the Instituto Ecuatoriano de Electrificacion strengthened the monitoring of Tungurahua and Cotopaxi volcanoes with real-time SP seismic networks and EDM lines. Thus, background activity levels became established, which was helpful because of the onset of the 1999 eruptive activity at Tungurahua and Guagua Pichincha. These eruptions had a notable impact on Baños and Quito. Unrest at Cotopaxi volcano was detected in 2001-2002, but waned. In 2002 Reventador began its eruptive period which continues to the present and is closely monitored by the IG. In 2006 permanent seismic BB stations and infrasound sensors were installed at Tungurahua and Cotopaxi under a cooperative program supported by JICA, which allowed us to follow Tungurahua's climatic eruptions of 2006 and subsequent eruptions up to the present. Programs supported by the Ecuadorian Secretaria Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia and the Secretaria Nacional de Planificacion resulted in further expansion of the IG's monitoring infrastructure. Thermal and video imagery, SO2 emission monitoring, geochemical analyses, continuous GPS and tiltmeters, and micro-barometric surveillance have been incorporated. Sangay, Soche, Ninahuilca, Pululahua, and Fernandina, Cerro Azul, Sierra Negra, and Alcedo in the Galapagos Islands are now monitored in real-time. During this time, international cooperation with universities (Blaise Pascal & Nice-France, U. North Carolina, New Mexico Tech, Uppsala-Sweden, Nagoya, etc.), and research centers (USGS & UNAVCO-USA, IRD-France, NIED-Japan, SGC-Colombia, VAAC, MIROVA) has introduced

  10. Modal content based damage indicators and phased array transducers for structural health monitoring of aircraft structures using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang

    Composite materials, especially carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP), have been widely used in the aircraft industry because of their high specific strength and stiffness, resistance to corrosion and good fatigue life. Due to their highly anisotropic material properties and laminated structures, joining methods like bolting and riveting are no longer appropriate for joining CFRP since they initiate defects during the assembly and severely compromise the integrity of the structure; thus new techniques for joining CFRP are highly demanded. Adhesive bonding is a promising method because it relieves stress concentration, reduces weight and provides smooth surfaces. Additionally, it is a low-cost alternative to the co-cured method which is currently used to manufacture components of aircraft fuselage. Adhesive defects, disbonds at the interface between adherend and adhesive layer, are focused on in this thesis because they can be initialized by either poor surface preparation during the manufacturing or fatigue loads during service. Aircraft need structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to increase safety and reduce loss, and adhesive bonds usually represent the hotspots of the assembled structure. There are many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for bond inspection. However, these methods cannot be readily integrated into an SHM system because of the bulk size and weight of the equipment and requirement of accessibility to one side of the bonded joint. The first objective of this work is to develop instruments, actuators, sensors and a data acquisition system for SHM of bond lines using ultrasonic guided waves which are well known to be able to cover large volume of the structure and inaccessible regions. Different from widely used guided wave sensors like PZT disks, the new actuators, piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC) phased array transducers0 (PAT), can control the modal content of the excited waves and the new sensors, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF

  11. How accurate are interpretations of curriculum-based measurement progress monitoring data? Visual analysis versus decision rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Ethan R; Christ, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Curriculum based measurement of oral reading (CBM-R) is used to monitor the effects of academic interventions for individual students. Decisions to continue, modify, or terminate these interventions are made by interpreting time series CBM-R data. Such interpretation is founded upon visual analysis or the application of decision rules. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of visual analysis and decision rules. Visual analysts interpreted 108 CBM-R progress monitoring graphs one of three ways: (a) without graphic aids, (b) with a goal line, or (c) with a goal line and a trend line. Graphs differed along three dimensions, including trend magnitude, variability of observations, and duration of data collection. Automated trend line and data point decision rules were also applied to each graph. Inferential analyses permitted the estimation of the probability of a correct decision (i.e., the student is improving - continue the intervention, or the student is not improving - discontinue the intervention) for each evaluation method as a function of trend magnitude, variability of observations, and duration of data collection. All evaluation methods performed better when students made adequate progress. Visual analysis and decision rules performed similarly when observations were less variable. Results suggest that educators should collect data for more than six weeks, take steps to control measurement error, and visually analyze graphs when data are variable. Implications for practice and research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  13. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho

  14. CT evaluation of the damaged upper limb muscle in patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Matsuke, Yutaka.

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the changes of CT numbers and cross sectional areas of the muscles, we determined CT scores of the muscle. In twelve patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD), we assessed the difference of CT scores of the muscle and the correlation between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities. CT scores of the subscapularis muscle and infraspinatus muscle were significantly lower than deltoideus muscle at the level of the shoulder, and flexor muscles showed also significantly lower than extensor muscles at the level of the upper extremity. Good correlations between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities were observed in the muscles of shoulder and upper arm. (author)

  15. CT evaluation of the damaged upper limb muscle in patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Hiroshi (Anan Central Hospital, Tokushima (Japan)); Matsuke, Yutaka

    1992-04-01

    In order to evaluate the changes of CT numbers and cross sectional areas of the muscles, we determined CT scores of the muscle. In twelve patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD), we assessed the difference of CT scores of the muscle and the correlation between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities. CT scores of the subscapularis muscle and infraspinatus muscle were significantly lower than deltoideus muscle at the level of the shoulder, and flexor muscles showed also significantly lower than extensor muscles at the level of the upper extremity. Good correlations between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities were observed in the muscles of shoulder and upper arm. (author).

  16. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) from January 1994 through December 1994 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support

  17. Progress Monitoring in Reading: Comparison of Weekly, Bimonthly, and Monthly Assessments for Students at Risk for Reading Difficulties in Grades 2-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Van Norman, Ethan R.; Christ, Theodore J.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Eckert, Tanya L.; White, Mary Jane

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the utility of two progress monitoring assessment schedules (bimonthly and monthly) as alternatives to monitoring once weekly with curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R). General education students (N = 93) in Grades 2-4 who were at risk for reading difficulties but not yet receiving special education services…

  18. Multimodal imaging-monitored progression of stroke-like episodes in a case of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, Izzie Jacques; Wolff, Valérie; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Marescaux, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We report imaging findings during, between, and after 2 stroke-like episodes in a 45-year-old woman with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome with an A32243G mitochondrial mutation 6 years before. In November 2010, for a first episode, she showed mixed aphasia with logorrhea, disinhibition, agitation, euphoria, and a large left temporoparietal lesion. Symptomatology progressively regressed under L-arginine treatment. She was readmitted in June 2011 for a second episode with great anxiety, disorientation, impaired face recognition, worsening mixed aphasia, and a new right temporal lesion. After additional L-carnitine treatment, she remained without relapse for 14 months.

  19. Biological dosimeter for cellular damage and repair by ionizing radiation. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1993 - April 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have investigated the alteration of chromatin domains in Human T and B cells after ionizing radiation using three DNA specific dyes, Feulgen, Hoechst and 7-amino actinomycin D. Characterization and differentiation of T and B cells was accomplished using only 4 of a possible 32 image features with the CAS and Quaritex QX7 Digital Image Systems. Human B and T cells were irradiated with 1, 5 and 10 Gy and analyzed during a 1.5 hour recovery period. The chosen features detect a dose dependent change in DNA domains which can be observed as early as 1.5 hours after a 1Gv exposure. The results suggest that the ability of DNA specific dyes to stain chromatin can be used as an early sensitive indicator of DNA damage. The observed alteration of chromatin staining suggests that chromatin structure does observably change in a significant manner during a DNA repair interval. Since these alteration can be detected with DNA specific dyes that stain both AT rich, GC rich or total DNA, these data suggest that a global alteration of the chromatin is occurring after exposure to ionizing radiation

  20. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  1. An alpha-synuclein MRM assay with diagnostic potential for Parkinson's disease and monitoring disease progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Stewart, Tessandra [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Shi, Min [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Pottiez, Gwenael [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Dator, Romel [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Wu, Rui [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Department of Pathology, No. 3 Hospital of Beijing University, Beijing China; Aro, Patrick [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Schuster, Robert J. [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Ginghina, Carmen [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Pan, Catherine [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zabetian, Cyrus P. [Parkinson' s Disease Research and Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle WA USA; Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle WA USA; Hu, Shu-Ching [Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle WA USA; Quinn, Joseph F. [Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Zhang, Jing [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Department of Pathology, Peking University Health Science Centre and Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 China

    2017-04-19

    Aim: The alpha-synuclein (α-syn) level in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as measured by immunoassays, is promising as a Parkinson’s disease (PD) biomarker. However, the levels of total α-syn are inconsistent among studies with large cohorts and different measurement platforms. Total α-syn level also does not correlate with disease severity or progression. Here, we developed a highly sensitive Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) method to measure absolute CSF α-syn peptide concentrations without prior enrichment or fractionation, aiming to discover new candidate biomarkers. Results: Six peptides covering 73% of protein sequence were reliably identified, and two were consistently quantified in cross-sectional and longitudinal cohorts. Absolute concentration of α-syn in human CSF was determined to be 2.1ng/mL. A unique α-syn peptide, TVEGAGSIAAATGFVK (81-96), displayed excellent correlation with previous immunoassay results in two independent PD cohorts (p < 0.001), correlated with disease severity, and its changes significantly tracked the disease progression longitudinally. Conclusions: An MRM assay to quantify human CSF α-syn was developed and optimized. Sixty clinical samples from cross-sectional and longitudinal PD cohorts were analyzed with this approach. Although further larger-scale validation is needed, the results suggest that α-syn peptide could serve as a promising biomarker in PD diagnosis and progression.

  2. Umatilla Basin natural production monitoring and evaluation. Annual progress report, 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contor, C.R.; Hoverson, E.; Kissner, P.; Volkman, J.

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPME) from September 30, 1994 to September 29, 1995. This program was funded by Bonneville Power Administration and was managed under the Fisheries Program, Department of Natural Resources, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. An estimated 36.7 km (22.6 miles) of stream habitat were inventoried on the Umatilla River, Moonshine, Mission, Cottonwood and Coonskin Creeks. A total of 384 of 3,652 (10.5%) habitat units were electrofished. The number of juvenile fish captured follows: 2,953 natural summer steelhead (including resident rainbow trout; Oncorhynchus mykiss), one hatchery steelhead, 341 natural chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), 163 natural coho salmon (O. kisutch), five bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), 185 mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and six northern squawfish (Ptychoicheilus oregonensis). The expanded population estimate for the areas surveyed was 73,716 salmonids with a mean density of 0.38 fish/m 2 . Relative salmonid abundance, seasonal distribution and habitat utilization were monitored at index sites throughout the basin. During index site monitoring, the following species were collected in addition to those listed above: american shad (Alosa sapidissima), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), carp (Cyprinus carpio) and chiselmouth (Acrocheilus alutaceus). Thirty-nine sites were electrofished during the spring and summer seasons, while 36 sites were sampled in the fall season. A study of the migration movements and homing requirements of adult salmonids in the Umatilla River was conducted during the 1994-95 return years. Radio telemetry was used to evaluate the movements of adult salmonids past diversion dams in the lower Umatilla River and to determine migrational movements of salmonids following upstream transport

  3. Damage dosimetry and embrittlement monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels in real time by magnetic properties measurement. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ougouag, A.M.; Stubbins, J.F.; Williams, J.F.; Shong, Wei-Ja.

    1995-04-01

    This program developed a nondestructive technique for gauging the progress of embrittlement of nuclear pressure vessel steels (PVS) by means of monitoring radiation-induced changes in magnetic properties. The technique was developed by running a series of experiments in reactor on typical nuclear pressure vessel steels and weldment material. Following irradiation, changes in magnetic properties were measured and correlated with irradiation dose and with mechanical properties changes, where possible. The changes in magnetic properties were unique to the irradiation environment, and were much larger than those produce by thermal aging in the absence of irradiation. Special techniques for magnetic properties change measurement were developed and complimented by more standard magnetic properties measurement techniques including SQUID measurements. The results of the experiments revealed that magnetic properties were very sensitive to irradiation. Changes in microstructurally-related magnetic properties of as much as 40% were noted after irradiation exposure of as little as 10 17 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The magnetic properties changes plateaued out after doses of around as 10 18 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). It is unclear whether further changes would be noted at higher doses which would also be useful for tracking the embrittlement phenomenon. This is recommended for further study. The work supported here resulted in several publications in the open scientific literature

  4. Seaweed as bio indicators for monitoring toxic element pollutants in the marine ecosystem. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfor-Armah, Y.; Nyarko, B.J.B.; Osae, E.K.; Carboo, D.; Seku, F.

    1997-01-01

    Twelve seaweed species were sampled from June 1996 to August 1997 along the coast of Southern Ghana which is being washed by the Gulf of Guinea (part of Atlantic ocean). Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to measure the concentration of twenty six chemical elements, with the aim of selecting suitable seaweeds for bio-monitoring. Al, As, Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Mn, Na and V were found in most of the seaweed species. The high values of the metal concentrations in the macro algae suggest that these marine organisms can be used as biological indicators for studying coastal pollution. (author)

  5. Detection of progression of glaucomatous visual field damage using the point-wise method with the binomial test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakawa, Ayako; Murata, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Hiroyo; Mayama, Chihiro; Asaoka, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    To compare the performance of newly proposed point-wise linear regression (PLR) with the binomial test (binomial PLR) against mean deviation (MD) trend analysis and permutation analyses of PLR (PoPLR), in detecting global visual field (VF) progression in glaucoma. 15 VFs (Humphrey Field Analyzer, SITA standard, 24-2) were collected from 96 eyes of 59 open angle glaucoma patients (6.0 ± 1.5 [mean ± standard deviation] years). Using the total deviation of each point on the 2(nd) to 16(th) VFs (VF2-16), linear regression analysis was carried out. The numbers of VF test points with a significant trend at various probability levels (pbinomial test (one-side). A VF series was defined as "significant" if the median p-value from the binomial test was binomial PLR method (0.14 to 0.86) was significantly higher than MD trend analysis (0.04 to 0.89) and PoPLR (0.09 to 0.93). The PIS of the proposed method (0.0 to 0.17) was significantly lower than the MD approach (0.0 to 0.67) and PoPLR (0.07 to 0.33). The PBNS of the three approaches were not significantly different. The binomial BLR method gives more consistent results than MD trend analysis and PoPLR, hence it will be helpful as a tool to 'flag' possible VF deterioration.

  6. DNA polymerase η modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Anna M.; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P.

    2013-11-01

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase η (polη) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of polη in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking polη than in cells expressing polη. This provides the first direct evidence that polη modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated polη-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of polη. Polη-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  7. Design rules of mechanical structure of reactors. Damage due to cyclic loading. Progressive distortion. Practical analysis of ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Gerard; Cousseran, Pierre; Lebey, Jacques; Moulin, Didier; Roche, Roland; Tremblais, Andre.

    1982-08-01

    At first is given a definition of what is ratcheting. A short discussion shows that computation results do not agree with experimental results. This is attributed to the complexity of the real material behavior. These considerations lead to try to build a design rule mainly based on the results of experimental tests. A large experimental program is in progress at CEN-Saclay. Using these results and the results available in open litterature, it was possible to propose a rule based on the concept of effective primary stress Psub(eff). The effective primary stress is a fictitious primary stress giving the same effects that the real loading (it is to say the same effect that the combination of an applied primary stress P and a cyclic straining). Determination of an upper bound value of Psub(eff) is made with the help of an efficiency diagram. More precisely the efficiency diagram include a curve giving a conservative value of an efficiency index V=P/Psub(eff) as a function of the secondary quotient SQ=ΔQ/P. Finally limitation of Psub(eff) intensity is discussed in regard with the current practice [fr

  8. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  9. Quantitative muscle MRI as an assessment tool for monitoring disease progression in LGMD2I: a multicentre longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A Willis

    Full Text Available Outcome measures for clinical trials in neuromuscular diseases are typically based on physical assessments which are dependent on patient effort, combine the effort of different muscle groups, and may not be sensitive to progression over short trial periods in slow-progressing diseases. We hypothesised that quantitative fat imaging by MRI (Dixon technique could provide more discriminating quantitative, patient-independent measurements of the progress of muscle fat replacement within individual muscle groups.To determine whether quantitative fat imaging could measure disease progression in a cohort of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I patients over a 12 month period.32 adult patients (17 male;15 female from 4 European tertiary referral centres with the homozygous c.826C>A mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP completed baseline and follow up measurements 12 months later. Quantitative fat imaging was performed and muscle fat fraction change was compared with (i muscle strength and function assessed using standardized physical tests and (ii standard T1-weighted MRI graded on a 6 point scale.There was a significant increase in muscle fat fraction in 9 of the 14 muscles analyzed using the quantitative MRI technique from baseline to 12 months follow up. Changes were not seen in the conventional longitudinal physical assessments or in qualitative scoring of the T₁w images.Quantitative muscle MRI, using the Dixon technique, could be used as an important longitudinal outcome measure to assess muscle pathology and monitor therapeutic efficacy in patients with LGMD2I.

  10. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and cell progression in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) was investigated with respect to its ability to affect radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells. At a concentration of 4mM, WR 1065 protected against the formation of single strand breaks (SSB), when present during irradiation. The protector appeared, however, to inhibit the subsequent postirradiation repair or rejoining of SSB. While repair was complete within 24h, the protector reduced the rate of repair by a factor of 3. This inhibitory effect on the rate of repair did not correlate with either measured differences in cell survival or mutagenesis. WR 1065 present in the growth medium inhibited the progression of cells through S-phase, and cell-doubling time following a 3h exposure to the protector was increased from 11 to 18h. These data are consistent with the property of thiols to inhibit DNA polymerase activity. It was concluded that, while the presence of WR 1065 during irradiation reduced SSB-DNA damage, its effect on the subsequent rejoining of these breaks could not be correlated with its observed effect on protecting against radiation-induced mutagenesis. (author)

  11. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Deletion Leads to Progressive Hypertension, Associated Organ Damage, and Reduced Survival: Novel Model for Human Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Nini, Ryan; Tonne, Jason M; Peng, Kah-Whye; Geurts, Aron; Jacob, Howard J; Burnett, John C; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Altered myocardial structure and function, secondary to chronically elevated blood pressure, are leading causes of heart failure and death. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a guanylyl cyclase A agonist, is a cardiac hormone integral to cardiovascular regulation. Studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between reduced production or impaired BNP release and the development of human hypertension. However, the consequences of BNP insufficiency on blood pressure and hypertension-associated complications remain poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to create and characterize a novel model of BNP deficiency to investigate the effects of BNP absence on cardiac and renal structure, function, and survival. Genetic BNP deletion was generated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Compared with age-matched controls, BNP knockout rats demonstrated adult-onset hypertension. Increased left ventricular mass with hypertrophy and substantially augmented hypertrophy signaling pathway genes, developed in young adult knockout rats, which preceded hypertension. Prolonged hypertension led to increased cardiac stiffness, cardiac fibrosis, and thrombi formation. Significant elongation of the QT interval was detected at 9 months in knockout rats. Progressive nephropathy was also noted with proteinuria, fibrosis, and glomerular alterations in BNP knockout rats. End-organ damage contributed to a significant decline in overall survival. Systemic BNP overexpression reversed the phenotype of genetic BNP deletion. Our results demonstrate the critical role of BNP defect in the development of systemic hypertension and associated end-organ damage in adulthood. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Ddx19 links mRNA nuclear export with progression of transcription and replication and suppresses genomic instability upon DNA damage in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodroj, Dana; Serhal, Kamar; Maiorano, Domenico

    2017-09-03

    The DEAD-box Helicase 19 (Ddx19) gene codes for an RNA helicase involved in both mRNA (mRNA) export from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and in mRNA translation. In unperturbed cells, Ddx19 localizes in the cytoplasm and at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Here we review recent findings related to an additional Ddx19 function in the nucleus in resolving RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops) generated during collision between transcription and replication, and upon DNA damage. Activation of a DNA damage response pathway dependent upon the ATR kinase, a major regulator of replication fork progression, stimulates translocation of the Ddx19 protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Only nuclear Ddx19 is competent to resolve R-loops, and down regulation of Ddx19 expression induces DNA double strand breaks only in proliferating cells. Overall these observations put forward Ddx19 as an important novel mediator of the crosstalk between transcription and replication.

  13. Fe model predicting the increase in seismic resistance induced by the progressive FRP strengthening on already damaged masonry arches subjected to settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, G.; Milani, G.

    2017-11-01

    In seismic regions, the retrofitting of masonry structures subjected to differential foundation settlements is of the upmost importance. This practice however poses significant challenges, most notably in the consideration of historical monuments where the integrity of the original structure must be weighted alongside public safety. Fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs), when appropriately applied, provide the potential to balance this duality of heritage preservation and modern safety. Using an advanced FE point of view, this work studies the seismic response of a progressive reinforcement strategy aimed at strengthening and controlling the failure mechanism for masonry arches that exist in a damaged state induced through a differential abutment settlement. A heterogeneous FE approach of a semi-circular block and mortar arch on continuously spreading supports is examined. In this model hinge formation is obtained by assigning a damage plasticity behavior to the mortar joints. Strategically placed FRPs, designed through the utilization of the Italian CNR recommendations for externally bonded FRP systems, are applied through the Abaqus birth and death approach and introduced to the spreading support model after settlement. Finally, the structural behavior of the reinforced and unreinforced models are examined for a seismic response.

  14. Progress in Gamma Ray Measurement Information Barriers for Nuclear Material Transparency Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolford, J.K.; White, G.K.

    2000-01-01

    Negotiations between technical representatives of the US and the Russian Federation in support of several pending nuclear arms and nuclear material control agreements must take account of the need for assurances against the release of sensitive information. Most of these agreements involve storing nuclear material and in some cases nuclear components from stockpile weapons in specially designed containers. Strategies for monitoring the agreements typically include measuring neutron and gamma radiation from the controlled items to verify declared attributes of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. If accurate enough to be useful, these measurements will contain information about the design of the component being monitored, information considered sensitive by one or both parties to the agreement. Safeguards have evolved to prevent disclosure of this information during inspections. These measures combine hardware, software, and procedural measures to contain the sensitive data, presenting only the results needed for verification. Custom features preserve data security and guard against disclosure in case of failure. This paper summarizes the general problem and discusses currently developing solutions for a high resolution gamma ray detection system. It argues for the simplest possible implementation of several key system components

  15. Effects of tritiated water ingestion on mice: II. Damage at cellular vis-a-vis subcellular level monitored up to four generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.N.; Sharan, R.N.; Pozzi, L.

    1983-01-01

    Damage at cellular level is measured using colony forming units in spleen (CFU-S) technique while that at subcellular level by DNA unwinding technique. The damage is monitored up to four generations in Swiss albino mice. The results show drastically reduced colony forming ability in mice bone marrow cells (BMC). On plotting survival fractions (percent of control) for BMC against generations of mice, the plateau is found around 50% survival. The role of DNA in colony forming ability of BMC is tested. The results indicate that, at least, initial impairment of colony ability is not DNA dependent but related to some other factor(s)

  16. Monitoring the progressive increase of the longest episode of spontaneous movements in Guinea pig fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the changes in the duration of spontaneous movements in the guinea pig fetus after the appearance of its first movements. Every day from the 25th to the 35th gestation day, one fetus from each of twenty pregnant animals was examined by ultrasound. Fetal movements were observed for 5 min. The episode with the longest period of movement was taken into consideration and was recorded as: 3 s. Days 25 and 26 were characterized by episodes lasting 3 s (χ2 = 140.51 p <0.05. Tracking the dynamics of progressive increases in the longest episode of spontaneous movement could be a useful factor in estimating the maturity and condition of a fetus. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175006/2011

  17. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  18. Superpulsed low-level laser therapy protects skeletal muscle of mdx mice against damage, inflammation and morphological changes delaying dystrophy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Joensen, Jon; Johnson, Mark I; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of preventive treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on progression of dystrophy in mdx mice. Ten animals were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups treated with superpulsed LLLT (904 nm, 15 mW, 700 Hz, 1 J) or placebo-LLLT at one point overlying the tibialis anterior muscle (bilaterally) 5 times per week for 14 weeks (from 6th to 20th week of age). Morphological changes, creatine kinase (CK) activity and mRNA gene expression were assessed in animals at 20th week of age. Animals treated with LLLT showed very few morphological changes in skeletal muscle, with less atrophy and fibrosis than animals treated with placebo-LLLT. CK was significantly lower (p=0.0203) in animals treated with LLLT (864.70 U.l-1, SEM 226.10) than placebo (1708.00 U.l-1, SEM 184.60). mRNA gene expression of inflammatory markers was significantly decreased by treatment with LLLT (pmuscle damage and inflammation in mdx mice. This indicates that LLLT has potential to decrease progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Progress and monitoring system on compression and transmission technologies of dynamic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saijo, Nobuyuki; Nakajo, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The Toshiba Corporation developed a real-time dynamic image transmission matched with quality of transmission circuit by using MPEG-4 which was recent international standard system for the dynamic image coding system. Concretely, this system made possible on real-time dynamic image transmission even at transmission on wireless circuit such as portable telephone, PHS, wireless LAN, and so on, at viewpoint of the mobile communication. And, by using the wireless circuit, it could be built without any limit of transmission cable, to realize its layout-free establishment. In addition, this system uses only image for communication without using voice, and some devices were carried out to upgrade image and frame speed as possible. Here were described on outlines of transmission system and principle of detection MPEG-4, and function and application of monitoring system using this system. (G.K.)

  20. Development of a reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Progress report, June 1982-July 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Sommerfield, G.A.

    1983-12-01

    The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables: The rotordynamic behavior of the pump shaft and related components, the internal conditions and performance of the seals, and the plant or pump operating environment (controlled by the plant operator). Interrelationships between these areas will be developed during the data collection task, scheduled to begin in October 1983 (for a full fuel cycle at Davis-Besse). This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during this period. Also described is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  1. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  2. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Tojo, Arinobu; Sekine, Rieko; Soda, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Nomura, Akiko; Izawa, Kiyoko; Kitamura, Toshio; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-01-01

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  3. Progress of the COST Action TU1402 on the Quantification of the Value of Structural Health Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thöns, Sebastian; Limongelli, Maria Pina; Ivankovic, Ana Mandic

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of Value of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Information analyses and introduces the development, objectives and approaches of the COST Action TU1402 on this topic. SHM research and engineering has been focused on the extraction of loading, degradation...... for its quantification. This challenge can be met with Value of SHM Information analyses facilitating that the SHM contribution to substantial benefits for life safety, economy and beyond can be may be quantified, demonstrated and utilized. However, Value of SHM Information analyses involve complex models...... encompassing the infrastructure and the SHM systems, their functionality and thus require the interaction of several research disciplines. For progressing on these points, a scientific networking and dissemination project namely the COST Action TU1402 has been initiated....

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality

  5. Muscle-Derived Proteins as Serum Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in Three Forms of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Peter M.; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying translatable, non-invasive biomarkers of muscular dystrophy that better reflect the disease pathology than those currently available would aid the development of new therapies, the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapy. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a panel of serum protein biomarkers with the potential to specifically detect skeletal muscle injury. Method: Serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) and muscle-type creatine kinase (CKM) proteins were measured in 74 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 38 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and 49 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) patients and 32 healthy controls. Results: All four proteins were significantly elevated in the serum of these three muscular dystrophy patient populations when compared to healthy controls, but, interestingly, displayed different profiles depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Additionally, the effects of patient age, ambulatory status, cardiac function and treatment status on the serum concentrations of the proteins were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between the serum concentrations and certain clinical endpoints including forced vital capacity in DMD patients and the time to walk ten meters in LGMD2B patients. Serum concentrations of these proteins were also elevated in two preclinical models of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse and the golden-retriever muscular dystrophy dog. Conclusions: These proteins, therefore, are potential muscular dystrophy biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26870665

  6. A Biodiversity Indicators Dashboard: Addressing Challenges to Monitoring Progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets Using Disaggregated Global Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuemei; Smyth, Regan L.; Young, Bruce E.; Brooks, Thomas M.; Sánchez de Lozada, Alexandra; Bubb, Philip; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Larsen, Frank W.; Hamilton, Healy; Hansen, Matthew C.; Turner, Will R.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the imperiled status of biodiversity and its benefit to human well-being, the world's governments committed in 2010 to take effective and urgent action to halt biodiversity loss through the Convention on Biological Diversity's “Aichi Targets”. These targets, and many conservation programs, require monitoring to assess progress toward specific goals. However, comprehensive and easily understood information on biodiversity trends at appropriate spatial scales is often not available to the policy makers, managers, and scientists who require it. We surveyed conservation stakeholders in three geographically diverse regions of critical biodiversity concern (the Tropical Andes, the African Great Lakes, and the Greater Mekong) and found high demand for biodiversity indicator information but uneven availability. To begin to address this need, we present a biodiversity “dashboard” – a visualization of biodiversity indicators designed to enable tracking of biodiversity and conservation performance data in a clear, user-friendly format. This builds on previous, more conceptual, indicator work to create an operationalized online interface communicating multiple indicators at multiple spatial scales. We structured this dashboard around the Pressure-State-Response-Benefit framework, selecting four indicators to measure pressure on biodiversity (deforestation rate), state of species (Red List Index), conservation response (protection of key biodiversity areas), and benefits to human populations (freshwater provision). Disaggregating global data, we present dashboard maps and graphics for the three regions surveyed and their component countries. These visualizations provide charts showing regional and national trends and lay the foundation for a web-enabled, interactive biodiversity indicators dashboard. This new tool can help track progress toward the Aichi Targets, support national monitoring and reporting, and inform outcome-based policy-making for the

  7. A biodiversity indicators dashboard: addressing challenges to monitoring progress towards the Aichi biodiversity targets using disaggregated global data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuemei; Smyth, Regan L; Young, Bruce E; Brooks, Thomas M; Sánchez de Lozada, Alexandra; Bubb, Philip; Butchart, Stuart H M; Larsen, Frank W; Hamilton, Healy; Hansen, Matthew C; Turner, Will R

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the imperiled status of biodiversity and its benefit to human well-being, the world's governments committed in 2010 to take effective and urgent action to halt biodiversity loss through the Convention on Biological Diversity's "Aichi Targets". These targets, and many conservation programs, require monitoring to assess progress toward specific goals. However, comprehensive and easily understood information on biodiversity trends at appropriate spatial scales is often not available to the policy makers, managers, and scientists who require it. We surveyed conservation stakeholders in three geographically diverse regions of critical biodiversity concern (the Tropical Andes, the African Great Lakes, and the Greater Mekong) and found high demand for biodiversity indicator information but uneven availability. To begin to address this need, we present a biodiversity "dashboard"--a visualization of biodiversity indicators designed to enable tracking of biodiversity and conservation performance data in a clear, user-friendly format. This builds on previous, more conceptual, indicator work to create an operationalized online interface communicating multiple indicators at multiple spatial scales. We structured this dashboard around the Pressure-State-Response-Benefit framework, selecting four indicators to measure pressure on biodiversity (deforestation rate), state of species (Red List Index), conservation response (protection of key biodiversity areas), and benefits to human populations (freshwater provision). Disaggregating global data, we present dashboard maps and graphics for the three regions surveyed and their component countries. These visualizations provide charts showing regional and national trends and lay the foundation for a web-enabled, interactive biodiversity indicators dashboard. This new tool can help track progress toward the Aichi Targets, support national monitoring and reporting, and inform outcome-based policy-making for the protection of

  8. A biodiversity indicators dashboard: addressing challenges to monitoring progress towards the Aichi biodiversity targets using disaggregated global data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Han

    Full Text Available Recognizing the imperiled status of biodiversity and its benefit to human well-being, the world's governments committed in 2010 to take effective and urgent action to halt biodiversity loss through the Convention on Biological Diversity's "Aichi Targets". These targets, and many conservation programs, require monitoring to assess progress toward specific goals. However, comprehensive and easily understood information on biodiversity trends at appropriate spatial scales is often not available to the policy makers, managers, and scientists who require it. We surveyed conservation stakeholders in three geographically diverse regions of critical biodiversity concern (the Tropical Andes, the African Great Lakes, and the Greater Mekong and found high demand for biodiversity indicator information but uneven availability. To begin to address this need, we present a biodiversity "dashboard"--a visualization of biodiversity indicators designed to enable tracking of biodiversity and conservation performance data in a clear, user-friendly format. This builds on previous, more conceptual, indicator work to create an operationalized online interface communicating multiple indicators at multiple spatial scales. We structured this dashboard around the Pressure-State-Response-Benefit framework, selecting four indicators to measure pressure on biodiversity (deforestation rate, state of species (Red List Index, conservation response (protection of key biodiversity areas, and benefits to human populations (freshwater provision. Disaggregating global data, we present dashboard maps and graphics for the three regions surveyed and their component countries. These visualizations provide charts showing regional and national trends and lay the foundation for a web-enabled, interactive biodiversity indicators dashboard. This new tool can help track progress toward the Aichi Targets, support national monitoring and reporting, and inform outcome-based policy-making for the

  9. The Role of Sarcosine, Uracil, and Kynurenic Acid Metabolism in Urine for Diagnosis and Progression Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Gkotsos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate sarcosine, uracil, and kynurenic acid in urine as potential biomarkers in prostate cancer detection and progression monitoring. Sarcosine, uracil, and kynurenic acid were measured in urine samples of 32 prostate cancer patients prior to radical prostatectomy, 101 patients with increased prostate-specific antigen prior to ultrasonographically-guided prostatic biopsy collected before and after prostatic massage, and 15 healthy volunteers (controls. The results were related to histopathologic data, Gleason score, and PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen. Metabolites were measured after analysis of urine samples with Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS instrumentation. Multivariate, nonparametric statistical tests including receiver operating characteristics analyses, one-way analysis of variance (Kruskal–Wallis test, parametric statistical analysis, and Pearson correlation, were performed to evaluate diagnostic performance. Decreased median sarcosine and kynurenic acid and increased uracil concentrations were observed for patients with prostate cancer compared to participants without malignancy. Results showed that there was no correlation between the concentration of the studied metabolites and the cancer grade (Gleason score <7 vs. ≥7 and the age of the patients. Evaluation of biomarkers by ROC (Receiving Operating Characteristics curve analysis showed that differentiation of prostate cancer patients from participants without malignancy was not enhanced by sarcosine or uracil levels in urine. In contrast to total PSA values, kynurenic acid was found a promising biomarker for the detection of prostate cancer particularly in cases where collection of urine samples was performed after prostatic massage. Sarcosine and uracil in urine samples of patients with prostate cancer were not found as significant biomarkers for the diagnosis of prostate cancer

  10. General guidelines for the assessment of internal dose from monitoring data: Progress of the IDEAS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.; Andrasi, A.; Bailey, M.; Blanchardon, E.; Cruz-Suarez, R.; Berkovski, V.; Castellani, C. M.; Hurtgenv, C.; Leguen, B.; Malatova, I.; Marsh, J.; Stather, J.; Zeger, J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent major international intercomparison exercises on intake and internal dose assessments from monitoring data, the results calculated by different participants varied significantly. Based on this experience the need for harmonisation of the procedures has been formulated within an EU 5. Framework Programme research project. The aim of the project, IDEAS, is to develop general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. The IDEAS project started in October 2001 and ended in June 2005. The project is closely related to some goals of the work of Committee 2 of the ICRP and since 2003 there has been close cooperation between the two groups. To ensure that the guidelines are applicable to a wide range of practical situations, the first step was to compile a database of well-documented cases of internal contamination. In parallel, an improved version of an existing software package was developed and distributed to the partners for further use. A large number of cases from the database was evaluated independently by the partners and the results reviewed. Based on these evaluations, guidelines were drafted and discussed with dosimetry professionals from around the world by means of a virtual workshop on the Internet early in 2004. The guidelines have been revised and refined on the basis of the experiences and discussions in this virtual workshop. The general philosophy of the Guidelines is presented here, focusing on the principles of harmonisation, optimisation and proportionality. Finally, the proposed Levels of Task to structure the approach of internal dose evaluation are reported. (authors)

  11. Monitoring the progress of NFFO-3 projects: short rotation willow coppice - agronomy and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twemlow, R.K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of Sidney C. Banks p.l.c., and the subsidiary company Banks Agriculture, in fuel supply for biofuelled power stations started some 4 years ago. When identifying possible opportunities and crops it was apparent that, with the third tranche of Non-Fossil Fuel Obligations (NFFO3) coming up, there were companies looking at developing biofuelled power stations, using Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and for this they needed to link with potential fuel suppliers. Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. linked with South Western Power (SWP) (a subsidiary of South Western Electricity p.l.c. (SWEB)) to act as their sole fuel supplier on projected biofuel wood power stations. Subsequently two wood fuelled power stations were awarded to SWP and Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. in the 3rd Tranche from NFFO, in December 1994. The objectives of this project were to: establish a network of SRC growers to produce fuel for a NFFO project; monitor the success of the enterprise; implement a programme of constant improvement to optimise the fuel supply strategy; and provide valuable information as to the performance of the SRC crop in large scale commercial production. (author)

  12. Dworshak Reservoir kokanee population monitoring: project progress report, 1999 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiolie, Melo; Vidergar, Dmitri T.; Harryman, Bill

    2001-01-01

    We used split-beam hydroacoustics and trawling to monitor the kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka population in Dworshak Reservoir during 1999. Estimated abundance of kokanee has continued to increase since the high entrainment losses in the spring of 1996. Based on hydroacoustic surveys, we estimated 1,545,000 kokanee and rainbow trout O. mykiss in Dworshak Reservoir during July 1999. This included 1,144,000 age-0 kokanee (90% CI ± 42%), 212,000 age-1 kokanee (90% CI ± 15%), and 189,000 age-2 kokanee and stocked rainbow trout (90% CI ± 39%). Rainbow trout could not be distinguished from the age-2 kokanee in the echograms since they were of similar size. Age-0 kokanee ranged in length from 40 mm to 90 mm, age-1 from 193 mm to 212 mm, and age-2 kokanee from 219 mm to 336 mm. These sizes indicated kokanee are still growing well. Discharge of water from Dworshak Dam during 1999 did not stop the expansion of the kokanee population based on these results. Counts of spawning kokanee in four tributary streams exceeded 11,000 fish. This index also showed a marked increase from last year's 660 spawning kokanee or the 1997 total of 144 spawning kokanee

  13. A Proposed Methodology to Assess the Accuracy of 3D Scanners and Casts and Monitor Tooth Wear Progression in Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaled E; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N; Murray, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detail and assess the capability of a novel methodology to 3D-quantify tooth wear progression in a patient over a period of 12 months. A calibrated stainless steel model was used to identify the accuracy of the scanning system by assessing the accuracy and precision of the contact scanner and the dimensional accuracy and stability of casts fabricated from three different types of impression materials. Thereafter, the overall accuracy of the 3D scanning system (scanner and casts) was ascertained. Clinically, polyether impressions were made of the patient's dentition at the initial examination and at the 12-month review, then poured in type IV dental stone to assess the tooth wear. The anterior teeth on the resultant casts were scanned, and images were analyzed using 3D matching software to detect dimensional variations between the patient's impressions. The accuracy of the 3D scanning system was established to be 33 μm. 3D clinical analysis demonstrated localized wear on the incisal and palatal surfaces of the patient's maxillary central incisors. The identified wear extended to a depth of 500 μm with a distribution of 4% to 7% of affected tooth surfaces. The newly developed 3D scanning methodology was found to be capable of assessing and accounting for the various factors affecting tooth wear scanning. Initial clinical evaluation of the methodology demonstrates successful monitoring of tooth wear progression. However, further clinical assessment is needed.

  14. Monitoring progression of clinical reasoning skills during health sciences education using the case method - a qualitative observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Kristina; Ekelin, Maria; Edgren, Gudrun; Sandgren, Olof; Hovbrandt, Pia; Persson, Eva K

    2017-09-11

    Outcome- or competency-based education is well established in medical and health sciences education. Curricula are based on courses where students develop their competences and assessment is also usually course-based. Clinical reasoning is an important competence, and the aim of this study was to monitor and describe students' progression in professional clinical reasoning skills during health sciences education using observations of group discussions following the case method. In this qualitative study students from three different health education programmes were observed while discussing clinical cases in a modified Harvard case method session. A rubric with four dimensions - problem-solving process, disciplinary knowledge, character of discussion and communication - was used as an observational tool to identify clinical reasoning. A deductive content analysis was performed. The results revealed the students' transition over time from reasoning based strictly on theoretical knowledge to reasoning ability characterized by clinical considerations and experiences. Students who were approaching the end of their education immediately identified the most important problem and then focused on this in their discussion. Practice knowledge increased over time, which was seen as progression in the use of professional language, concepts, terms and the use of prior clinical experience. The character of the discussion evolved from theoretical considerations early in the education to clinical reasoning in later years. Communication within the groups was supportive and conducted with a professional tone. Our observations revealed progression in several aspects of students' clinical reasoning skills on a group level in their discussions of clinical cases. We suggest that the case method can be a useful tool in assessing quality in health sciences education.

  15. High frequency electromagnetic impedance measurements for characterization, monitoring and verification efforts. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, A.; Lee, K.H.; Pellerin, L.

    1998-01-01

    'Non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of the shallow subsurface is needed for delineation of buried waste, detection of unexploded ordinance, verification and monitoring of containment structures, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic measurements at frequencies between 1 and 100 MHz are important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small due, and the ability to determine the dielectric permittivity in addition to electrical conductivity of the subsurface is possible. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but no quantifiable information was accurately determined. For high resolution imaging, accurate measurements are necessary so the field data can be mapped into the space of the subsurface parameters. The authors are developing a non-invasive method for accurately imaging the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using the plane wave impedance approach, known as the magnetotelluric (MT) method at low frequencies. Electric and magnetic sensors are being tested in a known area against theoretical predictions, thereby insuring that the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system will support high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging techniques. The summary of the work to date is divided into three sections: equipment procurement, instrumentation, and theoretical developments. For most earth materials, the frequency range from 1 to 100 MHz encompasses a very difficult transition zone between the wave propagation of displacement currents and the diffusive behavior of conduction currents. Test equipment, such as signal generators and amplifiers, does not cover the entire range except at great expense. Hence the authors have divided the range of investigation into three sub-ranges: 1--10 MHz, 10--30 MHz, and 30--100 MHz. Results to date are in the lowest frequency range of 1--10 MHz. Even though conduction currents

  16. TASK AND PROGRESS OF IAEG-SDGS: WGGI IN MONITORING SDGS THROUGH A ‘GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION’ LENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations (UN unanimously adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, aiming to transform the world over the next 15 years (ESDN, 2016. To meet the ambitions and demands of the 2030 Agenda, it is necessary for the global indicator framework to adequately and systematically address the issue of alternative data sources and methodologies, including geospatial information and Earth observations in the context of geographic location (UN-GGIM, 2016. For this purpose, the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicator (IAEG-SDGs created the Working Group on Geospatial Information (IAEG-SDGs: WGGI to give full play to the role of geospatial data in SDGs measurement and monitoring. The Working Group reviewed global indicators through a ‘geographic location’ lens to pick out those which geospatial information can significantly support the production, and analyzed the methodological and measurements issues. This paper has discussed the progress in monitoring SDGs ever since the establishment of IAEG-SDGs: WGGI, as well as the existing problems, appropriate solutions and plans for the next stage of work.

  17. Rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, I.S.; Shukla, V.K.; Singh, A.N.; Nair, C.K.G.; Hingorani, S.B.; Dey, N.N.; Jha, S.K.; Rao, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    surface barrier detector, in close agreement. Presently the liquid scintillation counter is used with discriminator settling adjusted to count Pu alpha pulses and also the output from the liquid scintillator is connected to a 2K MCA to see the alpha spectrum. The unit at present does not have the Pulse Shape Analyser (PSA) unit which is being planned to be incorporated in the system to improve the resolution. The work is in progress for direct extraction to a liquid scintillation cocktail containing extracting reagents like high mol. amine (TIOA) and Di2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid and then count by liquid scintillation counting. Solvent extraction using specific reagent and then direct liquid scintillation counting is being investigated as a general rapid method for beta and alpha emitters in environmental samples

  18. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  19. The use of the DInSAR method in the monitoring of road damage caused by mining activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdzek, Radosław; Malik, Hubert; Leśniak, Andrzej

    2018-04-01

    This paper reviews existing remote sensing methods of road damage detection and demonstrates the possibility of using DInSAR (Differential Interferometry SAR) method to identify endangered road sections. In this study two radar images collected by Sentinel-1 satellite have been used. Images were acquired with 24 days interval in 2015. The analysis allowed to estimate the scale of the post-mining deformation that occurred in Upper Silesia and to indicate areas where road infrastructure is particularly vulnerable to damage.

  20. Development of protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. It involves damage to the myelin sheath surrounding axons and to the axons themselves. MS most often presents with a series of relapses and remissions but then evolves over a variable period of time into a slowly progressive form of neurological dysfunction termed secondary progressive MS (SPMS. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are unclear. The absence of a diagnostic marker means that there is a lag time of several years before the diagnosis of SPMS can be established. At the same time, understanding the mechanisms that underlie SPMS is critical to the development of rational therapies for this untreatable stage of the disease. Results Using high performance liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC; we have established a highly specific and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM assay. Our multiplexed SRM assay has facilitated the simultaneous detection of surrogate peptides originating from 26 proteins present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Protein levels in CSF were generally ~200-fold lower than that in human sera. A limit of detection (LOD was determined to be as low as one femtomol. We processed and analysed CSF samples from a total of 22 patients with SPMS, 7 patients with SPMS treated with lamotrigine, 12 patients with non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND and 10 healthy controls (HC for the levels of these 26 selected potential protein biomarkers. Our SRM data found one protein showing significant difference between SPMS and HC, three proteins differing between SPMS and NIND, two proteins between NIND and HC, and 11 protein biomarkers showing significant difference between a lamotrigine-treated and untreated SPMS group. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed that these 26 proteins were correlated, and could be represented by four principal components. Overall, we established an

  1. Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of High Temperature Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The increased use of high-temperature composite materials in modern and next generation aircraft and spacecraft have led to the need for improved nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring techniques. Such technologies are desirable to improve quality control, damage detection, stress evaluation and temperature measurement capabilities. Novel eddy current sensors and sensor arrays, such as Meandering Winding Magnetometers (MWMs) have provided alternate or complimentary techniques to ultrasound and thermography for both nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). This includes imaging of composite material quality, damage detection and .the monitoring of fiber temperatures and multidirectional stresses. Historically, implementation of MWM technology for the inspection of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite (RCC) leading edge panels was developed by JENTEK Sensors and was subsequently transitioned by NASA as an operational pre and post flight in-situ inspection at the Kennedy Space Center. A manual scanner, which conformed'automatically to the curvature of the RCC panels was developed and used as a secondary technique if a defect was found during an infrared thermography screening, During a recent proof of concept study on composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV's), three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed excellent correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. Recent advancements of this technology have been made applying MWM sensor technology for scanning COPVs for mechanical damage. This presentation will outline the recent advance in the MWM.technology and the development of MWM techniques for NDE and SHM of carbon wraped composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) including the measurement of internal stresses via a surface mounted sensor

  2. Structural health monitoring and damage assessment using measured FRFs from multiple sensors. Part I. The indicator of correlation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, C.; Friswell, M.I. [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Univ. of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Imregun, M. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents two criteria for correlating measured frequency responses from multiple sensors and proposes to use them as indicators for structural damage detection. The first criterion is a global shape correlation (GSC) function that is sensitive to mode shape differences but not to relative scales. The second criterion, a global amplitude correlation (GAC) function, is based on actual response amplitudes. Both correlation criteria are a function of frequency and uniquely map a set of complex responses to a real scalar between zero and unity. The averaged integrations of GSC and GAC functions along the frequency points over the measurement range, also called damage indicators, are used to describe the correlation between two sets of vibration data. When a structure state remains unchanged, both correlation criteria are as close to unity simultaneously. Otherwise, the correlation with the reference data will be decreased with changes of structure states. Using GSC and GAC functions has the advantage of being able to deal with incomplete measurements. Also, all available response data are used and hence there is no critical selection of frequency points for damage detection. The above correlation criteria were applied to a bookshelf structure and various cases such as undamaged states, damage locations (single and multiple), damage levels, as well as environmental variability are discussed. As expected, it was found that indicators of correlation criteria were able to identify all various cases correctly. (orig.)

  3. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  4. Damage tolerant design and condition monitoring of composite material and bondlines in wind turbine blades: Failure and crack propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in composite material, in polymer, or in structural adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the host material, and its application in to a composite material structure: Wind Turbine Trailing Edge....... A Structure-Material-Sensor Finite Element Method (FEM) model was developed to simulate the Fibre Bragg Grating sensor output response, when embedded in a host material (Composite material, polymer or adhesive), during a crack growing/damage event. This Structure-Material-Sensor model provides a tool...

  5. Physical water scarcity metrics for monitoring progress towards SDG target 6.4 : An evaluation of indicator 6.4.2 “Level of water stress”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanham, D.; Hoekstra, A. Y.; Wada, Y.; Bouraoui, F.; de Roo, A.; Mekonnen, M. M.; van de Bund, W. J.; Batelaan, O.; Pavelic, P.; Bastiaanssen, Wim G M; Kummu, M.; Rockström, J.; Liu, J.; Bisselink, B.; Ronco, P.; Pistocchi, A.; Bidoglio, G.

    2018-01-01

    Target 6.4 of the recently adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) deals with the reduction of water scarcity. To monitor progress towards this target, two indicators are used: Indicator 6.4.1 measuring water use efficiency and 6.4.2 measuring the level of water stress (WS). This paper aims to

  6. The Reliability and Validity of a Progress-Monitoring Tool: A Psychometric Examination of the Phonological Awareness Skills of Preschoolers with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Jay R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a psychometric evaluation the "Sound Beginning" phonological awareness progress monitoring tool. This assessment was used to track emergent literacy skills of preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder who were participating in a randomized trial studying early literacy interventions. Research…

  7. Radiographic changes and factors associated with subsequent progression of damage in weight-bearing joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis under TNF-blocking therapies-three-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Isao; Motomura, Hiraku; Seki, Eiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2017-07-01

    The long-term effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking therapies on weight-bearing joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have not been fully characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the radiographic changes of weight-bearing joints in patients with RA during 3-year of TNF-blocking therapies and to identify factors related to the progression of joint damage. Changes in clinical variables and radiological findings in 243 weight-bearing joints (63 hips, 54 knees, 71 ankles, and 55 subtalar joints) in 38 consecutive patients were investigated during three years of treatment with TNF-blocking agents. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for the progression of weight-bearing joint damage. Seventeen (14.5%) of proximal weight-bearing joints (hips and knees) showed apparent radiographic progression during three years of treatment, whereas none of the proximal weight-bearing joints showed radiographic evidence of improvement or repair. In contrast, distal weight-bearing joints (ankle and subtalar joints) displayed radiographic progression and improvement in 20 (15.9%) and 8 (6.3%) joints, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis for proximal weight-bearing joints identified the baseline Larsen grade (p bearing joints identified disease activity at one year after treatment (p bearing joints. Disease activity after treatment was an independent factor for progression of damage in proximal and distal weight-bearing joints. Early treatment with TNF-blocking agents and tight control of disease activity are necessary to prevent the progression of damage of the weight-bearing joints.

  8. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. FY97 annual progress report for EMSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint in-version of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of under-ground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. The schedule of this project is as follows: In the first year, investigators perform laboratory measurements of elastic and electrical properties of sand-clay mixtures containing various fluids. Investigators also develop methods of relating measurable geophysical properties to porosity and saturation by using rock physics theories, geostatistical, and empirical techniques together with available laboratory measurements. In the second year, investigators finish any necessary laboratory measurements and apply the methods developed in the first year to invert available borehole log data to predict measured properties of cores and sediments from a borehole. Investigators refine the inversion code in the third year and carry out a field experiment to collect seismic and electrical data. Investigators then use the inversion code to invert the field data to produce estimates of porosity and saturation in the field area where the data were collected. This report describes progress made in the first year of this three-year project.'

  9. Damage Detection of Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls Using Mathematical Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Naderpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring is a procedure to provide accurate and immediate information on the condition and efficiency of structures. There is variety of damage factors and the unpredictability of future damage, is a necessity for the use of structural health monitoring. Structural health monitoring and damage detection in early stages is one of the most interesting topics that had been paid attention because the majority of damages can be repaired and reformed by initial evaluation ,thus the spread of damage to the structures, building collapse and rising of costs can be avoided .Detection of concrete shear wall damages are designed to withstand the lateral load on the structure is critical .Because failures and  malfunctions of shear walls can lead to serious damage or even progressive dilapidation of concrete structures .Change in stiffness and frequency can clearly show the damage occurrence. Mathematical transformation is also a tool to detect damage. In this article, with non- linear time history analysis, the finite element model of structures with concrete shear walls subject to four earthquakes have extracted and using Fourier and wavelet transform, the presence of shear walls is detected at the time of damage.

  10. Value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Teng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 1107 patients with different clinical stages of chronic HBV infection who had not received antiviral therapy at the time of hospitalization in The Second Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University from May 2011 to December 2015, and according to the disease status, they were divided into HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, compensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-C group, decompensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-D group, and primary liver cancer (PLC group. These groups were compared in terms of HBsAg expression and the association between HBsAg and clinical features. An analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between any two groups; the t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between these groups. Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsThere was a significant difference in serum HBsAg level between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=100.45, P<0.001. The HBeAg-positive CHB group had significantly higher levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA than the HBeAg-negative CHB group (t= 16.67 an 16.22, both P<0.001. There were significant differences in HBsAg and HBV DNA levels between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F= 42.92 and 27.38, both P<0.001, as well as between the HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=6.04 and 4.10, both P<0.05. HBV DNA level was significantly different across patients with different HBsAg levels (<1000 IU/ml, 1000-20 000 IU

  11. Progress in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring - Proceedings of the technical days organised by the SFRP Environment Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, Dominique; Calvez, Marianne; Rivasseau, Corinne Cea; Monfort, Marguerite; Manificat, Guillaume; Pierrard, Olivier; Couvez, Celine; Masson, Olivier; Bruno, Valerie; Renaud, Philippe; Genova, Zhana; Reynal, Nathalie; Le Coz, Eric; Tchilian, Nathalie; Diana, Jean-Jacques; Beguinel, Philippe; Cortes, Pierre; Puydarrieux, Stephane; Brun, Thierry; Devin, Patrick; Clavel, Benoit; Hemidy, Pierre-Yves; Gontier, Gilles; Delloye, Thierry; Mailliat, Alain; Ferreri, Giovanni; LECLERC, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    The Environment Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the progress made in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Environment monitoring at the global, national and local scale: historical overview (Dominique CALMET, CEA); 2 - Evolution of radioactivity monitoring in the environment from 1960 to the present day (Guillaume MANIFICAT, IRSN); 3 - Euratom's legal framework (Zhana GENOVA, CTE); 4 - Main regulatory changes during the last decade (Nathalie REYNAL, ASN); 5 - Progress of standardization works on radioactive effluent emissions control and environment monitoring (Philippe BEGUINEL, BNEN); 6 - From operators' self-monitoring to ASN's inspections: a many components control system (Eric LE COZ, ASN); 7 - Control of effluents and emissions management at CEA Centres (Marianne CALVEZ, CEA); 8 - Liquid and gaseous effluents of ITER experimental facility: description and impacts (Pierre CORTES, IO); 9 - Effluents and emissions management strategy at AREVA NC La Hague facility (Stephane PUYDARRIEUX, AREVA); 10 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear facilities ongoing deconstruction: from dimensioning to real effluents (Benoit CLAVEL, EDF); 11 - Radionuclides decontamination process for liquid effluents using micro-algae at the laboratory scale (Corinne RIVASSEAU, CEA); 12 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear medicine services: management, monitoring and impact measurement methods (Nathalie TCHILIAN, ASN); 13 - Evolution history of effluents management and environment monitoring at the Solvay La Rochelle site (Thierry DELLOYE, SOLVAY); 14 - Different international approaches in effluents management and monitoring: example of French and German gaseous effluents - regulation, analyses, accounting rules (Jean-Jacques DIANA, ASN); 15 - Environment

  12. Monitoring NSL. Progress of the Dutch National Air Quality Cooperation Programme (NSL). State of affairs 2012; Monitoringsrapportage NSL. Stand van zaken 2012 Nationaal Samenwerkingsprogamma Luchtkwaliteit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zanten, M.C.; Wesseling, J.; Mooibroek, D.; Van Alphen, A.; Nguyen, L. [Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Groot Wassink, H.; Verbeek, C. [InfoMil, Agentschap NL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    The National Air Quality Cooperation Programme (NSL) has been created to facilitate improvements in air quality in the Netherlands and to ensure that the Netherlands meets the respective deadlines set for compliance to EU limit values for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Local, regional and national authorities work together within the framework of this programme to ensure that these goals will be met. A monitoring programme has been put in place to monitor progress and, if necessary, to enable timely modifications to the programme. The annual results of the monitoring programme have been bundled together by the Monitoring Bureau (collaboration between RIVM and the InfoMil Knowledge Centre) into the 2012 progress report [Dutch] Om de luchtkwaliteit te verbeteren is het Nationaal Samenwerkingsprogramma Luchtkwaliteit (NSL) opgezet. Hierin werken de Rijksoverheid en decentrale overheden samen om te zorgen dat Nederland overal tijdig aan de grenswaarden voor fijn stof en stikstofdioxide zal voldoen. Om de voortgang van dit verbeterprogramma te volgen en tijdig eventuele extra maatregelen te kunnen nemen, is aan het NSL een monitoringsprogramma verbonden. De uitvoering van de monitoring is neergelegd bij Bureau Monitoring, een samenwerkingsverband tussen het RIVM en Kenniscentrum InfoMil.

  13. Development of criteria for early ascertainment of damage by monitoring of vibration in primary loops of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, F.; Schramm, K.; Wehling, H.J.; Bauernfeind, V.; Sunder, R.

    1988-11-01

    Nuclear Safety Standards KTA 3201.4 and KTA 3204 prescribe for all light water reactors installed in the Federal Republic of Germany that their vibration behaviour must be measurable in service. For this reason, most PWR plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are equipped with vibration monitoring systems of the KWU-SUeS type or at least with SUeS subsystems. The said safety standards do not prescribe how vibration should be measured. Over the past 20 years, multifarious efforts have been made in the FR Germany to arrive at objective assessment criteria for use in vibration monitoring. Under the terms of reference of this project, conditions were created for the efficient use of the measurement procedures, and general criteria for the evaluation of the results of vibration monitoring of PWR primary loop components were defined under consideration of all experience to date. (orig.) With 20 refs., 6 tabs., 145 figs [de

  14. Experimental system identification of the dynamics of a vibro-impact beam with a view towards structural health monitoring and damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Kurt, Mehmet; Lee, Young S.; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2014-05-01

    We perform nonlinear system identification (NSI) on the acceleration signals that were experimentally measured at ten, almost evenly spaced positions along a cantilever beam undergoing vibro-impacts between two rigid stops with clearances. Our goal is to characterize the nonlinear dynamics due to vibro-impacts with a view toward structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection (DD). The NSI methodology is based on the correspondence between analytical and empirical slow-flow dynamics, with the first step requiring empirical mode decomposition (EMD) analysis of the measured time series leading to sets of intrinsic modal oscillators (IMOs) governing the vibro-impact dynamics at different time scales. By comparing the spatiotemporal variations of the nonlinear modal interactions (and hence the IMOs), we examine how vibro-impacts influence the low- and high-frequency modes in global and local senses. In applications of the NSI results to SHM/DD, we calculate typical measures such as the modal assurance criterion (MAC) and the coordinate modal assurance criterion (COMAC) by extracting information about the mode shape functions from the spatiotemporal IMO solutions. Whereas the MAC provides a global aspect of damage occurrence (i.e., which modes are more affected by induced defects), the COMAC can narrow down the damage locations (i.e., where in the structure defects exist that yield low correlation values in specific modes).

  15. Asotin Creek instream habitat alteration projects : habitat evaluation, adult and juvenile habitat utilization and water temperature monitoring : 2001 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring

  16. Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific region (California and Hawaii). Task 2: Regional program monitoring and progress evaluation, topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-19

    All the objectives of the regional program monitoring and progress evaluation have been met through personal contacts and the review of data. They are as follows: to determine the existing status of power plant projects and future plans; to identify major problem areas for each project (technical, financial, regulatory) that are affecting progress; and to analyze the data and to develop recommendations directed toward resolving problems. The results have been presented in a tabular summary format that is accompanied by explanatory text covering 25 projects.

  17. Certified reference materials - beech leaves and spruce needles - for the quality control in monitoring damage in forests by acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, E A; Griepink, B [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Community Bureau of Reference; Muntau, H [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    1989-12-01

    The chemical determination of various elements in leaves or needles allows to establish the damage caused by acid deposition. To control the quality of such determinations the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) produced two Certified Reference Materials: Beech leaves (CRM No. 100) and Spruce needles (CRM No. 101). After a careful preparation procedure, a homogeneity study and a long term stability study, the materials were certified for: Cl, N, P and S in CRM No. 100, Al, Ca, Cl, Mg, Mn, N, P, S and Zn in CRM No. 101. Indicative values on the content of 19 majors and trace elements are also reported. (orig.).

  18. Claims Handling Co-operation between Nuclear Insurance Pools in a Case of Transboundary Damage - Multilateral and Bilateral Agreements in Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaruba, P.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is a short progress report on matters concerning the core reason for insurance of nuclear third party liability - registration, handling, organizing and settling of claims in case of a major nuclear incident, underlining claims handling co-operation between national nuclear insurance pools when damage to health or property becomes international. The contents of this paper is in close relation to information provided on this subject during the 6th International Conference in 2006. Commercial insurance companies have gained extensive experience with handling large scale claims (e.g. after floods and other natural disasters) and are capable in gathering and organizing a high number of professional loss surveyors and adjusters in a very short period of time. In case of nuclear insurance pools co-operation between members (commercial insurance companies) is an added value and can be used practically all over the country bringing into action the network of branches and offices of all the pool members. This advantage is also used in case of cross border claims when it is necessary to gather information and claims advises from a large number of subjects and from many countries, sometimes very far apart. The international network of nuclear insurance pools is an ideal tool for this task and can be mobilized practically at once. Operators of nuclear installations, especially nuclear power plants, do not have the possibility to put aside hundreds of workers to handle claims and are also usually not sufficiently equipped with the necessary know-how. The same goes for governments and government agencies which in many countries guarantee the payments of claims to victims. National nuclear insurance pools are on the other hand well equipped for this task which usually has to be in place for many years after a nuclear incident. Multilateral and bilateral agreements between national nuclear insurance pools and other institutions should be prepared and signed before any

  19. Multi-sensor system for in situ shape monitoring and damage identification of high-speed composite rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, K.; Filippatos, A.; Kuschmierz, R.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.; Fischer, A.; Czarske, J.

    2016-08-01

    Glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites offer a higher stiffness-to-weight ratio than conventional rotor materials used in turbomachinery. However, the material behaviour of GFRP high-speed rotors is difficult to predict due to the complexity of the composite material and the dynamic loading conditions. Consequently dynamic expansion measurements of GRFP rotors are required in situ and with micron precision. However, the whirling motion amplitude is about two orders of magnitude higher than the desired precision. To overcome this problem, a multi-sensor system capable of separating rotor expansion and whirling motion is proposed. High measurement rates well above the rotational frequency and micron uncertainty are achieved at whirling amplitudes up to 120μm and surface velocities up to 300 m/s. The dynamic elliptical expansion of a GFRP rotor is investigated in a rotor loading test rig under vacuum conditions. In situ measurements identified not only the introduced damage but also damage initiation and propagation.

  20. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site Facilities: Progress report for the period April 1--June 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area and near the 216-A-36B Crib

  1. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim; Stickland, David; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector ef fi ciency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, becaus...

  2. Peritoneal Cell-free DNA: an innovative method for determining acute cell damage in peritoneal membrane and for monitoring the recovery process after peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzì, Grazia Maria; Milan Manani, Sabrina; Brocca, Alessandra; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; de Cal, Massimo; Pastori, Silvia; Tantillo, Ilaria; Zambon, Roberto; Crepaldi, Carlo; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is present in the peritoneal effluent of stable peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, but there are no data on cfDNA in PD patients with peritonitis. We investigated the variation of peritoneal cfDNA levels subsequent to peritonitis in PD patients. We enrolled 53 PD patients: 30 without any history of systemic inflammation or peritonitis in the last 3 months (group A) and 23 with acute peritonitis (group B). CfDNA was quantified in the peritoneal effluent. Peritoneal samples on days 1, 3, 10, 30 and until day 120 from the start of peritonitis were collected for white blood cells (WBC) count and cfDNA evaluation in group B. Quantitative analysis of cfDNA showed significantly higher levels in group B on day 1, 3, 10 and 30 compared with group A (p peritoneal cfDNA levels tended to progressively decline during follow-up of peritonitis. From this decreasing curve, we estimated that 49 days are necessary to reach the value of 51 genome equivalents (GE)/ml (75th percentile in controls) and 63 days to reach 31 GE/ml (median). Our results demonstrate that cfDNA increases in peritoneal effluent of PD patients with peritonitis and tends to progressively decline in step with peritonitis resolution and membrane repair process. Peritoneal cfDNA quantification could be an innovative method to determine acute damage and an inverse index of the repair process.

  3. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  4. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  5. Monitoring Autophagy Immunohistochemically and Ultrastructurally during Human Head and Neck Carcinogenesis. Relationship with the DNA Damage Response Pathway †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaki, Sophia; Vlachou, Vassiliki; Zampetidis, Christos P.; Selemenakis, Platonas; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Rizou, Sophia V.; Kyrodimos, Euthymios; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Kletsas, Dimitris; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that preserves cellular homeostasis. Its exact role during carcinogenesis is not completely defined. Specifically in head and neck cancer, such information from clinical settings that comprise the whole spectrum of human carcinogenesis is very limited. Towards this direction, we examined the in situ status of the autophagy-related factors, Beclin-1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, member B (LC3B) and sequestosome 1/p62 (p62) in clinical material covering all histopathological stages of human head and neck carcinogenesis. This material is unique as each panel of lesions is derived from the same patient and moreover we have previously assessed it for the DNA damage response (DDR) activation status. Since Beclin-1, LC3B and p62 reflect the nucleation, elongation and degradation stages of autophagy, respectively, their combined immunohistochemical (IHC) expression profiles could grossly mirror the autophagic flux. This experimental approach was further corroborated by ultrastructural analysis, applying transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed Beclin-1/LC3B/p62 IHC patterns, obtained from serial sections analysis, along with TEM findings are suggestive of a declined authophagic activity in preneoplastic lesions that was restored in full blown cancers. Correlating these findings with DDR status in the same pathological stages are indicative of: (i) an antitumor function of autophagy in support to that of DDR, possibly through energy deprivation in preneoplastic stages, thus preventing incipient cancer cells from evolving; and (ii) a tumor-supporting role in the cancerous stage. PMID:28880214

  6. Continued Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell; Jablonski, David; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used in essentially all NASA spacecraft, launch. vehicles and payloads to contain high-pressure fluids for propulsion, life support systems and science experiments. Failure of any COPV either in flight or during ground processing would result in catastrophic damage to the spacecraft or payload, and could lead to loss of life. Therefore, NASA continues to investigate new methods to non-destructively inspect (NDE) COPVs for structural anomalies and to provide a means for in-situ structural health monitoring (SHM) during operational service. Partnering with JENTEK Sensors, engineers at NASA, Kennedy Space Center have successfully conducted a proof-of-concept study to develop Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM) eddy current sensors designed to make direct measurements of the stresses of the internal layers of a carbon fiber composite wrapped COPV. During this study three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed good correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. MWM-Array technology for scanning COPVs can reliably be used to image and detect mechanical damage. To validate this conclusion, several COPVs were scanned to obtain a baseline, and then each COPV was impacted at varying energy levels and then rescanned. The baseline subtracted images were used to demonstrate damage detection. These scans were performed with two different MWM-Arrays. with different geometries for near-surface and deeper penetration imaging at multiple frequencies and in multiple orientations of the linear MWM drive. This presentation will include a review of micromechanical models that relate measured sensor responses to composite material constituent properties, validated by the proof of concept study, as the basis for SHM and NDE data analysis as well as potential improvements including

  7. Lymphocytes with multiple chromosomal damages in a large cohort of West Siberia residents: Results of long-term monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhinin, Vladimir [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Bakanova, Maria [Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Fucic, Aleksandra, E-mail: afucic@imi.hr [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia); Golovina, Tatiana [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Savchenko, Yana [Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Sinitsky, Maxim; Volobaev, Valentin [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Study reports RC frequency in lymphocytes in the group of 3242 subjects. • The highest RC frequency was present in children environmentally exposed to radon. • In 85% of RCs double minutes were observed. • Results suggests that radon may be the leading factors causing RC. • RC may be a candidate biomarker for exposure to α-emitters. - Abstract: Cells with specific multiple chromosome aberrations, defined as rogue cells (RC) have been described in different populations, predominantly those exposed to radiation. The frequency, etiology and related health risks have still not been elucidated due to their low frequency of occurrences and rarely performed studies. This study reports RC frequency using chromosome aberration (CA) assay in peripheral lymphocytes in the group of 3242 subjects, during a 30-year long follow-up study in a general rural and urban population, children environmentally exposed to radon, occupationally exposed population and lung cancer patients from the Kemerovo region (Siberia, Russian Federation). Results show that the highest RC frequency was present in children environmentally exposed to radon and the lowest in the general urban population. Total frequency of CA did not correlate with frequency of RC. Genotoxic analysis of air and water samples excluded anthropogenic pollution as a possible cause of genome damage and RC frequency. In 85% of RCs, double minutes, observed in a large number of human tumors, were present. Results of CA analysis suggested that radon and its decay products (alpha-emitters) were the leading factors causing RC in subjects exposed to high LET radiation. Thus, RC may be a candidate biomarker for exposure to this type of radiation.

  8. Feasibility of a novel approach for fast, economical determination of radiation damage in nuclear reactor cores. Progress report, [November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Progress has been made in several areas in the second year of grant activity. This includes radiation induced segregation (modeling and experiment), deformation of the irradiated microstructure and stress corrosion cracking of irradiated microstructures

  9. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair: Technical progress report, August 1, 1986 to July 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Immunochemical methods are being developed to quantitate unique DNA base damages in x-irradiated DNA. The approach is to chemically synthesize modified nucleotides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits. Several thymine ring saturation or fragmentation products have been chosen as models for pyrimidine radiolysis products. These include thymine glycol, dihydrothymine and urea. The characterized antibodies are used to quantitate DNA damage x-irradiated in vitro and to immunochemically characterize the antibody to dihydrothymine. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Stickland, David

    2013-12-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors.

  11. Damage detection in concrete structures with smart piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Akshay S. K.; Bhalla, Suresh

    2003-10-01

    Detection of damages and progressive deterioration in structures is a critical issue. Visual inspections are tedious and unreliable. Incipient damages are often not discernible by low frequency dynamic response and other NDE techniques. Smart piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) transducers are emerging as an effective alternative in health monitoring of structures. The electro-mechanical impedance method employs the self-actuating and sensing characteristics of the PZT, without having to use actuators and sensors separately. When excited by an ac source, the PZT transducers bonded to the host structure activates the higher modes of vibration locally. Changes in the admittance response of the transducer serves as an indicator of damage around the transducer. In this paper, the effectiveness of PZT transducers for characterizing damages in concrete, in terms of the damage extent and location, is experimentally examined. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index, adopted to quantify the changes in the admittance signatures, correlates with the damage extent. The damages on the surface that is not mounted by the PZT are also discernible. An array of transducers proves effective in detecting the damaged zone. The progressive incipient crack can be detected much before it actually becomes visible to the naked eye.

  12. Radiation-induced damage in T4 bacteriophage: the effect of superoxid radicals and molecular oxygen. Progress report, December 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuni, A.; Chevion, M.; Halpern, Y.S.; Ilan, Y.A.; Czapski, G.

    1978-01-01

    The sensitivity of T4 bacteriophage towards γ irradiation has been studied in phosphate buffer suspensions. The spectrum of the water radicals was controlled by a careful choice of the appropriate saturating gas and the addition of radical scavengers. Thus, it was possible to distinguish between the effects of molecular oxygen and the superoxide radicals formed through its reactions. About 90 percent of the damage was caused by the water radicals formed in the bulk suspensions. These probably affected the phage proteins; only the remainder of the damage involved the viral DNA. The oxygen enhancement ratio observed was not connected in any way with the formation of the superoxide radicals. The results confirmed that the OH radicals are the reactive species, while e - /sub aq/ as well as the superoxide radical do not contribute to the radiodamage

  13. Radiation-induced damage in E. coli B: The effect of superoxide radicals and molecular oxygen. Progress report, December 1, 1978--November 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    The roles of superoxide radicals and of molecular oxygen in the radiodamage of E. coli B suspended in dilute phosphate buffer were studied. The presence of high concentrations of polyethylene glycol in the γ-irradiated cell suspensions, had no effect on bacterial radiosensitivity. This indicates that the damage was primarily endogenous, i.e. originated intracellularly. Saturation of the cell suspensions with N 2 O doubled the radiosensitivity, thus indicating that OH radicals are responsible for the majority of the damage (indirect radiation effect). The presence of oxygen either in the absence or presence of N 2 O brought about roughly a three-fold increase in the radiosensitivity. Since in the presence of N 2 O all e - /sub aq/ are scavenged by the nitrous oxide rather than by oxygen, this shows that superoxide radicals play no role in the bacterial radiodamage. Our results substantiate the attribution of the oxygen effect to a direct interaction of O 2 with the hydroxyl-radical-damaged sites on vital biomolecules, and exclude any significant contribution of e - /sub aq/ and superoxide radicals to the cellular radiodamage

  14. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978. [Uv and x radiation, bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: coordinate induction of mutagenesis, radioresistance, and inhibition of post-radiation DNA degradation; radioinduced filamentation; action spectrum for induction of K12 lambda phage; effects of uv radiation on cells in the frozen state; dependence of mutagenesis on wavelength of uv; and w-reactivation of x-irradiated phage lambda. (HLW)

  15. En Face Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for the Monitoring of Lesion Area Progression in Stargardt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Paolo; Testa, Francesco; Rossi, Settimio; Di Iorio, Valentina; Orrico, Ada; Auricchio, Alberto; Simonelli, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the progression of Stargardt disease (STGD1) over a multiyear follow-up by evaluating the macular lesion area as computed by an automatic algorithm from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We reviewed medical records of STGD1 patients, with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of STGD1 at a single institution, who underwent best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus photography, SD-OCT, full-field electroretinography, and, when available, fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Regression models were fitted on the selected clinical parameters; in particular, on the macular lesion area computed by SD-OCT, to evaluate the disease progression over a multiyear follow-up. The comparison between SD-OCT and FAF, available for 22 patients, showed that macular lesion area, assessed by SD-OCT, significantly correlated with the area of absent FAF (P disease, showing a significant progression over the follow-up. Our findings suggest that the evaluation of macular lesion area by en face SD-OCT, together with FAF, could drive the choice of the most amenable candidates and the most suitable area to be treated in gene therapy clinical trials.

  16. En Face Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for the Monitoring of Lesion Area Progression in Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Paolo; Testa, Francesco; Rossi, Settimio; Di Iorio, Valentina; Orrico, Ada; Auricchio, Alberto; Simonelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the progression of Stargardt disease (STGD1) over a multiyear follow-up by evaluating the macular lesion area as computed by an automatic algorithm from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods We reviewed medical records of STGD1 patients, with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of STGD1 at a single institution, who underwent best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus photography, SD-OCT, full-field electroretinography, and, when available, fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Regression models were fitted on the selected clinical parameters; in particular, on the macular lesion area computed by SD-OCT, to evaluate the disease progression over a multiyear follow-up. Results The comparison between SD-OCT and FAF, available for 22 patients, showed that macular lesion area, assessed by SD-OCT, significantly correlated with the area of absent FAF (P disease, showing a significant progression over the follow-up. Our findings suggest that the evaluation of macular lesion area by en face SD-OCT, together with FAF, could drive the choice of the most amenable candidates and the most suitable area to be treated in gene therapy clinical trials. PMID:27409479

  17. Grade and location of power Doppler are predictive of damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by anti-tumour necrosis factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffeiner, Bernd; Grisan, Enrico; Botsios, Costantino; Stramare, Roberto; Rizzo, Gaia; Bernardi, Livio; Punzi, Leonardo; Ometto, Francesca; Doria, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    To investigate power Doppler (PD) signal, grade and location and their association with radiographic progression in RA patients in remission. A prospective observational study was conducted in 125 consecutive RA patients in stable 28-joint DAS (DAS28) remission (⩾6 months) achieved on anti-TNF-α. At baseline, patients in stable remission underwent radiographic and US examination of the wrists and MCP, PIP and MTP joints. Semi-quantitative PD scoring (0-3) was recorded. We scored PD according to two locations: capsular or within synovial tissue without bone contact (location 1) and with bone contact or penetrating bone cortex (location 2). Radiographic progression was evaluated at the 1 year follow-up and defined as a change in van der Heijde-modified total Sharp score >0. Risk ratios (RRs) of radiographic progression according to presence, grade and location of PD were calculated. Four patients were excluded because of missing data. At baseline, 59/121 (48.7%) patients had a PD signal in one or more joints. PD location 2 was found in 74.6% patients (44/59). At the 1 year follow-up, 17/121 patients experienced radiographic progression: all had PD signal in one or more joints at baseline (RR 2.47, P location 2 (RR 3.49, P < 0.0001). Higher PD grades and PD in contact with/or penetrating bone are associated with radiographic progression in patients in DAS28 remission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Damage detection of an in-service condensation pipeline joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Julie; Rezaei, Davood; Taheri, Farid

    2010-04-01

    The early detection of damage in structural or mechanical systems is of vital importance. With early detection, the damage may be repaired before the integrity of the system is jeopardized, resulting in monetary losses, loss of life or limb, and environmental impacts. Among the various types of structural health monitoring techniques, vibration-based methods are of significant interest since the damage location does not need to be known beforehand, making it a more versatile approach. The non-destructive damage detection method used for the experiments herein is a novel vibration-based method which uses an index called the EMD Energy Damage Index, developed with the aim of providing improved qualitative results compared to those methods currently available. As part of an effort to establish the integrity and limitation of this novel damage detection method, field testing was completed on a mechanical pipe joint on a condensation line, located in the physical plant of Dalhousie University. Piezoceramic sensors, placed at various locations around the joint were used to monitor the free vibration of the pipe imposed through the use of an impulse hammer. Multiple damage progression scenarios were completed, each having a healthy state and multiple damage cases. Subsequently, the recorded signals from the healthy and damaged joint were processed through the EMD Energy Damage Index developed in-house in an effort to detect the inflicted damage. The proposed methodology successfully detected the inflicted damages. In this paper, the effects of impact location, sensor location, frequency bandwidth, intrinsic mode functions, and boundary conditions are discussed.

  19. Development of corrosion condition sensing and monitoring system using radio-frequency identification devices (RFID) : progress report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P.; Li, J.; Liu, P.; Bibby, D.; Zheng, W.; Lo, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2008-12-15

    The development of a corrosion severity monitoring system that used radio-frequency identification device (RIFD) technology was discussed. A corrosion monitoring sensor was integrated with a tag modified to partially block the radio frequency signal. The metallic coating caused a frequency shift of the device's reader antenna in order to allow for the accurate characterization of metal coatings. Communications between the tag and the reader were re-established as the corrosion process gradually deteriorated the coating. The method was tested experimentally with 3 RFID systems using both active and passive tags were assembled. A passive tag was covered in aluminum foil. Results of the experiment showed that the metallic coating interfered with RFID signals. A cold-spray technology was used to coat tags with metal alloys. The surface morphology of the coatings was tested to determine optimum coating parameters. Further studies are being conducted to develop software for the technology. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity in the Mont Terri gallery G-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Adler, A.; Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of opalinus clay have been studied in the last years for its capacity to retain radionuclide transport as a low permeable rock. This formation presents thereby suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) has been excavated in opalinus clay layer in order to develop experiences improving the knowledge on the physico-chemical properties of the rock. The study of electrical properties furnishes information on the rock structure, its anisotropy and the changes of these properties with time (Nicollin et al., 2010 ; Thovert et al., 2011). Here the three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity aims at monitoring the temporal evolution of the excavation damaged zone. Three rings of electrodes have been set-up around the gallery and voltage is measured between two electrodes while a current is injected between two others (Gibert et al., 2006). Measurements have been achieved from July 2004 until April 2008 before, during and after the excavation of the gallery 04. In this study we develop a computational approach to reconstruct three dimensional images of the resistivity in the vicinity of the electrodes. A finite element model is used to represent the complex geometry of the gallery. The measurements inferred from a given resistivity distribution are estimated using the software EIDORS (Adler and Lionheart, 2006), this constitutes the forward problem. The reconstruction of the media resistivity is then implemented by fitting the estimated to the measured data, via the resolution of an inverse problem. The parameters of this inverse problem are defined by mapping the forward problem elements into a coarser mesh. This allows to reduce drastically the number of unknowns and so increases the robustness of the inversion. The inversion is executed with the conjugate gradient method regularised by an analysis of the Jacobian singular values. The results show an

  1. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cordelli, Ermanno; Rizzi, Alessandro; De Leva, Francesca; Papi, Massimiliano; Ciasca, Gabriele; Samengo, Daniela; Pani, Giovambattista; Pitocco, Dario; Soda, Paolo; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Iannello, Giulio; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC) membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS) able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(pBlood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  2. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(p<0.001 among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. The development of an assay based on Phase separation of the plasma membrane of the Red Blood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  3. Point mutation in D8C domain of Tamm-Horsfall protein/uromodulin in transgenic mice causes progressive renal damage and hyperuricemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Ma

    Full Text Available Hereditary mutations in Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP/uromodulin gene cause autosomal dominant kidney diseases characterized by juvenile-onset hyperuricemia, gout and progressive kidney failure, although the disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that targeted expression in transgenic mice of a mutation within the domain of 8 cysteines of THP in kidneys' thick ascending limb (TAL caused unfolded protein response in younger (1-month old mice and apoptosis in older (12-month old mice. While the young mice had urine concentration defects and polyuria, such defects progressively reversed in the older mice to marked oliguria, highly concentrated urine, fibrotic kidneys and reduced creatinine clearance. Both the young and the old transgenic mice had significantly higher serum uric acid and its catabolic product, allantoin, than age-matched wild-type mice. This THP mutation apparently caused primary defects in TAL by compromising the luminal translocation and reabsorptive functions of NKCC2 and ROMK and secondary responses in proximal tubules by upregulating NHE3 and URAT1. Our results strongly suggest that the progressive worsening of kidney functions reflects the accumulation of the deleterious effects of the misfolded mutant THP and the compensatory responses. Transgenic mice recapitulating human THP/uromodulin-associated kidney diseases could be used to elucidate their pathogenesis and test novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. Point mutation in D8C domain of Tamm-Horsfall protein/uromodulin in transgenic mice causes progressive renal damage and hyperuricemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Nichole K.; El-Achkar, Tarek M.; Lieske, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary mutations in Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP/uromodulin) gene cause autosomal dominant kidney diseases characterized by juvenile-onset hyperuricemia, gout and progressive kidney failure, although the disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that targeted expression in transgenic mice of a mutation within the domain of 8 cysteines of THP in kidneys’ thick ascending limb (TAL) caused unfolded protein response in younger (1-month old) mice and apoptosis in older (12-month old) mice. While the young mice had urine concentration defects and polyuria, such defects progressively reversed in the older mice to marked oliguria, highly concentrated urine, fibrotic kidneys and reduced creatinine clearance. Both the young and the old transgenic mice had significantly higher serum uric acid and its catabolic product, allantoin, than age-matched wild-type mice. This THP mutation apparently caused primary defects in TAL by compromising the luminal translocation and reabsorptive functions of NKCC2 and ROMK and secondary responses in proximal tubules by upregulating NHE3 and URAT1. Our results strongly suggest that the progressive worsening of kidney functions reflects the accumulation of the deleterious effects of the misfolded mutant THP and the compensatory responses. Transgenic mice recapitulating human THP/uromodulin-associated kidney diseases could be used to elucidate their pathogenesis and test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:29145399

  5. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthoff, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.guthoff@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Süd, P.O. Box 6980, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Afanaciev, Konstantin [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); NC PHEP BSU, Minsk (Belarus); Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, 1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Süd, P.O. Box 6980, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lange, Wolfgang [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lohmann, Wolfgang [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Brandenburgische Technische Universität, Postfach 101344, 03013 Cottbus (Germany); Stickland, David [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors. -- Highlights: •The BCM system and its diamond detectors at the CMS experiment of the LHC are presented. •Detectors show a decreased signal strength with increasing integrated luminosity. •CCD measurements using constant HV and alternating HV to prevent polarization are compared. •TCT measurements show a decreasing signal when polarization builds up. •Polarization effects are a likely

  6. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthoff, Moritz; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Stickland, David

    2013-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors. -- Highlights: •The BCM system and its diamond detectors at the CMS experiment of the LHC are presented. •Detectors show a decreased signal strength with increasing integrated luminosity. •CCD measurements using constant HV and alternating HV to prevent polarization are compared. •TCT measurements show a decreasing signal when polarization builds up. •Polarization effects are a likely

  7. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The following are included: geothermal power plants proposed and on-line; direct heat applications proposed and operational; trends in drilling activities; exploration; leases; outreach and technical assistance; feasibility studies and application demonstrations; geothermal loan guaranty program; research and development activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; environmental activities; reports and publications; and a directory. (MHR)

  8. Program to develop acoustic emission: flaw relationship for inservice monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels. Progress report No. 1, July 1, 1976--February 1, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1977-03-01

    This is a laboratory research program to characterize acoustic emission (AE) from flaw growth and noise from innocuous sources in A533B Class 1 pressure vessel steel. The objectives are: characterize AE from a limited range of defects and material property conditions of concern to reactor pressure vessel integrity; characterize AE from innocuous sources (including defects); develop criteria for distinguishing significant flaws from innocuous sources; and develop an AE flaw damage model to serve as a basis for relating in-service AE to pressure vessel integrity. The purpose of the program is to build an experimental evaluation of the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries by continuously monitoring for AE. A detailed program plan in the form of an analysis-before-test document has been prepared and approved

  9. Vulnerability assessment of critical infrastructure : activity 2 progress report : information of SCADA systems and other security monitoring systems used in oil and gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2007-12-15

    Many pipelines are located in remote regions and subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Damage to pipelines can have significant economic and environmental impacts. This paper discussed the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems to monitor and control oil and gas pipeline infrastructure. SCADA systems are a real time, distributed computerized system with an intelligent capability for condition identification and fault diagnosis. SCADA systems can be used to capture thousands of miles of pipeline system process data and distribute it to pipeline operators, whose work stations are networked with the SCADA central host computer. SCADA architectures include monolithic, distributed, and networked systems that can be distributed across wide area networks (WANs). SCADA security strategies must be implemented to ensure corporate network security. Case studies of SCADA systems currently used by oil and gas operators in Alberta were also presented. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Association for Progressive Communication : Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Monitoring Progress Toward the Information Society : Digital Divide Index. Orbicom's Digital Divide Index is a rigorous statistical tool for benchmarking access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICT), and monitoring progress toward the... View moreMonitoring Progress Toward the Information ...

  11. The Soluble Plasminogen Activator Receptor as a Biomarker on Monitoring the Therapy Progress of Pulmonary TB-AFB(+ Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2010-01-01

    P=.0001<.05, R2=.890 after 2 months (median 8.019?ng/mL and 4 months (median 5.771?ng/mL of treatment, respectively. However, only slightly declined after 6 months therapy (median 5.009?ng/mL, near control group level (median 4.772?ng/mL. Interestingly, the significant reduced of suPAR level was parallel to treatment efficacy and correlated with other clinical and laboratory parameters, that is, decreasing of patients' complaints, increasing of BMI (r=-0.281, thoracic imaging improvement, sputum conversion, decreasing of ESR (r=0.577 and monocytes count (r=0.536 with exception the width of lesion in thoracic imaging. In conclusion, the suPAR level in could reflect the progress of TB therapy.

  12. Glutamate monitoring in vitro and in vivo: recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Rose, Nadia Cherouati; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2009-01-01

    is currently the most common method for in vivo glutamate sampling. However, the recent development and improvement of enzyme-based amperometric glutamate biosensors makes them a promising alternative to microdialysis for in vivo applications, as well as valuable devices for in vitro applications in basic......, and different techniques have been developed to this end. This review presents and discusses these techniques, especially the recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors, as well as the great potential of nanotechnology in glutamate sensing. Microdialysis coupled to analytical detection techniques...... neurobiological research. Another interesting group of biosensors for glutamate are fluorescence-based glutamate biosensors, which have unsurpassed spatio-temporal resolution and are therefore important tools for investigating glutamate dynamics during signaling. Adding to this list are biosensors based on nano...

  13. Real-Time Monitoring of Critical Care Analytes in the Bloodstream with Chemical Sensors: Progress and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Megan C; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We review approaches and challenges in developing chemical sensor-based methods to accurately and continuously monitor levels of key analytes in blood related directly to the status of critically ill hospitalized patients. Electrochemical and optical sensor-based technologies have been pursued to measure important critical care species in blood [i.e., oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, electrolytes (K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), etc.), glucose, and lactate] in real-time or near real-time. The two main configurations examined to date for achieving this goal have been intravascular catheter sensors and patient attached ex vivo sensors with intermittent blood sampling via an attached indwelling catheter. We discuss the status of these configurations and the main issues affecting the accuracy of the measurements, including cell adhesion and thrombus formation on the surface of the sensors, sensor drift, sensor selectivity, etc. Recent approaches to mitigate these nagging performance issues that have prevented these technologies from clinical use are also discussed.

  14. Development of a reactor-coolant-pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Semi-annual progress report, December 1981-May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Gabler, H.C.

    1982-10-01

    Reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failures have resulted in excessive leakage of primary coolant into reactor containment buildings. In some cases, high levels of airborne activity and surface contamination following these failures have necessitated extensive cleanup efforts and personnel radiation exposure. Unpredictable pump seal performance has also caused forced outages and frequent maintenance. The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical RC pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables. This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during the period of December 1981 through May 1982. Also described herein is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  15. Development of monitoring and diagnostic methods for robots used in remediation of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tecza, J.

    1998-01-01

    'Safe and efficient clean up of hazardous and radioactive waste sites throughout the DOE complex will require extensive use of robots. This research effort focuses on developing Monitoring and Diagnostic (M and D) methods for robots that will provide early detection, isolation, and tracking of impending faults before they result in serious failure. The utility and effectiveness of applying M and D methods to hydraulic robots has never been proven. The present research program is utilizing seeded faults in a laboratory test rig that is representative of an existing hydraulically-powered remediation robot. This report summarizes activity conducted in the first 9 months of the project. The research team has analyzed the Rosie Mobile Worksystem as a representative hydraulic robot, developed a test rig for implanted fault testing, developed a test plan and agenda, and established methods for acquiring and analyzing the test data.'

  16. AGR steel corrosion monitoring schemes: progress on off-site testing of coupon specimens to end of 1985: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittle, I.; Meredith, M.E.

    1988-03-01

    Off-site Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor steel corrosion monitoring through experiments on mild steel coupon specimens is reported. The appearance of all mild steel coupons oxidised over the temperature range 375 to 450 0 C is consistent with what is expected for the appropriate silicon content, temperature and in the gas mixes used. Likewise, weight gain data from the tests is as expected and where linear (breakaway) oxidation kinetics are in evidence, measured rates are within one standard deviation of the mean oxidation rates predicted by the 1/R model. Also, data relating mean breakaway oxide thickness to weight gain is in good agreement with the currently recommended relationship of 1 mg cm -2 weight gain = 6.72 μm oxide thickness. The observed oxidation behaviour of the off-site mild steel coupons is consistent with the most recent design data. (author)

  17. Candidate soil indicators for monitoring the progress of constructed wetlands toward a natural state: a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Adams, Jean V.; Fennessy, M. Siobhan; Mack, John; Micacchion, Mick

    2013-01-01

    A persistent question among ecologists and environmental managers is whether constructed wetlands are structurally or functionally equivalent to naturally occurring wetlands. We examined 19 variables collected from 10 constructed and nine natural emergent wetlands in Ohio, USA. Our primary objective was to identify candidate indicators of wetland class (natural or constructed), based on measurements of soil properties and an index of vegetation integrity, that can be used to track the progress of constructed wetlands toward a natural state. The method of nearest shrunken centroids was used to find a subset of variables that would serve as the best classifiers of wetland class, and error rate was calculated using a five-fold cross-validation procedure. The shrunken differences of percent total organic carbon (% TOC) and percent dry weight of the soil exhibited the greatest distances from the overall centroid. Classification based on these two variables yielded a misclassification rate of 11% based on cross-validation. Our results indicate that % TOC and percent dry weight can be used as candidate indicators of the status of emergent, constructed wetlands in Ohio and for assessing the performance of mitigation. The method of nearest shrunken centroids has excellent potential for further applications in ecology.

  18. Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila Annual progress report, 1 November 1994 - 1 January 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have recently cloned the mei-4l gene, and showed that its putative translation product is highly homologous to the ATM, MEC1, and RAD3 genes at the level of primary amino acid sequence. That this sequence similarity reflects a functional homology is suggested by three lines of evidence: (1) as is the case for the ATM gene, loss of function of mei-4l results in increased sensitivity to X-irradiation; (2) mutations in the mei-4l gene also resemble ATM mutations in that they cause high levels of chromosome breakage and genetic instability; and (3) like the ATM gene, the wild-type MEI-4l protein also plays a role in mediating the progression of the cell cycle

  19. Unsupervised progressive elastic band exercises for frail geriatric inpatients objectively monitored by new exercise-integrated technology-a feasibility trial with an embedded qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, C R; Bandholm, T; Spaich, E G

    2017-01-01

    feasibility and acceptability of an unsupervised progressive strength training intervention monitored by BandCizer for frail geriatric inpatients. Methods: This feasibility trial included 15 frail inpatients at a geriatric ward. At hospitalization, the patients were prescribed two elastic band exercises......Background: Frailty is a serious condition frequently present in geriatric inpatients that potentially causes serious adverse events. Strength training is acknowledged as a means of preventing or delaying frailty and loss of function in these patients. However, limited hospital resources challenge...... the amount of supervised training, and unsupervised training could possibly supplement supervised training thereby increasing the total exercise dose during admission. A new valid and reliable technology, the BandCizer, objectively measures the exact training dosage performed. The purpose was to investigate...

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

  1. Progress on mobility and instability of research personnel in Japan: scientometrics on a job-posting database for monitoring the academic job market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-07-01

    This study has two purposes. The first purpose is to extract statistics from a database of jobposting cards, previously little-used as a data source, to assess the academic job market. The second purpose is to connect statistics on the academic job market with monitoring of indicators of policy progress related to the mobility and instability of research personnel. The data source used in this study is a job-posting database named JREC-IN Portal, which is the de facto standard for academic job seeking in Japan. The present results show a growing proportion of fixed-term researchers in the Japanese academic job market and that job information is increasingly diverse. (Author)

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  3. Regulated necrosis-related molecule mRNA expression in humans and mice and in murine acute tissue injury and systemic autoimmunity leading to progressive organ damage, and progressive fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Desai, Jyaysi; Marschner, Julian A; Weidenbusch, Marc; Lech, Maciej; Vielhauer, Volker; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2016-12-01

    The species-specific, as well as organ-specific expression of regulated necrosis (RN)-related molecules, is not known. We determined the expression levels of tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1), receptor activated protein kinase (RIPK)1, RIPK3, mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL), CASP8, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein (CIAP)1, CIAP2, glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4), cyclophilin D (CYPD), CASP1, NLRP3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) in human and mouse solid organs. We observed significant differences in expression of these molecules between human and mice. In addition, we characterized their expression profiles in acute as well as persistent tissue injury and chronic tissue remodelling using acute and chronic kidney injury models. We observed that the degree and pattern of induction of RN-related molecules were highly dependent on the trigger and disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we studied their expression patterns in mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, which revealed that the expression of MLKL, GPX4 and PARP1 significantly increased in the spleen along disease progression and CASP1, RIPK1, RIPK3 and CYPD were higher at the earlier stages but were significantly decreased in the later stages. In contrast, in the kidney, the expression of genes involved in pyroptosis, e.g. NLRP3 and CASP1 were significantly increased and TNFR1, RIPK1, RIPK3, CIAP1/2 and GPX4 were significantly decreased along the progression of lupus nephritis (LN). Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression of RN-related molecules should be considered during designing experiments, interpreting the results as well as extrapolating the conclusions from one species or organ to another species or organ respectively. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Modeling Fatigue Damage Onset and Progression in Composites Using an Element-Based Virtual Crack Closure Technique Combined With the Floating Node Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Nelson V.; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to model the onset and propagation of matrix cracks and delaminations in carbon-epoxy composites subject to fatigue loading. An extended interface element, based on the Floating Node Method, is developed to represent delaminations and matrix cracks explicitly in a mesh independent fashion. Crack propagation is determined using an element-based Virtual Crack Closure Technique approach to determine mixed-mode energy release rates, and the Paris-Law relationship to obtain crack growth rate. Crack onset is determined using a stressbased onset criterion coupled with a stress vs. cycle curve and Palmgren-Miner rule to account for fatigue damage accumulation. The approach is implemented in Abaqus/Standard® via the user subroutine functionality. Verification exercises are performed to assess the accuracy and correct implementation of the approach. Finally, it was demonstrated that this approach captured the differences in failure morphology in fatigue for two laminates of identical stiffness, but with layups containing ?deg plies that were either stacked in a single group, or distributed through the laminate thickness.

  5. Development of Monitoring and Diagnostic Methods for Robots Used in Remediation of Waste Sites 1999 Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The final assembly of the test rig was completed in January 1999 (see Figure 1). The test rig incorporated a wheel motor typical of those used for hydraulic robots, and allowed wheel motor loading at expected operating conditions. The rig included instrumentation, as shown in Figure 2, for acquisition of key parameters for both unfaulted baseline and inserted fault runs. Checkout of the test rig was accomplished in two phases. In the first phase, only the wheel motor was connected to the hydraulic supply and the driven pump disconnected. With the rig in this configuration, operation of the wheel motor control loop and the monitoring and diagnostic (M and D) data acquisition system was verified. In the second phase, the driven pump was connected to the wheel motor and the operation of the rig under load was confirmed and unfaulted baseline data were acquired. A list of 13 faults was developed (see Table 1). All faults were inserted and data were acquired. The data files were electronically transmitted to Rice University for analysis using Analytical Redundancy (AR), a model-based static space technique that derives the maximum number of independent tests of the consistency of sensor data with the linearized system model and past sensor and control inputs

  6. Annual Progress Report on the Development of Waste Tank Leak Monitoring and Detection and Mitigation Activities in Support of M-45-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEFIGH PRICE, C.

    2000-01-01

    Milestone M-45-09E of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) [TPA 1996] requires submittal of an annual progress report on the development of waste tank leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) activities associated with the retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks (SSTs). This report details progress for fiscal year 2000, building on the current LDMM strategy and including discussion of technologies, applications, cost, schedule, and technical data. The report also includes discussion of demonstrations conducted and recommendations for additional testing. Tri-Party Agreement Milestones M-45-08A and M-45-08B required design and demonstration of LDMM systems for initial retrieval of SST waste. These specific milestones have recently been deleted as part of the M-45-00A change package. Future LDMM development work has been incorporated into specific technology demonstration milestones and SST waste retrieval milestones in the M-45-03 and M-45-05 milestone series

  7. Progressive outer retinal necrosis in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy: successful management with intravitreal injections and monitoring with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Philip D; Kurup, Shree K; Fischer, Steven H; Rhee, Henry H; Byrnes, Gordon A; Levy-Clarke, Grace A; Buggage, Ronald R; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Mican, JoAnn M; Wright, Mary E

    2007-03-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an ocular disease in individuals with AIDS and is associated with substantial morbidity. The optimal management of PORN and its clinical course in the HAART era is unclear. We report a case of successfully managed PORN that provides insight into the monitoring and treatment of this disease. Intravitreal injections and intravenous therapy targeted towards varicella zoster virus (VZV) were used to treat PORN. HAART was initiated for HIV-1 therapy. Serial PCR for VZV was performed on aqueous humor to monitor the clinical course. The presence of VZV DNA from aqueous humor correlated with clinical exacerbations of disease. Initiation of twice weekly intravitreal injections with dual antiviral drugs appeared to be an important therapeutic intervention that resulted in remission of PORN. Secondary prophylaxis against VZV was successfully withdrawn after HAART induced partial immune recovery. In addition to aggressive therapy with intravitreal injections, HAART and quantitative measurements of VZV DNA from aqueous humor have important roles in the management of PORN. A multidisciplinary approach involving specialists in infectious diseases, ophthalmology, and clinical microbiology will improve the chances for successful long-term outcomes.

  8. DA-1229, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, protects against renal injury by preventing podocyte damage in an animal model of progressive renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun Lee, Jee; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Song, Hye Kyoung; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kang, Young Sun; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Hyun Wook; Cha, Jin Joo; Han, Jee Young; Han, Sang Youb; Cha, Dae Ryong

    2016-05-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) inhibitors are known to have renoprotective effects, the mechanism underlying these effects has remained elusive. Here we investigated the effects of DA-1229, a novel DPPIV inhibitor, in two animal models of renal injury including db/db mice and the adriamycin nephropathy rodent model of chronic renal disease characterized by podocyte injury. For both models, DA-1229 was administered at 300 mg/kg/day. DPPIV activity in the kidney was significantly higher in diabetic mice compared with their nondiabetic controls. Although DA-1229 did not affect glycemic control or insulin resistance, DA-1229 did improve lipid profiles, albuminuria and renal fibrosis. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment resulted in decreased urinary excretion of nephrin, decreased circulating and kidney DPPIV activity, and decreased macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In adriamycin-treated mice, DPPIV activity in the kidney and urinary nephrin loss were both increased, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations were unchanged. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment significantly improved proteinuria, renal fibrosis and inflammation associated with decreased urinary nephrin loss, and kidney DPP4 activity. In cultured podocytes, DA-1229 restored the high glucose/angiotensin II-induced increase of DPPIV activity and preserved the nephrin levels in podocytes. These findings suggest that activation of DPPIV in the kidney has a role in the progression of renal disease, and that DA-1229 may exert its renoprotective effects by preventing podocyte injury.

  9. Lack of association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma2 polymorphisms and progressive liver damage in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongiovanni Paola

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs play key roles in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Aim to assess the effect of functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of PPARα and PPARγ2, previously associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, on liver damage in NAFLD, whose progression is influenced by metabolic abnormalities and inherited factors. Methods The Leu162Val PPARα and Pro12Ala PPARγ2 SNPs were evaluated by restriction analysis. We considered 202 Italian patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Results The frequency of the evaluated SNPs did not differ between patients and 346 healthy controls. The presence of the PPARα 162Val allele (prevalence 57%, but not of the PPARγ2 12Ala allele (prevalence 18%, was associated with higher insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index 4.71 ± 3.8 vs. 3.58 ± 2.7, p = 0.026, but not with hyperglycemia. The PPARα 162Val and PPARγ2 12Ala alleles were not associated with the severity of steatosis, necroinflammation, or fibrosis. Conclusions The presence of the PPARα 162Val allele was associated with insulin resistance, but not with liver damage in NAFLD. Because of the limited power of the present sample, larger studies are needed to exclude a minor effect of the PPARγ2 12Ala allele on necroinflammation/fibrosis in NAFLD.

  10. Physical water scarcity metrics for monitoring progress towards SDG target 6.4: An evaluation of indicator 6.4.2 "Level of water stress".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, D; Hoekstra, A Y; Wada, Y; Bouraoui, F; de Roo, A; Mekonnen, M M; van de Bund, W J; Batelaan, O; Pavelic, P; Bastiaanssen, W G M; Kummu, M; Rockström, J; Liu, J; Bisselink, B; Ronco, P; Pistocchi, A; Bidoglio, G

    2018-02-01

    Target 6.4 of the recently adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) deals with the reduction of water scarcity. To monitor progress towards this target, two indicators are used: Indicator 6.4.1 measuring water use efficiency and 6.4.2 measuring the level of water stress (WS). This paper aims to identify whether the currently proposed indicator 6.4.2 considers the different elements that need to be accounted for in a WS indicator. WS indicators compare water use with water availability. We identify seven essential elements: 1) both gross and net water abstraction (or withdrawal) provide important information to understand WS; 2) WS indicators need to incorporate environmental flow requirements (EFR); 3) temporal and 4) spatial disaggregation is required in a WS assessment; 5) both renewable surface water and groundwater resources, including their interaction, need to be accounted for as renewable water availability; 6) alternative available water resources need to be accounted for as well, like fossil groundwater and desalinated water; 7) WS indicators need to account for water storage in reservoirs, water recycling and managed aquifer recharge. Indicator 6.4.2 considers many of these elements, but there is need for improvement. It is recommended that WS is measured based on net abstraction as well, in addition to currently only measuring WS based on gross abstraction. It does incorporate EFR. Temporal and spatial disaggregation is indeed defined as a goal in more advanced monitoring levels, in which it is also called for a differentiation between surface and groundwater resources. However, regarding element 6 and 7 there are some shortcomings for which we provide recommendations. In addition, indicator 6.4.2 is only one indicator, which monitors blue WS, but does not give information on green or green-blue water scarcity or on water quality. Within the SDG indicator framework, some of these topics are covered with other indicators. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  11. Spreading, Infestation and Damage Rates and Adult Population Monitoring of Tomato Leaf Miner [Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)] on Open Field Tomato Grown in the South Marmara Region of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİN, Gürsel; GÖKSEL, Pınar; DURA, Onur; HANTAŞ, Cemil

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine spreading, infestation and fruit damage rates and adult population monitoring of Tomato leaf miner, (Tuta absoluta, Meyrick) on open field tomato grown in the South Marmara Region (Bilecik, Bursa, Kocaeli, Sakarya and Yalova provinces) of Turkey in 2011-2012. As result of spreading studies carried out according to systematic sampling method, it was determined that all tomato locations in every province were infested by this pest. Infestation rate...

  12. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  13. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  14. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate.

  15. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, R. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES) Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate. PMID:24191136

  16. MR T1{rho} as an imaging biomarker for monitoring liver injury progression and regression: an experimental study in rats with carbon tetrachloride intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Yuan, Jing; Deng, Min; Ahuja, Anil T. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wong, Hing Lok [School of Public Health and Primary Care, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chu, Eagle S.H.; Go, Minnie Y.Y.; Yu, Jun [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Institute of Digestive Disease and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Hong Kong SAR (China); Teng, Gao-Jun [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China)

    2012-08-15

    Recently it was shown that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1{rho} value increased with the severity of liver fibrosis in rats with bile duct ligation. Using a rat carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) liver injury model, this study further investigated the merit of T1{rho} relaxation for liver fibrosis evaluation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injection of 2 ml/kg CCl{sub 4} twice weekly for up to 6 weeks. Then CCl{sub 4} was withdrawn and the animals were allowed to recover. Liver T1{rho} MRI and conventional T2-weighted images were acquired. Animals underwent MRI at baseline and at 2 days, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 6 weeks post CCl{sub 4} injection, and they were also examined at 1 week and 4 weeks post CCl{sub 4} withdrawal. Liver histology was also sampled at these time points. Liver T1{rho} values increased slightly, though significantly, on day 2, and then increased further and were highest at week 6 post CCl{sub 4} insults. The relative liver signal intensity change on T2-weighted images followed a different time course compared with that of T1{rho}. Liver T1{rho} values decreased upon the withdrawal of the CCl{sub 4} insult. Histology confirmed the animals had typical CCl{sub 4} liver injury and fibrosis progression and regression processes. MR T1{rho} imaging can monitor CCl{sub 4}-induced liver injury and fibrosis. (orig.)

  17. DNA damage and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeremy; Poon, Randy Y C

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that polyploidization triggers chromosomal instability and contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA damage is increasingly being recognized for its roles in promoting polyploidization. Although elegant mechanisms known as the DNA damage checkpoints are responsible for halting the cell cycle after DNA damage, agents that uncouple the checkpoints can induce unscheduled entry into mitosis. Likewise, defects of the checkpoints in several disorders permit mitotic entry even in the presence of DNA damage. Forcing cells with damaged DNA into mitosis causes severe chromosome segregation defects, including lagging chromosomes, chromosomal fragments and chromosomal bridges. The presence of these lesions in the cleavage plane is believed to abort cytokinesis. It is postulated that if cytokinesis failure is coupled with defects of the p53-dependent postmitotic checkpoint pathway, cells can enter S phase and become polyploids. Progress in the past several years has unraveled some of the underlying principles of these pathways and underscored the important role of DNA damage in polyploidization. Furthermore, polyploidization per se may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to DNA damage, thereby may offer an opportunity for novel therapies.

  18. Fundamentals for remote structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades - a preproject. Annex C. Fibre transducer for damage detection in adhesive layers of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sendrup, P.

    2002-01-01

    displacement transducer for detection of damage in adhesive layers of wind turbine blades. It was chosen to base the transducer on the fibre optic micro-bend principle. The report contains the result of measurementsand optical simulations of light transmittance through optical fibres with micro......-bends and a suggestion for a micro-bend transducer design specifically suitable for detection of damage in adhesive layers between larger composite structures, as the shellsin a wind turbine blade. Such a damage will cause the joined parts to move slightly relative to each other, and the transducer is designed to change...... optic micro-bend transducer would be in the range between0.5%/um to 1 %/um depending on the number of bends on the fibre. A measurement on the final transducer showed that the sensitivity was 1.2 %/um. A large 50 % change in transmittance, that is easy to measure, is then obtained for displacements...

  19. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare the effect of biannual peripheral magnetic resonance imaging, radiography and standard of care disease progression monitoring on pharmacotherapeutic escalation in rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Permanent joint damage is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common and destructive form of inflammatory arthritis. In aggressive disease, joint damage can occur within 6 months from symptom onset. Early, intensive treatment with conventional and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can delay the onset and progression of joint damage. The primary objective of the study is to investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or radiography (X-ray) over standard of care as tools to guide DMARD treatment decision-making by rheumatologists for the care of RA. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled trial has been designed. Rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis patients will undergo an MRI and X-ray assessment every 6 months. Baseline adaptive randomization will be used to allocate participants to MRI, X-ray, or sham-intervention groups on a background of standard of care. Prognostic markers, treating physician, and baseline DMARD therapy will be used as intervention allocation parameters. The outcome measures in rheumatology RA MRI score and the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score will be used to evaluate the MRI and X-ray images, respectively. Radiologists will score anonymized images for all patients regardless of intervention allocation. Disease progression will be determined based on the study-specific, inter-rater smallest detectable difference. Allocation-dependent, intervention-concealed reports of positive or negative disease progression will be reported to the treating rheumatologist. Negative reports will be delivered for the sham-intervention group. Study-based radiology clinical reports will be provided to the treating rheumatologists for extra-study X-ray requisitions to limit patient radiation exposure as part of diagnostic imaging standard of care. DMARD treatment dose escalation and therapy changes will be measured to evaluate the primary objective. A sample size of

  20. Unsupervised progressive elastic band exercises for frail geriatric inpatients objectively monitored by new exercise-integrated technology-a feasibility trial with an embedded qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, C R; Bandholm, T; Spaich, E G; Jorgensen, M; Andreasen, J

    2017-01-01

    Frailty is a serious condition frequently present in geriatric inpatients that potentially causes serious adverse events. Strength training is acknowledged as a means of preventing or delaying frailty and loss of function in these patients. However, limited hospital resources challenge the amount of supervised training, and unsupervised training could possibly supplement supervised training thereby increasing the total exercise dose during admission. A new valid and reliable technology, the BandCizer, objectively measures the exact training dosage performed. The purpose was to investigate feasibility and acceptability of an unsupervised progressive strength training intervention monitored by BandCizer for frail geriatric inpatients. This feasibility trial included 15 frail inpatients at a geriatric ward. At hospitalization, the patients were prescribed two elastic band exercises to be performed unsupervised once daily. A BandCizer Datalogger enabling measurement of the number of sets, repetitions, and time-under-tension was attached to the elastic band. The patients were instructed in performing strength training: 3 sets of 10 repetitions (10-12 repetition maximum (RM)) with a separation of 2-min pauses and a time-under-tension of 8 s. The feasibility criterion for the unsupervised progressive exercises was that 33% of the recommended number of sets would be performed by at least 30% of patients. In addition, patients and staff were interviewed about their experiences with the intervention. Four (27%) out of 15 patients completed 33% of the recommended number of sets. For the total sample, the average percent of performed sets was 23% and for those who actually trained ( n  = 12) 26%. Patients and staff expressed a general positive attitude towards the unsupervised training as an addition to the supervised training sessions. However, barriers were also described-especially constant interruptions. Based on the predefined criterion for feasibility, the

  1. A Carbon Monitoring System Approach to US Coastal Wetland Carbon Fluxes: Progress Towards a Tier II Accounting Method with Uncertainty Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Holmquist, J. R.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Byrd, K. B.; Callaway, J.; Crooks, S.; Drexler, J. Z.; Feagin, R. A.; Ferner, M. C.; Gonneea, M. E.; Kroeger, K. D.; Megonigal, P.; Morris, J. T.; Schile, L. M.; Simard, M.; Sutton-Grier, A.; Takekawa, J.; Troxler, T.; Weller, D.; Woo, I.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their high rates of long-term carbon (C) sequestration when compared to upland ecosystems, coastal C accounting is only recently receiving the attention of policy makers and carbon markets. Assessing accuracy and uncertainty in net C flux estimates requires both direct and derived measurements based on both short and long term dynamics in key drivers, particularly soil accretion rates and soil organic content. We are testing the ability of remote sensing products and national scale datasets to estimate biomass and soil stocks and fluxes over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, the 2013 Wetlands Supplement to the 2006 IPCC GHG national inventory reporting guidelines requests information on development of Tier I-III reporting, which express increasing levels of detail. We report progress toward development of a Carbon Monitoring System for "blue carbon" that may be useful for IPCC reporting guidelines at Tier II levels. Our project uses a current dataset of publically available and contributed field-based measurements to validate models of changing soil C stocks, across a broad range of U.S. tidal wetland types and landuse conversions. Additionally, development of biomass algorithms for both radar and spectral datasets will be tested and used to determine the "price of precision" of different satellite products. We discuss progress in calculating Tier II estimates focusing on variation introduced by the different input datasets. These include the USFWS National Wetlands Inventory, NOAA Coastal Change Analysis Program, and combinations to calculate tidal wetland area. We also assess the use of different attributes and depths from the USDA-SSURGO database to map soil C density. Finally, we examine the relative benefit of radar, spectral and hybrid approaches to biomass mapping in tidal marshes and mangroves. While the US currently plans to report GHG emissions at a Tier I level, we argue that a Tier II analysis is possible due to national

  2. Horse species symposium: a novel approach to monitoring pathogen progression during uterine and placental infection in the mare using bioluminescence imaging technology and lux-modified bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P L; Christiansen, D L; Hopper, R M; Walters, F K; Moulton, K; Curbelo, J; Greene, J M; Willard, S T

    2011-05-01

    Uterine and placental infections are the leading cause of abortion, stillbirth, and preterm delivery in the mare. Whereas uterine and placental infections in women have been studied extensively, a comprehensive examination of the pathogenic processes leading to this unsatisfactory pregnancy outcome in the mare has yet to be completed. Most information in the literature relating to late-term pregnancy loss in mares is based on retrospective studies of clinical cases submitted for necropsy. Here we report the development and application of a novel approach, whereby transgenically modified bacteria transformed with lux genes of Xenorhabdus luminescens or Photorhabdus luminescens origin and biophotonic imaging are utilized to better understand pathogen-induced preterm birth in late-term pregnant mares. This technology uses highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging camera systems to localize and monitor pathogen progression during tissue invasion by measuring the bioluminescent signatures emitted by the lux-modified pathogens. This method has an important advantage in that it allows for the potential tracking of pathogens in vivo in real time and over time, which was hitherto impossible. Although the application of this technology in domestic animals is in its infancy, investigators were successful in identifying the fetal lungs, sinuses, nares, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems as primary tissues for pathogen invasion after experimental infection of pregnant mares with lux-modified Escherichia coli. It is important that pathogens were not detected in other vital organs, such as the liver, brain, and cardiac system. Such precision in localizing sites of pathogen invasion provides potential application for this novel approach in the development of more targeted therapeutic interventions for pathogen-related diseases in the equine and other domestic species.

  3. Damage Assessment and Monitoring of Cultural Heritage Places in a Disaster and Post-Disaster Event - a Case Study of Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafadari, A.; Philip, G.; Jennings, R.

    2017-08-01

    In recent decades, and in response to an increased focus on disastrous events ranging from armed conflict to natural events that impact cultural heritage, there is a need for methodologies and approaches to better manage the effects of disaster on cultural heritage. This paper presents the approaches used in the development of a Historic Environment Record (HER) for Syria. It describes the requirements and methodologies used for systematic emergency recording and assessment of cultural heritage. It also presents the type of information needed to record in the aftermath of disaster to assess the scale of damage and destruction. Started as a project at Durham University, the database is now being developed as part of the EAMENA (Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa) project. The core dataset incorporates information and data from archaeological surveys undertaken in Syria by research projects in recent decades and began life as a development of the Shirīn initiative1. The focus of this project is to provide a tool not only for the recording and inventory of sites and monuments, but also to record damage and threats, their causes, and assess their magnitude. It will also record and measure the significance in order to be able to prioritize emergency and preservation responses. The database aims to set procedures for carrying out systematic rapid condition assessment (to record damage) and risk assessment (to record threat and level of risk) of heritage places, on the basis of both on the ground and remote assessment. Given the large number of heritage properties damaged by conflict, the implementation of rapid assessment methods to quickly identify and record level of damage and condition is essential, as it will provide the evidence to support effective prioritization of efforts and resources, and decisions on the appropriate levels of intervention and methods of treatment. The predefined data entry categories, use of a data standard, and

  4. DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF CULTURAL HERITAGE PLACES IN A DISASTER AND POST-DISASTER EVENT – A CASE STUDY OF SYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vafadari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, and in response to an increased focus on disastrous events ranging from armed conflict to natural events that impact cultural heritage, there is a need for methodologies and approaches to better manage the effects of disaster on cultural heritage. This paper presents the approaches used in the development of a Historic Environment Record (HER for Syria. It describes the requirements and methodologies used for systematic emergency recording and assessment of cultural heritage. It also presents the type of information needed to record in the aftermath of disaster to assess the scale of damage and destruction. Started as a project at Durham University, the database is now being developed as part of the EAMENA (Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa project. The core dataset incorporates information and data from archaeological surveys undertaken in Syria by research projects in recent decades and began life as a development of the Shirīn initiative1. The focus of this project is to provide a tool not only for the recording and inventory of sites and monuments, but also to record damage and threats, their causes, and assess their magnitude. It will also record and measure the significance in order to be able to prioritize emergency and preservation responses. The database aims to set procedures for carrying out systematic rapid condition assessment (to record damage and risk assessment (to record threat and level of risk of heritage places, on the basis of both on the ground and remote assessment. Given the large number of heritage properties damaged by conflict, the implementation of rapid assessment methods to quickly identify and record level of damage and condition is essential, as it will provide the evidence to support effective prioritization of efforts and resources, and decisions on the appropriate levels of intervention and methods of treatment. The predefined data entry categories, use of a data

  5. Three dimensional fatigue damage evolution in non-crimp glass fibre fabric based composites used for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the tension fatigue damage progression of a uni-directional glass fibre composite made from a non-crimp fabric similar to those used for the main load carrying parts of a wind turbine blade. The spatial damage progression in a chosen region of a test specimen is monitored...... on a micro-structural scale by ex-situ X-ray computed tomography. The centimetre sized specimen remains uncut during the ex-situ experiment. The experimental results indicate that uni-directional fibre fractures initiate from matrix cracks related to the structure of the fabric: first in the thin off...

  6. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT...... scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures...

  7. Integrating Condition Indicators and Usage Parameters for Improved Spiral Bevel Gear Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Delgado, Irebert, R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the importance of combining Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) data with usage monitoring system data when detecting rotorcraft transmission health. Three gear sets were tested in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig. Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Damage progression was measured by debris generation and documented with inspection photos at varying torque values. A contact fatigue analysis was applied to the gear design indicating the effect temperature, load and reliability had on gear life. Results of this study illustrated the benefits of combining HUMS data and actual usage data to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears.

  8. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Progress Report, covering the period up to the end of 1979 year, was sent to the IAEA according to the research agreement No. 1971 /CF. This work covered the following fields: preparation and dummy irradiation experiments with a new experimental capsule of ''CHOUCA-M'' type; measurement of temperature fields and design of specimen holders; measurement of neutron energy spectrum in the irradiation place in our experimental reactor of VVR-S type (Nuclear Research Institute) using a set of activation detectors; unification and calibration of the measurement of neutron fluence with the use of Fe, Cu, Mn-Mg and Co-Al monitors; development and improvement of the measuring apparatus and technique for the dynamic testing of pre-cracked specimens with determination of dynamic parameters of fracture mechanics; preparation and manufacture of testing specimens from the Japanese steels - forging, plate and weld metal; preparation of the irradiation capsule for assembling

  9. Monitoring arterio-venous differences of glucose and lactate in the anesthetized rat with or without brain damage with ultrafiltration and biosensor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegsma-Vogt, G; Venema, K; Postema, F; Korf, J

    2001-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of arterio-venous glucose and lactate differences may serve as a diagnostic tool to assess normal brain function and brain pathology. We describe a method and some results obtained with arterio-venous measurements of glucose and lactate in the blood of the

  10. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  11. Early Glucose Derangement Detected by Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Progression of Liver Fibrosis in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: An Independent Predictive Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffini, Riccardo; Liccardo, Daniela; Alisi, Anna; Benevento, Danila; Cappa, Marco; Cianfarani, Stefano; Nobili, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose derangement has been reported to increase oxidative stress, one of the most important factors underlying the progression of hepatic fibrosis in adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To date, careful evaluation of the glucose profile in pediatric NAFLD has not been performed. A total of 30 severely obese children (15 males; mean age 12.87 ± 2.19 years) with biopsy-proven NAFLD were enrolled in this study from September to December 2013. All patients underwent anthropometric and laboratory evaluation, including the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Our study reveals some differences between OGTT and CGM in detecting NAFLD children with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). OGTT showed 2 (6.67%) patients with IFG and 1 (3.34%) with IGT, while CGM showed 5 (16.67%) patients with IFG and 6 (20%) with IGT. The daily blood glucose profile positively correlated with the baseline blood glucose (r = 0.39, p = 0.04) and the homeostatic model assessment (r = 0.56, p = 0.05). A positive correlation between hyperglycemia and liver fibrosis was found (r = 0.65, p < 0.05). Mean glucose values (F3-F4 group: 163.2 ± 35.92 mg/dl vs. F1 group: 136.58 ± 46.83 mg/dl and F2 group: 154.12 ± 22.51 mg/dl) and the difference between the minimum and maximum blood glucose levels (F3-F4 group: 110.21 ± 25.26 mg/dl vs. F1 group: 91.67 ± 15.97 mg/dl and F2 group: 92 ± 15.48 mg/dl) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the F3-F4 group compared to the F1 and F2 groups. Glucose profile derangement as detected by CGM is associated with the severity of hepatic fibrosis in children with NAFLD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Semiannual Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center June Through November 2016, January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surovchak, Scott [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Young - Rainey STAR Center (Science, Technology, and Research Center) at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility constructed in the mid-1950s. The 96-acre STAR Center is located in Largo, Florida, and lies in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East (Figure 1). While it was owned by DOE, the purpose of the site was to develop and manufacture components for the nation’s nuclear weapons program. In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Assessment (EPA 1988) at the site to gather information on potential releases of hazardous materials. In February of 1990, EPA issued a Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments permit to DOE, requiring DOE to investigate and perform remediation activities in those areas designated as solid-waste management units (SWMUs) contaminated by hazardous materials resulting from DOE operations. A total of 17 SWMUs were identified and investigated at the STAR Center. By 1997, 13 of the 17 SWMUs had been remediated or approved for no further action. More recently, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) executed Conditional Site Rehabilitation Completion Orders for the Northeast Site and the Wastewater Neutralization Area on July 27, 2016, stating that no further action is required for those SWMUs. The Building 100 Area (a combination of the Old Drum Storage Site and the Building 100-Industrial Drain Leaks SWMUs) comprises the only two active SWMUs at the STAR Center (Figure 2). This document serves as the semiannual progress report for the SWMUs by providing the results of recent monitoring activities and a summary of ongoing and projected work. The STAR Center is owned by the Pinellas County Industrial Development Authority, but DOE is responsible for remediation activities at the site. Additional background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance

  13. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  14. Progress report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Studsvik Science Research Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1978. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. Projects within the following fields are presented: neutron physics, neutron absorption and scattering, radiation chemistry, radiation damage studies, radioactivity and theoretical studies of condensed matter. (E.R.)

  15. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  16. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-09-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  17. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  18. Structural identification and damage diagnosis using self-sensing piezo-impedance transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Bhalla, Suresh; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2006-08-01

    The use of smart materials, such as lead zirconate titanate (PZT), has accelerated developments in the fields of structural identification and automated structural health monitoring (SHM). One such technique that has made much progress is the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique, which employs self-sensing piezo-impedance transducers. In this technique, a PZT patch is surface bonded to the structure to be monitored and its corresponding electro-mechanical admittance signature is used for damage detection. This paper introduces a new method for identifying structures from the measured admittance signatures in terms of equivalent structural parameters, whereby the identified parameters are used for damage characterization. The new method has been applied to a truss, a beam and a concrete cube, and found to be able to successfully perform structural identification and damage diagnosis. In addition, several advantages have been ascertained in comparison with the conventional, non-parametric statistical methods.

  19. Nonlinear structural damage detection using support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong

    2012-04-01

    An actual structure including connections and interfaces may exist nonlinear. Because of many complicated problems about nonlinear structural health monitoring (SHM), relatively little progress have been made in this aspect. Statistical pattern recognition techniques have been demonstrated to be competitive with other methods when applied to real engineering datasets. When a structure existing 'breathing' cracks that open and close under operational loading may cause a linear structural system to respond to its operational and environmental loads in a nonlinear manner nonlinear. In this paper, a vibration-based structural health monitoring when the structure exists cracks is investigated with autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM). Vibration experiments are carried out with a model frame. Time-series data in different cases such as: initial linear structure; linear structure with mass changed; nonlinear structure; nonlinear structure with mass changed are acquired.AR model of acceleration time-series is established, and different kernel function types and corresponding parameters are chosen and compared, which can more accurate, more effectively locate the damage. Different cases damaged states and different damage positions have been recognized successfully. AR-SVM method for the insufficient training samples is proved to be practical and efficient on structure nonlinear damage detection.

  20. Advances of reporter gene imaging monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation in the treatment of various tissue damage or degenerative diseases are research hotspots both at home and abroad. However, ignorance of the homing, differentiation and functional expression of the stem cell in vivo influence the further development of stem cell therapy. As an important component of molecular imaging technology, reporter gene imaging dynamically monitors the change of stem cell in vivo via monitoring the expression of transfected reporter gene. This paper briefly describes the latest research progress and the future development trend of the monitoring of reporter gene imaging in stem cell therapy in vivo. (authors)

  1. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  2. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  3. On micro to mesoscale homogenization of electrical properties for damaged laminated composites (and their potential applications in electrical tomography)

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    Efficient and optimal use of composites in structures requires tools to monitor and capture the complex degradation that can occur within the laminates over time. Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques uses sensors/actuators on the structure to progressively monitor the health of the structure with minimal manual intervention. Electrical tomography (ET) is a SHM technique that uses voltage measurements from the surface of the laminate to reconstruct a conductivity map of the structure. Since damage has been shown to modify the conductivity of the laminate, the conductivity map can provide an indirect measure of the damage within the material. Studies have shown the capability of ET to identify macroscale damage due to impact. But, little has been done to quantitatively assess damage using ET. In this work, we present a theoretical framework to link degradation mechanisms occuring at the microscale to the conductivity at the mesoscale through damage indicators. The mesoscale damage indicators are then shown to be intrinsic to the ply. Next, we use the knowledge obtained through mesoscale homogenization to study the detectability of transverse cracks. Last, we show how the mesoscale homogenization participates in regularization of the inverse problem and in the quantitative assessment of the reconstructed conductivity map. This is as such the first step towards turning ET into a viable quantitative health monitoring technique.

  4. Evaluation of damage accumulation behavior and strength anisotropy of NITE SiC/SiC composites by acoustic emission, digital image correlation and electrical resistivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Ozawa, Kazumi; Asakura, Yuuki; Kohyama, Akira; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cracking process of the composites is essential to establish the design basis for practical applications. This study aims to investigate the damage accumulation process and its anisotropy for nano-infiltration transient eutectic sintered (NITE) SiC/SiC composites by various characterization techniques such as the acoustic emission (AE), digital image correlation (DIC) and electrical resistivity (ER) measurements. Cracking behavior below the proportional limit stress (PLS) was specifically addressed. Similar to the other generic SiC/SiC composites, the 1st AE event was identified below the PLS for NITE SiC/SiC composites with a dependency of fabric orientation. The DIC results support that the primary failure mode depending on fiber orientation affected more than the other minor modes did. Detailed AE waveform analysis by wavelet shows a potential to classify the failure behavior depending on architecture. Cracking below the PLS is a potential concern in component deign but the preliminary ER measurements imply that the impact of cracking below the PLS on composite function was limited

  5. A Pilot Trial of Pioglitazone HCl and Tretinoin in ALS: Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers to Monitor Drug Efficacy and Predict Rate of Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd D. Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine if therapy with pioglitazone HCl and tretinoin could slow disease progression in patients with ALS. Levels of tau and pNFH in the cerebrospinal fluid were measured to see if they could serve as prognostic indicators. Methods. 27 subjects on stable doses of riluzole were enrolled. Subjects were randomized to receive pioglitazone 30 mg/d and tretinoin 10 mg/BID for six months or two matching placebos. ALSFRS-R scores were followed monthly. At baseline and at the final visit, lumbar punctures (LPs were performed to measure cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker levels. Results. Subjects treated with tretinoin, pioglitazone, and riluzole had an average rate of decline on the ALSFRS-R scale of −1.02 points per month; subjects treated with placebo and riluzole had a rate of decline of -.86 (P=.18. Over six months of therapy, CSF tau levels decreased in subjects randomized to active treatment and increased in subjects on placebo. Further higher levels of pNF-H at baseline correlated with a faster rate of progression. Conclusion. ALS patients who were treated with tretinoin and pioglitazone demonstrated no slowing on their disease progression. Interestingly, the rate of disease progression was strongly correlated with levels of pNFH in the CSF at baseline.

  6. Shape Memory Alloys for Monitoring Minor Over-Heating/Cooling Based on the Temperature Memory Effect via Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. X.; Huang, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development in the temperature memory effect (TME) via differential scanning calorimetry in shape memory alloys is briefly discussed. This phenomenon was also called the thermal arrest memory effect in the literature. However, these names do not explicitly reveal the potential application of this phenomenon in temperature monitoring. On the other hand, the standard testing process of the TME has great limitation. Hence, it cannot be directly applied for temperature monitoring in most of the real engineering applications in which temperature fluctuation occurs mostly in a random manner within a certain range. However, as shown here, after proper modification, we are able to monitor the maximum or minimum temperature in either over-heating or over-cooling with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Monitoring mammary tumor progression and effect of tamoxifen treatment in MMTV-PymT using MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar Butt, Sadia; Søgaard, Lise V.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To use dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate to follow the progress over time in vivo of breast cancer metabolism in the MMTV-PymT model, and to follow the response to the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen. Methods: Tumor growth was monitored by anatomical...... significantly in the treated group. Conclusion: These hyperpolarized 13C MRS findings indicate that tumor metabolic changes affects kP. The measured kp did not relate to treatment response to the same extent as did tumor growth, histological evaluation, and in vitro determination of LDH activity. © 2014 Wiley...

  8. Monitoring and assessment of soil erosion at micro-scale and macro-scale in forests affected by fire damage in northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Ali; Ghorbani-Dashtaki, Shoja; Naderi-Khorasgani, Mehdi; Kerry, Ruth; Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, Ruhollah

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the occurrence of erosion processes at large scales is very difficult without studying them at small scales. In this study, soil erosion parameters were investigated at micro-scale and macro-scale in forests in northern Iran. Surface erosion and some vegetation attributes were measured at the watershed scale in 30 parcels of land which were separated into 15 fire-affected (burned) forests and 15 original (unburned) forests adjacent to the burned sites. The soil erodibility factor and splash erosion were also determined at the micro-plot scale within each burned and unburned site. Furthermore, soil sampling and infiltration studies were carried out at 80 other sites, as well as the 30 burned and unburned sites, (a total of 110 points) to create a map of the soil erodibility factor at the regional scale. Maps of topography, rainfall, and cover-management were also determined for the study area. The maps of erosion risk and erosion risk potential were finally prepared for the study area using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) procedure. Results indicated that destruction of the protective cover of forested areas by fire had significant effects on splash erosion and the soil erodibility factor at the micro-plot scale and also on surface erosion, erosion risk, and erosion risk potential at the watershed scale. Moreover, the results showed that correlation coefficients between different variables at the micro-plot and watershed scales were positive and significant. Finally, assessment and monitoring of the erosion maps at the regional scale showed that the central and western parts of the study area were more susceptible to erosion compared with the western regions due to more intense crop-management, greater soil erodibility, and more rainfall. The relationships between erosion parameters and the most important vegetation attributes were also used to provide models with equations that were specific to the study region. The results of this

  9. Progress in the development of the neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: simulations and experimental validations [ANIMMA--2015-IO-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; De Izarra, G. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Elter, Zs.; Pazsit, I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Goteborg, (Sweden); Verma, V.; Hellesen, C.; Jacobsson, S. [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, (Sweden); Hamrita, H.; Bakkali, M. [CEA, DRT, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architecture Laboratory, Saclay, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Chapoutier, N.; Scholer, A-C.; Verrier, D. [AREVA NP, 10 rue Juliette Recamier F-69456 Lyon, (France); Cantonnet, B.; Nappe, J-C. [PHONIS France S.A.S, Nuclear Instrumentation, Avenue Roger Roncier, B.P. 520, F-19106 Brive Cedex, (France); Molinie, P.; Dessante, P.; Hanna, R.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Odic, E. [Supelec, Department of Power and Energy System, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Jadot, F. [CEA, DEN, DER, ASTRID Project Group, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor will rely on high temperature fission chambers installed in the reactor vessel and capable of operating over a wide-range neutron flux. The definition of such a system is presented and the technological solutions are justified with the use of simulation and experimental results. (authors)

  10. Aberrant expression of PlncRNA-1 and TUG1: potential biomarkers for gastric cancer diagnosis and clinically monitoring cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratieh, Zohreh; Khalaj, Zahra; Honardoost, Mohammad Amin; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Mansoor; Nikpour, Parvaneh

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate PlncRNA-1, TUG1 and FAM83H-AS1 gene expression and their possible role as a biomarker in gastric cancer (GC) progression. Long noncoding RNA expressions and clinicopathological characteristics were assessed in 70 paired GC tissues. Furthermore, corresponding data from 318 GC patients were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Expression of PlncRNA-1 and TUG1 were significantly upregulated in GC tumoral tissues, and significantly correlated with clinicopathological characters. However, FAM83H-AS1 showed no consistently differential expression. The expression of these three long noncoding RNAs was significantly higher in The Cancer Genome Atlas tumoral tissues. In conclusion, PlncRNA-1 and TUG1 genes may play a critical role in GC progression and may serve as potential diagnostic biomarkers in GC patients.

  11. Fatigue Damage in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Fatigue failure is found to depend both on the total time under load and on the number of cycles.Recent accelerated fatigue research on wood is reviewed, and a discrepancy between...... to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation between stiffness reduction...

  12. Effect of disease stage on progression of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F; Hu, Julia

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine sulfate retinopathy can progress after the drug is stopped. It is not clear how this relates to the stage of retinopathy or whether early screening with modern imaging technology can prevent progression and visual loss. To determine the relationship between progression of retinopathy and the severity of disease using objective data from optical coherence tomography and assess the value of early screening for the toxic effects of hydroxychloroquine. Clinical findings in patients with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy were monitored with repeated anatomical and functional examinations for 13 to 40 months after the drug was stopped in a referral practice in a university medical center. Eleven patients participated, with the severity of toxic effects categorized as early (patchy parafoveal damage shown on field or objective testing), moderate (a 50%-100% parafoveal ring of optical coherence tomography thinning but intact retinal pigment epithelium), and severe (visible bull's-eye damage). Visual acuity, white 10-2 visual field pattern density plots, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-density optical coherence tomography cross sections, thickness (from cube diagrams), and ellipsoid zone length. Visual acuity and visual fields showed no consistent change. Fundus autofluorescence showed little or no change except in severe cases in which the bull's-eye damage expanded progressively. Optical coherence tomography cross sections showed little visible change in early and moderate cases but progressive foveal thinning (approximately 7 μm/y) and loss of ellipsoid zone (in the range of 100 μm/y) in severe cases, which was confirmed by quantitative measurements. The measurements also showed some foveal thinning (approximately 4 μm/y) and deepening of parafoveal loss in moderate cases, but the breadth of the ellipsoid zone remained constant in both early and moderate cases. A few cases showed a suggestion of ellipsoid zone improvement. Patients with

  13. Damage Detection of a Concrete Column Subject to Blast Loads Using Embedded Piezoceramic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Deng, Qingshan; Cai, Lujun; Ho, Siuchun; Song, Gangbing

    2018-04-28

    Some of the most severe structural loadings come in the form of blast loads, which may be caused by severe accidents or even terrorist activities. Most commonly after exposure to explosive forces, a structure will suffer from different degrees of damage, and even progress towards a state of collapse. Therefore, damage detection of a structure subject to explosive loads is of importance. This paper proposes a new approach to damage detection of a concrete column structure subjected to blast loads using embedded piezoceramic smart aggregates (SAs). Since the sensors are embedded in the structure, the proposed active-sensing based approach is more sensitive to internal or through cracks than surface damage. In the active sensing approach, the embedded SAs act as actuators and sensors, that can respectively generate and detect stress waves. If the stress wave propagates across a crack, the energy of the wave attenuates, and the reduction of the energy compared to the healthy baseline is indicative of a damage. With a damage index matrix constructed by signals obtained from an array of SAs, cracks caused by blast loads can be detected throughout the structure. Conventional sensing methods such as the measurement of dynamic strain and acceleration were included in the experiment. Since columns are critical elements needed to prevent structural collapse, knowledge of their integrity and damage conditions is essential for safety after exposure to blast loads. In this research, a concrete column with embedded SAs was chosen as the specimen, and a series of explosive tests were conducted on the column. Experimental results reveal that surface damages, though appear severe, cause minor changes in the damage index, and through cracks result in significant increase of the damage index, demonstrating the effectiveness of the active sensing, enabled by embedded SAs, in damage monitoring of the column under blast loads, and thus providing a reliable indication of structural

  14. Three year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: x-ray and uv effects in photosynthetic organisms; effects of alcohols and oxygen concentration on transforming DNA; free radical studies; sensitization by metal ions; role of the solvated electron in radiation damage to cells; effectiveness of organic and inorganic compounds in sensitizing bacterial spores to high energy radiation; oxygen effects; radiosensitivity of enzyme systems in Chlorella; and effects of pre-irradiation of solutions on spores

  15. KDHE Project Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LDB/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in July-December 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Agra, Kansas, from the 1950s to the early 1970s. No structures remain on the property, and the land is used for agricultural purposes, specifically wheat production. The property is currently owned by the Kyle Railroad Co. and is leased to Mr. Herb VanEaton. The Pro-Ag Marketing grain storage facility is directly south of the former CCC/USDA facility. Quarterly progress reports for October-December 2008, January-March 2009, and April- June 2009 (Argonne 2009a,b,c) provided detailed information regarding construction and startup of the cleanup. Previous periodic monitoring reports (Argonne 2010a,b,c,d, 2011a,b,c, 2012, 2013a,b,c, 2014a,b) have tracked the subsequent progress of the cleanup effort. Data for evaluation of system performance are collected primarily by sampling SVE effluents, soil gas monitoring points, and groundwater wells for analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Table 1.1 provides a detailed chronological summary of activities during implementation of the cleanup.

  16. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  17. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  18. Treaty Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jasani, B.; Lingenfelder, I.

    2009-01-01

    of remote sensing technologies. The book therefore comprises management aspects (issues and priorities of security research, crisis response), applied methodologies and process chains (treaty monitoring, estimation of population densities and characteristics, border permeability models, damage assessment...... companies, national research institutions and international organizations, all of whom were brought together under the aegis of the European research project GMOSS (Global Monitoring for Security and Stability). This book is tailored for the scientific community that deals with the application of EO data...... of civil security. Written for: Scientists, researchers in spatial sciences as well as practitioners, politicians, decision makers at NGO's in the field of security, crisis management, risk assessment and vulnerability....

  19. Damaged Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  20. Structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.E.; Bruhn, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtually all structures show some signs of distress due to deterioration of the building components, to changed loads, or to changed support conditions. Changed support conditions result from ground movements. In mining regions many cases of structural distress are attributed to mining without considering alternative causes. This is particularly true of coal mining since it occurs under extensive areas. Coal mining is estimated to have already undermined more than eight million acres and may eventually undermine 40 million acres in the United States. Other nonmetal and metal underground mines impact much smaller areas. Although it is sometimes difficult, even with careful study, to identify the actual cause of damage, persons responsible for underground coal mining should at least be aware of possible causes of building stress other than mine subsidence. This paper presents information on distress to structures and briefly reviews a number of causes of ground movements other than subsidence: Mass movements, dissolution, erosion, frost action, shrinking and swelling, yield into excavations and compressibility