WorldWideScience

Sample records for molten metal freezing

  1. Freezing controlled penetration of molten metals flowing through stainless steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Vetter, D.L.; Wesel, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The freezing controlled penetration potential of molten metals flowing within stainless steel structure is important to the safety assessment of hypothetical severe accidents in liquid metal reactors. A series of scoping experiments has been performed in which molten stainless steel and nickel at various initial temperatures and driving pressures were injected downward and upward into 6.4 and 3.3 mm ID stainless steel tubes filled with argon gas and initially at room temperature. In all tests, there was no evidence that the solid tube wall was wetted by the molten metals. The penetration phenomena are markedly different for downward versus upward injections. The dependency upon tube orientation is explained in terms of the absence of wetting. Complete plugs were formed in all experiments halting the continued injection of melt. Calculations with a fluid dynamics/heat transfer computer code show that the injected masses limited by plugging are consistent with freezing through the growth of a stable solidified layer (crust) of metal upon the solid tube wall. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Metalcasting: Filtering Molten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauren Poole; Lee Recca

    1999-01-01

    A more efficient method has been created to filter cast molten metal for impurities. Read about the resulting energy and money savings that can accrue to many different industries from the use of this exciting new technology

  3. Thermal conductivity of molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta-Martinez, Maria Vita

    2000-02-01

    A new instrument for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals has been designed, built and commissioned. The apparatus is based on the transient hot-wire technique and it is intended for operation over a wide range of temperatures, from ambient up to 1200 K, with an accuracy approaching 2%. In its present form the instrument operates up to 750 K. The construction of the apparatus involved four different stages, first, the design and construction of the sensor and second, the construction of an electronic system for the measurement and storage of data. The third stage was the design and instrumentation of the high temperature furnace for the melting and temperature control of the sample, and finally, an algorithm was developed for the extraction of the thermal conductivity from the raw measurement data. The sensor consists of a cylindrical platinum-wire symmetrically sandwiched between two rectangular plane sheets of alumina. The rectangular sensor is immersed in the molten metal of interest and a voltage step is applied to the ends of the platinum wire to induce heat dissipation and a consequent temperature rise which, is in part, determined by the thermal conductivity of the molten metal. The process is described by a set of partial differential equations and appropriate boundary conditions rather than an approximate analytical solution. An electronic bridge configuration was designed and constructed to perform the measurement of the resistance change of the platinum wire in the time range 20 {mu}s to 1 s. The resistance change is converted to temperature change by a suitable calibration. From these temperature measurements as a function of time the thermal conductivity of the molten metals has been deduced using the Finite Element Method for the solution of the working equations. This work has achieved its objective of improving the accuracy of the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals from {+-}20% to {+-}2%. Measurements

  4. Metal Production by Molten Salt Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.; Qingfeng, Li

    Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed.......Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed....

  5. Mechanism study of freeze-valve for molten salt reactor (MSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qinhua, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the fourth generation nuclear reactor, ordinary nuclear grade valve is unsuitable for MSR due to its special coolant and extraordinary working temperature. Freeze-valve is proposed as the most appropriate valve for MSR, but the technology issue about freeze-valve has not been report in recent decades. Its significance to test the comprehensive property of freeze-valve for the application in MSR. A high temperature molten salt test loop was built which the physics property of salt is similar to the coolant of MSR. The results indicate that freeze-valve has a good performance use in the molten salt circumstances of high temperature (max 700 deg. C) and strong corrosion (authors)

  6. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  7. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiesen, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a vessel for handling molten metal having an interior refractory lining, apparatus for continuous high temperature measurement of the molten metal. It comprises a thermowell; the thermowell containing a multiplicity of thermocouples; leads being coupled to a means for continuously indicating the temperature of the molten metal in the vessel

  8. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  9. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir

  10. Interaction of calcium oxide with molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, A.V.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Ermakov, D.S.; Magurina, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium oxide solubility in molten lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium chlorides and their binary mixtures is determined in a temperature range of 973-1173 K by the method of isothermal saturation. Mechanisms of calcium oxide interaction with molten alkali metal chlorides are proposed

  11. Measurement of emittance of metal interface in molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, N.; Makino, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for measuring the total normal emittance of a metal in a semi-transparent liquid has been proposed and this technique has been applied to measure the emittance of stainless steel (SUS304), nickel, and gold in molten potassium nitrate KNO 3 . These emittance data are indispensable to analyzing the radiative heat transfer between a metal and a semitransparent liquid, such as a molten salt

  12. Transient freezing of molten salts in pipe-flow systems: Application to the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, N.; Hewitt, G.F.; Markides, C.N.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermo-hydraulic model has been proposed to simulate the transient freezing of molten salts in complex piping systems. • The passive safety system DRACS in Generation-IV, molten salt reactor is susceptible to failure due to salt freezing. • For the prototypical 0.2 MW reactor considered in this study considerable freezing occurs after 20 minutes leading to reactor temperatures above 900 °C within 4 hours. • Conservative criteria for the most important/least known variables in the design of DRACS have been discussed. • Over-conservative approaches in designing the NDHX should be used with caution as they can promote pipe clogging due to freezing. - Abstract: The possibility of molten-salt freezing in pipe-flow systems is a key concern for the solar-energy industry and a safety issue in the new generation of molten-salt reactors, worthy of careful consideration. This paper tackles the problem of coolant solidification in complex pipe networks by developing a transient thermohydraulic model and applying it to the ‘Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System’ (DRACS), the passive-safety system proposed for the Generation-IV molten-salt reactors. The results indicate that DRACS, as currently envisioned, is prone to failure due to freezing in the air/molten-salt heat exchanger, which can occur after approximately 20 minutes, leading to reactor temperatures above 900 °C within 4 hours. The occurrence of this scenario is related to an unstable behaviour mode of DRACS in which newly formed solid-salt deposit on the pipe walls acts to decrease the flow-rate in the secondary loop, facilitating additional solid-salt deposition. Conservative criteria are suggested to facilitate preliminary assessments of early-stage DRACS designs. The present study is, to the knowledge of the authors, the first of its kind in serving to illustrate possible safety concerns in molten-salt reactors, which are otherwise considered very safe in the literature. Furthermore

  13. Natural convection heat transfer in the molten metal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.; Choi, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical studies using the FLOW-3D computer program have been performed on natural convection heat transfer of a high density molten metal pool, in order to evaluate the coolability of the corium pool. The FLOW-3D results on the temperature distribution and the heat transfer rate in the molten metal pool region have been compared and evaluated with the experimental data. The FLOW-3D results have shown that the developed natural convection flow contributes to the solidified crust formation of the high density molten metal pool. The present FLOW-3D results, on the relationship between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region, are more similar to the calculated results of Globe and Dropkin's correlation than any others. The natural convection heat transfer in the low aspect ratio case is more substantial than that in the high aspect ratio case. The FLOW-3D results, on the temperature profile and on the heat transfer rate in the molten metal pool region, are very similar to the experimental data. The heat transfer rate of the internal heat generation case is higher than that of the bottom heating case at the same heat supply condition. (author)

  14. Nonmetal-metal transition in metal–molten-salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to study the nonmetal-metal transition in two different metal–molten-salt solutions, Kx(KCl)1-x and Nax(NaBr)1-x. As the excess metal concentration is increased the electronic density becomes

  15. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

  16. Compatibility tests between molten salts and metal materials (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki

    2003-08-01

    Latent heat storage technology using molten salts can reduce temperature fluctuations of heat transfer fluid by latent heat for middle and high temperature regions. This enables us to operate several heat utilization systems in cascade connected to High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) from high to low temperature range by setting the latent heat storage system after a heat utilization system to reduce thermal load after the heat utilization systems. This latent heat technology is expected to be used for effective use of heat such as equalization of electric load between night and daytime. In the application of the latent heat technology, compatibility between molten salts and metal materials is very important because molten salts are corrosive, and heat transfer pipes and vessels will contact with the molten salts. It will be necessary to prevail the latent heat storage technique that normal metal materials can be used for the pipes and vessels. However, a few studies have been reported of compatibility between molten salts and metals in middle and high temperature ranges. In this study, four molten salts, range of the melting temperature from 490degC to 800degC, are selected and five metals, high temperature and corrosion resistance steels of Alloy600, HastelloyB2, HastelloyC276, SUS310S and pure Nickel are selected for the test with the consideration of metal composition. Test was performed in an electric furnace by setting the molten salts and the metals in melting pots in an atmosphere of nitrogen. Results revealed excellent corrosion resistance of pure Nickel and comparatively low corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys such as Alloy600 and Hastelloys against Li 2 CO 3 . Corrosion resistance of SUS310S was about same as nickel based alloys. Therefore, if some amount of corrosion is permitted, SUS310S would be one of the candidate alloys for structure materials. These results will be used as reference data to select metals in latent heat technology

  17. Fluid Mechanics Of Molten Metal Droplets In Additive Manufacturing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Šonský, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2016), s. 403-412 ISSN 2046-0546 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : additive manufacturing * droplets * molten metal Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.witpress.com/elibrary/cmem-volumes/4/4/1545

  18. Metallic materials corrosion problems in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, G.; Dixmier, J.; Jarny, P.

    1977-01-01

    The USA forecastings concerning the molten salt reactors are reviewed (mixtures of fluorides containing the fuel, operating between 560 and 700 0 C). Corrosion problems are important in these reactors. The effects of certain characteristic factors on corrosion are analyzed: humidity and metallic impurities in the salts, temperature gradients, speed of circulation of salts, tellurium from fission products, coupling. In the molten fluorides and experimental conditions, the materials with high Ni content are particularly corrosion resistant alloys (hastelloy N). The corrosion of this material is about 2.6 mg.cm -2 at 700 0 C [fr

  19. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  20. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  1. Study on corrosion of metal materials in nitrate molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wei; Yang, Bo; Li, Maodong; Li, Shiping; Xin, Mingliang; Zhang, Shuanghong; Huang, Guojia

    2017-01-01

    High temperature molten salts as a heat transfer heat storage medium has been more widely used in the field of concentrated solar thermal power generation. In the thermal heat storage system, metal material stability and performance at high temperatures are of one major limitation in increasing this operating temperature. In this paper, study on corrosion of 321H, 304, 316L, P91 metal materials in modified solar two molten salts. The corrosion kinetics of 304, 316L, 321H, P91 metal material in the modified solar two molten salts at 450°C, 500°C is also investigated. Under the same condition it was found that 304, 321H corroded at a rate of 40% less than P91. Spallation of corrosion products was observed on P91 steel, while no obvious observed on other kinds of stainless steel. Corrosion rates of 304, 321H, and 316L slowly increased with temperature. Oxidation mechanisms little varied with temperature. Corrosion products of metal materials observed at 450°C, 500°C were primarily Fe oxide and Fe, Cr oxide.

  2. Cracking of crude oil in the molten metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat A. Glikin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is investigated the process of crude oil and its individual fractions cracking in the molten metals medium to produce light petroleum products. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the possibility of using lead and tin including alloys thereof as the melt. The cracking of West Siberian crude oil is studied at temperatures 400-600 °C. It is detected that as the temperature increases there is increase of aromatic hydrocarbons and olefins content in gasoline while naphthenes, n- and i-paraffins content reduces. Optimal temperature for cracking in molten metals is ~500 °C. The use of a submerged nozzle increases the yield of light petroleum products by ~2%. The research octane number of gasoline produced is 82-87 points. It is determined that the yield of light petroleum products depending on the experimental conditions is increased from 46.9 to 55.1-61.3% wt.   

  3. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  4. Molten salt/metal extractions for recovery of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (EFR) is an advanced reactor concept that incorporates metallic driver and blanket fuels, an inherently safe, liquid-sodium-cooled, pool-type, reactor design, and on-site pyrochemical reprocessing (including electrorefining) of spent fuels and wastes. This paper describes a pyrochemical method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to recover transuranic elements from the EFR electrorefiner process salt. The method uses multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and cadmium metal at high temperatures. The chemical basis of the salt extraction method, the test equipment, and a test plan are discussed

  5. Online monitoring of corrosion behavior in molten metal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Pan, Congyuan; Li, Chaoyang; Fei, Teng; Ding, Xiaokang; Du, Xuewei; Wang, Qiuping

    2018-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of structure materials in direct contact with molten metals is widespread in metallurgical industry. The corrosion of casting equipment by molten metals is detrimental to the production process, and the corroded materials can also contaminate the metals being produced. Conventional methods for studying the corrosion behavior by molten metal are offline. This work explored the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for online monitoring of the corrosion behavior of molten metal. The compositional changes of molten aluminum in crucibles made of 304 stainless steel were obtained online at 1000 °C. Several offline techniques were combined to determine the corrosion mechanism, which was highly consistent with previous studies. Results proved that LIBS was an efficient method to study the corrosion mechanism of solid materials in molten metal.

  6. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  7. ESR hollows molten metal/slag interface detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, B.; Klein, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    A system for detecting the location of a molten metal/slag interface during the casting of electroslag remelted hollows includes a gamma ray radiation source and a scintillation counter. The source and counter reside outside the casting mould and are held in fixed spatial relationships with respect to one another and with respect to the mandrel. The radiation from the source is directed chordally through the mould and through the annular casting zone, defined between the sidewalls of the upwardly driven mandrel and the mould without contacting said mandrel. The counter provides an electrical signal responsive to the rate of radiation events detected thereby. (author)

  8. Local coordination of polyvalent metal ions in molten halide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Tosi, M.P.

    1989-07-01

    Ample experimental evidence is available in the literature on the geometry and the stability of local coordination for polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of their halides with alkali halides. Recent schemes for classifying this evidence are discussed. Dissociation of tetrahedral halocomplexes in good ionic systems can be viewed as a classical Mott problem of bound-state stability in a conducting matrix. More generally, structural coordinates can be constructed from properties of the component elements, to separate out systems with long-lived fourfold or sixfold coordination and to distinguish between these. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig

  9. Optical absorption of dilute solutions of metals in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senatore, G.; Parrinello, M.; Tosi, M.P. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica; Gruppo Nazionale di Struttura dell material del CNR, Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1978-12-23

    The theory of liquid structure for fluids of charged hard spheres is applied to an evaluation of the F-centre model for valence electrons in metal-molten salt solutions at high dilution. Minimization of the free energy yields the groundstate radius of the elctron bubble and hence the optical excitation energy in a Franck-Condon transition, the shift and broadening of the transition due to fluctuations in the bubble radius, the volume of mixing, and the activity of the salt in the solution.

  10. Energy Dissipation Rate in an Agitated Crucible Containing Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Shimasaki, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Shoji

    2017-10-01

    The energy dissipation rate (EDR) is an important parameter for characterizing the behavior of inclusion coagulation in agitated molten metal. To clarify the inclusion coagulation mechanism, we review previous water model studies by particularly focusing on the relation between the impeller torque and the EDR of the fluid, which indicates the ratio of energy dissipated in the viscous medium to the energy inputted by the rotating impeller. In the present study, simulations coupled with experiments were performed to determine the relation between the torque and the effective EDR for water and liquid Al in crucibles with and without baffles.

  11. The nonmetal-metal transition in solutions of metals in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1997-04-01

    Solutions of metals in molten salts present a rich phenomenology: localization of electrons in disordered ionic media, activated electron transport increasing with metal concentration towards a nonmetal-metal (NM-M) transition, and liquid-liquid phase separation. A brief review of progress in the study of these systems is given in this article, with main focus on the NM-M transition. After recalling the known NM-M behaviour of the component elements in the case of expanded fluid alkali metals and mercury and of solid halogens under pressure, the article focuses on liquid metal - molten salt solutions and traces the different NM-M behaviours of the alkalis in their halides and of metals added to polyvalent metal halides. (author). 51 refs, 2 figs

  12. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Streitz, Frederick H.

    2004-01-01

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized

  13. Application of molten salts in pyrochemical processing of reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Various mixes of chloride and fluoride salts are used as the media for conducting pyrochemical processes in the production and purification of reactive metals. These processes generate a significant amount of contaminated waste that has to be treated for recycling or disposal. Molten calcium chloride based salt systems have been used in this work to electrolytically regenerate calcium metal from calcium oxide for the in situ reduction of reactive metal oxides. The recovery of calcium is characterized by the process efficiency to overcome back reactions in the electrowinning cell. A thermodynamic analysis, based on fundamental rate theory, has been performed to understand the process parameters controlling the metal deposition, rate, behavior of the ceramic anode-sheath and influence of the back-reactions. It has been observed that the deposition of calcium is dependent on the ionic diffusion through the sheath. It has also been evidenced that the recovered calcium is completely lost through the back-reactions in the absence of a sheath. A practical scenario has also been presented where the electrowon metal can be used in situ as a reductant to reduce another reactive metal oxide

  14. Heat transfer on liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Saito, Yasushi; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2001-01-01

    Molten-core pool had been formed in the lower-head of TMI-2 pressure vessel at the severe accident. The lower head, however, didn't receive any damage by reactor core cooling. Heat transfer at outside of the lower head and boiling heat transfer at liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water, however, are important for initial cooling process of the molten-core pool. The heat transfer experiments for the liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water are carried out over the range of natural convection to film boiling region. Phenomenon on the heat transfer experiments are visualized by using of high speed video camera. Wood's metal and U-alloy 78 are used as molten-metal. The test section of the experiments consists of a copper block with heater, wood's metal, and water. Three thermocouple probes are used for temperature measurement of water side and the molten-metal side. Stability of the liquid-liquid interface is depended on the wetness of container wall for molten metal and the temperature distribution of the interface. Entrainment phenomena of molten-metal occurs by a fluctuation of the interface after boiling on the container wall surface. The boiling curves obtained from the liquid-liquid interface experiments are agree with the nucleate boiling and the film boiling correlations of solid-liquid system. (Suetake, M.)

  15. Sythesis of rare earth metal - GIC graphite intercalation compound in molten chloride system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds of ytterbium and neodymium have been prepared by interacting graphite and metals in molten chlorides. These rare earth metals can be suspended in molten chlorides in the presence of trichlorides via disproportionation reaction RE(0) + RE(III) = 2RE(II) at lower than 300 degC. Carbides-free compounds are obtained in these systems. (author)

  16. Metal-carbide multilayers for molten Pu containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, T.S.E.; Curtis, P.G.; Juntz, R.S.; Krueger, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Multilayers composed of nine or ten alternating layers of Ta or W and TaC were studied for the feasibility of their use in containing molten plutonium (Pu) at 1200 degrees C. Single layers of W and TaC were also investigated. A two-source electron beam evaporation process was developed to deposit these coatings onto the inside surface of hemispherical Ta cups about 38 mm in diameter. Pu testing was done by melting Pu in the coated hemispherical cups and holding them under vacuum at 1200 degrees C for two hours. Metallographic examination and microprobe analysis of cross sections showed that Pu had penetrated to the Ta substrate in all cases to some extent. Full penetration to the outer surface of the Ta substrate, however, occurred in only a few of the samples. The fact that full penetration occurred in any of the samples suggests that it would have occurred in uncoated Ta under these testing conditions which in turn suggests that the multilayer coatings do afford some protection against Pu attack. The TaC used for these specimens was wet by Pu under these testing conditions, and following testing, Pu was found uniformly distributed throughout the carbide layers which appeared to be rather porous. Pu was seen in the W and Ta layers only when exposed directly to molten Pu during testing or near defects suggesting that Pu penetrated the multilayers at defects in the coating and traveled parallel to the layers along the carbide layers. These results indicate that the use of alternating metal and ceramic layers for Pu containment should be possible through the use of nonporous ceramic that is not wet by molten Pu and defect-free films

  17. Synthesis of CeS and interactions with molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Hot-pressed and sintered discs of single-phase CeS were tested for interaction with molten aluminium, uranium, and iron to determine the conditions under which reaction first begins and the nature of the reaction. Aluminium begins to react with CeS at ∼ 1190 K, slowly dissolving cerium and forming a thin layer of Ce 3 S 4 at the reaction interface. At 1363 K, aluminium wets and spreads over the CeS surface and dissolves ∼ 01 at% Ce. Ce 3 Al 11 precipitates out in the aluminium phase on cooldown. Uranium does not react with CeS at 1673 K, but at 1873 K it wets and spreads on CeS and dissolves ∼ 100 atom ppm S, which precipitates out as US on cooldown. Iron wets CeS at 1873 K and 1973 K but does not spread or interact. Because of the desirable containment characteristics of CeS and similar sulfides for molten metals, we recommend their use in a number of applications. (author)

  18. Visualization study of molten metal-water interaction by using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to visualize the behavior of molten metal dropped into water during the premixing process by means of neutron radiography which makes use of the difference in the attenuation characteristics of materials. For this purpose, a high-sensitive, high-frame-rate imaging system using neutron radiography was constructed and was applied to visualization of the behavior of molten metal dropped into water. The test rig consisted of a furnace and a test section. The furnace could heat the molten metal up to 650 C. The test section was a rectangular tank made of aluminum alloy. The tank was filled with heavy water and molten Wood's metal was dropped into heavy water. Visualization study was carried out with use of the high-frame-rate neutron radiography to see the breakup of molten metal jet or lump dropped into heavy water pool. In the images obtained, water, steam or air bubbles, molten metal jets or droplets, cloud of small particles of molten metal after atomization could be distinguished. The debris of Wood's metal was collected after the experiment, and the relation between the break-up behavior and the size and the shape of the debris particles was investigated. (orig.)

  19. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidifcation of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. As a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 .deg. C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleight number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer

  20. Behaviour of metals and alloys in molten fluoride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, St.

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride salts are contemplated for Generation IV nuclear systems which structural materials need to resist corrosion at high temperatures. Corrosion of metals in molten fluorides has been investigated in support of the Molten Salt Reactor's development and led to an optimized alloy, Hastelloy-N, but it lacked fundamentals data for the comprehension of materials' degradation mechanisms. The main objective of this work is then to help with the understanding of the corrosion behaviour of nickel and its alloys in fluoride salts. An experimental method was built up using electrochemical techniques and enabled to investigate the thermochemical conditions of the media and the influence of different parameters (media, temperature and quantity of impurities) on the behaviour of the materials. Most tests were performed in LiF-NaF mixtures between 800 and 1000 C. Pure metals can be classified as follows: Cr ≤ Fe ≤ Ni ≤ Mo ≤ W in increasing stability order and two specific behaviours were evidenced: Cr and Fe corrode in the melt, whereas Ni, Mo and W are stable, underlining the significance level of the redox couple controlling the reactions in the mixture. Moreover, corrosion current densities increase with temperature, fluoro-acidity and the quantity of dissolved oxide in the melt. Binary Ni-Cr alloys were also tested; selective attack of Cr is first observed before both elements are oxidized. Combining thermochemical calculations and experimental results enables to propose an approach to establish an optimized composition for a stable alloy. Immersion tests were finally achieved in addition to the electrochemical tests: interpretations of both methods were compared and completed. (author)

  1. Wetting and spreading behavior of molten brazing filler metallic alloys on metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Satoshi; Kajiura, Tetsurou; Hanada, Yukiakira; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Wetting and spreading of molten brazing filler material are important factors that influence the brazing ability of a joint to be brazed. Several investigations into the wetting ability of a brazing filler alloy and its surface tension in molten state, in addition to effects of brazing time and temperature on the contact angle, have been carried out. In general, dissimilar-metals brazing technology and high-performance brazed joint are necessities for the manufacturing field in the near future. Therefore, to address this requirement, more such studies on wetting and spreading of filler material are required for a deeper understanding. Generally, surface roughness and surface conditions affect spreading of molten brazing filler material during brazing. Wetting by and interfacial reactions of the molten brazing filler material with the metallic substrate, especially, affect strongly the spreading of the filler material. In this study, the effects of surface roughness and surface conditions on the spreading of molten brazing filler metallic alloys were investigated. Ag-(40-x)Cu-xIn and Ag- (40-x)Cu-xSn (x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25) alloys were used as brazing filler materials. A mild-steel square plate (S45C (JIS); side: 30 mm; thickness: 3mm) was employed as the substrate. A few surfaces with varying roughness were prepared using emery paper. Brazing filler material and metallic base plate were first washed with acetone, and then a flux was applied to them. The filler, 50 mg, was placed on the center of the metallic base with the flux. A spreading test was performed under Ar gas using an electrically heated furnace, after which, the original spreading area, defined as the sessile drop area, and the apparent spreading area, produced by the capillary grooves, were both evaluated. It was observed that the spreading area decreased with increasing In and Sn content.

  2. Freezing of liquid alkali metals as screened ionic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badirkhan, Z.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between Wigner crystallization of the classical ionic plasma and the liquid-solid transition of alkali metals is examined within the density wave theory of freezing. Freezing of the classical plasma on a rigid neutralizing background into the bcc structure is first re-evaluated, in view of recent progress in the determination of its thermodynamic functions by simulation and of the known difficulties of the theory relating to the order parameter at the (200) star of reciprocal lattice vectors. Freezing into the fcc structure is also considered in this context and found to be unfavoured. On allowing for long-wavelength deformability of the background, the ensuing appearance of a volume change on freezing into the bcc structure is accompanied by reduced stability of the fluid phase and by an increase in the entropy of melting. Freezing of alkali metals into the bcc structure is next evaluated, taking their ionic pair structure as that of an ionic plasma reference fluid screened by conduction electrons and asking that the correct ionic coupling strength at liquid-solid coexistence should be approximately reproduced. The ensuring values of the volume and entropy changes across the phase transition, as estimated from the theory by two alternative routes, are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The order parameters of the phase transition, excepting the (200) one, conform rather closely to a Gaussian behaviour and yield a Lindemann ratio in reasonable agreement with the empirical value for melting of bcc crystals. It is suggested that ionic ordering at the (200) star in the metal may be (i) assisted by medium range ordering in the conduction electrons, as indicated by differences in X-ray and neutron diffraction intensities from the liquid, and/or (ii) quite small in the hot bcc solid. Such a possible premelting behaviour of bcc metals should be worth testing experimentally by diffraction. (author). 48 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Effect of crust increase on natural convection heat transfer in the molten metal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong; Choi, Sang Min

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed on natural convection heat transfer with a rapid crust formation in the molten metal pool of a low Prandtl number fluid. Two types of steady state tests, a low and high geometric aspect ratio cases in the molten metal pool, were performed. The crust thickness by solidification was measured as a function of boundary surface temperatures. The experimental results on the relationship between the Nusselt number and Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool with a crust formation were compared with existing correlations. The experimental study has shown that the bottom surface temperature of the molten metal layer, in all experiments, is the major influential parameter in the crust formation, due to the natural convection flow. The Nusselt number of the case without a crust formation in the molten metal pool is greater than that of the case with the crust formation at the same Rayleigh number. The present experimental results on the relationship between the Nusselt number and Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool match well with Globe and Dropkin's correlation. From the experimental results, a new correlation between the Nusselt number and Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool with the crust formation was developed as Nu=0.0923 (Ra) 0.0923 (2 X 10 4 7 ). (author)

  4. Apparatus and Method for Increasing the Diameter of Metal Alloy Wires Within a Molten Metal Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

    2002-01-29

    In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

  5. Mutual inductance appliance for measuring the level of a molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, Marc.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns an appliance for measuring the level of a molten metal of the kind using the variation of the mutual inductance between two imbricated windings depending on the level of the free area of the molten metal in the range of levels taken up by the windings. It has a particularly significant use in measuring the level of liquid sodium, especially in nuclear facilities where sodium is used as coolant [fr

  6. Neutron scattering lengths of molten metals determined by gravity refractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiner, G.; Waschkowski, W.; Koester, L.

    1990-01-01

    Very accurate values of the coherent neutron scattering lengths of the heavy elements Bi and Pb are important quantities for the investigation of the electric interactions of neutrons with atoms. We performed, therefore, a series of experiments to determine accurate scattering lengths by means of neutron gravity refractometry on liquid mirrors of molten metals. The possible perturbations of the necessary reflection measurements have been discussed in details. After taking into account the uncertainties and corrections associated with observable perturbations we obtained the following values for bound atoms: b(Bi)=8.532±0.002 fm, b(Pb)=9.405±0.003 fm, b(Tl)=8.776±0.005 fm, b(Sn)=6.225±0.002 fm and b(Ga)=7.288±0.002 fm. These data are corrected for the local field effect occuring in the reflection on liquids. The recently reported results for the neutron's electric polarizability and the neutron-electron scattering length are supported by the Bi- and Pb-scattering length of this work. (orig.)

  7. Neutron scattering lengths of molten metals determined by gravity refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, G; Waschkowski, W; Koester, L [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1990-10-01

    Very accurate values of the coherent neutron scattering lengths of the heavy elements Bi and Pb are important quantities for the investigation of the electric interactions of neutrons with atoms. We performed, therefore, a series of experiments to determine accurate scattering lengths by means of neutron gravity refractometry on liquid mirrors of molten metals. The possible perturbations of the necessary reflection measurements have been discussed in details. After taking into account the uncertainties and corrections associated with observable perturbations we obtained the following values for bound atoms: b(Bi)=8.532{plus minus}0.002 fm, b(Pb)=9.405{plus minus}0.003 fm, b(Tl)=8.776{plus minus}0.005 fm, b(Sn)=6.225{plus minus}0.002 fm and b(Ga)=7.288{plus minus}0.002 fm. These data are corrected for the local field effect occuring in the reflection on liquids. The recently reported results for the neutron's electric polarizability and the neutron-electron scattering length are supported by the Bi- and Pb-scattering length of this work. (orig.).

  8. Neutron scattering lengths of molten metals determined by gravity refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, G.; Waschkowski, W.; Koester, L. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik)

    1990-10-01

    Very accurate values of the coherent neutron scattering lengths of the heavy elements Bi and Pb are important quantities for the investigation of the electric interactions of neutrons with atoms. We performed, therefore, a series of experiments to determine accurate scattering lengths by means of neutron gravity refractometry on liquid mirrors of molten metals. The possible perturbations of the necessary reflection measurements have been discussed in details. After taking into account the uncertainties and corrections associated with observable perturbations we obtained the following values for bound atoms: b(Bi)=8.532{plus minus}0.002 fm, b(Pb)=9.405{plus minus}0.003 fm, b(Tl)=8.776{plus minus}0.005 fm, b(Sn)=6.225{plus minus}0.002 fm and b(Ga)=7.288{plus minus}0.002 fm. These data are corrected for the local field effect occuring in the reflection on liquids. The recently reported results for the neutron's electric polarizability and the neutron-electron scattering length are supported by the Bi- and Pb-scattering length of this work. (orig.).

  9. Proton conducting ceramics for potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, H.; Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis and chemical characterization of proton conductor ceramics. • Qualification of ceramics for hydrogen sensors in molten lithium–lead. • Ceramics have well-defined grains with a wide distribution of sizes. • Good agreement with predictions obtained with BaZrY, BaCeZrY and SrFeCo ceramics. -- Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic (Pb–15.7Li) is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. Also, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. Potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten lithium–lead eutectic have been designed at the Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) at Barcelona and are under development and qualification. The probes are based on the use of solid state electrolytes and works as proton exchange membranes (PEM). In this work the following compounds: BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α}, Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}-Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized in order to be tested as PEM H-probes. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements at 500 °C have been performed at a fixed hydrogen concentration. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor elements BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 7−δ} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation (deviation around 60 mV). In contrast, the sensor constructed using the proton conductor element Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}–Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} showed a deviation higher than 100 mV between experimental an theoretical data.

  10. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  11. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  12. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing low reluctance rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and rollers including low reluctance rim structures. The magnetic field and the rollers help contain the molten metal from leaking out of the containment structure.

  13. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure.

  14. Numerical simulation on the explosive boiling phenomena on the surface of molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqi; Peng Cheng; Wang Qinghua; Pan Liangming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation was carried out to investigate the explosive boiling phenomenon on high temperature surface also the influence of vapor growth rate during explosive boiling, vapor condensation in sub-cooled water and the subsequent effect on flowing and heat transfer. The simulation result indicates that the steam on the molten metal surface grows with very high speed, and it pushes away the sub-cooled water around and causes severe flowing. The steam clusters which block the sub-cooled water to rewet the molten metal surface are appearing at the same time. During the growth, lifting off as well as condensation of the steam clusters, the sub-cooled water around is strongly disturbed, and obvious vortexes appear. Conversely, the vortex will influence the steam cluster detachment and cub-cooled water rewetting the metal surface. This simulation visually displays the complex explosive boiling phenomena on the molten metal surface with high temperature. (authors)

  15. Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Molten Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Shaymus W.; Craparo, Joseph; De Saro, Robert; Apelian, Diran

    2017-10-01

    In order for metals to meet the demand for critical applications in the automotive, aerospace, and defense industries, tight control over the composition and cleanliness of the metal must be achieved. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for applications in metal processing has generated significant interest for its ability to perform quick analyses in situ. The fundamentals of LIBS, current techniques for deployment on molten metal, demonstrated capabilities, and possible avenues for development are reviewed and discussed.

  16. Recovery of metal chlorides from their complexes by molten salt displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process for recovering zirconium or hafnium chloride from a complex of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride and phosphorus oxychloride. The process comprising: introducing liquid complex of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride and phosphorus oxychloride into an upper portion of a feed column containing zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and phosphorus oxychloride vapor. The liquid complex absorbing zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and producing a bottoms liquid and also producing a phosphorus oxychloride vapor stripped of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride; introducing the bottoms liquid into a molten salt containing displacement reactor, the reactor containing molten salt comprising at least 30 mole percent lithium chloride and at least 30 mole percent of at least one other alkali metal chloride, the reactor being heated to 30-450 0 C to displace phosphorus oxychloride from the complex and product zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and phosphorus oxychloride vapor and zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride-containing molten salt; introducing the zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and the phosphorus oxychloride vapor into the feed column below the point of introduction of the liquid stream; introducing the zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride containing-molten salt into a recovery vessel where zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride is removed from the molten salt to produce zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride product and zirconium or hafnium chloride-depleted molten salt; and recycling the zirconium or hafnium tetachloride-depleted molten salt to the displacement reactor

  17. Development of electrolytic process in molten salt media for light rare-earth metals production. The metallic cerium electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restivo, T.A.G.

    1994-01-01

    The development of molten salt process and the respective equipment aiming rare-earth metals recovery was described. In the present case, the liquid cerium metal electrodeposition in a molten electrolytes of cerium chloride and an equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides in temperatures near 800 C was studied. Due the high chemical reactivity of the rare-earth metals in the liquid state and their molten halides, an electrolytic cell was constructed with controlled atmosphere, graphite crucibles and anodes and a tungsten cathode. The electrolytic process variables and characteristics were evaluated upon the current efficiency and metallic product purity. Based on this evaluations, were suggested some alterations on the electrolytic reactor design and upon the process parameters. (author). 90 refs, 37 figs, 20 tabs

  18. Heavy metal: Can molten metal technology turn toxic dross into gold? A study in alchemy, controversy, and green tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, S.

    1995-12-31

    In a Massachusetts industrial park, inside a renovated helicopter factory, stands a giant, Rube Goldbergesque machine of metal boxes and pipes. Technicians in blue uniforms, hard hats, and safety glasses attend this contraption, watching over the fire at its heart: a cauldron of molten metal, usually iron, heated to some 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Hazardous wastes are injected into this molten bath. There, according to its inventor, the metal acts as a catalyst for a chemical reaction that instantly reduces compound molecules to their elemental components. A considerable portion for the wastes thus digested are spit out again in the form of industrial-grade materials, ready for reuse or resale. This article describes both the processing of hazardous wastes by using molten metal to drive reactions that would recover useful materials from hazardous waste and the future possibilities for its use.

  19. Molten salt oxidation of ion-exchange resins doped with toxic metals and radioactive metal surrogates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Yoo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Joon-Hyung; Eun, Hee-Chul

    2005-01-01

    Ion-exchange resins doped with toxic metals and radioactive metal surrogates were test-burned in a bench-scale molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor system. The purposes of this study are to confirm the destruction performance of the two-stage MSO reactor system for the organic ion-exchange resin and to obtain an understanding of the behavior of the fixed toxic metals and the sulfur in the cationic exchange resins. The destruction of the organics is very efficient in the primary reactor. The primarily destroyed products such as carbon monoxide are completely oxidized in the secondary MSO reactor. The overall collection of the sulfur and metals in the two-stage MSO reactor system appeared to be very efficient. Over 99.5% of all the fixed toxic metals (lead and cadmium) and radioactive metal surrogates (cesium, cobalt, strontium) remained in the MSO reactor bottom. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and the XRD patterns of the spent salt samples revealed that the collected metals existed in the form of each of their carbonates or oxides, which are non-volatile species at the MSO system operating conditions. (author)

  20. Convective heat transfer the molten metal pool heated from below and cooled by two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. S.; Suh, K. Y.; Chung, C. H.; Park, R. J.; Kim, S. B.

    1998-01-01

    During a hypothetical servere accident in the nuclear power plant, a molten core material may form stratified fluid layers. These layers may be composed of high temperature molten debris pool and water coolant in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel or in the reactor cavity. This study is concerned with the experimental test and numerical analysis on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool immersed in the boiling coolant. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 .deg. C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. Tests were performed under the condition of the bottom surface heating in the test section and the forced convection of the coolant being injected onto the molten metal pool. The constant temperature and constant heat flux conditions are adopted for the bottom heating. The test parameters included the heated bottom surface temperature of the molten metal pool, the input power to the heated bottom surface of the test section, and the coolant injection rate. Numerical analyses were simultaneously performed in a two-dimensional rectangular domain of the molten metal pool to check on the measured data. The numerical program has been developed using the enthalpy method, the finite volume method and the SIMPLER algorithm. The experimental results of the heat transfer show general agreement with the calculated values. In this study, the relationship between the Nusselt number and Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region was estimated and compared with the dry experiment without coolant nor solidification of the molten metal pool, and with the crust formation experiment with subcooled coolant, and against other correlations. In the experiments, the

  1. Morphology and Orientation Selection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Electrified Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. C.; Qin, R. S.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of electric current on morphology and orientation selection of non-metallic inclusions in molten metal has been investigated using theoretical modeling and numerical calculation. Two geometric factors, namely the circularity ( fc ) and alignment ratio ( fe ) were introduced to describe the inclusions shape and configuration. Electric current free energy was calculated and the values were used to determine the thermodynamic preference between different microstructures. Electric current promotes the development of inclusion along the current direction by either expatiating directional growth or enhancing directional agglomeration. Reconfiguration of the inclusions to reduce the system electric resistance drives the phenomena. The morphology and orientation selection follow the routine to reduce electric free energy. The numerical results are in agreement with our experimental observations.

  2. Coolant material effect on the heat transfer rates of the molten metal pool with solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies on heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling were performed. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 degree C. Demineralized water and R113 are used as the working coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool immersed in the boiling coolant. The Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study are compared between the water coolant case and the R113 coolant case. The experimental results for the water coolant are higher than those for R113. Also, the empirical relationship of the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number is compared with the literature correlations measured from mercury. The present experimental results are higher than the literature correlations. It is believed that this discrepancy is caused by the effect of the heat loss to the environment on the natural convection heat transfer in the molten pool

  3. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO_2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li_2O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  4. Novel ceramic coatings for containment of uranium and reactive molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Satpute, R.U.; Ramanathan, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma sprayed aluminium oxide coatings, which are currently used for casting uranium metal are, however, not suitable for long duration handling of molten uranium and is also unstable under reducing conditions. Yttrium oxide and rare earth phosphates are suggested as promising materials for prevention of high temperature corrosion by molten metals. The present paper reports research efforts directed towards development of plasma sprayed coatings of yttria and lanthanum phosphate. Thermal spray grade powders of yttrium oxide and lanthanum phosphate, synthesized using locally available raw materials have been used as feedstock powders for plasma spray deposition. The coatings have been deposited using the indigenously developed 40 kW atmospheric plasma spray system and have been characterized. Results of preliminary experiments on compatibility of yttria and lanthanum phosphate with molten uranium are quite encouraging. (author)

  5. Pumps of molten metal based on magnetohydrodynamicprinciple for cooling high-temperature nuclear reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Ivo; Donátová, M.; Karban, P.; Ulrych, B.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 4 (2009), s. 13-15 ISSN 0033-2097 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : pumps of molten metal * magnetohydrodynamic principle * nuclear reactors Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.196, year: 2009

  6. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  7. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  8. The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on thermal history of an arch - welded steel plate by numerical methods. SM Adedayo. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol. 1(1) 2001: 1-16. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  9. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  10. Four stream breakup of molten IFR [Integral Fast Reactor] metal fuel in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in which the breakup behavior of kilogram quantities of molten uranium, uranium-zirconium alloy, and uranium-iron alloy pour streams in 600C sodium was studied. A sodium depth of less than 0.3 m was required for hydrodynamic breakup and freezing of 25-mm pour streams of uranium and uranium-zirconium alloy with up to 400C melt superheat. The breakup material was primarily in the form of filaments and sheets with a settled bed voidage on the order of 0.9. The uranium-iron alloy with 800C melt superheat exhibited similar behavior except a sodium depth somewhat greater than 0.3 m was required for breakup and freezing of the particles

  11. Thermal Stress and Heat Transfer Coefficient for Ceramics Stalk Having Protuberance Dipping into Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Hendra; Li, Wenbin; Takase, Yasushi; Ogura, Hiroki; Higashi, Yusuke

    Low pressure die casting is defined as a net shape casting technology in which the molten metal is injected at high speeds and pressure into a metallic die. The low pressure die casting process plays an increasingly important role in the foundry industry as a low-cost and high-efficiency precision forming technique. In the low pressure die casting process is that the permanent die and filling systems are placed over the furnace containing the molten alloy. The filling of the cavity is obtained by forcing the molten metal, by means of a pressurized gas, to rise into a ceramic tube having protuberance, which connects the die to the furnace. The ceramics tube, called stalk, has high temperature resistance and high corrosion resistance. However, attention should be paid to the thermal stress when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the molten aluminum. It is important to reduce the risk of fracture that may happen due to the thermal stresses. In this paper, thermo-fluid analysis is performed to calculate surface heat transfer coefficient. The finite element method is applied to calculate the thermal stresses when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the crucible with varying dipping speeds. It is found that the stalk with or without protuberance should be dipped into the crucible slowly to reduce the thermal stress.

  12. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten metal drop in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Izumi; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to clarify the fragmentation mechanism of a metallic alloy (U-Pu-Zr) fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions (liquefaction temperature =650degC), which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum (m.p.=660degC) and sodium mainly under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur. When the instantaneous contact interface temperature (T i ) between molten aluminum drop and sodium is lower than the boiling point of sodium (T c,bp ), the molten aluminum drop can be fragmented and the mass median diameter (D m ) of aluminum fragments becomes small with increasing T i . When T i is roughly equivalent to or higher than T c,bp , the fragmentation of aluminum drop is promoted by thermal interaction caused by the boiling of sodium on the surface of the drop. Furthermore, even under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur and the solid crust is formed on the surface of the drop, it is found from an analytical evaluation that the thermal fragmentation of molten aluminum drop with solid crust is caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the crust. These results indicate the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by the metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt. (author)

  13. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten metal drop in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Zhang Zhigang; Sugiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    2007-01-01

    In order to clarify the fragmentation mechanism of a metallic alloy (U-Pu-Zr) fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions (liquefaction temperature = 650 deg. C), which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum (melting point 660 deg. C) and sodium mainly under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur. When the instantaneous contact interface temperature (T i ) between molten aluminum drop and sodium is lower than the boiling point of sodium (T c,bp ), the molten aluminum drop can be fragmented and the mass median diameter (D m ) of aluminum fragments becomes small with increasing T i . When T i is roughly equivalent to or higher than T c,bp , the fragmentation of aluminum drop is promoted by thermal interaction caused by the boiling of sodium on the surface of the drop. Furthermore, even under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur and the solid crust is formed on the surface of the drop, it is confirmed from an analytical evaluation that the thermal fragmentation of molten aluminum drop with solid crust has a potential to be caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the crust. These results indicate the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by the metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt

  14. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...

  15. Thermal behaviour of a spherical addition to molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehmen, E.

    1995-05-01

    This thesis presents a numerical model for describing the thermal behaviour of a spherical alloy addition when added to a melt. It is assumed that: no significant heat of solution between the alloy addition and the melt is involved, the dissolution rate is dominated by heat transfer from the melt, the heat flow into the addition is spherically symmetric, the additions have a well defined melting point, there are no solid phase transformations, heat conduction can be represented by Fourier`s law, and the heat transfer from the melt can be described by an average heat transfer coefficient. The model is validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from immersion experiments on: (1) a 4.88 cm diameter Al sphere chilled in liquid nitrogen to -196 {sup o}C and then immersed in water of 3.8 {sup o}C and 18.1 {sup o}C, (2) 4.90 cm diameter Al spheres at room temperatures immersed in molten Al of 720 {sup o}C, and (3) 3.72 cm diameter 75 wt% FeSi spheres at 150 {sup o}C immersed in molten steel of 1600 {sup o}C. The shell thickness and temperatures at the sphere centre and surface were recorded as functions of time. For model and experiment to agree, it was found that the density, specific heat and thermal conductivity of the alloy addition must depend on temperature, and an inner heat transfer resistance across the sphere-shell interphase must be included. The sensible heat of the melt that solidifies should be included in the heat balance only when the shell is expanding. The inner heat transfer resistance is shown to be very important in determining the melting/dissolution time for alloy additions that react strongly with the melt. 70 refs., 60 figs., 36 tabs.

  16. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  17. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K. [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  18. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.

    2001-01-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  19. Metallic oxide reduction in molten chlorides: electrochemical solvent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2005-11-01

    We consider the reaction MeO 2 + 2 Ca → Me + 2 CaO in CaCl 2 at 850 C. We want to re-use the molten media, which is a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at the end of the reaction. For that we want to de-oxidize it. When we electrolyse CaO we obtain Ca and O 2 ; it presents three difficult points that we want to solve: (1) it is difficult to oxidize O 2 - without oxidizing Cl - because their oxidation potential are very closed, (2) the chemical or electrochemical anodic corrosion, (3) the anodically produced gas dissolution in the mell One way of avoiding chlorine gas evolution is to prevent chloride ions from reaching the anode, for example using a selective membrane. Furthermore, the best prevention of the anodically produced gas dissolution in the melt can be done with a compartment, physically separating the anode from the rest of the reactional media. Thus in this work we have used an yttria stabilized zirconia membrane as a selective membrane for the deoxidation of a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at 850 C. (author)

  20. Investigation of the fragmentation of molten metals dropped into cold water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, G.S.

    1976-11-01

    The physical mechanism by which small quantities of molten metal fragment extensively when dropped into a pool of cold water was investigated. Since this subject has been the focus of considerable research in the past, some of the more prominent theories are briefly discussed. Experiments were conducted dropping small solid spheres at a high temperature instead of molten metal drops, and indicate a significant difference from the latter. Several hypotheses were proposed based on the hydrodynamics of the molten drop and tested analytically. The theory that the drop fragmentation is caused by the violent release of dissolved gas from within the drop was investigated experimentally and lead to the conclusion that tin fragmentation probably does not occur in this way. It is felt that a calculation of the dynamics of the vapor film that would be expected to surround the hot drop is needed. This calculation was not performed but several suggestions and estimates have been made. It would seem that the possibility of metal fragmentation by rapid vaporization of water entrapped within the metal drop is well worth investigating

  1. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

  2. The electrodeposition and rare earths reduction in the molten salt actinides recovery systems using liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, J-B.; Lee, J-H.; Kwon, S-W.; Ahn, B-G.; Woo, M-S.; Lee, B-J.; Kim, E-H.; Park, H-S.; Yoo, J-H.

    2005-01-01

    A pyrochemical partitioning system uses liquid metals such as cadmium and bismuth in order to recover the actinide metals from a molten salt mixture containing rare earth fission product metals. The liquid metals play roles as a cathode in the electrowinning or an extracting phase in the reductive extraction operation. The product resulting from the above operations is metal-cadmium or-bismuth alloy, which should contain the rare earth element amounts as low as possible for a transmutation purpose. In this study, the electrodeposition behaviours of uranium and lanthanide elements such as La, Ce and Nd were investigated for solid molybdenum and liquid cadmium electrodes in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Electrochemical methods used are a cyclic voltammetry (CV) and a chronopotentiometry for monitoring the salt phase and recovering the metals, respectively. The CV graphs for monitoring the oxidizing agent CdCl 2 in the salt phase were obtained. These show a time dependently disappearance of the oxidizing agent corresponding to the formation of UCl 3 by inserting the uranium metal into the salt. Also, a sequential oxidation technique which is added at a controlled amount of the oxidizing agents into the salt phase was applied. It was found that this method is feasible for the selective reduction of the rare earths content in liquid metal alloys. (author)

  3. Observation of the molten metal behaviors during the laser cutting of thick steel specimens using attenuated process images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Yamagishi, Ryuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Molten metal behaviors during the laser cutting of carbon steel and stainless steel specimens up to 300 mm in thickness were observed to dismantle large steel objects for the nuclear decommissioning, where attenuated process images from both steels were observed for detailed process analysis. Circular and rod-like molten metal structures were observed at the laser irradiated region depending on the assist gas flow conditions. Molten metal blow-off and flow processes were observed as cutting processes. The observations were explained by the aerodynamic interaction of the melted surface layer. The method is useful for the detailed observation of the molten metal behaviors, and the results are informative to understand and optimize the laser cutting process of very thick steel specimens. (author)

  4. Electromagnetic confinement and movement of thin sheets of molten metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus capable of producing a combination of magnetic fields that can retain a metal in liquid form in a region having a smooth vertical boundary including a levitation magnet that produces low frequency magnetic field traveling waves to retain the metal and a stabilization magnet that produces a high frequency magnetic field to produce a smooth vertical boundary. As particularly adapted to the casting of solid metal sheets, a metal in liquid form can be continuously fed into one end of the confinement region produced by the levitation and stabilization magnets and removed in solid form from the other end of confinement region. An additional magnet may be included for support at the edges of the confinement region where eddy currents loop.

  5. Results of measurements of thermal interaction between molten metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-10-01

    The report describes results of an experimental investigation into thermal interaction of molten metals with water. The experiments were performed in two stages: the aim of the first stage was to study the general character of thermal interaction between molten metal and water and to measure the Leidenfrost temperature of the inverse Leidenfrost phenomenon. The second stage was directed to the experimental study of the triggering mechanism of thermal explosion. The experimental material gathered in this study includes: 1) transient temperature measurements in the hot material and in water, 2) measurements of pressure and reactive force combined with thermal explosion, 3) high-speed films of thermal interaction, 4) investigation results of thermal explosion debris (microscopic, mechanical, metallographical and chemical). The most significant observation is, that small jets from the main particle mass occuring 1 to 10 msec before, precede thermal explosion. (orig.) [de

  6. Polymer-Derived In- Situ Metal Matrix Composites Created by Direct Injection of a Liquid Polymer into Molten Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan; Terauds, Kalvis; Anilchandra, A. R.; Raj, Rishi

    2014-02-01

    We show that a liquid organic precursor can be injected directly into molten magnesium to produce nanoscale ceramic dispersions within the melt. The castings made in this way possess good resistance to tensile deformation at 673 K (400 °C), confirming the non-coarsening nature of these dispersions. Direct liquid injection into molten metals is a significant step toward inserting different chemistries of liquid precursors to generate a variety of polymer-derived metal matrix composites.

  7. Ionic structure of solutions of alkali metals and molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrier, G.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1982-02-01

    Neutron diffraction patterns from K-KCl and Rb-RbBr liquid solutions at various compositions are examined in an ionic-mixture model which neglects screening and aggregation due to the metallic electrons. The main feature of the observed diffraction patterns for wave number k above roughly 1A -1 are accounted for by the model. The approach to the metal-rich end of the phase diagram is analyzed in detail from different viewpoints in the K-KCl system. Short-range correlations of the potassium ions are described in this region by a metallic radius deduced from properties of the pure liquid metal, but a simple expanded-metal model must be supplemented by the assumption that considerable disorder is introduced in its structure by the halogen ions. Features of short-range ordering in the salt-rich region that are implied by a shoulder on the high-k side of the main peak in the diffraction pattern are also commented upon. (author)

  8. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  9. Performance Testing of Molten Regolith Electrolysis with Transfer of Molten Material for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald; Tripathy, Prabhat; Standish, Evan; Sirk, Aislinn; Melendez, Orlando; Stefanescu, Doru

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated the production of oxygen by electrolysis of molten regolith simulants at temperatures near 1600 C. Using an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in the production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Initial direct measurements of current efficiency have confirmed that the process offer potential advantages of high oxygen production rates in a smaller footprint facility landed on the moon, with a minimum of consumables brought from Earth. We now report the results of a scale-up effort toward the goal of achieving production rates equivalent to 1 metric ton O2/year, a benchmark established for the support of a lunar base. We previously reported on the electrochemical behavior of the molten electrolyte as dependent on anode material, sweep rate and electrolyte composition in batches of 20-200g and at currents of less than 0.5 A. In this paper, we present the results of experiments performed at currents up to 10 Amperes) and in larger volumes of regolith simulant (500 g - 1 kg) for longer durations of electrolysis. The technical development of critical design components is described, including: inert anodes capable of passing continuous currents of several Amperes, container materials selection, direct gas analysis capability to determine the gas components co-evolving with oxygen. To allow a continuous process, a system has been designed and tested to enable the withdrawal of cathodically-reduced molten metals and spent molten oxide electrolyte. The performance of the withdrawal system is presented and critiqued. The design of the electrolytic cell and the configuration of the furnace were supported by modeling the thermal environment of the system in an effort to realize a balance between external heating and internal joule heating. We will discuss the impact these simulations and experimental findings have

  10. Obtainment of lithium metal by electrolysis of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Costa, M.A.Z. da.

    1988-04-01

    The obtainment metallic lithium through KCL + LiCl, using a stainless steel cathode and a graphite anode is studied. The applications of lithium on nuclear energy, aerospatial program, metalurgy and as refining and degassing agent are also presented. The purification of lithium is still mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  11. Viscosity measurements of molten refractory metals using an electrostatic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-François; Okada, Junpei T; Watanabe, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Viscosities of several refractory metals (titanium, nickel, zirconium, niobium, ruthenium, rhodium, hafnium, iridium and platinum) and terbium have been measured by the oscillation drop method with an improved procedure. The measured data were less scattered than our previous measurements. Viscosities at their melting temperatures showed good agreement with literature values and some predicted values. (paper)

  12. Breakup Behavior of Molten Wood's Metal Jet in Subcooled Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Park, Seong Dae; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    There are safety characteristics of the metal fueled sodium fast-cooled reactor (SFR), by identifying the possibility of early termination of severe accidents. If the molten fuel is ejected from the cladding, the ejected molten fuel can interact with the coolant in the reactor vessel. This phenomenon is called as fuel-coolant interaction (FCI). The FCI occurs at the initial phase leading to severe accidents like core disruptive accident (CDA) in the SFR. A part of the corium energy is intensively transferred to the coolant in a very short time during the FCI. The coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands so results in steam explosion that can threat to the integrity of nuclear reactor. The intensity of steam explosion is determined by jet breakup and the fragmentation behavior. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the jet breakup between the molten fuel jet and the coolant in order to evaluate whether the steam explosion occurs or not. The liquid jet breakup has been studied in various areas, such as aerosols, spray and combustion. In early studies, small diameter jets of low density liquids were studied. The jet breakup for large density liquids has been studied in nuclear reactor field with respect to safety. The existence of vapor film layer between the melt and liquid fluid is only in case of large density breakup. This paper deals with the jet breakup experiment in non-boiling conditions in order to analyze hydraulic effect on the jet behavior. In the present study, the wood's metal was used as the jet material. It has similar properties to the metal fuel. The physical properties of molten materials and coolants are listed in Table I, respectively. It is easy to conduct the experiment due to low melting point of the wood's metal. In order to clarify the dominant factors determining jet breakup and size distribution of the debris, the experiment that the molten wood's metal was injected into the subcooled condition was conducted. The

  13. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  14. Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

    2009-02-06

    The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri – Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project

  15. Integrated oil production and upgrading using molten alkali metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2016-10-04

    A method that combines the oil retorting process (or other process needed to obtain/extract heavy oil or bitumen) with the process for upgrading these materials using sodium or other alkali metals. Specifically, the shale gas or other gases that are obtained from the retorting/extraction process may be introduced into the upgrading reactor and used to upgrade the oil feedstock. Also, the solid materials obtained from the reactor may be used as a fuel source, thereby providing the heat necessary for the retorting/extraction process. Other forms of integration are also disclosed.

  16. A study of metallic coatings obtained by electrolysis of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, Michel.

    1978-06-01

    An appropriate technique has been developed for obtaining compact metallic coatings from electrolysis of molten salts. Through the use of this method, it has been possible to produce pure metal deposits which, until now, has been extremely difficult to do. The apparatus used and the main steps of the process such as dehydration of the solvant, degassing of the equipment, and starting of the electrolytic process, are first described. This is followed by a discussion of the deposits of the metals beryllium, uranium, tantalum and tungsten obtained from electrolysis of molten fluorides at temperatures between 600 and 800 0 C. The metal coatings so obtained are homogeneous and show continuity, their thicknesses varying from a few microns to a millimeter or more. They have been studied by measurements. As potential applications of this new technique, one can mention the growth of diffusion barriers and the production of cathodes for thermoionic emission. The method can also be used for electroforming. An intermetallic diffusion between the deposit and the substrate has been observed in some cases. The advantage of the technique of melt electrolysis in obtaining metal coatings of enhanced thicknesses is illustrated by taking the beryllium-nickel system as an example. It is shown that the thickness obtained is proportional to the square root of growth time and is about 6 to 8 times larger than that obtained by conventional techniques [fr

  17. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1987-08-10

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

  18. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Kudyakov, V Ya; Smirnov, M V; Moskalenko, N I [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1984-08-01

    The coefficient of HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl/sub 4/+HfCl/sub 4/). HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl.

  19. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Smirnov, M.V.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    The coefficient of HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl 4 +HfCl 4 ). HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl

  20. Direct reduction of uranium oxide(U3O8) by Li metal and U-metal(Fe, Ni) alloy formation in molten LiCl medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Tack Jin; Choi, In Kyu; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2004-01-01

    Molten salt based electrochemical processes are proposed as a promising method for the future nuclear programs and more specifically for spent fuel processing. The lithium reduction has been introduced to convert actinide oxides into corresponding actinide metal by using lithium metal as a reductant in molten LiCl medium. We have applied similar lab-scale experiments to reduce uranium oxide in an effort to gain additional information on rates and mechanisms

  1. Removal of platinum group metals contained in molten glass using copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruga, Kazuyoshi; Sawada, Kayo; Arita, Yuji; Enokida, Youichi; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Removal of platinum group metals (PGMs) such as Pd, Ru, and RuO 2 from molten glass by using various amounts of liquid Cu was done as a basic study on a new vitrification process for a high-level radio-active waste. We prepared two types of borosilicate glasses containing PGMs and Cu, respectively. These glasses were mixed together and heated at 1,473 K for 4h in Ar atmosphere. More than 95% of Pd were removed as a spherical metal button composed of Pd-Cu alloy when Cu was added in an amount 0.5 times the weight of Pd. Nearly 95% of Ru was also removed as a spherical button with 2.5-5 times as much Cu addition as Ru in weight. Ruthenium oxide was reduced to metallic Ru by a reaction with Cu in the molten glass. The removal fraction was increased by increasing the amount of Cu and reached 63% when Cu addition was 7.5 times as much as RuO 2 in weight. By addition of Si as a reducing agent, nearly 90% of Pd and Ru were removed with Cu and Si metal composites even under O 2 :Ar=20:80 (v/v) condition. (author)

  2. Residual salts separation from metal reduced electrolytically in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Sun Seok; Seo, Chung Seok; Park, Seong Won

    2005-01-01

    The PWR spent oxide fuel can be reduced electrolytically in a hot molten salt for the conditioning and the preparation of a metallic fuel. Then the metal product is smelted into an ingot to be treated in the post process. Incidentally, the residual salt which originated from the molten salt and spent fuel elements should be separated from the metal product during the smelting. In this work, we constructed a surrogate material system to simulate the salt separation from the reduced spent fuel and studied the vaporization behaviors of the salts

  3. Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten alkaline-earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalik, O.Yu.; Tkhaj, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten calcium, strontium and barium chlorides are measured and their temperature dependences are determined. It is stated that the corrosion potential of hafnium becomes more electropositive with an increase of the environment temperature. If the temperature is the same the potential shifts to the interval of more electronegative values in the row of CaCl 2 , SrCl 2 , BaCl 2 which corresponds to a lesser corrosion rate in environments positioned from left to right. the comparison of hafnium corrosion potentials with previously measured values for titanium and zirconium shows that a metal activity decrease results in a more electronegative corrosion potential [ru

  4. Dissolution Rate And Mechanism Of Metals In Molten Aluminum Alloy A380

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hengyu

    2014-01-01

    Shot sleeve is a very easily worn out part in a high-pressure die-casting machine due to serious dissolution of the area underneath the pouring hole. It is because during a normal pouring process, the high temperature molten aluminum will impact and dissolve that area of the shot sleeve by complex chemical and physical process. Rotation experiment was carried out to H13 and four kinds of refractory metal samples. SEM and EDS pictures were taken in order to investigate the microstructure and t...

  5. Flowing and freezing of molten core materials during unprotected loss of flow accidents in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Royl, P.

    1988-09-01

    Flowing and freezing of mobile core materials change the fissile material distribution and core-inventory under hypothetical accident conditions and determine the path to permanent shutdown of the neutronic events and the energetic potentials. The report classifies the bondary conditions for such flowing and freezing processes by going through the different situations under which these processes can occur in the scenario of the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident. The classification is based on ULOF-accident simulations for a homogeneous reactor core concept of a 300 MWe LMFBR (e. g. SNR-300), but many boundary conditions are also characteristic for other core designs. A review of the relevant experiments is then made to correlate the available experimental information with these classified boundary conditions and to look at the resulting flowing and freezing processes. Boundary conditions that have been experimentally shown to be important are assigned high priorities. The data are specifically valued in relation to these boundary conditions of high priorities. The review includes the major experimental programs with published results. The discussion shows that the results from most clean condition tests for melt relocations are valuable for a better understanding of basic phenomena and analytical model development, but are not directly applicable to real accident conditions. The database for relevant boundary conditions from the ULOF scenario is limited and largely included in integral sequence tests from which quantitative information for modelling is difficult to obtain. Needs for additional investigations are identified. The suggestions are mainly restricted to investigations of the early phase of fuel removal. They are given with reference to candidate facilities and include relocations in the subassemblies and in the inter-subassembly gaps. Particular emphasis is put on the leading edge properties and possible driving forces to which more attention

  6. Performance and properties of anodes reinforced with metal oxide nanoparticles for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Grazia; Frattini, Domenico; Yoon, Sung Pil; Ham, Hyung Chul; Nam, Suk Woo

    2017-12-01

    Development of electrode materials for molten carbonate fuel cells is a fundamental issue as a balance between mechanical and electrochemical properties is required due to the particular operating environments of these cells. As concern the anode, a viable strategy is to use nano-reinforced particles during electrodes' fabrication. Candidate nanomaterials comprise, but are not limited to, ZrO2, CeO2, TiO2, Ti, Mg, Al, etc. This work deals with the characterization and test of two different types of hard oxide nanoparticles as reinforce for NiAl-based anodes in molten carbonate fuel cells. Nano ceria and nano zirconia are compared each other and single cell test performances are presented. Compared to literature, the use of hard metal oxide nanoparticles allows good performance and promising perspectives with respect to the use a third alloying metal. However, nano zirconia performed slightly better than nano ceria as polarization and power curves are higher even if nano ceria has the highest mechanical properties. This means that the choice of nanoparticles to obtain improved anodes performance and properties is not trivial and a trade-off between relevant properties plays a key role.

  7. Effect of thermodiffusion on the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification of molten metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jafar-Salehi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a transient Finite Element (FE method has been employed to solve the transport equations to investigate the heat transfer and fluid flow and the effect of thermodiffusion on vertical solidification of a binary molten metal alloy, forming a rod. The binary system considered in this study is SnBi composed of 65% Sn and 35% Bi subjected to bottom cooling. It is found that the flow of molten metal at the boundary of the mushy region plays an important role in the shape and geometry of the zone. The presence of thermodiffusion shows considerable difference in the composition of the solidified rod, compared with the one without considering the effect of thermodiffusion. Thermodiffusion also causes a faster solidification and a more uniform concentration distribution. The results of this study may be extended to similar binary and multicomponent systems in which a temperature gradient exists and the Soret coefficient is large enough so as to affect the fluid flow and concentration of the species.

  8. Laser cutting performances for thick steel specimens studied by molten metal removal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Toyama, Shin'ichi

    2017-01-01

    Laser cutting performances for thick carbon steel and stainless steel specimens up to 300 mm in thickness were studied to dismantle large steel objects. The cutting performances were summarized based on the assist gas flow rate and the front kerf width, and the range for appropriate cutting conditions was shown. Gas pressure in the kerf region required for molten metal removal was estimated from the pressure loss on the kerf surface, which depended on the gas flow rate and the kerf width. The relation to keep sufficient gas pressure in the kerf well corresponded to the experimental relations for appropriate cutting. Drag force to the molten metal on the kerf surface was also estimated, which varied by the structures and materials. The behaviors such as cavity formation and its expansion in the kerf region at the unsuccessful cutting trials were well explained. The results are informative for the development of the laser cutting technology applied to the thick steel specimen for the nuclear decommissioning. (author)

  9. Electrochemical separation of cerium and yttrium in molten chlorides on liquid-metallic electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, L.F.; Lebedev, V.A.; Nichkov, I.F.

    1978-01-01

    An estimating calculation of the coefficients of separation of cerium and yttrium in the process of electrolysis in molten salts on liquid electrodes of aluminium, gallium, indium, lead, tin, antimonium and zinc is carried out. The calculation of the separation coefficients was carried out according to the known values of activation coefficients of cerium and yttrium in fusible metals. The electrolysis was carried out at 973 K in the argon air in the cell with an eutectic mixture of NaCl and KCl as an elactrolyte. It is shown that the salten phase is concentrated by yttrium, and the melallic one- by cerium on all the electrodes. The value of the separation coefficient of Ce and Y is considerably high and continuously increases on the fusible metals in the Zn, In, Ga, Al, Pb, Sn, Sb series. The experimental values of the separation coefficients practically coincide with the theoretically calculated ones, testifying to the possibility of the effective separation of elements even in a single-staged possibility of the effective separation of elements even in a single-staged process. An electrolysis of molten salts is not inferior in its selectivity to the universally recognized methods of the fine purification of substances permitting to separate Ce and Y with the Ksub(sep) approximately equal to 10

  10. Thorium valency in molten alkali halides in equilibrium with metallic thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic thorium is shown to corrode in molten alkali halides even in the absence of external oxidizing agents, alkali cations acting as oxidizing agents. Its corrosion rate grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl at constant temperature. Substituting halide anions for one another exerts a smaller influence, the rate rising slightly in going from chlorides to bromides and iodides, having the same alkali cations. Thorium valency is determined coulometrically, the metal being dissolved anodically in molten alkali halides and their mixtures. In fluoride melts it is equal to 4 but in chloride, bromide and iodide ones, as a rule, it has non-integral values between 4 and 2 which diminish as the temperature is raised, as the thorium concentration is lowered, as the radii of alkali cations decrease and those of halide anions increase. The emf of cells Th/N ThHlsub(n) + (1-N) MHl/MHl/C, Hlsub(2(g)) where Hl is Cl, Br or I, M is Li, Na, K, Cs or Na + K, and N < 0.05, is measured as a function of concentration at several temperatures. Expressions are obtained for its concentration dependence. The emf grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl, other conditions being equal. (author)

  11. On some regularities of metal oxide solubility in molten CsI at T = 973 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherginets, V.L., E-mail: v_cherginets@ukr.net [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 21 Frunze St., 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Rebrova, T.P.; Datsko, Yu.N.; Shtitelman, V.A. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Bryleva, E.Yu. [State Scientific Organization STC ' Institute for Single Crystals' , National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > CdO, ZnO, NiO, and EuO are insoluble in CsI melt at 973 K. > The oxide solubilities are lower than those in chloride melts. > The oxide solubilities reduce with the cation radius. > ZnO, NiO, and EuO are suitable for scavenging CsO from oxide ion traces. - Abstract: Solubility products of CdO (pK{sub s,CdO} = 6.80 {+-} 0.2), ZnO (pK{sub s,ZnO} = 10.0 {+-} 0.5), NiO (pK{sub s,NiO} = 11.2 {+-} 0.2) and EuO (pK{sub s,EuO} = 13.1 {+-} 0.2) in molten CsI at T = 973 K are determined by potentiometric titration of (0.02 to 0.03) mol . kg{sup -1} solutions of the corresponding metal chlorides by strong base (KOH) using a membrane oxygen electrode Pt(O{sub 2})|ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) as an indicator. On the basis of pK{sub s,MeO} values, all the oxides studied are referred to practically insoluble in molten CsI. The values of the oxide solubility in CsI melt are lower than the corresponding values in molten alkali metal chlorides. This can be explained by 'softer' basic properties of I{sup -} as compared with Cl{sup -} in the frames of the Pearson 'hard' and 'soft' acid-base concept. In the oxide samples studied, the values of the solubility fall with the decreasing cation radius. The correlation between pK{sub s,MeO} and the polarizing action by Goldshmidt (Zr{sub Me{sup 2+}}{sup -2}) of the cation is practically linear and may be proposed for estimation of the solubility of s- and d- element oxides in molten CsI on the basis of their cation radii.

  12. Direct Electrolysis of Molten Lunar Regolith for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirk, Aislinn H. C.; Sadoway, Donald R.; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    When considering the construction of a lunar base, the high cost ($ 100,000 a kilogram) of transporting materials to the surface of the moon is a significant barrier. Therefore in-situ resource utilization will be a key component of any lunar mission. Oxygen gas is a key resource, abundant on earth and absent on the moon. If oxygen could be produced on the moon, this provides a dual benefit. Not only does it no longer need to be transported to the surface for breathing purposes; it can also be used as a fuel oxidizer to support transportation of crew and other materials more cheaply between the surface of the moon, and lower earth orbit (approximately $20,000/kg). To this end a stable, robust (lightly manned) system is required to produce oxygen from lunar resources. Herein, we investigate the feasibility of producing oxygen, which makes up almost half of the weight of the moon by direct electrolysis of the molten lunar regolith thus achieving the generation of usable oxygen gas while producing primarily iron and silicon at the cathode from the tightly bound oxides. The silicate mixture (with compositions and mechanical properties corresponding to that of lunar regolith) is melted at temperatures near 1600 C. With an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. The effect of anode material, sweep rate, and electrolyte composition on the electrochemical behavior was investigated and implications for scale-up are considered. The activity and stability of the candidate anode materials as well as the effect of the electrolyte composition were determined. Additionally, ex-situ capture and analysis of the anode gas to calculate the current efficiency under different voltages, currents and melt chemistries was carried out.

  13. Atomic size effects on local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatlipinar, H.; Akdeniz, Z.; Pastore, G.

    1992-08-01

    Structural correlations in molten trivalent metal chlorides are evaluated as functions of the metal ion size R M across the range from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A), using a charged soft-sphere model and the hypernetted chain approximation. Main attention is given to trends in the local liquid structure (partial radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and bond lengths) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the number-number and partial structure factors). The trend towards fourfold local coordination of the metal ions, the stabilization of their first-neighbour chlorine cage and the growth of medium range order are found to proceed in parallel as the size of the metal ion is allowed to decrease at constant number density and temperature. A tendency to molecular-type local structure and liquid-vapour phase separation is found within the hypernetted chain scheme at small metal ion sizes corresponding to AlCl 3 and is emphasized by decreasing the number density of the fluid. The predicted molecular units are rather strongly distorted Al 2 Cl 6 dimers, in agreement with observation. The calculated structural trends for other trichlorides are compared with diffraction and transport data. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  14. Quantum State-Resolved Collision Dynamics of Nitric Oxide at Ionic Liquid and Molten Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia Marie

    Detailed molecular scale interactions at the gas-liquid interface are explored with quantum state-to-state resolved scattering of a jet-cooled beam of NO(2pi1/2; N = 0) from ionic liquid and molten metal surfaces. The scattered distributions are probed via laser-induced fluorescence methods, which yield rotational and spin-orbit state populations that elucidate the dynamics of energy transfer at the gas-liquid interface. These collision dynamics are explored as a function of incident collision energy, surface temperature, scattering angle, and liquid identity, all of which are found to substantially affect the degree of rotational, electronic and vibrational excitation of NO via collisions at the liquid surface. Rotational distributions observed reveal two distinct scattering pathways, (i) molecules that trap, thermalize and eventually desorb from the surface (trapping-desorption, TD), and (ii) those that undergo prompt recoil (impulsive scattering, IS) prior to complete equilibration with the liquid surface. Thermally desorbing NO molecules are found to have rotational temperatures close to, but slightly cooler than the surface temperature, indicative of rotational dependent sticking probabilities on liquid surfaces. Nitric oxide is a radical with multiple low-lying electronic states that serves as an ideal candidate for exploring nonadiabatic state-changing collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface, which induce significant excitation from ground (2pi1/2) to excited (2pi 3/2) spin-orbit states. Molecular beam scattering of supersonically cooled NO from hot molten metals (Ga and Au, Ts = 300 - 1400 K) is also explored, which provide preliminary evidence for vibrational excitation of NO mediated by thermally populated electron-hole pairs in the hot, conducting liquid metals. The results highlight the presence of electronically nonadiabatic effects and build toward a more complete characterization of energy transfer dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces.

  15. From Oxygen Generation to Metals Production: In Situ Resource Utilization by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetpal, Deepak; Ducret, Andrew C.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    For the exploration of other bodies in the solar system, electrochemical processing is arguably the most versatile technology for conversion of local resources into usable commodities: by electrolysis one can, in principle, produce (1) breathable oxygen, (2) silicon for the fabrication of solar cells, (3) various reactive metals for use as electrodes in advanced storage batteries, and (4) structural metals such as steel and aluminum. Even so, to date there has been no sustained effort to develop such processes, in part due to the inadequacy of the database. The objective here is to identify chemistries capable of sustaining molten oxide electrolysis in the cited applications and to examine the behavior of laboratory-scale cells designed to generate oxygen and to produce metal. The basic research includes the study of the underlying high-temperature physical chemistry of oxide melts representative of lunar regolith and of Martian soil. To move beyond empirical approaches to process development, the thermodynamic and transport properties of oxide melts are being studied to help set the limits of composition and temperature for the processing trials conducted in laboratory-scale electrolysis cells. The goal of this investigation is to deliver a working prototype cell that can use lunar regolith and Martian soil to produce breathable oxygen along with metal by-product. Additionally, the process can be generalized to permit adaptation to accommodate different feedstock chemistries, such as those that will be encountered on other bodies in the solar system. The expected results of this research include: (1) the identification of appropriate electrolyte chemistries; (2) the selection of candidate anode and cathode materials compatible with electrolytes named above; and (3) performance data from a laboratory-scale cell producing oxygen and metal. On the strength of these results it should be possible to assess the technical viability of molten oxide electrolysis for in

  16. Electrodeposition of some metals and niobium superconducting alloys from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, U.

    1978-01-01

    The major goal of this thesis was to study the feasibility of electrodeposition from molten fluorides of the pure elements niobium, aluminium, tin, germanium and silicon, and the niboium superconducting intermetallic compounds with these elements, and to prepare and study films of these materials in the form of coherent and uniform coatings. Decomposition potential measurements with a gold anode were carried out on the alkali fluoride solvent and the fluoride salt solutions of niobium, aluminum, tin, and germanium to provide important initial thermodynamic data. Attempts to codeposit niobium and aluminum invariably failed, niobium being the exclusive deposit in all cases. Codeposition of niobium--tin alloys was demonstrated. Of the four intermetallic compounds of the niobium--germanium system, three were obtained as single-phase coatings. The superconducting compound (A15 phase) was not successfully electrodeposited in a single-phase form. It was obtained, however, in phase-mixture coatings. Application of alternating square wave pulses produced substantial changes in the morphology of niobium deposits. Silicon electrocrystallization epitaxy (ECE) was demonstrated for the first time. Uniform, coherent, and well adherent coatings of polycrystalline Si with a grain diameter of up to 40 to 50 μm were plated onto nonalloying metal substrates, such as silver and tungsten.These processes offer some attractive features for both integrated circuit technology and silicon solar cell fabrication. Aluminum, tin, and germanium were also electrodeposited from molten fluorides

  17. Reactions of metal oxides with molten NaPO3 + NaCl mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskaya, E.N.; Mityakhina, V.S.; Rodionov, Yu.I.; Silin, M.Yu.

    1988-01-01

    We consider the dissolution mechanism for iron (III), europium(III), and tin(IV) oxides in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl that are responsible for the peak solubilities. We chose Fe 2 O 3 as the basic material since this occurs in large amounts around damaged metal structures in rock salt mines in a proposed zone for storing vitrified radioactive wastes. Solubility measurement and paper chromatography show that Fe 2 O 3 dissolves in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl in air by reaction with the solvent to give double iron and sodium diphosphates and monophosphates in accordance with the initial solution-in-the-melt composition, the degree of equilibration, and the temperature. The elevated solubilities for initial NaCl contents close to 30 mole % are due to sodium triphosphates and tricyclophosphates present in these melts. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirms that double iron, europium and tin diphosphates and monophosphates containing sodium occur in these chloride-polyphosphate melts

  18. A study on the reduction of uranium oxide to uranium metal in LiCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Hur, J. M.; Lee, W. K.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Research for the analysis on a metallization process of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li molten salt was carried out. Effect of a concentration of Li 2 O on the metallization process was also studied. The new concept, electrochemical reduction of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt was proposed. The concept is based on the integrated process of metallization of UO 2 with simultaneous electrochemical reduction of Li 2 O which is recycled in a closed system. In a LiCl-Li molten salt system, U 3 O 8 whose conversion ratio to U turns out to be 97.1%, showed a better metallization characteristic than UO 2 . It is verified that electrochemically reduced Li is well deposited on the UO 2 powder cathode through a porous magnesia filter in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. In that process Li 2 O was from by the reduction process of UO 2 to U. This electrochemical reduction process showed good results to covert UO 2 to U

  19. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  20. Control of molten salt corrosion of reduced activation steel for fusion applications by metallic beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2001 the INL started a research program as a part of the 2. Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Energy Research (JUPITER-II collaboration) aimed at the characterization of the 2LiF-BeF2 (Flibe) molten salt as a breeder and coolant material for fusion applications. A key objective of the work was to demonstrate chemical compatibility between Flibe and potential fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. A series of tests performed at INL demonstrated that this can be achieved by contacting the salt with metallic beryllium, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W JLF-1 to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) and fluoride potential control (metallic Be) at 530 C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The specimen and a beryllium rod were simultaneously immersed in the molten salt through gas tight fittings mounted on risers extending from the top lid of the test vessel; the beryllium rod was extracted after 5 hours, while the sample was left in the salt for 250 hours during which salt samples were withdrawn from the melt at fixed intervals. A diagnostic system based on the measurement of reacting HF through on-line titration was coupled with the analysis of metallic components in the salt samples that were dissolved and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Impurity levels of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon were determined from pieces of the solidified melt using Leco analytical systems. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic elements dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration falls below the detectable limit when the beryllium rod is inserted and increases when the

  1. The Solubility of metal oxides in molten carbonates - why the acid-basic chemistry fails?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Niels; Qingfeng, Li; Borup, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    Solubilities of various metal oxides in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650°C under carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubility of NiO and PbO decreases with increasing lithium mole fraction and decreasing CO2 partial pressure. On the other hand, the emf measurement...... shows opposite effects, i.e., decreasing CO2 pressure leads to more negative emf values but increasing lithium content gives more positive emf values. This contradiction is explained by means of a complex formation model. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)2]-2 and/or [Pb(CO3) 3...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Magnetohydrodynamics Effects in Molten Metals and Study of Homogeneity of Radioactive Mercury Amalgams

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, A

    2002-01-01

    The high neutrino output demanded for a neutri no factory requests a high power proton beam interacting with a static target. The additional circumstances of limited space and long term stability ask for development of novel concepts for such types of targets. In our working group, part of the Neutri no Factory Working Group (NFWG) of CERN, we are investigating on the proton interaction with the mercury target. This is called the study of proton induced shocks in molten metal. In the US scheme for a neutrino factory the interaction between proton beam and the mercury jet target takes place inside a 20 Tesla solenoidal magnetic field, which serv es as a focusing device for the produced particles. This field of study is refe rred to as Magneto Hydrodynamics (MHD). The high power proton beam deposits a large amount of energy in the small volume of the target, which results in disruption. The aim is to establi...

  3. Electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium. The experiment is carried out in a molten alkaline halogenide medium in a temperature range between 670 and 750 degrees Celsius. The first part of this work concerns more particularly the electrochemical behaviour of the hafnium and uranium ions in the electrolytic solution. The reduction mechanisms of these ions have been studied by the use of three methods: cyclic voltametry, chrono-potentiometry and square wave voltametry. Results have shown that the process of metal deposition is difficult to explain because secondary reactions (as for instance: adsorption phenomena or cathodic deposit dissolution) occur. The uranium germination has then been studied by modelling of chrono-amperograms. The experiments have shown that the deposition is the result of the initial uranium crystal growth and depends on the electrolyte diffusion. The second part of this work deals with the implementation of hafnium and uranium deposition taking into account the preceding mechanistic studies. Depositions have all been observed by physical methods as for instance scanning electron microscopy. Particular experimental solutions (soluble anode, addition of fluoride ions to the electrolyte) have been used. The obtained deposition of hafnium is smooth and adheres very well to the substrate. The uranium depositions have been implemented with the use of a soluble anode. Uranium is deposited in a dendritic shape to the cathode. It has also been shown that the electro-kinetic parameters (temperature, uranium ions concentration, current density) have not an important influence on the dendritic morphology of the deposition. This morphology could be the consequence of particular convection movements to the surface of the cathode. (O.M.)

  4. Control and monitoring of oxygen content in molten metals. Application to lead and lead-bismuth melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghetta, V.; Fouletier, J.; Henault, M.; Le Moulec, A.

    2002-01-01

    The sources of error in potentiometric measurements of the oxygen activity in molten metals and the methods proposed to reduce these measurements errors are described. Specific constraints related to low temperature measurements are emphasized. Two set-ups for control of the oxygen activity in molten lead and lead-bismuth were developed. They involve zirconia-based cells, i.e., an oxygen pump and an oxygen probe. The performance of the set-ups was characterized attempts to reduce the working temperature (T<450 deg C) are discussed. (authors)

  5. The combined effect of freeze thaw events and heavy metal pollution leads to distinct lethal synergy in Enchytraeus albidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Sara Wincentz; Slotsbo, Stine; Holmstrup, Martin

    Many anthropogenic activities negatively affect the environment and stress the organisms living here in various ways. Due to global warming it is likely that freeze-thaw events will replace permanent freezing of soils in arctic regions. Metals are some of the most common contaminants in soil...

  6. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2009-01-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF + BeF 2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 deg. C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to levels close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimen corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 h exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimen's surface.

  7. Behavior of uranium and its surrogates in molten aluminosilicate glasses in contact with liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevreux, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns an innovative process used for conditioning nuclear waste that contain metallic parts contaminated with actinides. High actinides concentrations are expected to be incorporated in the glass melt in contact with the molten metals. Among these metals, aluminum and/or stainless steel impose a strongly reducing environment to the glass melt involving redox reactions. These reactions modify actinides oxidation states and therefore change their solubilities in the glass and could also reduce them into the metallic form. In this work, we focus on the behavior of uranium and its surrogates, namely hafnium and neodymium, in aluminosilicate glasses from the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 system melted in highly reducing conditions. The first step consists in comparing the hafnium and uranium solubilities in the glass as functions of redox conditions and glass composition. A methodology has been set up and a specific device has been used to control the oxygen fugacity and the alkali content of the glass. The results show that uranium is far less soluble in the glass than hafnium (Hf(IV)) in reducing conditions. The uranium solubility ranges from 4 to 7 wt% UO 2 for an oxygen fugacity below 10 -14 atm at 1250 C-1400 C. Uranium oxidation states have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES). It has been pointed out that U(IV) is the main form in the glass for such imposed oxygen fugacities. The second step of this work is to identify the glass-metal interaction mechanisms in order to determine the localization of uranium and its surrogates (Nd, Hf) in the glass-metal system. Mechanisms are mostly ruled by the presence of metallic aluminum and are similar for uranium, neodymium and hafnium. Glass-metal interaction kinetics demonstrate that uranium and its surrogates can temporarily be reduced into the metallic form for particular conditions. A re-oxidation occurs with time which is in good agreement with thermodynamics. Regarding uranium, the re

  8. Effect of Metallic Li on the Behavior of Metals in Molten Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambaram, Dev [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Phillips, William [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Merwin, Augustus [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Singh, Vickram [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Unger, Aaron [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Moon, Jeremy [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-12-29

    The deleterious effect of Li0 on the reactor container materials has not been studied. Exposure to liquid Li0 results in material degradation primarily through lithium intercalation, leaching of specific alloying elements, and decarburization. The objective of this research is to understand how the presence of Li0 in molten LiCl-Li2O affects the degradation of two classes of alloys by correlating their accelerated and long term electrochemical behavior to the surface chemistry of the alloys and the chemistry of the electrolyte. This study has completed all the proposed tasks. The project led to the design and development of unique experimental setups and protocols. Several groundbreaking findings resulted from this study. The project had several products in terms of student education, thesis and dissertation, publications and presentations.

  9. Impingement heat flux by dispersed molten metal fuel on a horizontal stainless steel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Although the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) possesses inherent safety features, an assessment of the consequences of melting of the metal fuel is necessary for risk analysis. As part of this effort an experimental study was conducted to determine the depths of sodium at 600 C required for pour streams of various molten uranium alloys (U, U-5 wt % Zr, U-10 wt % Zr, and U-10 wt % Fe) to break up and solidify. The quenched particulate material, which was in the shape of filaments and sheets, formed coolable beds because of the high void-age (∼0.9) and large particle size (∼10 mm). In a test with a 0.15-m sodium depth, the fragments from a pure uranium pour stream did not completely solidify but formed an agglomerated mass which did not fuse to the base plate. However, the agglomerated fragments of U-10 wt % Fe eutectic fused to the stainless steel base plate. An analysis of the temperature response of a 25-mm thick base plate was made by volume averaging the properties of the sodium and metal phases and assuming two semi-infinite solids coming into contact. Good agreement was obtained with the data during the initial 5 to 10 s of the contact period. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Environmental and energy gains from using molten magnesium–sodium–potassium chlorides for electro-metallisation of refractory metal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molten eutectic mixture of magnesium, sodium and potassium chlorides (MgCl2–NaCl–KCl has inappreciable solubility for oxide ions, and can help disengage a carbon anode from the oxide ions generated at a metal oxide cathode, and effectively avoid carbon dioxide formation. This “disengaging strategy” was successfully demonstrated in electro-reduction of solid oxides of zirconium and tantalum. It has led to significantly higher current efficiency (93%, and lower energy consumption (1.4 kW h kg−1 in electrolysis of tantalum oxide to tantalum metal compared to the conventional electrolysis in molten calcium chloride (e.g. 78% and 2.4 kW h/kg-Ta.

  11. Electrodeposition of metallic tungsten coating from binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.H.; Zhang, Y.C.; Jiang, F.; Fu, B.J.; Sun, N.B.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten is considered a promising plasma facing armor material for future fusion devices. An electrodeposited metallic tungsten coating from Na 2 WO 4 –WO 3 binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel (LAS) substrate was investigated in this paper. Tungsten coatings were deposited under various pulsed currents conditions at 1173 K in atmosphere. Cathodic current density and pulsed duty cycle were investigated for pulsed current electrolysis. The crystal structure and microstructure of tungsten coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy X-ray dispersive analysis techniques. The results indicated that pulsed current density and duty cycle significantly influence tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. The average grain size of the coating becomes much larger with increasing cathodic current density, which demonstrates that appropriate high cathodic current density can accelerate the growth of grains on the surface of the substrate. The micro-hardness of tungsten coatings increases with the increasing thickness of coatings; the maximum micro-hardness is 482 HV. The prepared tungsten coatings have a smooth surface, a porosity of less than 1%, and an oxygen content of 0.024 wt%

  12. Electrodeposition of metallic tungsten coating from binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China); State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Xicheng District, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.C., E-mail: zycustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China); Jiang, F.; Fu, B. J.; Sun, N. B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China)

    2013-11-15

    Tungsten is considered a promising plasma facing armor material for future fusion devices. An electrodeposited metallic tungsten coating from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel (LAS) substrate was investigated in this paper. Tungsten coatings were deposited under various pulsed currents conditions at 1173 K in atmosphere. Cathodic current density and pulsed duty cycle were investigated for pulsed current electrolysis. The crystal structure and microstructure of tungsten coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy X-ray dispersive analysis techniques. The results indicated that pulsed current density and duty cycle significantly influence tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. The average grain size of the coating becomes much larger with increasing cathodic current density, which demonstrates that appropriate high cathodic current density can accelerate the growth of grains on the surface of the substrate. The micro-hardness of tungsten coatings increases with the increasing thickness of coatings; the maximum micro-hardness is 482 HV. The prepared tungsten coatings have a smooth surface, a porosity of less than 1%, and an oxygen content of 0.024 wt%.

  13. Experimental study on vapor explosion induced by pressure pulse in coarse mixing of hot molten metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A.; Tobita, Y.; Aritomi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was done to investigate characteristics of metal-water interaction, when a mount of hot liquid metal is injected into the water. The test section is a vertical shock tube of 60mm in inner diameter and 1200mm in length. A special injector which is designed to inject hot metal of controlled volume and flow rate is attached at the top of the tube. When the hot metal is injected in the water and comes down at a position of the test vessel, a trigger pressure pulse is generated at the bottom of the test tube. Local transient pressures along the tube are measured by piezo pressure transducers. The following items were investigated in the experiment; 1) The criteria to cause a vapor explosion, 2) Transient behaviors and propagation characteristics of pressure wave in the mixing region. 3) Effects of triggering pulse, injection temperature and mass of hot molten metal on the peak pressure. The probability of the vapor explosion jumped when the interface temperature at the molten metal-water direct contact is higher than the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water and the triggering pulse becomes larger than 0.9MPa. Two types of the pressure propagation modes are observed, one is the detonative mode with a sharp rise and other is usual pressure mode with a mild rise. (author)

  14. Production of uranium metal via electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide in molten LiCl and salt distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun-Young Choi; Chan Yeon Won; Dae-Seung Kang; Sung-Wook Kim; Ju-Sun Cha; Sung-Jai Lee; Wooshin Park; Hun Suk Im; Jin-Mok Hur

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of metallic uranium has been achieved by electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O electrolyte at 650 deg C, followed by the removal of the residual salt by vacuum distillation at 850 deg C. Four types of stainless steel mesh baskets, with various mesh sizes (325, 1,400 and 2,300 meshes) and either three or five ply layers, were used both as cathodes and to contain the reduced product in the distillation stage. The recovered uranium had a metal fraction greater than 98.8 % and contained no residual salt. (author)

  15. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  16. Molten metal technologies advance waste processing systems for liquid radioactive waste treatment for PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Gary; Vance, Jene N.

    1997-01-01

    Molten Metal Technologies (MMT) has recently acquired a proprietary filtration process for specific use in radioactive liquid waste processing systems. The filtration system has been incorporated in to a PWR liquid radwaste system which is currently being designed for the ComEd Byron Nuclear Station. It has also been adopted as the prefiltration step up from of the two RO systems which were part of the VECTRA acquisition and which are currently installed in the ComEd Dresden and Lacily Nuclear Stations. The filtration process has been successfully pilot-tested at both Byron and Dresden and is currently being tested at LaSalle. The important features of the filtration process are the high removal efficiencies for particulates, including colloidal particles, and the low solid waste volume generation per gallon filtered which translates into very small annual solid waste volumes. This filtration process system has been coupled with the use of selective ion exchange media in the PWR processing system to reduce the solid waste volumes generated compared to the current processing methods and to reduce the curie quantities discharged to the environs. In the BWR processing system, this filtration method allows the coupling of an RO system to provide for recycling greater than 95% of the liquid radwaste back to the plant for reuse while significantly reducing the solid waste volumes and operating costs. This paper discusses the process system configurations for the MMT Advanced Waste Processing Systems for both PWRs and BWRs. In addition, the pilot test data and full-scale performance projections for the filtration system are discussed which demonstrate the important features of the filtration process

  17. Stabilization of molten salt materials using metal chlorides for solar thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, T O; Jarvis, D J; Voice, W E; Sullivan, J H

    2018-05-29

    The effect of a variety of metal-chlorides additions on the melting behavior and thermal stability of commercially available salts was investigated. Ternary salts comprised of KNO 3, NaNO 2, and NaNO 3 were produced with additions of a variety of chlorides (KCl, LiCl, CaCl 2 , ZnCl 2 , NaCl and MgCl 2 ). Thermogravimetric analysis and weight loss experiments showed that the quaternary salt containing a 5 wt% addition of LiCl and KCl led to an increase in short term thermal stability compared to the ternary control salts. These additions allowed the salts to remain stable up to a temperature of 630 °C. Long term weight loss experiments showed an upper stability increase of 50 °C. A 5 wt% LiCl addition resulted in a weight loss of only 25% after 30 hours in comparison to a 61% loss for control ternary salts. Calorimetry showed that LiCl additions allow partial melting at 80 °C, in comparison to the 142 °C of ternary salts. This drop in melting point, combined with increased stability, provided a molten working range increase of almost 100 °C in total, in comparison to the control ternary salts. XRD analysis showed the oxidation effect of decomposing salts and the additional phase created with LiCl additions to allow melting point changes to occur.

  18. Vapour explosions (fuel-coolant interactions) resulting from the sub-surface injection of water into molten metals: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, R.C.; Bullen, D.; Davies, D.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary experiments are reported on the relationship between the injection mode of contact and the occurrence and magnitude of vapour explosions. Water was injected beneath the surface of molten metals, chiefly tin at 250 to 900 0 C. Vapour explosions occurred in many, but not all, cases. The results are compared with Dullforce's observations (Culham Report (CLM-P424) on the dropping mode of contact and it appears that rather different behaviour is found; in particular, the present results suggest that the Temperature Interaction Zone is different for the two modes of contact. (author)

  19. Wettability between TiN,TiC Containing Carbon Composite Refractory and Molten Slag or Hot Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIYue-xun; LIYingand; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a new-type TiC-TiN containing carbon composite refractory so as to improve the service life of blast furnace hearth,the wettability between the carbon refractory and molten slag or metal has been mea-sured.It was indicated that the carbon refractory is wet-ted by slag(θ≤90°) when(TiC+TiN)>33.52%,The effects of TiN or TiC on wetting behavior are basi-cally identical.When the amount of TiC in the carbon com-posite refractory is greater than 60% it will be wetted by hot metal;therefore,the carbon composite refractory will be wetted by slag but not permeated by hot metal when the amount of TiC is restricted.

  20. Visualization and void-fraction measurements in a molten metal bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael Charles

    In the experimental study of multiphase flow phenomena, including intense multiphase interactions, such as vapor explosions, the fluids are often opaque. To obtain images, suitable for quantitative analysis, of such phenomena requires the use of something other than visible light, such as x-rays or neutrons. In this study a unique flow visualization technique using a continuous high energy x-ray source to measure void fraction with good spatial and temporal resolution in pools of liquid metal has been developed. In the present experiments, 11 to 21 kg of molten tin at 360sp° C to 425sp° C is collected in a pre-heated stainless steel test section of rectangular cross section (18 x 10 cm). In the base of the test section are two injection ports for the introduction of nitrogen gas and water. Each port is composed of two coaxial tubes. Nitrogen gas flows through the annular region and either nitrogen gas or water flows through the central tube. The test section is imaged using a high energy x-ray source (Varian Linatron 3000A) with a peak energy of 9 MeV and a maximum on axis dose rate of 30 Gy/min. The transmitted x-rays are viewed with an imaging system composed of a high density silicate glass screen, a mirror, a lens coupled image intensifier, and a CCD camera. Two interchangeable CCD cameras allow for either high resolution imaging (1128 x 480 pixels) at a frame rate of 30 Hz or low resolution imaging (256 x 256 pixels) at a frame rate of 220 Hz. The collected images are digitally processed to obtain the chordal averaged local and volume integral void fractions. At the experimental conditions examined, estimated relative uncertainty using this measurement technique is 10% for worst case conditions. The upper bound on the relative systematic error due to void dynamics is estimated to be 20%. Reasonable agreement has been demonstrated between the data generated from the processed images, past integral void fraction experimental data, and a semi-empirical drift

  1. Nickel-plating for active metal dissolution resistance in molten fluoride salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar, E-mail: kumar@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Ni electroplating of Incoloy-800H was investigated with the goal of mitigating Cr dissolution from this alloy into molten 46.5%LiF-11.5%NaF-42%KF eutectic salt, commonly referred to as FLiNaK. Tests were conducted in graphite crucibles at a molten salt temperature of 850 deg. C. The crucible material graphite accelerates the corrosion process due to the large activity difference between the graphite and the alloy. For the purposes of providing a baseline for this study, un-plated Incoloy-800H and a nearly pure Ni-alloy, Ni-201 were also tested. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to significantly improve the corrosion resistance of Incoloy-800H in molten fluoride salts. Diffusion of Cr from the alloy through the Ni-plating does occur and if the Ni-plating is thin enough this Cr eventually dissolves into the molten salt. The post-corrosion test microstructure of the Ni-plating, particularly void formation was also observed to depend on the plating thickness. Diffusion anneals in a helium environment of Ni-plated Incoloy-800H and an Fe-Ni-Cr model alloy were also investigated to understand Cr diffusion through the Ni-plating. Further enhancements in the efficacy of the Ni-plating as a protective barrier against Cr dissolution from the alloy into molten fluoride salts can be achieved by thermally forming a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier film on the surface of the alloy prior to Ni electroplating.

  2. Wetting Behavior of Molten AZ61 Magnesium Alloy on Two Different Steel Plates Under the Cold Metal Transfer Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZENG Cheng-zong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The wetting behavior and interfacial microstructures of molten magnesium AZ61 alloy on the surface of two different Q235 and galvanized steel plates under the condition of cold metal transfer were investigated by using dynamic sessile drop method. The results show that the wetting behavior is closely related to the wire feed speed. Al-Fe intermetallic layer was observed whether the substrate is Q235 steel or galvanized steel, and the formation of Al-Fe intermetallic layer should satisfy the thermodynamic condition of such Mg-Al/Fe system. The wettability of molten AZ61 magnesium alloy is improved with the increase of wire feed speed whether on Q235 steel surface or on galvanized steel surface, good wettability on Q235 steel surface is due to severe interface reaction when wire feed speed increases, good wettability on galvanized steel surface is attributed to the aggravating zinc volatilization. When the wire feed speed is ≤10.5m·min-1, the wettability of Mg alloy on Q235 steel plate is better than on galvanized steel plate. However, Zn vapor will result in instability for metal transfer process.

  3. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-10-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing.

  4. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing

  5. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li2O Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-01

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U 3 O 8 powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li 2 O, Y 2 O 3 and SrCl 2 were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li 2 O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li 2 O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl 2 > SrCl 2

  6. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O Molten Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-15

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li{sub 2}O, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SrCl{sub 2} were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li{sub 2}O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li{sub 2}O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl{sub 2} > SrCl{sub 2}.

  7. Wetting of a Charged Surface of Glassy Carbon by Molten Alkali-Metal Chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    Values of the contact angle of wetting of a surface of glassy carbon by molten chlorides of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium are measured by the meniscus weight method to determine the common factors of wettability of solid surfaces by ionic melts upon a change in the salt phase composition and a jump in electric potential. It is found that with a potential shift in the positive direction the shape of the curve of the contact angle's dependence on the potential varies upon substitution of one salt by another: the angle of wetting shrinks monotonously in lithium chloride but remains constant in molten cesium chloride. This phenomenon is explained by the hypothesis that the nature of the halide anion adsorption on the positively charged surface of an electrode is chemical and not electrostatic. It is shown that the adsorption process is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface, with covalent bonding between the adsorbent and adsorbate.

  8. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of zirconium in molten alkali metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of zirconium during its interaction with molten lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates containing from 1 to 5 wt % additives to the salt phase are studied in a temperature range of 500-800°C using gravimetry, corrosion potential measurement, and anodic polarization. The substances decreasing the corrosion losses due to the strengthening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used as passivators. Sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate serve as corrosion stimulators (activators).

  9. Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Ho-Lin; Wu, Yu-Che; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the transient transport phenomenon during the pile up of molten lead-free solder via the inkjet printing method. With regard to the droplet impact velocity, the distance from nozzle to substrate can be controlled by using the pulse voltage and distance control apparatus. A high-speed digital camera was used to record the solder impact and examine the accuracy of the pile up. These impact conditions correspond to We  =  2.1–15.1 and Oh  =  5.4  ×  10 −3 –3.8  ×  10 −3 . The effects of impact velocity and relative distance between two types of molten droplets on the shape of the impact mode are examined. The results show that the optimal parameters of the distance from nozzle to substrate and the spreading factor in this experiment are 0.5 mm and 1.33. The diameter, volume and velocity of the inkjet solder droplet are around 37–65 μ m, 25–144 picoliters, and 2.0–3.7 m s −1 , respectively. The vertical and inclined column structures of molten lead-free solder can be fabricated using piezoelectric ink-jet printing systems. The end-shapes of the 3D micro structure have been found to be dependent upon the distance from nozzle to substrate and the impact velocity of the molten lead-free solder droplet. (paper)

  10. Investigation of the thermodynamics governing metal hydride synthesis in the molten state process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Berseth, Polly A.; Farrell, Thomas P.; Laughlin, Laura; Anton, Donald; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2008-01-01

    This work is aimed at utilizing a new synthetic technique to form novel complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. This technique is based on fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with improved hydrogen storage properties. Under conditions of elevated hydrogen overpressures and temperatures the starting materials can reach melting or near-melting point without decomposing (molten state processing), allowing for enhanced diffusion and exchange of elements among the starting materials. The formation and stabilization of these compounds, using the molten state process, is driven by the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the starting and resulting compounds. Complex hydrides (e.g. NaK 2 AlH 6 , Mg(AlH 4 ) 2 ) were formed, structurally characterized and their hydrogen desorption properties were tested. In this paper we report on investigations of the thermodynamic aspects governing the process and products. We also report on the role of molar ratio in determining the final products. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with chemomechanical synthetic methods (ball milling)

  11. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmachowski, M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Process and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Lodz, 90-924 Lodz, Wolczanska 213 (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel-like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, ''gasoline'' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C{sub 4}-C{sub 10}) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation. (author)

  12. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelmachowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 deg. C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, 'gasoline' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C 4 -C 10 ) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation.

  13. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  14. Neutron scattering on molten transition metals and on Fe-C melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.

    1978-01-01

    In order to find out whether short-range order phenomena can be detected in iron-carbon melts, neutron scattering experiments were carried out in molten iron-carbon alloys. The method of isotope substitution, where the natural alloying iron was substituted by a 57 Fe-enriched isotope mixture, helped to increase the ratio between the scattering length of the carbon atoms and that of the iron atoms. The mean coherent scattering length for the isotope mixture which is required for further evaluation of the measurements, was determined in an experiment by measuring the limiting angle for total reflection of neutrons on evaporated films. From this determination of the scattering length, a value for the so far unknown scattering length of the 58 Fe isotope was obtained. The small angle scattering in corrected intensity curves of molten Fe-C alloys was investigated in detail. Scattering experiments in unalloyed Fe, Co, and Ni in the range of small scattering vectors proved that this small-angle scattering effect, which was observed here for the first time, is of magnetic origin. It is caused by short-range spin correlations fluctuating with space and time. [de

  15. Simulation of Molten Core-Concrete Interaction in oxide/metal stratified configuration with the TOLBIAC-ICB code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.; Spindler, B.

    2005-01-01

    The frame of this work is the validation of the TOLBIAC-ICB code which is devoted to the simulation of Molten Core-Concrete Interaction (MCCI) for reactor safety analysis. Attention focuses here on the validation of TOLBIAC-ICB in configurations expected to be representative of the long term phase of MCCI i.e. during an interaction between an oxide/metal stratified corium melt and a concrete structure. Up to now the BETA tests performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are the only tests available to study such kind of interaction. The BETA tests are first described and the operating conditions are reminded. The TOLBIAC-ICB code is then briefly described, with emphasis on the models used for stratified configurations. The results of the simulations are discussed. A sensitivity study is also performed with the power generated in the oxide layer instead of the metal layer as in the test. This last calculation shows that the large axial ablation observed in the tests is probably due to the peculiar configuration of the test with input power in the bottom metal layer. Since in the reactor case the residual power would be mainly concentrated in the upper oxide layer, the conclusions of the BETA tests for the reactor applications, in term of axial ablation, must be derived with caution. (author)

  16. Solubility of metal oxides in molten equimolar KBr-NaBr mixture at 973 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherginets, V. L.; Rebrova, T. P.; Naumenko, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    Solubility products (p K s,MO, molality) are measured by potentiometric titration with a Pt(O2)|ZrO2(Y2O3) oxygen electrode in the molten KBr-NaBr equimolar mixture at 973 K for the following oxides: CaO (5.00 ± 0.3), MnO (7.85 ± 0.3), NiO (9.72 ± 0.04), PbO (5.20 ± 0.3), and SrO (3.81 ± 0.3). The correlation between p K s,MeO and the polarization of the corresponding cations by Goldschmidt is obtained.

  17. LiCl-LiI molten salt electrolyte with bismuth-lead positive electrode for liquid metal battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junsoo; Shin, Donghyeok; Jung, Youngjae; Hwang, Soo Min; Song, Taeseup; Kim, Youngsik; Paik, Ungyu

    2018-02-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) are attractive energy storage device for large-scale energy storage system (ESS) due to the simple cell configuration and their high rate capability. The high operation temperature caused by high melting temperature of both the molten salt electrolyte and metal electrodes can induce the critical issues related to the maintenance cost and degradation of electrochemical properties resulting from the thermal corrosion of materials. Here, we report a new chemistry of LiCl-LiI electrolyte and Bi-Pb positive electrode to lower the operation temperature of Li-based LMBs and achieve the long-term stability. The cell (Li|LiCl-LiI|Bi-Pb) is operated at 410 °C by employing the LiCl-LiI (LiCl:LiI = 36:64 mol %) electrolyte and Bi-Pb alloy (Bi:Pb = 55.5:44.5 mol %) positive electrode. The cell shows excellent capacity retention (86.5%) and high Coulombic efficiencies over 99.3% at a high current density of 52 mA cm-2 during 1000th cycles.

  18. Dispersion and thermal interactions of molten metal fuel settling on a horizontal steel plate through a sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Although the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) possesses inherent safety features, an assessment of the consequences of melting of the metal fuel is necessary for risk analysis. As part of this effort an experimental study was conducted to determine the depths of sodium at 600 C required for pour streams of various molten uranium alloys (U, U-5 wt % Zr, U-10 wt % Zr, and U-10 wt % Fe) to break up and solidify. The quenched particulate material, which was in the shape of filaments and sheets, formed coolable beds because of the high voidage (∼0.9) and large particle size (∼10 mm). In a test with a 0.15-m sodium depth, the fragments from a pure uranium pour stream did not completely solidify but formed an agglomerated mass which did not fuse to the base plate. However, the agglomerated fragments of U-10 wt % Fe eutectic fused to the stainless steel base plate. An analysis of the temperature response of a 25-mm thick base plate was made by volume averaging the properties of the sodium and metal particle phases and assuming two semi-infinite solids coming into contact. Good agreement was obtained with the data during the initial 5 to 10 s of the contact period. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. The measurement of metallic uranium solubility in lithium chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Choi, I. K.; Yeon, J. W.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of more precise solubility measurement of metallic uranium in lithium chloride melt, the effect of lithium chloride on uranium determination and and the change of oxidation state of metallic uranium in the media were investigated. Uranium of higher than 10 μg/g could be directly determined by ICP-AES. In the case of the lower concentration, the separation and concentration of uranium by anion exchanger was followed by ICP-AES, thereby extending the measurable concentration to 0.1 μg/g. The effects of lithium oxide, uranium oxides(UO 2 or U 3 O 8 ) and metallic lithium on the solubility of metallic uranium were individually investigated in glassy carbon or stainless steel crucibles under argon gas atmosphere. Since metallic uranium is oxidized to uranium(III) in the absence of metallic lithium, causing an increase in the solubility, metallic lithium as reducing agent should be present in the reaction media to obtain the more precise solubility. The metallic uranium solubilities measured at 660 and 690 .deg. C were both lower than 10 μg/g

  20. Stabilization of heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge by freeze-thaw treatment with a blend of diatomite, FeSO4, and Ca(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Rongbing; Xu, Zhen

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effects of diatomite with 15% FeSO 4 •7H 2 O and 7.5% Ca(OH) 2 on sludge stabilization were investigated using batch leaching tests. The influence of cell rupture caused by freezing and thawing on stabilization was also evaluated. The results indicated that the optimal diatomite percentage was 2%. Cell rupture by freezing and thawing reduced heavy metal leachability, followed by cell death and decrease of organic groups. The concentration of heavy metals in sludge leachate increased after cell rupture, indicating that the heavy metal leachability was reduced after freezing and thawings. Moreover, the stabilization effects were generally improved after freezing and thawing. As compared with the stabilization of the original sludge, the unstable fractions decreased and the residual fractions of the heavy metals increased in the stabilized sludge after cell rupture. This study developed a method to stabilize heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge. Diatomite combined with FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O and Ca(OH) 2 improved the treatment of sewage sludge contaminated by heavy metals. Cell lysis by freeze-thaw treatment reduced the risk of leaching heavy metals caused by cell death and decreased major organic groups in the sludge.

  1. Ionic charge transport in strongly structured molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatlipinar, H.; Amoruso, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-08-01

    Data on the d.c. ionic conductivity for strongly structured molten halides of divalent and trivalent metals near freezing are interpreted as mainly reflecting charge transport by the halogen ions. On this assumption the Nernst-Einstein relation allows an estimate of the translational diffusion coefficient D tr of the halogen. In at least one case (molten ZnCl 2 ) D tr is much smaller than the measured diffusion coefficient, pointing to substantial diffusion via neutral units. The values of D tr estimated from the Nernst-Einstein relation are analyzed on the basis of a model involving two parameters, i.e. a bond-stretching frequency ω and an average waiting time τ. With the help of Raman scattering data for ω, the values of τ are evaluated and found to mostly lie in the range 0.02 - 0.3 ps for a vast class of materials. (author)

  2. Analysis of natural convection heat transfer with crust formation in the molten metal pool using CONV-2 and 3D computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R. J.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Choi, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical studies have been performed on natural convection heat transfer with crust formation in a molten metal pool to validate and evaluate experimental data using the CONV-2 and 3D computer codes. Two types of steady state tests, a low and high geometric aspect ratio case in the molten metal pool, were performed to investigate crust thickness as a function of boundary conditions. The CONV-2 and 3D computer codes were developed under the OECD/NEA RASPLAV project to simulate two- and three-dimensional natural convection heat transfer with crust formation, respectively. The Rayleigh-Benard flow patterns in the molten metal pool contribute to the temperature distribution, which affects non-uniform crust formation. The CONV-2D results on crust thickness are a little higher than the experimental data because of heat loss during the test. In comparison of the CONV-3D results with the CONV-2D results on crust thickness, the three-dimensional results are higher than the two-dimensional results, because of three dimensional natural convection flow and wall effect

  3. Saturated vapor pressure over molten mixtures of GaCl3 and alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Smolenskij, V.V.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    2004-01-01

    Volatilities of GaCl 3 and alkali metal chlorides over diluted (up to 3 mol %) solutions of GaCl 3 in LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl were measured at 1100 K by dynamic and indirect static methods. Chemical composition of saturated vapor over the mixed melts was determined. Partial pressures of the components were calculated. Their values depend essentially on specific alkali metal cation and on concentration of GaCl 3 ; their variation permits altering parameters of GaCl 3 distillation from the salt melt in a wide range [ru

  4. Are freeze drying and oven drying methods for trace metal determination in zoological specimens analytically sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, H.O.; Peisach, M.

    1976-01-01

    High specific activity radio-isotopes of chromium, zinc and selenium were used to label these elements accumulated by the oyster Crassostrea gigas. The retention of the metabolised forms of these elements during freeze-drying or oven drying at 50, 90, 105 and 120 deg C was studied. Observed losses question the accuracy of these analytical procedures. (author)

  5. Fragmentation of a single molten copper and silver droplets penetrating a sodium pool with solid crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataru Itagaki; Ken-ichiro Sugiyama; Satoshi Nishimura; Izumi Kinoshita

    2005-01-01

    As a basic study of molten fuel-coolant interaction in liquid metal fast cooled reactors, we carried out a series of experiments for the fragmentation of molten copper droplet penetrating sodium pool at instantaneous contact interface temperatures below its freezing point. A single molten copper droplet with 5g in weight and with superheating varied from 0 degree C to 131 degree C was dropped into a sodium pool in a wide range of ambient Weber numbers 24 to 228. In addition to the experiment of molten copper droplet, molten silver droplet with 5gs in weight and with superheating varied from 3 degree C to 174 degree C was dropped into the sodium pool at an ambient Weber number of about 80. From the observation of the cross section of solidified silver droplet without fragmentation, it was clearly confirmed that sodium micro jet is driven into the inside from the upper surface of molten droplet keeping liquid phase, which is clear evidence for the thermal fragmentation mechanism proposed in the previous paper. Large scattering in the values of dimensionless mass median diameter observed in the present experimental study is recognized to be dependent on whether latent heat instantaneously released due to the injection of sodium micro jet can be effectively utilized for fragmentation. (authors)

  6. A basic study on electrodeposition of metal halogen mixture in fluoride/chloride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Z. H.; Kang, Y. H.; Hwang, S. C.; Woo, M. S.; Yoo, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    The electrodeposition experiments of metal mixture composed of U, Y, Gd, Nd and Ce were carried out in the KCl-LiCl and LiF-NaF-KF (FLINAK) eutectic melts at 500 .deg. C and 600 .deg. C, respectively. Uranium was major component in the cathode deposits, and the separation factors of uranium with respect to the rare earths (REs) are nearly same in both electrolytes. REs content in the cathode deposits increased sharply below -1.9V which is the decomposition voltage of the halogen compounds of REs. The current efficiency for electrodeposition of metals was inversely in proportion to the applied voltage in the range of -1.0 V to -1.9 V(vs. S.S. 304 or Ni)

  7. Study of electrochemical behaviour of tantalum in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajmakov, A.N.; Ezrokhina, A.M.; Sashinina, O.A.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium potentials of metallic tantalum in the melt TaCl 5 +KCl-NaCl are studied. Are average degree of tantalum ion oxidation, which are in equilibrium with metallic tantalum, is determined. Anodic behaviour of tantalum in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodium chlorides with Ta and F ion additions is considered. An average degree of oxidation of Ta ions, which transfer into the melt, depending on current density, is determined. It is established that tantalum is dissolved in the regime of diffusional kinetics. It is shown that tantalum corrodes in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodiUm chlorides, at that, corrosion rate increases with introdUction of Ta and F ions into solution. The corrosion is of electrochemical nature and it proceeds in the regime of diffusional kinetics

  8. Cation and anion dependence of stable geometries and stabilization energies of alkali metal cation complexes with FSA(-), FTA(-), and TFSA(-) anions: relationship with physicochemical properties of molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Kubota, Keigo; Matsumoto, Hajime

    2013-12-19

    Stable geometries and stabilization energies (Eform) of the alkali metal complexes with bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide, (fluorosulfonyl)(trifluoromethylslufonyl)amide and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (FSA(-), FTA(-) and TFSA(-)) were studied by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The FSA(-) complexes prefer the bidentate structures in which two oxygen atoms of two SO2 groups have contact with the metal cation. The FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+) and Na(+) prefer the bidentate structures, while the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Cs(+) prefer tridentate structures in which the metal cation has contact with two oxygen atoms of an SO2 group and one oxygen atom of another SO2 group. The two structures are nearly isoenergetic in the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with K(+) and Rb(+). The magnitude of Eform depends on the alkali metal cation significantly. The Eform calculated for the most stable TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) cations at the MP2/6-311G** level are -137.2, -110.5, -101.1, -89.6, and -84.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The viscosity and ionic conductivity of the alkali TFSA molten salts have strong correlation with the magnitude of the attraction. The viscosity increases and the ionic conductivity decreases with the increase of the attraction. The melting points of the alkali TFSA and alkali BETA molten salts also have correlation with the magnitude of the Eform, which strongly suggests that the magnitude of the attraction play important roles in determining the melting points of these molten salts. The anion dependence of the Eform calculated for the complexes is small (less than 2.9 kcal/mol). This shows that the magnitude of the attraction is not the cause of the low melting points of alkali FTA molten salts compared with those of corresponding alkali TFSA molten salts. The electrostatic interactions are the major source of the attraction in the complexes. The electrostatic energies for the most stable TFSA

  9. Applicable technical method for freeze-substitution of high pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bmshsj

    2011-11-02

    Quintana, 1994) are available for the microscopic visualization of intracellular organelles. Cryo- fixation, plunge freezing, propane jet freezing, cold metal block freezing, and high pressure freezing provide advantages over chemical ...

  10. The study of molten salt electrorefining characteristics of metallic uranium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Ho; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Woo, Mun Sik; Hwang, Sung Chan

    2000-01-01

    Uranium was electrodeposited on solid cathode in LiCl-KCl eutectic with some CdCl 2 as an oxidizing agent at 550 deg C. In every electro-transport, uranium metal deposit was obtained in the form of dendrite grown on the cathode surface The shape of dendrite on the cathode surface was changed on applied voltage. At the current density range of 100 ∼150 mA/cm 2 , the highest efficiency was observed in this experiment. The deposition rate and current efficiency was the highest at about 75 rpm

  11. Electromagnetic detection and infrared visualization techniques for non-metallic inclusions in molten aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei Ming; Ludwig, Reinhold; Shankar, Sumanth; Apelian, Diran

    2002-01-01

    The role of detecting non-metallic and weakly conducting inclusions in hot melts during the manufacturing process is of major importance. However, the key impediment to assessing melt cleanliness is the quantification of the level of inclusions. In this paper, we present the theory and practice in using a magnetic force-based detection system capable of monitoring small inclusions of micron-size dimensions. The idea is to force the non-conducting inclusions to a detection location (the free melt surface) by electromagnetic Archimedes forces. Further, an infrared (IR) imaging system can then be applied to detect their thermal signature. Finally, a novel image-processing algorithm is used to analyze the inclusion level on the measurement surface

  12. Nonreactive spreading at high temperature: molten metals and oxides on molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, E; Tomsia, A P; Rauch, N; Scheu, C; Ruehle, M; Benhassine, M; Seveno, D; de Coninck, J; Lopez-Esteban, S

    2007-10-01

    The spontaneous spreading of small liquid metal (Cu, Ag, Au) and oxide drops on Mo substrates has been studied using a drop transfer setup combined with high-speed video. Under the experimental conditions used in this work, spreading occurs in the absence of interfacial reactions or ridging. The analysis of the spreading data indicates that dissipation at the triple junction (that can be described in terms of a triple-line friction) is playing a dominant role in the movement of the liquid front. This is due, in part, to the much stronger atomic interactions in high-temperature systems when compared to organic liquids. As a result of this analysis, a comprehensive view of spreading emerges in which the strength of the atomic interactions (solid-liquid, liquid-liquid) determines the relative roles of viscous impedance and dissipation at the triple junction in spreading kinetics.

  13. Electrochemistry of chromium subgroup transition metal ions in an ambient temperature chloroaluminate molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffler, T.B.

    1984-01-01

    The electrochemistry of several chromium subgroup transition metal solutes was studied in the basic AlCl 3 -1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MEIC) ionic liquid at 40.0 0 C by using stationary and rotating disk electrode voltametry, chronoamperometry, coulometry, and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Chromium(III) was present in the melt as the chloro complex [CrCl 6 ] 3- . This complex underwent as essentially irreversible reduction, apparently as a result of slow charge-transfer, to a chromium(II) species at ca. -1.08 V versus an aluminum wire immersed in 66.7 mol % melt. Similar investigations of molybdenum and tungsten were also conducted. Mechanisms are proposed to account for the results

  14. Evolution of fast reactor core spectra in changing a heavy liquid metal coolant by molten PB-208

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhin, D. A.; Mitenkova, E. F. [Nuclear Safety Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, B. Tulskaya 52, Moscow, 115119 (Russian Federation); Khorasanov, G. L.; Zemskov, E. A.; Blokhin, A. I. [State Scientific Center, Russian Federation, Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Bondarenko Square 1, Obninsk, 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    In the paper neutron spectra of fast reactor cooled with lead-bismuth or lead-208 are given. It is shown that in changing the coolant from lead-bismuth to lead-208 the core neutron spectra of the fast reactor FR RBEC-M are hardening in whole by several percents when a little share of low energy neutrons (5 eV - 50 keV) is slightly increasing. The shift of spectra to higher energies permits to enhance the fuel fission while the increased share of low energy neutrons provides more effective conversion of uranium-238 into plutonium due to peculiarity of {sup 238}U neutron capture cross section. Good neutron and physical features of molten {sup 208}Pb permit to assume it as perspective coolant for fast reactors and accelerator driven systems. The one-group cross sections of neutron radiation capture, {sigma}(n,g), by {sup 208}Pb, {sup 238}U, {sup 99}Tc, mix of lead and bismuth, {sup nat}Pb-Bi, averaged over neutron spectra of the fast reactor RBEC-M are given. It is shown that one-group cross sections of neutron capture by material of the liquid metal coolant consisted from lead enriched with the stable lead isotope, {sup 208}Pb, are by 4-7 times smaller {sigma}(n,g) for the coolant {sup nat}Pb-Bi. The economy of neutrons in the core cooled with {sup 208}Pb can be used for reducing reactor's initial fuel load, increasing fuel breeding and transmutation of long lived fission products, for example {sup 99}Tc. Good neutron and physical features of lead enriched with {sup 208}Pb permit to consider it as a perspective low neutron absorbing coolant for fast reactors and accelerator driven systems. (authors)

  15. A study on the electrolytic reduction of U3O8 to uranium metal in LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Heo, J. M.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    New electrolytic reduction technology was proposed that is based on the intregration of metallization of U 3 O 8 and Li 2 O electrowinning. In this electrolytic reduction reaction, electrolytically reduced Li deposits on cathode and simultaneously reacts with uranium oxide to produce uranium metal showing more than 99% conversion. For the verification of process feasibility, the experiments to obtain basic data on the metallization of uranium oxide, materials for cathode and anode electrode, the characteristics of closed recycle of Li 2 O and mass transfer were carried out. This evolutionary electrolytic reduction technology would give benefits over the conventional Li-reduction process improving economic viability such as: avoidance of handling of chemically active Li-LiCl molten salt, increase of metallization yield, and simplification of process

  16. Electrodeposition of alkali and alkali-earth metals on liquid lead cathodes in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravaca, C.; De Cordoba, G.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel leads to the dissolution as chlorides of fission products (FPs) that have to be removed in order to recycle the salt. Precipitation technique have been tested for the removal of these FPs in the LiCl-KCl, salt selected as reference, with different results. Salt decontamination from lanthanides can be easily achieved as solid precipitates of oxychlorides or single phosphates; however, for the alkaline and alkaline-earth metals this technique is not suitable. Within the EUROPART project (VI FP of the EC), a new route that consist of the electrodeposition of these FP on a liquid lead cathode (LLC) has been considered, including the Li and K constituting the electrolyte. First results obtained with Sr and Cs are presented herein. Although according to the thermodynamic potential values, the electrodeposition order on LLC is Ba, Sr, Li, K and Cs, during our experiments it was not possible to distinguish the electrochemical signals corresponding to the individual elements. (authors)

  17. Electrodeposition of alkali and alkali-earth metals on liquid lead cathodes in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, C.; De Cordoba, G. [CIEMAT/DE/DFN/URAA. Avda. Complutense, 22. 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel leads to the dissolution as chlorides of fission products (FPs) that have to be removed in order to recycle the salt. Precipitation technique have been tested for the removal of these FPs in the LiCl-KCl, salt selected as reference, with different results. Salt decontamination from lanthanides can be easily achieved as solid precipitates of oxychlorides or single phosphates; however, for the alkaline and alkaline-earth metals this technique is not suitable. Within the EUROPART project (VI FP of the EC), a new route that consist of the electrodeposition of these FP on a liquid lead cathode (LLC) has been considered, including the Li and K constituting the electrolyte. First results obtained with Sr and Cs are presented herein. Although according to the thermodynamic potential values, the electrodeposition order on LLC is Ba, Sr, Li, K and Cs, during our experiments it was not possible to distinguish the electrochemical signals corresponding to the individual elements. (authors)

  18. Analysis of molten fuel behavior in coolant channel during severe accidents in KALIMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Soo Dong; Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do Hee

    2004-11-01

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double fault initiators such as ATWS events without boiling coolant or melting fuel. For the future design of liquid metal reactor, however, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may require consideration of tripe-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to fuel melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will required as a design requirement for the future design of LMR. For sodium-cooled core designs with metallic fuel, one of the major phenomenological modeling uncertainties to be resolved is the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above- and below-core structures and possibly in inter-subassembly spaces. In this study, scoping analyses were carried out to evaluate the penetration depths in the coolant channels by molten fuel mixture during the unprotected loss-of-flow accidents in the core of the KALIMER-600. It is assumed in the analyses that a solid fuel crust would start to form upon contact with the coolant channel structure temperature of which is below the fuel solidus. The analysis results predict that the coolant channels would be plugged by the freezing molten fuel in the inlet lower shield as well as in the outlet, fission-gas-plenum region for the KALIMER-600 design

  19. A novel molten-salt electrochemical cell for investigating the reduction of uranium dioxide to uranium metal by lithium using in situ synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Leon D; Abdulaziz, Rema; Jervis, Rhodri; Bharath, Vidal; Mason, Thomas J; Atwood, Robert C; Reinhard, Christina; Connor, Leigh D; Inman, Douglas; Brett, Daniel J L; Shearing, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    A novel electrochemical cell has been designed and built to allow for in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements to be made during reduction of UO 2 to U metal in LiCl-KCl at 500°C. The electrochemical cell contains a recessed well at the bottom of the cell into which the working electrode sits, reducing the beam path for the X-rays through the molten-salt and maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio from the sample. Lithium metal was electrodeposited onto the UO 2 working electrode by exposing the working electrode to more negative potentials than the Li deposition potential of the LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte. The Li metal acts as a reducing agent for the chemical reduction of UO 2 to U, which appears to proceed to completion. All phases were fitted using Le Bail refinement. The cell is expected to be widely applicable to many studies involving molten-salt systems.

  20. Compatibility of molten salt and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    As the important factors for considering the compatibility of fuel salt and coolant salt with structural materials in molten salt reactors, there are the moisture remaining in molten salt and the fluorine potential in molten salt. In this study, as for the metals which are the main components of corrosion resistant alloys, the corrosion by the moisture remaining in molten salt and the dependence of the corrosion on fluorine potential were examined. As the molten salts, an eutectic molten salt LiF-BeF 2 was mainly used, and LiF-KF was used in combination. As the metallic materials, Cr, Ni and Cu which are the main components of corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloys, Hastelloy and Monel, were used. In the experiment, the metal pieces were immersed in the molten salt, and by sampling the molten salt, the change with time lapse of the concentration of the dissolved metals was examined. Besides, the electrochemical measurement was carried out for Cr, of which the corrosion was remarkable, and the change with time lapse of the dissolved ions was examined. The experimental setup, the experimental method, and the results of the immersion test and the electrochemical test are reported. The experiment on the corrosion of metals depending on fluorine potential is also reported. (K.I.)

  1. Compatibility of molten salt and structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Masahiro [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    As the important factors for considering the compatibility of fuel salt and coolant salt with structural materials in molten salt reactors, there are the moisture remaining in molten salt and the fluorine potential in molten salt. In this study, as for the metals which are the main components of corrosion resistant alloys, the corrosion by the moisture remaining in molten salt and the dependence of the corrosion on fluorine potential were examined. As the molten salts, an eutectic molten salt LiF-BeF{sub 2} was mainly used, and LiF-KF was used in combination. As the metallic materials, Cr, Ni and Cu which are the main components of corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloys, Hastelloy and Monel, were used. In the experiment, the metal pieces were immersed in the molten salt, and by sampling the molten salt, the change with time lapse of the concentration of the dissolved metals was examined. Besides, the electrochemical measurement was carried out for Cr, of which the corrosion was remarkable, and the change with time lapse of the dissolved ions was examined. The experimental setup, the experimental method, and the results of the immersion test and the electrochemical test are reported. The experiment on the corrosion of metals depending on fluorine potential is also reported. (K.I.).

  2. Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. In a first phase, a thermal analysis model was built to study the formation of a melt of lunar basaltic regolith irradiated by a focused solar beam This mode of heating was selected because it relies on radiative heat transfer, which is the dominant mode of transfer of energy in melts at 1600 C. Knowing and setting the Gaussian-type heat flux from the concentrated solar beam and the phase and temperature dependent thermal properties, the model predicts the dimensions and temperature profile of the melt. A validation of the model is presented in this paper through the experimental formation of a spherical cap melt realized by others. The Orbitec/PSI experimental setup uses an 3.6-cm diameter concentrated solar beam to create a hemispheric melt in a bed of lunar regolith simulant contained in a large pot. Upon cooling, the dimensions of the vitrified melt are measured to validate the thermal model. In a second phase, the model is augmented by multiphysics components to compute the passage of electrical currents between electrodes inserted in the molten regolith. The current through the melt generates Joule heating due to the high resistivity of the medium and this energy is transferred into the melt by conduction, convection and primarily by radiation. The model faces challenges in two major areas, the change of phase as

  3. Evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of portland cement-stabilized-solidified heavy metal waste using acoustic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Korchi, T.; Gress, D.; Baldwin, K.; Bishop, P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of stress wave propagation to assess freeze-thaw resistance of portland cement solidified/stabilized waste is presented. The stress wave technique is sensitive to the internal structure of the specimens and would detect structural deterioration independent of weight loss or visual observations. The freeze-thaw resistance of a cement-solidified cadmium waste and a control was evaluated. The control and cadmium wastes both showed poor freeze-thaw resistance. However, the addition of cadmium and seawater curing increased the resistance to more cycles of freezing and thawing. This is attributed to microstructural changes

  4. Charge-charge liquid structure factor and the freezing of alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-10-01

    The peak height of the charge-charge liquid structure factor Ssub(QQ) in molten alkali halides is proposed as a criterion for freezing. Available data on molten alkali chlorides, when extrapolated to the freezing point suggests Ssub(QQ)sup(max) approximately 5. (author)

  5. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient debris freezing and potential wall melting during a severe reactivity initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to light water reactor (LWR) safety analysis to understand the transient freezing of molten core debris on cold structures following a hypothetical core meltdown accident. The purpose of this paper is to (a) present the results of a severe reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in-pile experiment with regard to molten debris distribution and freezing following test fuel rod failure, (b) analyze the transient freezing of molten debris (primarily a mixture of UO/sub 2/ fuel and Zircaloy cladding) deposited on the inner surface of the test shroud wall upon rod failure, and (c) assess the potential for wall melting upon being contacted by the molten debris. 26 refs

  7. Electrolytic reduction runs of 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt using metal anode shrouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Jeong; Heo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Kwon; Jeon, Min Ku; Hong, Sun Seok; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-06-01

    Ten electrolytic reduction or oxide reduction (OR) runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. During this procedure, an anode shroud surrounds a platinum anode and discharges hot oxygen gas from the salt to outside of the OR apparatus, thereby preventing corrosion of the apparatus. In this study, a number of anode shrouds made of various metals were tested. Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. A stainless steel (STS) wire mesh with five-ply layer was a material commonly used for the lower porous shroud for the OR runs. The metals tested for the upper nonporous shroud in the different OR runs are STS, nickel, and platinum- or silver-lined nickel. The lower porous shroud showed no significant damage during two consecutive OR runs, but exhibited signs of damage from three or more runs due to thermal stress. The upper nonporous shrouds made up of either platinum- or silver-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas while STS or nickel without any platinum or silver lining exhibited poor corrosion resistance.

  8. CFD to modeling molten core behavior simultaneously with chemical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper deals with the basic features of a computing procedure, which can be used for modeling of destruction and melting of a core with subsequent corium retaining into the reactor vessel. The destruction and melting of core mean the account of the following phenomena: a melting, draining (moving of the melt through a porous layer of core debris), freezing with release of an energy, change of geometry, formation of the molten pool, whose convective intermixing and distribution influence on a mechanism of borders destruction. It is necessary to take into account that during of heating molten pool and development in it of convective fluxes a stratification of a multi-component melt on two layers of metal light and of oxide heavy components is observed. These layers are in interaction, they can exchange by the separate components as result of diffusion or oxidizing reactions. It can have an effect considerably on compositions, on a specific weight, and on properties of molten interacting phases, and on a structure of the molten stratified pool. In turn, the retaining of the formed molten masses in reactor vessel requires the solution of a matched heat exchange problem, namely, of a natural convection in a heat generating fluid in partially or completely molten corium and of heat exchange problem with taking into account of a melting of the reactor vessel. In addition, it is necessary to take into account phase segregation, caused by influence of local and of global natural convective flows and thermal lag of heated up boundaries. The mathematical model for simulation of the specified phenomena is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties together with the heat transfer equation. For modeling of a corium moving through a porous layer of core debris, the special computing algorithm to take into account density jump on interface between a melt and a porous layer of core debris is designed. The model was

  9. Development of electrolytic process in molten salt media for light rare-earth metals production. The metallic cerium electrodeposition; Desenvolvimento de processo de eletrolise em meio de sais fundidos para a producao de metais de terras-raras leves. A obtencao do cerio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, T A.G.

    1994-12-31

    The development of molten salt process and the respective equipment aiming rare-earth metals recovery was described. In the present case, the liquid cerium metal electrodeposition in a molten electrolytes of cerium chloride and an equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides in temperatures near 800{sup C} was studied. Due the high chemical reactivity of the rare-earth metals in the liquid state and their molten halides, an electrolytic cell was constructed with controlled atmosphere, graphite crucibles and anodes and a tungsten cathode. The electrolytic process variables and characteristics were evaluated upon the current efficiency and metallic product purity. Based on this evaluations, were suggested some alterations on the electrolytic reactor design and upon the process parameters. (author). 90 refs, 37 figs, 20 tabs.

  10. Freezing Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingett, Christian; Ahmadi, Farzad; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    The two-stage freezing process of a liquid droplet on a substrate is well known; however, how bubbles freeze has not yet been studied. We first deposited bubbles on a silicon substrate that was chilled at temperatures ranging from -10 °C to -40 °C, while the air was at room temperature. We observed that the freeze front moved very slowly up the bubble, and in some cases, even came to a complete halt at a critical height. This slow freezing front propagation can be explained by the low thermal conductivity of the thin soap film, and can be observed more clearly when the bubble size or the surface temperature is increased. This delayed freezing allows the frozen portion of the bubble to cool the air within the bubble while the top part is still liquid, which induces a vapor pressure mismatch that either collapses the top or causes the top to pop. In cases where the freeze front reaches the top of the bubble, a portion of the top may melt and slowly refreeze; this can happen more than just once for a single bubble. We also investigated freezing bubbles inside of a freezer where the air was held at -20 °C. In this case, the bubbles freeze quickly and the ice grows radially from nucleation sites instead of perpendicular to the surface, which provides a clear contrast with the conduction limited room temperature bubbles.

  11. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  12. Molten salt processes in special materials preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, N.; Suri, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    As a class, molten salts are the largest collection of non aqueous inorganic solvents. On account of their stability at high temperature and compatibility to a number of process requirements, molten salts are considered indispensable to realize many of the numerous benefits of high temperature technology. They play a crucial role and form the basis for numerous elegant processes for the preparation of metals and materials. Molten salt are considered versatile heat transfer media and have led to the evolution of many interesting reactor concepts in fission and possibly in fusion. They also have been the basis of thinking for few novel processes for power generation. While focusing principally on the actual utilization of molten salts for a variety of materials preparation efforts in BARC, this lecture also covers a few of the other areas of technological applications together with the scientific basis for considering the molten salts in such situations. (author)

  13. Molten salt: Corrosion problems and electrometallurgy in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliographic survey is given of corrosion problems and electrometallurgical problems of molten salt in nuclear reactor applications. Due to the high potential to be achieved, their high ionic conductivity and the rapidity of reactions in a molten salt atmosphere, molten salts are interesting solvents for various electrometallurgical processes. Another important field of application is in the separation or electrolytical refining of various metals (Be, U, Pu, Th, Hf, Zr). However, these very characteristics of molten salts may also cause serious corrosion problems. Results obtained for the molten-salt reactor and the different causes of corrosion are reviewed an possible countermeasures analyzed. (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigation in separating the heavy metal elements of refuse incineration fly ashes by using molten iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China)]|[CPI-Yuanda Environmental-protection Engineering Co. Ltd., Chongqing (China); Liu, Q.; Dong, L. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China); Du, Y. [CPI-Yuanda Environmental-protection Engineering Co. Ltd., Chongqing (China)

    2008-07-01

    One of the main waste treatment methods in the world for municipal solid waste (MSW) is incineration. It is effective in toxic substance destruction, waste volume reduction, and energy recovery. Some chemical substances are accumulated during incineration, most notably lead, zinc, chromium and cadmium, as well as other heavy metals. Untreated fly ash disposed in landfills can pollute the soil, surface water and groundwater because of the high levels of hazardous heavy metals and high salt concentration that can be leached out. This paper presented an experiment that melt-separated the heavy metal elements from fly ash generated during refuse incineration. Molted iron, was used as resolvent to dissolve the heavy metal elements in it. The paper described the materials and methods as well as the results of the study. It was concluded that using molted iron to separate the heavy metal elements from MSW incineration fly ash was feasible. The removal ratio of the main heavy metal elements was above 80 per cent, and some of it was above 99 per cent. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Fundamentals of molten-salt thermal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This book has been published by the Society of Molten-Salt Thermal Technology to publish a part of the achievement of its members. This book is composed of seven chapters. The chapter 1 is Introduction. The chapter 2 explains the physical properties of molten salts, such as thermal behavior, surface tension, viscosity, electrical conductivity and others. The chapter 3 presents the compatibility with construction materials. Corrosion in molten salts, the electrochemical behavior of fluoride ions on carbon electrodes in fluoride melts, the behaviors of hastelloy N and metals in melts are items of this chapter. The equipments and instruments for molten salts are described in chapter 4. The heat transfer in molten salts is discussed in chapter 5. The chapter 6 explains the application of molten salt technology. The molten salt technology can be applied not only to thermal engineering and energy engineering but also to chemical and nuclear engineerings, and the technical fundamentals, current development status, technical problems and the perspective for the future are outlined. The chapter 7 is the summary of this book. The commercialization of molten salt power reactors is discussed at the end of this book. (Kato, T.)

  16. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included

  17. Molten salt reactors - safety options galore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Dodds, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    Safety features and attributes of molten salt reactors (MSR) are described. The unique features of fluid fuel reactors of on-line continuous processing and the ability for so-called external cooling result in simple and safe designs with low excess reactivity, low fission product inventory, and small source term. These, in turn, make a criticality accident unlikely and reduce the severity of a loss of coolant to where they are no longer severe accidents. A melt down is not an accident for a reactor that uses molten fuel. The molten salts are stable, non-reactive and efficient heat transfer media that operate at high temperatures at low pressures and are highly compatible with selected structural materials. All these features reduce the accident plethora. Freeze valves can be used for added safety. An ultimate safe reactor (U.S.R) is described with safety features that are passive, inherent and non-tamperable (PINT)

  18. METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magel, T.T.

    1958-03-01

    This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

  19. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R and D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium

  20. Mechanical structure and problem of thorium molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi accident, there became great interest in Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) for the safety as station blackout leading to auto drainage of molten salts with freeze valve. This article described mechanical structure of MSR and problems of materials and pipes. Material corrosion problem by molten salts would be solved using modified Hastelloy N with Ti and Nb added, which should be confirmed by operation of an experimental reactor. Trends in international activities of MSR were also referred including China declaring MSR development in January 2011 to solve thorium contamination issues at rare earth production and India rich in thorium resources. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    MSBR Study Group formed in October 1974 has studied molten salt breeder reactor and its various aspects. Usage of a molten salt fuel, extremely interesting as reactor chemistry, is a great feature to MSBR; there is no need for separate fuel making, reprocessing, waste storage facilities. The group studied the following, and these results are presented: molten salt technology, molten salt fuel chemistry and reprocessing, reactor characteristics, economy, reactor structural materials, etc. (Mori, K.)

  2. Local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides: The role of screening by the chlorine component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    Earlier work has identified the metal ion size R M as a relevant parameter in determining the evolution of the liquid structure of trivalent metal chlorides across the series from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A). Here we highlight the structural role of the chlorines by contrasting the structure of fully equilibrated melts with that of disordered systems obtained by quenching the chlorine component. Main attention is given to how the suppression of screening of the polyvalent ions by the chlorines changes trends in the local liquid structure (first neighbour coordination and partial radial distribution functions) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the partial structure factors). The main microscopic consequences of structural quenching of the chlorine component are a reduction in short range order and an enhancement of intermediate range order in the metal ion component, as well as the suppression of a tendency to molecular-type states at the lower end of the range of R M . (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  3. Molten salt reactors. Synthesis of studies realized between 1973 and 1983. Chemistry file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The chemistry of molten salt reactors was first acquired by foreign literature and developed by experimental studies. Salt preparation, analysis, chemical and electrochemical properties, interaction with metals or graphites and use of molten lead for direct cooling are examined. [fr

  4. Sampling device for radioactive molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masato

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for accurately sampling molten salts to which various kinds of metals in a molten salt storage tank are mixed for analyzing them during a spent fuel dry type reprocessing. Namely, the device comprises a sampling tube having an opened lower end to be inserted into the radioactive molten salts stored in a tank and keeps reduced pressure from the upper end, and a pressure reducing pipeline having one end connected to the sampling tube and other end connected to an evacuating pump. In this device, the top end of the sampling tube is inserted to a position for sampling the radioactive molten salts (molten salts). The pressure inside the evacuating pipeline connected to the upper portion of the sampling tube is reduced for a while. In this case, the inside of the pressure reducing pipeline is previously evacuated by the evacuating pump so as to keep a predetermined pressure. Since the pressure in the sampling tube is lowered, molten salts are inserted into the sampling tube, the sampling tube is withdrawn, and the molten salts flown in the sampling tube are analyzed. (I.S.)

  5. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  6. Structure and thermodynamics of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papatheodorou, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates single-component molten salts and multicomponent salt mixtures. Molten salts provide an important testing ground for theories of liquids, solutions, and plasmas. Topics considered include molten salts as liquids (the pair potential, the radial distribution function, methods of characterization), single salts (structure, thermodynamic correlations), and salt mixtures (the thermodynamics of mixing; spectroscopy and structure). Neutron and X-ray scattering techniques are used to determine the structure of molten metal halide salts. The corresponding-states theory is used to obtain thermodynamic correlations on single salts. Structural information on salt mixtures is obtained by using vibrational (Raman) and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge-symmetrical systems and charge-unsymmetrical systems are used to examine the thermodynamics of salt mixtures

  7. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya; Komarov, V E; Salyulev, A B [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1979-02-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10/sup -4/ T-(1.67-10/sup -4/T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10/sup -4/T-(0.71x10/sup -4/T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed.

  8. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Komarov, V.E.; Salyulev, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10 -4 T-(1.67-10 -4 T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10 -4 T-(0.71x10 -4 T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed

  9. Electrolytic reduction runs of 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt using metal anode shrouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Young, E-mail: eychoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong; Heo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Min Ku [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Ten electrolytic reduction or oxide reduction (OR) runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. During this procedure, an anode shroud surrounds a platinum anode and discharges hot oxygen gas from the salt to outside of the OR apparatus, thereby preventing corrosion of the apparatus. In this study, a number of anode shrouds made of various metals were tested. Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. A stainless steel (STS) wire mesh with five-ply layer was a material commonly used for the lower porous shroud for the OR runs. The metals tested for the upper nonporous shroud in the different OR runs are STS, nickel, and platinum- or silver-lined nickel. The lower porous shroud showed no significant damage during two consecutive OR runs, but exhibited signs of damage from three or more runs due to thermal stress. The upper nonporous shrouds made up of either platinum- or silver-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas while STS or nickel without any platinum or silver lining exhibited poor corrosion resistance. - Highlights: •Electrolytic reduction runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. •Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. •The upper nonporous shrouds made up of noble metal-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas.

  10. Challenges Related to the Use of Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants in Advanced Reactors. Report of the collaborative project COOL of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in 2000, based on a resolution by the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO aims at helping to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the twenty-first century in a sustainable manner, and seeks to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to jointly consider actions to achieve desired innovations. INPRO is taking care of the specific needs of developing countries. One of the aims of INPRO is to develop options for enhanced sustainability through promotion of technical and institutional innovations in nuclear energy technology through collaborative projects among IAEA Member States. Collaboration among INPRO members is fostered on selected innovative nuclear technologies to bridge technology gaps. Collaborative projects have been selected so that they complement other national and international R and D activities. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL on Investigation of Technological Challenges Related to the Removal of Heat by Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants from Reactor Cores Operating at High Temperatures investigated the technological challenges of cooling reactor cores that operate at high temperatures in advanced fast reactors, high temperature reactors and accelerator driven systems by using liquid metals and molten salts as coolants. The project was initiated in 2008 and was led by India; experts from Brazil, China, Germany, India, Italy and the Republic of Korea participated and provided chapters of this report. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL addressed the following fields of research regarding liquid metal and molten salt coolants: (i) survey of thermophysical properties; (ii) experimental investigations and computational fluid dynamics studies on thermohydraulics, specifically pressure drop and heat transfer under different operating conditions; (iii) monitoring and control of coolant

  11. Cyclic voltammetric study of the reduction of U(III) to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl2-BaCl2-UCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poa, D.S.; Tomczuk, Z.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemistry of the reduction of UCl 3 to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 (49.7-8.0-26.5-15.8 mol %) containing dissolved UCl 3 . The purpose of the study was to obtain information on the kinetics of the reaction, which will be used in the design of electrorefining equipment for the reprocessing of core and blanket fuel discharged from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The electrorefining operation employs the above salt as the electrolyte and a liquid cadmium pool as the anode

  12. Molten salt engineering for thorium cycle. Electrochemical studies as examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    1998-01-01

    A Th-U nuclear energy system utilizing accelerator driven subcritical molten salt breeder reactor has several advantages compared to conventional U-Pu nuclear system. In order to obtain fundamental data on molten salt engineering of Th-U system, electrochemical study was conducted. As the most primitive simulated study of beam irradiation of molten salt, discharge electrolysis was investigated in molten LiCl-KCl-AgCl system. Stationary discharge was generated under atmospheric argon gas and fine Ag particles were obtained. Hydride ion (H - ) behavior in molten salts was also studied to predict the behavior of tritide ion (T - ) in molten salt fuel. Finally, hydrogen behavior in metals at high temperature was investigated by electrochemical method, which is considered to be important to confine and control tritium. (author)

  13. Molten salt reactors. Synthesis of studies realized between 1973 and 1983. General synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, M.; Lecocq, A.

    1983-03-01

    After a brief recall of the MSBR project, French studies on molten salt reactors are summed up. Theoretical and experimental studies for a graphite moderated 1000 MWe reactor using molten Li, Be, Th and U fluorides cooled by salt-lead direct contact are given. These studies concern the core, molten salt chemistry, graphite, metals (molybdenum, alloy TZM), corrosion, reactor components [fr

  14. Molten salt electrorefining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Shoji, Yuichi; Matsumaru, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    A molten cadmium phase (lower side) and a molten salt phase (upper side) are filled in an electrolytic bath. A basket incorporating spent nuclear fuels is inserted/disposed in the molten cadmium phase. A rotatable solid cathode is inserted/disposed in the molten salt phase. The spent fuels, for example, natural uranium, incorporated in the basket is dissolved in the molten cadmium phase. In this case, the uranium concentration in the molten salt phase is determined as from 0.5 to 20wt%. Then, electrolysis is conducted while setting a stirring power for stirring at least the molten salt phase of from 2.5 x 10 2 to 1 x 10 4 based on a reynolds number. Crystalline nuclei of uranium are precipitated uniformly on the surface of the solid cathode, and they grow into fine dendrites. With such procedures, since short-circuit between the cathode precipitates and the molten cadmium phase (anode) is scarcely caused, to improve the recovering rate of uranium. (I.N.)

  15. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 -UF 4 ) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate [fr

  16. Distribution behavior of uranium, neptunium, rare-earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd) and alkaline-earth metals (Sr,Ba) between molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and liquid cadmium or bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, M.; Sakamura, Y.; Hijikata, T.; Kinoshita, K.

    1995-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of uranium neptunium, eight rare-earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) and two alkaline-earth metals (Sr and Ba) between molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and either liquid cadmium or bismuth were measured at 773 K. Separation factors of trivalent rare-earth elements to uranium or neptunium in the LiCl-KCl/Bi system were by one or two orders of magnitude larger than those in the LiCl-KCl/Cd system. On the contrary, the separation factors of alkaline-earth metals and divalent rare-earth elements to trivalent rare-earth elements were by one or two orders of magnitude smaller in the LiCl-KCl/Bi system. (orig.)

  17. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride

  18. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  19. Electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurry, L.E.; Moy, G.M.M.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides is of technological importance as a method of purification of plutonium. Previous authors have reported that plutonium can be purified by electrorefining impure plutonium in various molten haldies. Work to eluciate the mechanism of the plutonium reduction in molten halides has been limited to a chronopotentiometric study in LiCl-KCl. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the standard reduction potential for the plutonium (III) couple in various molten alkali metal halides. Initial cyclic voltammetric experiments were performed in molten KCL at 1100 K. A silver/silver chloride (10 mole %) in equimolar NaCl-KCl was used as a reference electrode. Working and counter electrodes were tungsten. The cell components and melt were contained in a quartz crucible. Background cyclic voltammograms of the KCl melt at the tungsten electrode showed no evidence of electroactive impurities in the melt. Plutonium was added to the melt as PuCl/sub 3/, which was prepared by chlorination of the oxide. At low concentrations of PuCl/sub 3/ in the melt (0.01-0.03 molar), no reduction wave due to the reduction of Pu(III) was observed in the voltammograms up to the potassium reduction limit of the melt. However on scan reversal after scanning into the potassium reduction limit a new oxidation wave was observed

  20. Advances in molten salt electrochemistry towards future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    This review article describes some selected novel molten salt electrochemical processes which have been created/developed by the author and his coworkers, with emphasis on the applications towards future energy systems. After showing a perspective of the applications of molten salt electrochemistry from the viewpoints of energy and environment, several selected topics are described in detail, which include nitride fuel cycle in a nuclear field, hydrogen energy system coupled with ammonia economy, thermally regenerative fuel cell systems, novel Si production process for solar cell and novel molten salt electrochemical processes for various energy and environment related functional materials including nitrides, rare earth-transition metal alloys, fine particles obtained by plasma-induced electrolysis, and carbon film. And finally, the author stresses again, the importance and potential of molten salt electrochemistry, and encourages young students, scientists and researchers to march in a procession hand in hand towards a bright future of molten salts. (author)

  1. Molten core material holding device in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of cooling to hold molten core materials in a molten core material holding device. Constitution: Plenum structures are formed into a pan-like configuration, in which liners made of metal having high melting point and relatively high heat conductivity such as tantalum, tungsten, rhenium or alloys thereof are integrally appended to hold and directly cool the molten reactor core materials. Further, a plurality of heat pipes, passing through the plenum structures, facing the cooling portion thereof to the coolants at the outer side and immersing the heating portion into the molten core materials fallen to deposit in the inner liners are disposed radially. Furthermore, heat pipes embodded in the plenum structure are disposed in the same manner below the liners. Thus, the plenum structures and the molten reactor core materials can be cooled at a high efficiency. (Seki, T.)

  2. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  3. Effect of tungsten metal particle sizes on the solubility of molten alloy melt: Experimental observation of Gibbs-Thomson effect in nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. H.; Das, J.; Sordelet, D. J.; Eckert, J.; Hurd, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the effect of tungsten particle sizes on the thermal stability and reactivity of uniformly dispersed W particles in molten Hf-based alloy melt at elevated temperature (1673 K). The solubility of particles less than 100 nm in radius is significantly enhanced. In case of fine W particles with 20 nm diameter, their solubility increases remarkably around 700% compared to that of coarse micrometer-scale particles. The mechanisms and kinetics of this dynamic growth of particle are discussed as well as techniques developed to obtain frozen microstructure of particle-reinforced composites by rapid solidification.

  4. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.

  5. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept. • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L. • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  6. Simulation of the cladding freezing during the loss of flow accident in a Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, N.N.; Eggen, D.T.

    1977-06-01

    The accident condition of the stainless steel cladding melting, relocation and freezing, following a loss of flow situation in gas-cooled fast reactors has not been determined yet. An alloy of 50 Pb/ 50 Sn was selected to facilitate experimental procedures because of its workability and its wide phase transition temperature range (183 to 216 0 C) similar to that of stainless steel (1375 to 1500 0 C). The objective of the experiment is to simulate the motion of liquid alloy through a tube and observe the conditions where it solidifies in the tube. The objective of the theoretical model is to use transient heat transfer analysis to describe the freezing front of the moving liquid metal and the plugging of the channel. Tests were conducted in alloy tubes having inside diameters 0.5 to 0.95 cm. Molten solder was poured through the vertically held tubes. The average falling velocity of the melt was measured to be about 89 cm/sec. The distance in the tube where the molten Pb/Sn solidifed across the diameter was measured. This penetration length varies from 20 to 40 cm as the initial liquid temperature ranges from 216 (liquidus point) to 500 0 C. The plugging time is calculated for those temperatures under which data on both the penetration distance and the falling velocity were obtained

  7. Chemical Reactions of Simulated Producer Gas with Molten Tin-Bismuth Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith J. Bourne

    2012-01-01

    A pyrolysis and gasification system utilizing molten metal as an energy carrier has been proposed and the initial stages of its design have been completed. However, there are several fundamental questions that need to be answered before the design of this system can be completed. These questions include: How will the molten metal interact with the products of biomass...

  8. Particle coagulation in molten metal based on three-dimensional analysis of cluster by x-ray micro-computer tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Shimasaki, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Shoji; Narita, Shunsuke; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Particle coagulation plays a key role in steel refining process to remove inclusions. Many research works focus on the behaviors of particle coagulation. To reveal its mechanism water model experiments have been performed by some researchers including the authors' group. In this paper, experiments of particle coagulation were carried out with molten Al including SiC particles in a mechanically agitated crucible with two baffles. Particle coagulation and formation of clusters were observed on the microscopy images of as-polished samples. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the clusters in solidified Al was implemented by X-ray micro CT available at SPring-8. The methods to distinguish clusters on two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images were discussed, which were established in the previous works by the present authors' group. The characteristics of the 3D SiC clusters and their 2D cross-sections were analyzed. The statistical ranges of the parameters for 2D clusters were used as criterions to distinguish the clusters on 2D microscopy images from the as-polished samples. The kinetics of SiC particle coagulation was studied by the measured cluster number density and size using our program to distinguish cluster in 2D cross-sectional images according to 3D information (DC-2D-3D). The calculated and experimental results of the SiC particle coagulation in molten Al agree well with each other. (author)

  9. Improvement to molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienvenu, Claude.

    1975-01-01

    The invention proposes a molten salt nuclear reactor whose core includes a mass of at least one fissile element salt to which can be added other salts to lower the melting temperature of the mass. This mass also contains a substance with a low neutron capture section that does not give rise to a chemical reaction or to an azeotropic mixture with these salts and having an atmospheric boiling point under that of the mass in operation. Means are provided for collecting this substance in the vapour state and returning it as a liquid to the mass. The kind of substance chosen will depend on that of the molten salts (fissile element salts and, where required, salts to lower the melting temperature). In actual practice, the substance chosen will have an atmospheric pressure boiling point of between 600 and 1300 0 C and a melting point sufficiently below 600 0 C to prevent solidification and clogging in the return line of the substance from the exchanger. Among the materials which can be considered for use, mention is made of magnesium, rubidium, cesium and potassium but metal cesium is not employed in the case of many fissile salts, such as fluorides, which it would reduced to the planned working temperatures [fr

  10. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    OpenAIRE

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450?470??C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, a...

  11. The chemistry of molten salt mixtures: application to the reductive extraction of lanthanides and actinides by a liquid metal; Chimie des melanges de sels fondus. Application a l'extraction reductrice d'actinides et de lanthanides par un metal liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finne, J

    2005-10-15

    The design of a process of An/Ln separation by liquid - liquid extraction can be used for on-line purification of the molten salt in a molten salt nuclear reactor (Generation IV) as well as reprocessing various spent fuels. In order to establish the chemical properties of An and Ln in molten salt mediums, E - pO{sub 2} - diagrams were established for the relevant chemical elements. With the purpose of checking the possibilities of separating the An from Ln, the real activity coefficients in liquid metals were measured. An experimental protocol was developed and validated on the Gd/Ga system. It was then transferred to radioactive environment to measure the activity coefficient of Pu in Ga. The results made it possible to estimate the effectiveness of the Pu extraction and its separation from Gd and Ce. The selectivity was shown to decrease with the temperature and Al and Ga showed a good selectivity between Pu and the Ce in fluoride medium. (author)

  12. Dynamics of the Molten Contact Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, Ain A.; Duthaler, Gregg; Liu, Michael; Torresola, Javier; Qiu, Taiqing

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a basic understanding of how a molten material front spreads over a solid that is below its melting point, arrests, and freezes. Our hope is that the work will contribute toward a scientific knowledge base for certain new applications involving molten droplet deposition, including the "printing" of arbitrary three-dimensional objects by precise deposition of individual molten microdrops that solidify after impact. Little information is available at this time on the capillarity-driven motion and arrest of molten contact line regions. Schiaffino and Sonin investigated the arrest of the contact line of a molten microcrystalline wax spreading over a subcooled solid "target" of the same material. They found that contact line arrest takes place at an apparent liquid contact angle that depends primarily on the Stefan number S=c(T(sub f) -T(sub t)/L based on the temperature difference between the fusion point and the target temperature, and proposed that contact line arrest occurs when the liquid's dynamic contact angle approaches the angle of attack of the solidification front just behind the contact line. They also showed, however, that the conventional continuum equations and boundary conditions have no meaningful solution for this angle. The solidification front angle is determined by the heat flux just behind the contact line, and the heat flux is singular at that point. By comparing experiments with numerical computations, Schiaffino and Sonin estimated that the conventional solidification model must break down within a distance of order 0.1 - 1 microns of the contact line. The physical mechanism for this breakdown is as yet undetermined, and no first-principles theory exists for the contact angle at arrest. Schiaffino and Sonin also presented a framework for understanding how to moderate Weber number molten droplet deposition in terms of similarity laws and experimentation. The study is based on experiments with three molten

  13. Freezing for Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Katherine; Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    The promise of egg freezing for women’s fertility preservation entered feminist debate in connection with medical and commercial control over, and emancipation from, biological reproduction restrictions. In this paper we explore how women negotiate and make sense of the decision to freeze...... their eggs. Our analysis draws on semi-structured interviews with 16 women from the Midwest and East Coast regions of the USA who froze their eggs. Rather than freezing to balance career choices and ‘have it all’, the women in this cohort were largely ‘freezing for love’ and in the hope of having their ‘own...... healthy baby’. This finding extends existing feminist scholarship and challenges bioethical concerns about egg freezing by drawing on the voices of women who freeze their eggs. By viewing egg freezing as neither exclusively liberation nor oppression or financial exploitation, this study casts egg freezing...

  14. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  15. Molten salt reactors: chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This work is a critical analysis of the 1000 MW MSBR project. Behavior of rare gases in the primary coolant circuit, their extraction from helium. Coating of graphite by molybdenum, chemistry of protactinium and niobium produced in the molten salt, continuous reprocessing of the fuel salt and use of stainless steel instead of hastelloy are reviewed [fr

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  17. Surface freezing of water

    OpenAIRE

    P?rez-D?az, J. L.; ?lvarez-Valenzuela, M. A.; Rodr?guez-Celis, F.

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered?exclusively?by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on ...

  18. Reoxidation of uranium metal immersed in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt after electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Young, E-mail: eychoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Min Ku [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Jai [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We present our findings that uranium (U) metal prepared by using the electrolytic reduction process for U oxide (UO{sub 2}) in a Li{sub 2}O–LiCl salt can be reoxidized into UO{sub 2} through the reaction between the U metal and Li{sub 2}O in LiCl. Two salt types were used for immersion of the U metal: one was the salt used for electrolytic reduction, and the other was applied to the unused LiCl salts with various concentrations of Li{sub 2}O and Li metal. Our results revealed that the degree of reoxidation increases with the increasing Li{sub 2}O concentration in LiCl and that the presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal. - Highlights: • Uranium (U) metal can be reoxidized into UO{sub 2} through the reaction between the U metal and Li{sub 2}O in LiCl. • The degree of reoxidation increases with the Li{sub 2}O concentration in LiCl. • The presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal.

  19. Reoxidation of uranium metal immersed in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt after electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jeon, Min Ku; Lee, Jeong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Sung-Jai; Heo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-03-01

    We present our findings that uranium (U) metal prepared by using the electrolytic reduction process for U oxide (UO2) in a Li2O-LiCl salt can be reoxidized into UO2 through the reaction between the U metal and Li2O in LiCl. Two salt types were used for immersion of the U metal: one was the salt used for electrolytic reduction, and the other was applied to the unused LiCl salts with various concentrations of Li2O and Li metal. Our results revealed that the degree of reoxidation increases with the increasing Li2O concentration in LiCl and that the presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal.

  20. Cold crucible technique for interaction test of molten corium with structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Kwang Soon; An, Sang Mo; Min, Beong Tae; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2012-01-01

    During a severe accident, the molten corium might interact with several structures in a nuclear power plant such as core peripheral structures, lower plenum, lower head vessel, and external structures of a reactor vessel. The interaction of the molten corium with the structure depends on the molten corium composition, temperature, structural materials, and environmental conditions such as pressure and humidity. For example, the interaction of a metallic molten corium containing metal uranium (U) and zirconium (Zr) with the oxidized steel structure (Fe 2O3 ) is affected by not only thermal ablation but oxidation reduction reaction because the oxidation quotients of the U and Zr are higher than that of Fe. KAERI set up an experimental facility and technique using a cold crucible melting method to verify the interaction mechanism between the metallic molten corium and structural materials. This technique includes the generation of the metallic melt, melt delivery, measurement of the interaction process, and post analyses after the test

  1. Molten pool-lower head integrity. Heat transfer models including advanced numerical simulations (DNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, J.M.; Bonnet, J.M.; Bernaz, L.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed to investigate the heat transfer within a molten corium pool (homogeneous, stratified and with miscibility gap): Synthesis of heat transfer correlations in molten pool (homogeneous and stratified), Focusing effect in stratified metal layer, DNS analysis of Rayleigh Benard instabilities at the top boundary; interpretation of the different convection regimes and exponents affecting the Rayleigh number in the heat transfer correlations, Molten pool model for corium presenting a miscibility gap. Condition for de-stratification. (authors)

  2. Molten pool-lower head integrity. Heat transfer models including advanced numerical simulations (DNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M.; Bonnet, J.M.; Bernaz, L. [CEA Grenoble (France)

    2001-07-01

    Extensive studies have been performed to investigate the heat transfer within a molten corium pool (homogeneous, stratified and with miscibility gap): Synthesis of heat transfer correlations in molten pool (homogeneous and stratified), Focusing effect in stratified metal layer, DNS analysis of Rayleigh Benard instabilities at the top boundary; interpretation of the different convection regimes and exponents affecting the Rayleigh number in the heat transfer correlations, Molten pool model for corium presenting a miscibility gap. Condition for de-stratification. (authors)

  3. Study of the pyrochemical treatment-recycling process of the Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussier, H.; Heuer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Separation Processes Studies Laboratory (Commissariat a l'energie Atomique) has made a preliminary assessment of the reprocessing system associated with Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). The scheme studied in this paper is based on the principle of reductive extraction and metal transfer that constituted the core process designed for the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR), although the flow diagram has been adapted to the current needs of the Molten Salt Reactor Fast (MSFR).

  4. Study on mechanical interaction between molten alloy and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    Simulant experiments using low melting point molten alloy and water have been conducted to observe both fragmentation behavior of molten jet and boiling phenomena of water, and to measure both particle size and shape of fragmented solidified jet, focusing on post-pin-failure molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCl) which was important to evaluate the sequence of the initiating phase for metallic fueled FBR. In addition, characteristics of coolant boiling phenomena on FCIs have been investigated, focusing on the boiling heat transfer in the direct contact heat transfer mode. As a results, it is concluded that the fragmentation of poured molten alloy jet is affected by a degree of boiling of water and is classified into three modes by thermal conditions of both the instantaneous contact interface temperature of two liquids and subcooling of water. In the case of forced convection boiling in direct contact mode, it is found that the heat transfer performance is enhanced by increase of the heat transfer area, due to oscillation of the surface and fragmentation of molten alloy. As a results of preliminary investigation of FCI behavior for metallic fuel core based on these results, it is expected that the ejected molten fuel is fragmented into almost spherical particles due to the developed boiling of sodium. (author)

  5. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  6. Fission product removal from molten salt using zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Babcock, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) can be treated in a molten salt electrorefiner for conversion into metal and mineral waste forms for geologic disposal. The fuel is dissolved in molten chloride salt. Non-transuranic fission products in the molten salt are ion-exchanged into zeolite A, which is subsequently mixed with glass and consolidated. Zeolite was found to be effective in removing fission product cations from the molten salt. Breakthrough of cesium and the alkaline earths occurred more rapidly than was observed for the rare earths. The effluent composition as a function of time is presented, as well as results for the distribution of fission products along the length of the column. Effects of temperature and salt flow rate are also discussed

  7. Electrodeposition of antimony, tellurium and their alloys from molten acetamide mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Peng, X.; Murugan, G.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the electrodeposition of antimony (Sb), tellurium (Te) and their alloys from molten mixtures of acetamide - antimony chloride and tellurium chloride. The binary mixtures of acetamide with SbCl3 and TeCl 4 exhibit eutectic formation with large depressions of freezing points to below room

  8. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Tsukada, Kineo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Oomichi, Toshihiko; Oono, Hideo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure, as well as improve the technical reliability and safety by the elimination of a proton beam entering window. Constitution: The nuclear reactor container main body is made of Hastelloy N and provided at the inner surface with two layers of graphite shields except for openings. An aperture was formed in the upper surface of the container, through which protons accelerated by a linear accelerator are directly entered to the liquid surface of molten salts such as 7LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 , 7LiF-NaF-ThF 4 , 7LiF-Rb-UF 4 , NaF-KF-UF 4 and the like. The heated molten salts are introduced by way of a pipeway into a heat exchanger where the heat is transferred to coolant salts and electric generation is conducted by way of heated steams. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  10. Thermal interaction of molten copper with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental work was performed to study the thermal interaction between molten copper particles (in the range of temperature from the copper melting point to about 1800 0 C) and water from about 15-80 0 C. The transient temperatures of the copper particles and water before and during their thermal interaction were measured. The history of the phenomena was filmed by means of a high speed FASTAX camera (to 8000 f/s). Classification of the observed phenomena and description of the heat-transfer modes were derived. One among the phenomena was the thermal explosion. The necessary conditions for the thermal explosion are discussed and their physical interpretation is given. According to the hypothesis proposed, the thermal explosion occurs when the molten metal has the temperature of its solidification and the heat transfer on its surface is sufficiently intensive. The 'sharp-change' of the crystalline structure during the solidification of the molten metal is the cause of the explosion fragmentation. (author)

  11. Activity coefficients of plutonium and cerium in liquid gallium at 1073 K: Application to a molten salt/solvent metal separation concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, David; Ched'homme, Severine; Bourges, Gilles; Sanchez, Sylvie; Picard, Gerard S.

    2005-01-01

    Activity coefficients in liquid metal and salt phases are important parameters for predicting the separation efficiency of reductive extraction or electrochemical pyrochemical processes. The electrochemical properties of Ce and Pu in gallium metal and chlorides media - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl-KCl - have been studied at 1073 K. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry show the thermodynamic feasibility of using gallium as solvent metal for pyrochemical processes involving Pu and Ce. The activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga (log(γ Pu,Ga ) = -7.3 ± 0.5) is deduced from the results and is a basis of assessing the potential for using liquid metals in pyrochemical separation of actinides and lanthanides. Evaluation of literature data for Al, Bi and Cd suggests that Ga is most favorable for selective separation of Pu from Ce near 1073 K

  12. State-to-state dynamics at the gas-liquid metal interface: rotationally and electronically inelastic scattering of NO[2Π(1/2)(0.5)] from molten gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Roscioli, Joseph R; Nesbitt, David J

    2011-06-21

    Jet cooled NO molecules are scattered at 45° with respect to the surface normal from a liquid gallium surface at E(inc) from 1.0(3) to 20(6) kcal/mol to probe rotationally and electronically inelastic scattering from a gas-molten metal interface (numbers in parenthesis represent 1σ uncertainty in the corresponding final digits). Scattered populations are detected at 45° by confocal laser induced fluorescence (LIF) on the γ(0-0) and γ(1-1) A(2)Σ ← X(2)Π(Ω) bands, yielding rotational, spin-orbit, and λ-doublet population distributions. Scattering of low speed NO molecules results in Boltzmann distributions with effective temperatures considerably lower than that of the surface, in respectable agreement with the Bowman-Gossage rotational cooling model [J. M. Bowman and J. L. Gossage, Chem. Phys. Lett. 96, 481 (1983)] for desorption from a restricted surface rotor state. Increasing collision energy results in a stronger increase in scattered NO rotational energy than spin-orbit excitation, with an opposite trend noted for changes in surface temperature. The difference between electronic and rotational dynamics is discussed in terms of the possible influence of electron hole pair excitations in the conducting metal. While such electronically non-adiabatic processes can also influence vibrational dynamics, the γ(1-1) band indicates rotational energy transfer is compared from a hard cube model perspective with previous studies of NO scattering from single crystal solid surfaces. Despite a lighter atomic mass (70 amu), the liquid Ga surface is found to promote translational to rotational excitation more efficiently than Ag(111) (108 amu) and nearly as effectively as Au(111) (197 amu). The enhanced propensity for Ga(l) to transform incident translational energy into rotation is discussed in terms of temperature-dependent capillary wave excitation of the gas-liquid metal interface. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  14. A study on conductivity, density, and viscosity of molten salt systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kangjo

    1976-01-01

    A relation between the equivalent conductivity and density for molten salts is deduced with the aid of significant structures theory, and the solid state density at melting point is evaluated approximately for some rare-earth metal chlorides and the other chlorides. Furthermore, the relation among the equivalent conductivity, density, and viscosity for some molten salts is discussed. (auth.)

  15. Studies on yttrium oxide coatings for corrosion protection against molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Y.; Bhandari, Subhankar; Pragatheeswaran; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Das, A.K.; Kumar, Jay; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium oxide is resistant to corrosion by molten uranium and its alloys. Yttrium oxide is recommended as a protective oxide layer on graphite and metal components used for melting and processing uranium and its alloys. This paper presents studies on the efficacy of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings for barrier applications against molten uranium

  16. Structure of molten Bi-Sb-alloys by means of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamparter, P.; Knoll, W.; Steeb, S.

    1976-01-01

    The structural investigations with melts can be subdivided into two groups: The first group contains molten metals and molten alloys, and one can state that the structure of molten metals and of molten alloys nowadays is rather well understood. Interference functions of molten metals may be described by a hard sphere model. This is valid also for molten alloys with statistical distribution. For the second group, namely molten non-metals and molecular melts, the interference functions as well as the pair correlation functions are very offen rather complicated and not well understood. The present study is concerned with the transition region between these two groups. It is shown that the melts of the Bi-Sb system exhibit a change from metallic to non-metallic structure. Regarding the experimental details: the experiments were done with the two-axes spectrometer D 4 at the high-flux reactor at Grenoble. The containers consisted of cylindrical quartz tubes with a wall thickness of 0.1 cm. The furnace consisted of a direct-heated vanadium tube. The wavelength of the neutrons was 0.695 A. The final result is that the structure in molten Bi-Sb-alloys consists of primitive tetrahedra with coordination number 3. There are less tetrahedra in molten Bi than in molten Sb. Also with rising temperature the number of tetrahedra decreases. It is shown how to compose the coordination numbers of two structures to get the observed coordination number. The observed values are always the mean values of the two structures. (orig./HK) [de

  17. Electrochemical studies on plutonium in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, G.; Lambertin, D.; Rochefort, S.; Delpech, S.; Picard, G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies on plutonium have been supporting the development of pyrochemical processes involving plutonium at CEA. The electrochemical properties of plutonium have been studied in molten salts - ternary eutectic mixture NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 , equimolar mixture NaCl-KCl and pure CaCl 2 - and in liquid gallium at 1073 K. The formal, or apparent, standard potential of Pu(III)/Pu redox couple in eutectic mixture of NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 at 1073 K determined by potentiometry is equal to -2.56 V (versus Cl 2 , 1 atm/Cl - reference electrode). In NaCl-KCl eutectic mixture and in pure CaCl 2 the formal standard potentials deduced from cyclic voltammetry are respectively -2.54 V and -2.51 V. These potentials led to the calculation of the activity coefficients of Pu(III) in the molten salts. Chronoamperometry on plutonium in liquid gallium using molten chlorides - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl/KCl - led to the determination of the activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga, log γ = -7.3. This new data is a key parameter to assess the thermodynamic feasibility of a process using gallium as solvent metal. By comparing gallium with other solvent metals - cadmium, bismuth, aluminum - gallium appears to be, with aluminum, more favorable for the selectivity of the separation at 1073 K of plutonium from cerium. In fact, compared with a solid tungsten electrode, none of these solvent liquid metals is a real asset for the selectivity of the separation. The role of a solvent liquid metal is mainly to trap the elements

  18. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  19. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  20. Electron spin resonance study of electron localization and dynamics in metal-molten salt solutions: comparison of M-MX and Ln-LnX sub 3 melts (M alkali metal, Ln = rare earth metal, X = halogen)

    CERN Document Server

    Terakado, O; Freyland, W

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra in liquid K-KCl and M-(NaCl/KCl) sub e sub u sub t mixtures at different concentrations in salt-rich melts approaching the metal-nonmetal transition region. In both systems F-centre-like characteristics are found. Strongly exchange narrowed signals clearly indicate that fast electron exchange occurs on the picosecond timescale. In contrast, the ESR spectra of a (NdCl sub 2)(NdCl sub 3)-(LiCl/KCl) sub e sub u sub t melt are characterized by a large line width of the order of 10 sup 2 mT which decreases with increasing temperature. In this case, the g-factor and correlation time are consistent with the model of intervalence charge transfer, which is supported by recent conductivity and optical measurements. The different transport mechanisms will be discussed.

  1. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwall, Piyush, E-mail: Piyush.Sabharwall@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Hastelloy N and 242, shows corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures. • Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. • Thermal gradients and galvanic couples in the molten salts enhance corrosion rates. • Corrosion rates found were typically <10 mils per year. - Abstract: This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non-nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, that show good corrosion resistance in molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700 °C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in 58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF{sub 4} at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. Corrosion rates were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <100 μm per year after 1000 h of corrosion tests. No catastrophic corrosion was observed in the diffusion welded regions. For materials of construction, nickel-based alloys and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of the type of salt impurity and alloy composition, with respect to chromium and carbon, to better define the best conditions for corrosion resistance. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high-temperature components per American Society of Mechanical

  2. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief... the White House staff forgo pay increases until further notice. Accordingly, as a signal of our shared...

  3. The Freezing Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  4. Molten fuel studies at Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.J.; Knowles, J.B.; Tattersall, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the experimental facilities available for molten fuel studies at Winfrith. These include a large facility capable of testing components at full LMFBR subassembly scale and also a high pressure facility for experiments at pressures up to 25 MPa, covering the whole range of temperatures and pressures of interest for the PWR. If the hypothetical accident conditions initiating the release of molten fuel do not produce an explosive transfer of thermal energy on contact of molten fuel with the reactor coolant, then an intermediate rate of heat transfer over several hundred milliseconds may occur. Theoretical work is described which is being carried out to predict the resulting pressurisation and the degree of mechanical loading on the reactor structure. Finally the current programme of molten fuel studies and recent progress are reviewed, and future plans, which are chiefly focussed on the study of thermal interactions between molten fuel and sodium coolant for the LMFBR are outlined. (author)

  5. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  6. Surface freezing of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided.

  7. Freeze drying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppa, N.V.; Stewart, P.; Renzi, E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser

  8. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.; Silva, F.T. da

    1988-01-01

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author) [pt

  9. Fuel processing for molten-salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Research devoted to development of processes for the isolation of protactinium and for the removal of fission products from molten-salt breeder reactors is reported. During this report period, engineering development progressed on continuous fluorinators for uranium removal, the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal, the fuel reconstitution step, and molten salt--bismuth contactors to be used in reductive extraction processes. The metal transfer experiment MTE-3B was started. In this experiment all parts of the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal are demonstrated using salt flow rates which are about 1 percent of those required to process the fuel salt in a 1000-MW(e) MSBR. During this report period the salt and bismuth phases were transferred to the experimental vessels, and two runs with agitator speeds of 5 rps were made to measure the rate of transfer of neodymium from the fluoride salt to the Bi--Li stripper solution. The uranium removed from the fuel salt by fluorination must be returned to the processed salt in the fuel reconstitution step before the fuel salt is returned to the reactor. An engineering experiment to demonstrate the fuel reconstitution step is being installed. In this experiment gold-lined equipment will be used to avoid introducing products of corrosion by UF 6 and UF 5 . Alternative methods for providing the gold lining include electroplating and mechanical fabrication

  10. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  11. Electrodeposition of uranium metal by reduction of uranium oxides in molten Lif-KF=NaF-CaF 2-UF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, D.S.; Burris, L.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Tomczuk, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Although electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides was shown to be feasible in the early 1960's it is recognized that considerable improvement in the electrolytic reduction technology must be achieved for practical applications. This exploratory work on electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was undertaken to investigate potential improvements in the technology. The approach taken was to deposit solid uranium metal directly on a solid cathode at temperatures below the melting point of uranium (1132 degrees C). The lower temperature electrolytic reduction process has several advantages over the existing chemical reduction processes. It lessens materials problems and special heating and insulating requirements associated with high-temperature operations. It removes most impurities. It does not produce the large quantities of byproduct oxides wastes typical of chemical reduction processes

  12. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. This part describes the MSBR core (data presented are from ORNL 4541). The principal characteristics of the core are presented in tables together with plane and elevation drawings, stress being put upon the reflector, and loading and unloading. Neutronic, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics (core and reflectors) are more detailed. The reasons why a graphite with a tight graphite layer has been chosen are briefly exposed. The physical properties of the standard graphite (irradiation behavior) have been determined for an isotropic graphite with fine granulometry; its dimensional variations largely ressemble that of Gilsonite. The mechanical stresses computed (Wigner effect) do not implicate in any way the graphite stack [fr

  13. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. This part 'CIRCUITS' regroups under a condensed form - in French and using international units - the essential information contained in both basic documents of the American project for a molten-salt breeder power plant. This part is only dealing with things relating to the CEA-EDF workshop 'CIRCUITS'. It is not concerned with information on: the reactor and the moderator replacement, the primary and secondary salts, and the fuel salt reprocessing, that are dealt with in parts 'CORE' and 'CHEMISTRY' respectively. The possible evolutions in the data - and solutions - taken by the American designers for their successive projects (1970 to 1972) are shown. The MSBR power plant comprises three successive heat transfer circuits. The primary circuit (Hastelloy N), radioactive and polluted, containing the fuel salt, includes the reactor, pumps and exchangers. The secondary circuit (pipings made of modified Hastelloy N) contaminated in the exchanger, ensures the separation between the fuel and the fluid operating the turbo-alternator. The water-steam circuit feeds the turbine with steam. This steam is produced in the steam generator flowed by the secondary fluid. Some subsidiary circuits (discharge and storage of the primary and secondary salts, ventilation of the primary circuit ...) complete the three principal circuits which are briefly described. All circuits are enclosed inside the controlled-atmosphere building of the nuclear boiler. This building also ensures the biological protection and the mechanical protection against outer aggressions [fr

  14. Analyses of out-of-pile freezing experiments by SIMMER-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the interpretation of the TRAN Simulation experiments performed by SIMBATH facility of KfK. Two typical TRAN Simulation experiments were analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The original TRAN experiments were performed at SNL in order to examine the freezing behavior of molten UO 2 injected into an annular channel. In the TRAN Simulation experiments of SIMBATH series, similar freezing phenomena were investigated for molten thermite, i.e., a mixture of Al 2 O 3 and iron, instead of UO 2 . The analyses of the simulation experiments by SIMMER-II code aimed at clarifying the applicability of the code and interpreting the freezing process during the experiments. Distribution of molten materials that had deposited in the test section was compared between experimental measurements and calculation by SIMMER-II. Through this study, it has been confirmed that SIMMER-II can well reproduce the TRAN Simulation experiments with allowable difference. The calculations by SIMMER-II also suggested that further model improvements, e.g., freezing on a convex surface, would be effective for a better interpretation of the freezing phenomena. (author)

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Superalloys in Hot Lithium Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng; Hur, Jin-Mok; Seo, Chung-Seok; Park, Seoung-Won

    2006-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at ∼ 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of metals in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of superalloys have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under oxidation condition

  16. The molten salt reactor adventure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF 4 -ThF 4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized

  17. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-01-01

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li 2 O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes

  18. Molten material-containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The molten material-containing vessel of the present invention comprises a vessel main body having an entrance opened at the upper end, a lid for closing the entrance, an outer tube having an upper end disposed at the lower surface of the lid, extended downwardly and having an closed lower end and an inner tube disposed coaxially with the outer tube. When a molten material is charged from the entrance to the inside of the vessel main body of the molten material-containing vessel and the entrance is closed by the lid, the outer tube and the inner tube are buried in the molten material in the vessel main body, accordingly, a fluid having its temperature elevated by absorption of the heat of the molten material rises along the inner circumferential surface of the outer tube, abuts against the lower surface of the lid and cooled by exchanging heat with the lid and forms a circulating flow. Since the heat in the molten material is continuously absorbed by the fluid, transferred to the lid and released from the lid to the atmospheric air, heat releasing efficiency can be improved compared with conventional cases. (N.H.)

  19. Molten salt electrolysis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Takasawa, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    A rotational shaft is disposed vertically downwardly from an upper portion so as to be immersed in a liquid metal in a vessel, impellers for stirring the liquid metal are disposed on the lower portion of the rotational shaft, and a cylindrical body is disposed in the inside of the vessel so as to surround the impellers. When the rotational shaft is rotated, the impellers suck the liquid metal upwardly from the lower portion of the cylindrical body and flow the metal from the upper portion to cause a downwarding stream on the outside of the cylindrical body. As a result, materials reduced and deposited on the upper surface of a liquid metal cathode along with the stream of the liquid metal are precipitated effectively on the lower portion of the vessel. In addition, since a liquid metal with no deposition of uranium is always frown over from the upper portion of the cylindrical body, growth of uranium on the surface of the cathode of liquid metal is prevented, so that uranium, plutonium and transuranium elements can be recovered stably by electrolytic reduction. (N.H.)

  20. Facile preparation of highly pure KF-ZrF4 molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Guoqiang; Cui, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Long; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2018-03-01

    The preparation of highly pure KF-ZrF4 (FKZr) molten salt, a potential secondary coolant in molten salt reactors, was realized simply by heating a mixture of (NH4)2ZrF6 and KF. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the FKZr molten salt was mainly composed of KZrF5 and K2ZrF6. The melting point of the prepared FKZr molten salt was 420-422 °C under these conditions. The contents of all metal impurities were lower than 20 ppm, and the content of oxygen was lower than 400 ppm. This one-step protocol avoids the need for a tedious procedure to prepare ZrF4 and for an additional purification process to remove oxide impurities, and is therefore a convenient, efficient and economic preparation method for high-purity FKZr molten salt.

  1. Experimental study on thermal interaction between a high-temperature molten jet and plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Saito, M.; Furutani, A.; Isozaki, M.; Imahori, S.; Konishi, K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent simulant experiments to study molten corium-structure interactions under postulated core disruptive accident (CDA) conditions in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFMRs). These experiments were conducted in the MELT-II facility generating high-temperature molten simulants by an induction heating technique. From a series of molten jet-structure interaction experiments, the effects of the solidified crust layer and molten layer on the erosion behavior were identified, and analytical models were developed to assess the structure erosion rate with and without crust formation. Especially, we revealed the inherent mitigation mechanism that when the molten oxide jet with high melting point falls down onto the structure plate, solidified crust of the oxide can significantly reduce the erosion rate. (author)

  2. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  3. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  4. Metallurgical electrochemistry: the interface between materials science and molten salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Even though molten salt electrolysis finds application in the primary extraction of metals (electrowinning), the purification and recycling of metals (electrorefining), and in the formation of metal coatings (electroplating), the technology remains in many respects underexploited. Electrolysis in molten salts as well as other nonaqueous media has enormous potential for materials processing. First, owing to the special attributes of nonaqueous electrolytes electrochemical processing in these media has an important role to play in the generation of advanced materials, i.e., materials with specialized chemistries or tailored microstructures (electrosynthesis). Secondly, as environmental quality standards rise beyond the capabilities of classical metals extraction technologies to comply, molten salt electrolysis may prove to be the only acceptable route from ore to metal. Growing public awareness of pollution from the metals industry could stimulate a renaissance in molten salt electrochemistry. Challenges facing metallurgical electrochemistry as relates to the environment fall into two categories: (1) improving existing electrochemical technology, and (2) developing clean electrochemical technology to displace current nonelectrochemical technology. In both instances success hinges upon the discovery of advanced materials and the ecologically sound extraction of metals, the close coupling between materials science and molten salt chemistry is manifest. (author) 6 refs

  5. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (United States). Indian Head Div.; Wernly, K. [Molten Salt Oxidation Corp. (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  6. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.

    1999-01-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible 238 Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na 2 SO 4 , Na 3 PO 4 and NaAsO 2 or Na 3 AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the 238 Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox

  7. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  8. Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Yun, H. C.; Lee, D. G.

    2005-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation, MSO for short, is a robust technology that can effectively treat mixed waste (radioactive waste including hazardous metals or organics). It can safely and economically treat the difficult wastes such as not-easily destroyable toxic organic waste, medical waste, chemical warfare and energetic materials such as propellant and explosives, all of which are not easily treated by an incinerator or other currently existing thermal treatment system. Therefore, molten salt oxidation technology should be developed and utilized to treat a lot of niche waste stored in the nuclear and environmental industries. So, if we put the MSO technology to practical use by Korea-Vietnam joint research, we can reduce R and D fund for MSO technology by ourselves and we can expect an export of the outcome of nuclear R and D in Korea. For Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research concerning molten salt oxidation technology between KOREA and VIETNAM, in this research, We invited two Vietnamese researchers and we introduced our experimental scale molten salt oxidation system in order to let them understand molten salt oxidation technology. We also visited Viet man and we consulted about molten salt oxidation process. We held seminar on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology, discussed on the joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology and finally we wrote MOU for joint research

  9. Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Yun, H. C.; Lee, D. G

    2005-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation, MSO for short, is a robust technology that can effectively treat mixed waste (radioactive waste including hazardous metals or organics). It can safely and economically treat the difficult wastes such as not-easily destroyable toxic organic waste, medical waste, chemical warfare and energetic materials such as propellant and explosives, all of which are not easily treated by an incinerator or other currently existing thermal treatment system. Therefore, molten salt oxidation technology should be developed and utilized to treat a lot of niche waste stored in the nuclear and environmental industries. So, if we put the MSO technology to practical use by Korea-Vietnam joint research, we can reduce R and D fund for MSO technology by ourselves and we can expect an export of the outcome of nuclear R and D in Korea. For Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research concerning molten salt oxidation technology between KOREA and VIETNAM, in this research, We invited two Vietnamese researchers and we introduced our experimental scale molten salt oxidation system in order to let them understand molten salt oxidation technology. We also visited Viet man and we consulted about molten salt oxidation process. We held seminar on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology, discussed on the joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology and finally we wrote MOU for joint research.

  10. Polymerization with freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2005-01-01

    Irreversible aggregation processes involving reactive and frozen clusters are investigated using the rate equation approach. In aggregation events, two clusters join irreversibly to form a larger cluster; additionally, reactive clusters may spontaneously freeze. Frozen clusters do not participate in merger events. Generally, freezing controls the nature of the aggregation process, as demonstrated by the final distribution of frozen clusters. The cluster mass distribution has a power-law tail, F k ∼k -γ , when the freezing process is sufficiently slow. Different exponents, γ = 1 and 3, are found for the constant and the product aggregation rates, respectively. For the latter case, the standard polymerization model, either no gels, or a single gel, or even multiple gels, may be produced

  11. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  12. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal--metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    Metal powders, metal oxide powders, and mixtures thereof of controlled particle size are provided by reacting an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea. Upon heating, urea reacts with water from the solution to leave a molten urea solution containing the metal values. The molten urea solution is heated to above about 180 0 C, whereupon metal values precipitate homogeneously as a powder. The powder is reduced to metal or calcined to form oxide particles. One or more metal oxides in a mixture can be selectively reduced to produce metal particles or a mixture of metal and metal oxide particles

  13. Cermets from molten metal infiltration processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard Lee

    2012-09-18

    New cermets with improved properties and applications are provided. These new cermets have lower density and/or higher hardness than B4C cermet. By incorporating other new ceramics into B4C powders or as a substitute for B4C, lower densities and/or higher hardness cermets result. The ceramic powders have much finer particle size than those previously used which significantly reduces grain size of the cermet microstructure and improves the cermet properties.

  14. Accuracy analysis of the thermal diffusivity measurement of molten salts by stepwise heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshio; Furukawa, Kazuo

    1976-11-01

    The stepwise heating method for measuring thermal diffusivity of molten salts is based on the electrical heating of a thin metal plate as a plane heat source in the molten salt. In this method, the following estimations on error are of importance: (1) thickness effect of the metal plate, (2) effective length between the plate and a temperature measuring point and (3) effect of the noise on the temperature rise signal. In this report, a measuring apparatus is proposed and measuring conditions are suggested on the basis of error estimations. The measurements for distilled water and glycerine were made first to test the performance; the results agreed well with standard values. The thermal diffusivities of molten NaNO 3 at 320-380 0 C and of molten Li 2 BeF 4 at 470-700 0 C were measured. (auth.)

  15. Molten fuel-moderator interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Kynstautas, R.

    1987-02-01

    A critical review of the current understanding of vapor explosions was carried out. It was concluded that, on the basis of actual industrial accidents and large scale experiments, energetic high yield steam explosion cannot be regarded as an improbable event if large quantities of molten fuel and coolant are mixed together. This study also reviewed a hydrodynamic transient model proposed by Henry and Fauske Associates to assess a molten fuel-moderator interaction event. It was found that the proposed model negates a priori the possibility of a violent event, by introducing two assumptions: 1) fine fragmentation of the molten fuel, and ii) rapid heat transfer from the fine fragments to form steam. Using the Hicks and Menzies thermodynamic model, maximum work potential and pressure rise in the calandria were estimated. However, it is recommended that a more representative upper bound model based on an underwater explosion of a pressurized volume of steam be developed

  16. Aluminum titanate crucible for molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    An improved crucible for molten uranium is described. The crucible or crucible liner is formed of aluminum titanate which essentially eliminates contamination of uranium and uranium alloys during molten states thereof. (U.S.)

  17. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  18. Status of the French research in the field of molten salt nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, M.; Israel, M.; Fauger, P.; Lecocq, A.

    1977-01-01

    The research program of the CEA in the field of molten salt nuclear reactors has been concerned with MSBR type reactors (Molten Salt Breeder Reactor). The papers written after having performed the theoretical analysis are entitled: core, circuits, chemistry and economy; they include some criticisms and suggestions. The experimental studies consisted in: graphite studies, chemical studies of the salt, metallic materials, the salt loop and the lead loop [fr

  19. Freezing hot electrons. Electron transfer and solvation dynamics at D{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehler, A.J.

    2007-05-15

    The present work investigates the electron transfer and solvation dynamics at the D{sub 2}O/Cu(111), D{sub 2}O/Ru(001), and NH{sub 3}/Cu(111) interfaces using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. Within this framework, the influence of the substrate, adsorbate structure and morphology, solvation site, coverage, temperature, and solvent on the electron dynamics are studied, yielding microscopic insight into the underlying fundamental processes. Transitions between different regimes of ET, substrate-dominated, barrier-determined, strong, and weak coupling are observed by systematic variation of the interfacial properties and development of empirical model descriptions. It is shown that the fundamental steps of the interfacial electron dynamics are similar for all investigated systems: Metal electrons are photoexcited to unoccupied metal states and transferred into the adlayer via the adsorbate's conduction band. The electrons localize at favorable sites and are stabilized by reorientations of the surrounding polar solvent molecules. Concurrently, they decay back two the metal substrate, as it offers a continuum of unoccupied states. However, the detailed characteristics vary for the different investigated interfaces: For amorphous ice-metal interfaces, the electron transfer is initially, right after photoinjection, dominated by the substrate's electronic surface band structure. With increasing solvation, a transient barrier evolves at the interface that increasingly screens the electrons from the substrate. Tunneling through this barrier becomes the rate-limiting step for ET. The competition of electron decay and solvation leads to lifetimes of the solvated electrons in the order of 100 fs. Furthermore, it is shown that the electrons bind in the bulk of the ice layers, but on the edges of adsorbed D{sub 2}O clusters and that the ice morphology strongly influences the electron dynamics. For the amorphous NH{sub 3}/Cu(111

  20. Propagation mechanisms of molten fuel/moderator interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, D.L.; Ciccarelli, G.

    1991-06-01

    It is well known that a vapor explosion can result when molten is suddenly brought into contact with a cold volatile liquid such as water. However, the rapid melt fragmentation and heat transfer processes that occur during a propagating melt-water interaction are poorly understood. Experiments were carried out in the present work to investigate the fragmentation processes for single molten metal drops in water. To determine the time scale for the fragmentation of a drop, liquid metal drops (in thermal equilibrium with the water) as well as hot molten drops surrounded by a vapor film were subjected to underwater shocks with overpressures of up to about 20 MPa. In the hot molten drop tests, the induction time for the initiation of the explosion is typically less than 100 μs; at a corresponding time in the cold drop tests, very little or no direct hydrodynamic fragmentation of the drop has occurred. Therefore, in the hot drop case the fragmentation of the drop is dominated by thermal effects; i.e., the heat transfer from the melt to the water leads to violent boiling, pressurization, and drop fragmentation. The melt-water interaction consists of several cycles involving bubble growth and collapse. The strength of the interaction was not found to be a strong function of initial shock pressure (for molten tin drops with trigger pressures of up to 20 MPa), but depends on the thermal energy in the melt: high-temperature thermite drops generated a larger first bubble than lower temperature melt drops. A model for the fine fragmentation process for a hot drop is proposed that is based on thermal effects. The fragmentation processes governed by thermal effects observed in the present experiments are expected to play an important role in the escalation of a local interaction to a large-scale coherent vapor explosion, and are not accounted for in current transient models for propagating vapor explosions

  1. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50

  2. Molten-salt converter reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    Molten-salt reactors appear to have substantial promise as advanced converters. Conversion ratios of 0.85 to 0.9 should be attainable with favourable fuel cycle costs, with 235 U valued at $12/g. An increase in 235 U value by a factor of two or three ($10 to $30/lb. U 3 O 8 , $75/SWU) would be expected to increase the optimum conversion ratio, but this has not been analyzed in detail. The processing necessary to recover uranium from the fuel salt has been partially demonstrated in the MSRE. The equipment for doing this would be located at the reactor, and there would be no reliance on an established recycle industry. Processing costs are expected to be quite low, and fuel cycle optimization depends primarily on inventory and burnup or replacement costs for the fuel and for the carrier salt. Significant development problems remain to be resolved for molten-salt reactors, notably the control of tritium and the elimination of intergranular cracking of Hastelloy-N in contact with tellurium. However, these problems appear to be amenable to solution. It is appropriate to consider separating the development schedule for molten-salt reactors from that for the processing technology required for breeding. The Molten-Salt Converter Reactor should be a useful reactor in its own right and would be an advance towards the achievement of true breeding in thermal reactors. (author)

  3. Catalysis in Molten Ionic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, Soghomon; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with catalysis in molten salts and ionic liquids, which are introduced and reviewed briefly, while an in-depth review of the oxidation catalyst used for the manufacturing of sulfuric acid and cleaning of flue gas from electrical power plants is the main topic of the chapter...

  4. thermic oil and molten salt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A

    1 mai 2016 ... [27] Zavoico, AB. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document. Tech. rep, Sandia National. Laboratories, SAND2001-2100, 2001. How to cite this article: Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A. Performance simulation of parabolic trough solar collector using two fluids (thermic oil and molten salt).

  5. Time-of-flight pulsed neutron diffraction of molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Y; Misawa, M; Suzuki, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1975-06-01

    In this work, the pulsed neutron diffraction of molten alkali metal nitrate and bismuth trihalide was measured by the time-of-flight method. An electron linear accelerator was used as the pulsed neutron source. All the measurements were carried out with the T-O-F neutron diffractometer installed on the 300 MeV electron lineac. Molten NaNO/sub 3/ and RbNO/sub 3/ were adopted as the samples for alkali metal nitrate. The measurement is in progress for KNO/sub 3/ and LiNO/sub 3/. As the first step of the study on bismuth-bismuth trihalide system, the temperature dependence of structure factors was observed for BiCl/sub 3/, BiBr/sub 3/ and BiI/sub 3/ in the liquid state. The structure factors Sm(Q) for molten NaNO/sub 3/ at 340/sup 0/C and RbNO/sub 3/ at 350/sup 0/C were obtained, and the form factor F/sub 1/(Q) for single NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical with equilateral triangle structure was calculated. In case of molten NaNO/sub 3/, the first peak of Sm(Q) is simply smooth and a small hump can be observed in the neighbourhood of the first minimum Q position. The first peak of Sm(Q) for molten RbNO/sub 3/ is divided into two peaks, whereas a hump at the first minimum becomes big, and shifts to the low Q side of the second peak. The size of the NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical in molten NaNO/sub 3/ is a little smaller than that in molten RbNO/sub 3/. The values of the bond length in the NO/sub 3//sup -/ radical are summarized for crystal state and liquid state. The temperature dependence of the structure factor S(Q) was observed for BiCl/sub 3/, BiBr/sub 3/ and BiI/sub 3/, and shown in a figure.

  6. An Investigation on the Thermophysical Properties of a Binary Molten Salt System Containing Both Aluminum Oxide and Titanium Oxide Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridhar, Kunal

    Molten salts are showing great potential to replace current heat transfer and thermal energy storage fluids in concentrated solar plants because of their capability to maximize thermal energy storage, greater stability, cost effectiveness and significant thermal properties. However one of the major drawbacks of using molten salt as heat transfer fluid is that they are in solid state at room temperature and they have a high freezing point. Hence, significant resources would be required to maintain it in liquid form. If molten salt freezes while in operation, it would eventually damage piping network due to its volume shrinkage along with rendering the entire plant inoperable. It is long known that addition of nanoparticle suspensions has led to significant changes in thermal properties of fluids. In this investigation, aluminum oxide and titanium oxide nanoparticles of varying concentrations are added to molten salt/solar salt system consisting of 60% sodium nitrate and 40% potassium nitrate. Using differential scanning calorimeter, an attempt will be made to investigate changes in heat capacity of system, depression in freezing point and changes in latent heat of fusion. Scanning electron microscope will be used to take images of samples to study changes in micro-structure of mixture, ensure uniform distribution of nanoparticle in system and verify authenticity of materials used for experimentation. Due to enormous magnitude of CSP plant, actual implementation of molten salt system is on a large scale. With this investigation, even microscopic enhancement in heat capacity and slight lowering of freezing point will lead to greater benefits in terms of efficiency and cost of operation of plant. These results will further the argument for viability of molten salt as a heat transfer fluid and thermal storage system in CSP. One of the objective of this experimentation is to also collect experimental data which can be used for establishing relation between concentration

  7. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sooby, E., E-mail: soobyes@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Baty, A. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Beneš, O. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Salanne, M. [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, Laboratoire PECSA, F-75005 Paris (France); Sattarov, A. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Developing accelerator driven subcritical fission to destroy transuranics in SNF. • The core is a vessel containing a molten mixture of NaCl and transuranic chlorides. • Molecular dynamics used to calculate the thermophysical properties of the salt. • Density and molecular structure for actinide salts reported here. • The neutronics of ADS fission in molten salt are presented. -- Abstract: We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated.

  8. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sooby, E.; Baty, A.; Beneš, O.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Salanne, M.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Developing accelerator driven subcritical fission to destroy transuranics in SNF. • The core is a vessel containing a molten mixture of NaCl and transuranic chlorides. • Molecular dynamics used to calculate the thermophysical properties of the salt. • Density and molecular structure for actinide salts reported here. • The neutronics of ADS fission in molten salt are presented. -- Abstract: We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated

  9. Freezing of Water Droplet due to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Isao; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yu

    In this study, the feasibility of cooling/freezing of phase change.. materials(PCMs) due to evaporation for cold storage systems was experimentally examined. A pure water was used as the test PCM, since the latent heat due to evaporation of water is about 7 times larger than that due to freezing. A water droplet, the diameter of which was 1-4 mm, was suspended in a test cell by a fine metal wire (O. D.= 100μm),and the cell was suddenly evacuated up to the pressure lower than the triple-point pressure of water, so as to enhance the evaporation from the water surface. Temperature of the droplet was measured by a thermocouple, and the cooling/freezing behavior and the temperature profile of the droplet surface were captured by using a video camera and an IR thermo-camera, respectively. The obtained results showed that the water droplet in the evacuated cell is effectively cooled by the evaporation of water itself, and is frozen within a few seconds through remarkable supercooling state. When the initial temperature of the droplet is slightly higher than the room temperature, boiling phenomena occur in the droplet simultaneously with the freezing due to evaporation. Under such conditions, it was shown that the degree of supercooling of the droplet is reduced by the bubbles generated in the droplet.

  10. New type of metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharov, A.V.; Ankudinov, V.B.; Ogorodnikov, V.P.; Marukhin, Y.A.

    2014-01-01

    Now the technologies based on interaction of high-intensity beams with substance of a target are being intensively developed. As a target it is possible to use the new type of monodisperse metal targets. The principal advantages of new targets type are: target cooling isn't required; there is no induced activity: the target can be used many times; small dispersion on the speed, the size and interaction points with a beam. The basis of a target is the jet of molten metal, following in the vacuum chamber .Under the influence of the special disturbance superimposed on the liquid jet, the jet disintegrated into identical drops. In the vacuum chamber the drops freeze and form into the solid granules. It is possible to receive monodisperse targets from different metals, alloys and salts (diameter of targets is from 30 .m to 1.5 mm). Dispersion by the sizes and speed is less than 1%. The technique allows to receive not only continuous targets, but also hollow targets with dispersion on thickness of wall within 1...2%.

  11. An assessment of fuel freezing and drainage phenomena in a reactor shield plug following a core disruptive accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    An important problem related to the assessment of the recriticality potential for an LMFBR following a core disruptive accident is an understanding of the freezing phenomena of molten fuel on a cold structure which may prevent fuel dispersal and sunsequent shutdown. Transient analytical freezing and drainage calculations have been applied to molten UO 2 travel through the rather cold lower shield plug of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). The successive approximation technique is used to obtain a solution of the non-linear freezing problem, where such effects as heat generation, viscous heat dissipation, temperature dependent thermophysical properties and a convective boundary condition at the solidification front have been incorporated into the present analytical formulation. Results indicate that previous steady-state analysis overestimate the rate of frozen layer build-up by about a factor of two. However, of primary importance is the driving force for drainage and the diameter of the shield plug flow channel. (Auth.)

  12. Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

    1973-12-25

    A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

  13. Molten fuel/coolant interaction studies: some results obtained with the Windscale small shock tube rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higham, E.J.; Vaughan, G.J.

    1978-02-01

    Experiments are described in which water has been brought into contact with various molten metals in a shock tube, thus simulating the fall of coolant into molten uranium dioxide in a postulated reactor accident. Impact velocities of the water on to the molten material were in the range 5 to 7 m/s. Shock-pulse pressures in the water column after impact and particle size distributions of the dispersed resolidified material that was recovered were measured. The proportion of dispersed material and the size of the shock pulse (by comparison with that expected from water hammer alone) have been used as criteria for the occurrence of a molten fuel/coolant interaction and such interactions of varying degrees of violence have been found for water/aluminium, water/bismuth, water/tin, over a range of temperatures from 350 0 C to 950 0 C, for water/boric oxide, but not for water/magnesium. (author)

  14. Evaluation of a molten salt electrolyte for direct reduction of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alangi, Nagaraj; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Use of molten fluoride salt towards direct reduction of actinides and lanthanides by molten salt electrolysis is of interest for problems related to metallic nuclear fuels. The performance of the molten salt bath is dependent on the pre-conditioning of the molten salt. A procedure for conditioning of LiF-BaF 2 salt mixtures has been developed based on systematic electrochemical experimental investigations using voltammetry with graphite and platinum as electrode materials. We utilize the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the electrolyte condition. This technique is fast and offers the advantage of in-situ/online measurement eliminating the need for sampling. The conditioning procedure that was developed was tried on LiF-CaF 2

  15. Visualization of direct contact heat transfer between water and molten alloy by neutron radiography. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1997-01-01

    Design of an innovative Steam Generator (SG) for Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFRs) using liquid-liquid direct contact heat transfer has been developing. In this concept, the SG shell is filled with a molten alloy, which is heated by primary sodium. Water is fed into the high-temperature, molten alloy, and evaporates by direct contact heating. In order to obtain the fundamental information needed to discuss the heat transfer mechanisms of direct contact between the water and molten alloy, this phenomenon was observed by neutron radiography. JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was used. This paper deals with the results of visualization of direct contact heat exchange in the molten alloy. (author)

  16. Accelerator molten-salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Kuroi, Hideo; Kato, Yoshio; Oomichi, Toshihiko.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain fission products and to transmute transuranium elements and other radioactive wastes by the use of Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor. Constitution: Beams from an accelerator pipe at one end of a target vessel is injected through a window into target molten salts filled inside of the target vessel. The target molten salts are subjected to pump recycling or spontaneous convection while forcively cooled by blanket molten salts in an outer vessel. Then, energy is recovered from the blanket molten salts or the target molten salts at high temperatures through electric power generation or the like. Those salts containing such as thorium 232 and uranium 238 are used as the blanket molten salts so that fission products may be produced by neutrons generated in the target molten salts. PbCl 2 -PbF 2 and LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 can be used as the target molten salts and as the blanket molten salts respectively. (Seki, T.)

  17. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooby, E.; Baty, A.; Beneš, O.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Salanne, M.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated. A special thanks is due to Prof. Paul Madden for introducing the ADSMS group to the concept of using the molten salt as the spallation target, rather than a conventional heavy metal spallation target. This feature helps to optimize this core as a Pu/TRU burner.

  18. Fuel processing for molten-salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the development of processes for the isolation of protactinium and for the removal of fission products from molten-salt breeder reactors. The metal transfer experiment MTE-3 (for removing rare earths from MSRE fuel salt) was completed and the equipment used in that experiment was examined. The examination showed that no serious corrosion had occurred on the internal surfaces of the vessels, but that serious air oxidation occurred on the external surfaces of the vessels. Analyses of the bismuth phases indicated that the surfaces in contact with the salts were enriched in thorium and iron. Mass transfer coefficients in the mechanically agitated nondispersing contactors were measured in the Salt/Bismuth Flow-through Facility. The measured mass transfer coefficients are about 30 to 40 percent of those predicted by the preferred literature correlation, but were not as low as those seen in some of the runs in MTE-3. Additional studies using water--mercury systems to simulate molten salt-bismuth systems indicated that the model used to interpret results from previous measurements in the water--mercury system has significant deficiencies. Autoresistance heating studies were continued to develop a means of internal heat generation for frozen-wall fluorinators. Equipment was built to test a design of a side arm for the heating electrode. Results of experiments with this equipment indicate that for proper operation the wall temperature must be held much lower than that for which the equipment was designed. Studies with an electrical analog of the equipment indicate that no regions of abnormally high current density exist in the side arm. (JGB)

  19. Partially molten magma ocean model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model

  20. The value of a freeze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, H.A.; Long, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the rapid increase in public support for a nuclear-freeze agreement---that is, a mutual freeze on the testing, production and further deployment of nuclear weapons---which has been a remarkable political phenomenon. In less than a year, support has grown from a few volunteers collecting signatures on petitions to a congressional vote in which supporters of a freeze very nearly prevailed. This fall, eight states and the District of Columbia will vote on freeze referendums. Already Wisconsin voters have overwhelmingly voted yes in such a referendum. There are many reasons for this strong support for a freeze, including fear of nuclear war, resistance to high levels of military spending and opposition to particular military policies of the Reagan administration. But to most supporters, the chief purpose of a freeze is simple: it is to help stop an immense, continuing, dangerous and incredibly costly arms race between the two superpowers

  1. Structure Formation Mechanisms during Solid Ti with Molten Al Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L; Pronichev, D; Trunov, M

    2016-01-01

    The study discuses advantages and disadvantages of previously proposed mechanisms of the formation of structure between solid Ti and molten Al and presents a new mechanism based on the reviewed and experimental data. The previously proposed mechanisms were classified into three groups: mechanisms of precipitation, mechanisms of destruction and mechanisms of chemical interaction between intermetallics and melt. The reviewed mechanisms did not explain the formation of heterogeneous interlayer with globular aluminide particles and thin layers of pure Al, while the present study reveals variation in the solid Ti/molten Al reaction kinetics during various phases of laminated metal-intermetallic composite formation. The proposed mechanism considers formed during composite fabrication thin oxide interlayers between Ti and Al evolution and its impact on the intermetallic compound formation and explains the initial slow rate of intermetallic interlayer formation and its subsequent acceleration when the oxide foils are ruptured. (paper)

  2. Steam explosion studies with single drops of molten refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    Laser heating, levitation melting, and metal combustion were used to prepare individual drops of molten refractory materials which simulate LWR fuel melt products. Drop temperatures ranged from approx. = 1500 to > 3000K. These drops, several millimeters in diameter, were injected into water and subjected to pressure transients (approx. = 1MPa peak pressures) generated by a submerged exploding bridgewire. Molten oxides of Fe, Al and Zr could be induced to explode with bridgewire initiation. High speed films showed the explosions with exceptional clarity, and pressure transducer records could be correlated with individual frames in the films. Pressure spikes one or two MPa high were generated whenever an explosion occurred. Debris particles were mostly spheroidal, with diameters in the range 10 to 1000 μm

  3. On modeling of beryllium molten depths in simulated plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsotridis, G.; Rother, H.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma-facing components in tokamak-type fusion reactors are subjected to intense heat loads during plasma disruptions. The influence of high heat fluxes on the depth of heat-affected zones of pure beryllium metal and beryllium containing very low levels of surface active impurities is studied by using a two-dimensional transient computer model that solves the equations of motion and energy. Results are presented for a range of energy densities and disruption times. Under certain conditions, impurities, through their effect on surface tension, create convective flows and hence influence the flow intensities and the resulting depths of the beryllium molten layers during plasma disruptions. The calculated depths of the molten layers are also compared with other mathematical models that are based on the assumption that heat is transported through the material by conduction only. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. Partial structures in molten AgBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroki [Department of Condensed Matter Chemistry and Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-mail: ueno@gemini.rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Tahara, Shuta [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Science, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2009-02-21

    The structure of molten AgBr has been studied by means of neutron and X-ray diffractions with the aid of structural modeling. It is confirmed that the Ag-Ag correlation has a small but well-defined first peak in the partial pair distribution function whose tail penetrates into the Ag-Br nearest neighbor distribution. This feature on the Ag-Ag correlation is intermediate between that of molten AgCl (non-superionic melt) and that of molten AgI (superionic melt). The analysis of Br-Ag-Br bond angle reveals that molten AgBr preserves a rocksalt type local ordering in the solid phase, suggesting that molten AgBr is clarified as non-superionic melt like molten AgCl.

  5. Fragmentation of molten core material by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1982-01-01

    A series of scoping experiments was performed to study the fragmentation of prototypic high temperature melts in sodium. The quantity of melt involved was at least one order of magnitude larger than previous experiments. Two modes of contact were used: melt streaming into sodium and sodium into melt. The average bulk fragment size distribution was found to be in the range of previous data and the average size distribution was found to be insensitive to mode of contact. SEM studies showed that the metal component typically fragmented in the molten phase while the oxide component fragmented in the solid phase. For UO 2 -ZrO 2 /stainless steel melts no sigificant spatial separation of the metal and oxide was observed. The fragment size distribution was stratified vertically in the debris bed in all cases. While the bulk fragment size showed generally consistent trends, the individual experiments were sufficiently different to cause different degrees of stratification in the debris bed. For the highly stratified beds the permeability can decrease by as much as a factor of 20 from the bottom to the top of the bed

  6. Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yibo; He, Canming; Lu, Jianfeng; Ding, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator were experimentally studied. • Overall heat transfer coefficient reached maximum with optimal molten salt flow rate. • Energy efficiency first rose and then decreased with salt flow rate and temperature. • Optimal molten salt flow rate and temperature existed for good thermal performance. • High inlet water temperature benefited steam generating rate and energy efficiency. - Abstract: Molten salt steam generator is the key technology for thermal energy conversion from high temperature molten salt to steam, and it is used in solar thermal power station and molten salt reactor. A shell and tube type molten salt steam generator was set up, and its thermal performance and heat transfer mechanism were studied. As a coupling heat transfer process, molten salt steam generation is mainly affected by molten salt convective heat transfer and boiling heat transfer, while its energy efficiency is also affected by the heat loss. As molten salt temperature increased, the energy efficiency first rose with the increase of heat flow absorbed by water/steam, and then slightly decreased for large heat loss as the absorbed heat flow still rising. At very high molten salt temperature, the absorbed heat flow decreased as boiling heat transfer coefficient dropping, and then the energy efficiency quickly dropped. As the inlet water temperature increased, the boiling region in the steam generator remarkably expanded, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency both rose with the overall heat transfer coefficient increasing. As the molten salt flow rate increased, the wall temperature rose and the boiling heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased according to the boiling curve, so the overall heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency of steam generator both had maxima.

  7. Structure and dynamics of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1986-02-01

    Modern techniques of liquid state physics have been successfully used over the last decade to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a variety of multicomponent liquids in which relative ordering of the species is present near freezing. The alkali halides are prototypes for this specific type of short range order in relation to the nature of bonding, but the systems in question include also other monovalent and polyvalent metal-ion halides, alkali-based intermetallic compounds, and chalcogen-based alloys. A viewpoint is taken in this review which gives attention to relations between liquid and solid phase properties across melting for compound systems at stoichiometric composition. In addition, large deviations from stoichiometry can be realized in the liquid phase, to display trends of evolution of structure, bonding and electronic states with composition. (author)

  8. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareg, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers.

  9. Freeze Protection in Gas Holders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Duursma, Gail

    In cold weather, the water seals of gasholders need protection from freez- ing to avoid compromising the seal. These holders have a large reservoir of “tank water” at the base which is below ground. At present freeze- protection is achieved by external heating of the seal water which...

  10. Comparison of molten chloride and fluoride salts potentialities for An/Ln separation by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, A.; Peron, F.; Marrot, F.; Lacquement, J. [DRCP/SCPS/LPP - CEA/CEN Valrho - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is the comparison of molten fluoride and chloride salts potentialities for Am/Nd separation by electrodeposition on inert cathode, on a purely thermodynamic point of view. The molten LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic (77-23 mol.%, at 780 deg. C) was considered for this study. Cyclic voltammetry showed a one step Am(III)/Am reduction at a potential of {approx_equal}+0.5 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. A potential difference of 290 mV between Am and Nd metallic deposition was estimated by square-wave voltammetry. This Am/Nd potential difference is more important than in molten chlorides (220 mV in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 500 deg. C). Moreover in molten fluoride salt, the americium and neodymium (+II) oxidation state is not stable contrary to the molten chloride one where corrosion of deposited Am would be potential. However this larger potential difference in molten fluorides is quite balanced by the higher working temperature. (authors)

  11. Experimental study on forced convection boiling heat transfer on molten alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the characteristics of forced convection boiling heat transfer on molten metal, basic experiments have been carried out with subcooled water flowing on molten Wood's alloy pool surface. In these experiments, water flows horizontally in a rectangular duct. A cavity filled with Wood's alloy is present in a portion of the bottom of the duct. Wood's alloy is heated by a copper conductor at the bottom of the cavity. The experiments have been carried out with various velocities and subcoolings of water, and temperature of Wood's alloy. Boiling curves on the molten alloy surface were obtained and compared with that on a solid heat transfer surface. It is observed that the boiling curve on molten alloy is in a lower superheat region than the boiling curve on a solid surface. This indicates that the heat transfer performance of forced convection boiling on molten alloy is enhanced by increase of the heat transfer area, due to oscillation of the surface and fragmentation of molten alloy

  12. Generalized structural theory of freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1980-10-01

    The first-principles order parameter theory of freezing, proposed in an earlier work, has been successful in yielding quantitative agreement with known freezing parameters for monoatomic liquids forming solids with one atom per unit cell. A generalization of this theory is presented here to include the effects of a basis set of many atoms per unit cell. The basic equations get modified by the 'density structure factors' fsub(i) which arise from the density variations within the unit cell. Calculations are presented for the important case of monoatomic liquids freezing into hexagonal close packed solids. It is concluded that all freezing transitions can be described by using structural correlations in the liquid instead of the pair potential; and that the three body correlations are important in deciding the type of solid formed after freezing. (author)

  13. A Feasibility Study of Steelmaking by Molten Oxide Electrolysis (TRP9956)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Sadoway; Gerbrand Ceder

    2009-12-31

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is an extreme form of molten salt electrolysis, a technology that has been used to produce tonnage metals for over 100 years - aluminum, magnesium, lithium, sodium and the rare earth metals specifically. The use of carbon-free anodes is the distinguishing factor in MOE compared to other molten salt electrolysis techniques. MOE is totally carbon-free and produces no CO or CO2 - only O2 gas at the anode. This project is directed at assessing the technical feasibility of MOE at the bench scale while determining optimum values of MOE operating parameters. An inert anode will be identified and its ability to sustain oxygen evalution will be demonstrated.

  14. Development of structural materials to enable the electrochemical reduction of spent oxide nuclear fuel in a molten salt electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, J. M.; Cho, S. H.; Lim, J. H.; Seo, C. S.; Park, S. W

    2006-02-15

    For the development of the advanced spent fuel management process based on the molten salt technology, it is essential to choose the optimum material for the process equipment handling a molten salt. In this study, corrosion behavior of Fe-base superalloy, Ni-base superalloy, non-metallic material and surface modified superalloy were investigated in the hot molten salt under oxidation atmosphere. These experimental data will suggest a guideline for the selection of corrosion resistant materials and help to find the operation criteria of each equipment in aspects of high temperature characteristics and corrosion retardation.

  15. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  16. Freeze drying method for preparing radiation source material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.; Smith, P.K.

    1976-01-01

    Fabrication of a neutron source is specifically claimed. A palladium/californium solution is freeze dried to form a powder which, through conventional powder metallurgy, is shaped into a source containing the californium evenly distributed through a palladium metal matrix. (E.C.B.)

  17. A new method to evaluate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for Molten Salt Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiming, E-mail: liqiming@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Tian, Jian; Zhou, Chong [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Naxiu, E-mail: wangnaxiu@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We novelly valuate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for MSRs. • We focus on the passive decrease of the leak impetus in flanged connections. • The modified flanged connections are acquired a sealing ability of self-adjustment. • Effects of redesigned flange configurations on molten salt leakage are discussed. - Abstract: The Thorium based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project is a future Generation IV nuclear reactor system proposed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences with the strategic goal of meeting the growing energy needs in the Chinese economic development and social progress. It is based on liquid salts served as both fuel and primary coolant and consequently great challenges are brought into the sealing of the flanged connections. In this study, an improved prototype flange assembly is performed on the strength of the Freeze-Flange initially developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The calculation results of the finite element model established to analyze the temperature profile of the Freeze-Flange agree well with the experimental data, which indicates that the numerical simulation method is credible. For further consideration, the ideal-gas thermodynamic model, together with the mathematical approximation, is novelly borrowed to theoretically evaluate the sealing performance of the modified Freeze-Flange and the traditional double gaskets bolted flange joint. This study focuses on the passive decrease of the leak driving force due to multiple gaskets introduced in flanged connections for MSR. The effects of the redesigned flange configuration on molten salt leakage resistance are discussed in detail.

  18. A new method to evaluate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for Molten Salt Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiming; Tian, Jian; Zhou, Chong; Wang, Naxiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We novelly valuate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for MSRs. • We focus on the passive decrease of the leak impetus in flanged connections. • The modified flanged connections are acquired a sealing ability of self-adjustment. • Effects of redesigned flange configurations on molten salt leakage are discussed. - Abstract: The Thorium based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project is a future Generation IV nuclear reactor system proposed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences with the strategic goal of meeting the growing energy needs in the Chinese economic development and social progress. It is based on liquid salts served as both fuel and primary coolant and consequently great challenges are brought into the sealing of the flanged connections. In this study, an improved prototype flange assembly is performed on the strength of the Freeze-Flange initially developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The calculation results of the finite element model established to analyze the temperature profile of the Freeze-Flange agree well with the experimental data, which indicates that the numerical simulation method is credible. For further consideration, the ideal-gas thermodynamic model, together with the mathematical approximation, is novelly borrowed to theoretically evaluate the sealing performance of the modified Freeze-Flange and the traditional double gaskets bolted flange joint. This study focuses on the passive decrease of the leak driving force due to multiple gaskets introduced in flanged connections for MSR. The effects of the redesigned flange configuration on molten salt leakage resistance are discussed in detail

  19. Kinetic studies on the removal of fission products from molten salt using Zeolite-4A. Contributed Paper RD-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Suheel; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Perumal, S.V.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is one of the nonaqueous processes, being developed for reprocessing metallic spent fuel. This process uses liquid metals and molten salts and is operated at elevated temperatures. In the electro-refining process, the spent fuel is used as the anode of the electro-refiner and the actinide elements in the spent fuel are electrotransported from the anode through the molten salt electrolyte onto a suitable cathode where they are collected as metals in pure form. After some batches are processed, chlorides of fission products such as alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metals accumulate in the electrolyte salt. The accumulated FPs in the salt will be removed by adsorption/ion-exchange by using zeolite columns. Hence, kinetic studies on the adsorption of Cs, Ba which are some of the major FP products in LiCI-KCI eutectic, have been carried out

  20. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface

  1. Study on dissolution behavior of molten solidified waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Toshikatsu

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive molten solidified waste (slag) has been generated by melting non-metallic low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Slag is expected to immobilize radionuclides in the waste repository. The chemical durability of slag is an important factor for the safety assessment of the disposal in that the durability provides the source term in the assessment. Since a chemical characteristic of slag is similar to that of glass, the general information on the chemical durability of slag might be provided from previous studies on nuclear waste glass. We have investigated effects of chemical compositions of slag and alkaline environments of repository on the chemical durability of slag. (author)

  2. Momentum anisotropy at freeze out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, S.; Borghini, N.; Lang, C.

    2017-01-01

    The transition from a hydrodynamical modeling to a particle-based approach is a crucial element of the description of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Assuming this “freeze out” happens instantaneously at each point of the expanding medium, we show that the local phase-space distribution of the emitted particles is asymmetric in momentum space. This suggests the use of anisotropic hydrodynamics for the last stages of the fluid evolution. We discuss how observables depend on the amount of momentum-space anisotropy at freeze out and how smaller or larger anisotropies allow for different values of the freeze-out temperature. (paper)

  3. Anhydrobiosis and Freezing-Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGill, Lorraine; Shannon, Adam; Pisani, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic animals can survive the loss of both free and bound water from their cells. While in this state they are also resistant to freezing. This physiology adapts anhydrobiotes to harsh environments and it aids their dispersal. Panagrolaimus davidi, a bacterial feeding anhydrobiotic nematode...... Panagrolaimus strains from tropical, temperate, continental and polar habitats and we analysed their phylogenetic relationships. We found that several other Panagrolaimus isolates can also survive freezing when fully hydrated and that tissue extracts from these freezing-tolerant nematodes can inhibit the growth...

  4. Electrolytic production of light lanthanides from molten chloride alloys on a large laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szklarski, W.; Bogacz, A.; Strzyzewska, M.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data relating to electrolytic production of rare earth metals are presented. Conditions and results are given of own investigations into the electrolytic process of light lanthanide chloride solutions (LA-Nd) in molten potassium and sodium chlorides conducted on a large laboratory scale using molybdenic, iron, cobaltic and zinc cathodes. Design schemes of employed electrolysers are enclosed. (author)

  5. Electrochemical Behavior of La on Liquid Bi electrode in LiCl-KCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom Kyu; Han, Hwa Jeong; Park, Byung Gi [Soonchunyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Pyroprocessing technology aims to achieve a grouped and efficiently separation of all actinide for recycling with a sufficient decontamination of fission products generating the minimum. The main steps of the pyroprocess is electrowinning process, where the remaining elements in a molten salt after electrorifinning process. That process is U, MAs are concurrently recovered at the liquid metal. Recently, a study of the liquid metal and molten salt using an electrochemical is carried out in a variety of fields. However, there is deficient information about the electrode reaction of lanthanide and actinide on the liquid bismuth metal electrodes. In this paper, the electrochemical behavior of La(III), with liquid bismuth was investigated by the electrochemical method. The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of lanthanum or neodymium among lanthanides in molten LiCl-KCl salt at liquid metal bismuth electrode cyclic voltammetry and derive the thermochemical properties. The electrochemical behavior of La was studied in LiCl-KCl-LaCl{sub 3} molten salts using electrochemical techniques Cyclic Voltammetry on liquid Bi electrodes at 773K. During the process of cyclic voltammetry electrolysis, intermetallic compound were observed of La, Lax-Biy, Li-Bi. The diffusion coefficient of La was measured by cyclic voltemmetry and was found to be 8.18x10{sup -5}cm{sup 2}/s.

  6. Co-ordination of heterovalent cation impurities in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, W.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The local liquid structure around heterovalent cation impurities in molten chlorides is discussed in relation to spectroscopic data on solutions of transition metal ions. A tightly packed, low co-ordination shell is shown to be favoured by Coulomb ionic interactions for physically reasonable values of the size of the impurity. A competition between these forces and ''crystal field'' interactions favouring octahedral co-ordination is thus to be expected for many transition metal ions, as suggested by Gruen and McBeth. The transition observed for some transition metal ions from higher to lower co-ordination with increasing temperature is attributed primarily to entropy differences, that are roughly estimated in a solid-like model. (author)

  7. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal-metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method for preparing particulate metal or metal oxide of controlled partile size comprises contacting an an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea at a temperature sufficient to cause urea to react with water to provide a molten urea solution containing the metal values; heating the molten urea solution to cause the metal values to precipitate, forming a mixture containing precipitated metal values; heating the mixture containing precipitated metal values to evaporate volatile material leaving a dry powder containing said metal values. The dry powder can be calcined to provide particulate metal oxide or reduced to provide particulate metal. Oxide mixtures are provided when the aqueous solution contains values of more than one metal. Homogeneousmetal-metal oxide mistures for preparing cermets can be prepared by selectively reducing at least one of the metal oxides. (auth)

  8. FREEZE DRYING PROCESS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Soham Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Among the various methods of drying, this article has mentioned only one most important method, “Freeze drying”. This method is mainly used for the drying of thermo labile materials. This method works on the principle of sublimation. This method is divided into 3 steps for its better understanding; these are Freezing, Primary drying, and secondary drying. There are many advantages and disadvantages of this method, but still this is the most useful drying method nowadays.

  9. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliakbar Ghadi; Hassan Saghafian; Mansour Soltanieh; Zhi-gang Yang

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investi-gated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the sub-strate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  10. Inertia-confining thermonuclear molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Yamanaka, Chiyoe; Nakai, Sadao; Imon, Shunji; Nakajima, Hidenori; Nakamura, Norio; Kato, Yoshio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the heat generating efficiency while improving the reactor safety and thereby maintaining the energy balance throughout the reactor. Constitution: In an inertia-confining type D-T thermonuclear reactor, the blanket is made of lithium-containing fluoride molten salts (LiF.BeF 2 , LiF.NaF.KF, LiF.KF, etc) which are cascaded downwardly in a large thickness (50 - 100 cm) along the inner wall of the thermonuclear reaction vessel, and neutrons generated by explosive compression are absorbed to lithium in the molten salts to produce tritium, Heat transportation is carried out by the molten salts. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. Optimizing the space-time-yield and the specific energy consumption of molten salt electrolysis processes for the electrowinning of metals in subgroups 4 and 5 of the periodic table of elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeck, W.

    1988-04-01

    Disadvantages of molten salt electrolysis are its low space-time-yield (kg/m 3 h) combined with its high specific energy consumption (kWh/kg). These factors essentially determine how electrolysis is applied on an industrial scale. The electrolysis of tantalum was selected as an example representative for other electrolytic processes; this series of tests allow statements also on the winning of the other elements from subgroups 4 and 5 of the periodic table, and on electrolytic aluminium extraction. Optimal operating conditions for direct current electrolysis were determined in the laboratory by varying the current density and the electrolysis temperature. In order to improve the space-time-yield from an existing electrolytic cell with a given electrolyte composition beyond the optimal range of direct current electrolysis, the process of periodic current reversal is applied. In this process, the polarity is reversed for a short time at constant periodic intervals. If the forward time period and the backward time period are chosen in a suitable way, both the current efficiency and the space-time-yield can be improved without increasing the energy consumption. 59 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  12. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  13. Numerical modelling of coupled phenomena within molten glass heated by induction and mechanically stirred

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoutot, L.

    2006-11-01

    This study reports on a new vitrification process developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Marcoule). This process is used for the treatment of high activity nuclear waste. It is characterized by the cooling of all the metal walls and by currents directly induced inside the molten glass. In addition, a mechanical stirring device is used to homogenize the molten glass. The goal of this study is to develop numerical tools to understand phenomena which take place within the bath and which involve thermal, hydrodynamic and electromagnetic aspects. The numerical studies are validated using experimental results obtained from pilot vitrification facilities. (author)

  14. Saturated steams pressure of HfCl/sub 4/-KCl molten mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1980-02-01

    A bellows null pressure gauge and the dynamic method were used to measure the total and partial pressures of saturated vapors of individual components of molten HfCl/sub 4/-KCl mixtures, as a function of temperature (260 to 1000 deg C) and composition (1.9 to 64.3 mol.% HfCl/sub 4/). Empirical equations expressing the relationship between pressure and temperature are presented. It is shown that in molten mixtures of hafnium tetrachloride with chlorides of alkaline metals its partial pressure dramatically increases when potassium chloride substitutes for cesium chloride.

  15. Saturated steams pressure of HfCl4-KCl molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    A bellows null pressure gauge and the dynamic method were used to measure the total and partial pressures of saturated vapors of individual components of molten HfCl 4 -KCl mixtures, as a function of temperature (260 to 1000 deg C) and composition (1.9 to 64.3 mol.% HfCl 4 ). Empirical equations expressing the relationship between pressure and temperature are presented. It is shown that in molten mixtures of hafnium tetrachloride with chlorides of alkaline metals its partial pressure dramatically increases when potassium chloride substitutes for cesium chloride

  16. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Simpson, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal

  17. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Simpson, Mike [Idaho National Lab., (United States)

    2012-11-30

    This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.

  18. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region

  19. Method for producing metallic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-06-29

    Method for producing metallic particles. The method converts metallic nanoparticles into larger, spherical metallic particles. An aerosol of solid metallic nanoparticles and a non-oxidizing plasma having a portion sufficiently hot to melt the nanoparticles are generated. The aerosol is directed into the plasma where the metallic nanoparticles melt, collide, join, and spheroidize. The molten spherical metallic particles are directed away from the plasma and enter the afterglow where they cool and solidify.

  20. Study of the pyrochemical treatment-recycling process of the Molten Salt Reactor fuel; Estudio de sistema de un proceso de tratamiento-reciclaje piroquimico del combustible de un reactor de sales fundidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussier, H.; Heuer, D.

    2010-07-01

    The Separation Processes Studies Laboratory (Commissariat a l'energie Atomique) has made a preliminary assessment of the reprocessing system associated with Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). The scheme studied in this paper is based on the principle of reductive extraction and metal transfer that constituted the core process designed for the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR), although the flow diagram has been adapted to the current needs of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR).

  1. Dissolution of Si in Molten Al with Gas Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Ahmadi, Mehran

    Silicon is an essential component of many aluminum alloys, as it imparts a range of desirable characteristics. However, there are considerable practical difficulties in dissolving solid Si in molten Al, because the dissolution process is slow, resulting in material and energy losses. It is thus essential to examine Si dissolution in molten Al, to identify means of accelerating the process. This thesis presents an experimental study of the effect of Si purity, bath temperature, fluid flow conditions, and gas stirring on the dissolution of Si in molten Al, plus the results of physical and numerical modeling of the flow to corroborate the experimental results. The dissolution experiments were conducted in a revolving liquid metal tank to generate a bulk velocity, and gas was introduced into the melt using top lance injection. Cylindrical Si specimens were immersed into molten Al for fixed durations, and upon removal the dissolved Si was measured. The shape and trajectory of injected bubbles were examined by means of auxiliary water experiments and video recordings of the molten Al free surface. The gas-agitated liquid was simulated using the commercial software FLOW-3D. The simulation results provide insights into bubble dynamics and offer estimates of the fluctuating velocities within the Al bath. The experimental results indicate that the dissolution rate of Si increases in tandem with the melt temperature and bulk velocity. A higher bath temperature increases the solubility of Si at the solid/liquid interface, resulting in a greater driving force for mass transfer, and a higher liquid velocity decreases the resistance to mass transfer via a thinner mass boundary layer. Impurities (with lower diffusion coefficients) in the form of inclusions obstruct the dissolution of the Si main matrix. Finally, dissolution rate enhancement was observed by gas agitation. It is postulated that the bubble-induced fluctuating velocities disturb the mass boundary layer, which

  2. On purpose simulation model for molten salt CSP parabolic trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranese, Carlo; Matino, Francesca; Maccari, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of computer codes and simulation software is one of the fundamental aspects for the development of any kind of technology and, in particular, in CSP sector for researchers, energy institutions, EPC and others stakeholders. In that extent, several models for the simulation of CSP plant have been developed with different main objectives (dynamic simulation, productivity analysis, techno economic optimization, etc.), each of which has shown its own validity and suitability. Some of those models have been designed to study several plant configurations taking into account different CSP plant technologies (Parabolic trough, Linear Fresnel, Solar Tower or Dish) and different settings for the heat transfer fluid, the thermal storage systems and for the overall plant operating logic. Due to a lack of direct experience of Molten Salt Parabolic Trough (MSPT) commercial plant operation, most of the simulation tools do not foresee a suitable management of the thermal energy storage logic and of the solar field freeze protection system, but follow standard schemes. ASSALT, Ase Software for SALT csp plants, has been developed to improve MSPT plant's simulations, by exploiting the most correct operational strategies in order to provide more accurate technical and economical results. In particular, ASSALT applies MSPT specific control logics for the electric energy production and delivery strategy as well as the operation modes of the Solar Field in off-normal sunshine condition. With this approach, the estimated plant efficiency is increased and the electricity consumptions required for the plant operation and management is drastically reduced. Here we present a first comparative study on a real case 55 MWe Molten Salt Parabolic Trough CSP plant placed in the Tibetan highlands, using ASSALT and SAM (System Advisor Model), which is a commercially available simulation tool.

  3. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni-based superalloys in lithium molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Lim, Jong Ho; Chung, Joon Ho; Hur, Jin Mok; Seo, Chung Seok; Park, Seoung Won

    2004-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of metals in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of Ni-based superalloys have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under oxidation condition

  4. Corrosion Behavior of a Surface Modified Inconel 713LC in a Hot Lithium Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Lim, Jong Ho; Seo, Chung Seok; Jung, Ki Jung; Park, Seoung Won

    2005-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of the lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside a remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent an unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of the chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance the process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of the oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of the metals in a LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under an oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of a surface modified Inconel 713LC have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under an oxidation condition

  5. Waste treatment using molten salt oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Stewart, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    MSO technology can be characterized as a submerged oxidation process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The molten salt (usually sodium carbonate at 900-1000 C) provides four waste management functions: providing a heat transfer medium, catalyzing the oxidation reaction, preventing the formation of acid gases by forming stable salts, and efficiently capturing ash particles and radioactive materials by the combined effects of wetting, encapsulation and dissolution. The MSO process requires no wet scrubbing system for off-gas treatment. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous wastes). (author). 24 refs, 2 tabs, 2 figs

  6. Plasma spheroidization and high temperature stability of lanthanum phosphate and its compatibility with molten uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: pvananth@barc.gov.in; Sreekumar, K.P.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Satpute, R.U. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Krishnan, K.; Kulkarni, N.K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kutty, T.R.G. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-01-15

    Lanthanum phosphate has excellent thermal stability and corrosion resistance against many molten metals and other chemically corrosive environments. Lanthanum phosphate (LaPO{sub 4}) was synthesized from lanthanum oxalate by thermal dissociation of the oxalate to the oxide, followed by conversion to hydrated lanthanum phosphate (LaPO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O). Thermal treatment of LaPO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O above 773 K resulted in the irreversible transformation of the hydrated phase to the stable monazite phase. Thermal and chemical stability of monazite was studied by plasma spheroidization experiments using a DC thermal plasma reactor set up. Compatibility of monazite with molten uranium was studied by thermal analysis. Results showed that monazite is thermally stable up to its melting point and also is resistant towards attack by molten uranium. Adherent coatings of LaPO{sub 4} could be deposited onto various substrates by atmospheric plasma spray technique.

  7. Method of forming a ceramic superconducting composite wire using a molten pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geballe, T.H.; Feigelson, R.S.; Gazit, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a method for making a flexible superconductive composite wire. It comprises: drawing a wire of noble metal through a molten material, formed by melting a solid formed by pressing powdered Bi 2 O 3 , CaCO 3 SrCO 3 and CuO in a ratio of components necessary for forming a Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor, into the solid and sintering at a temperature in the range of 750 degrees - 800 degrees C. for 10-20 hours, whereby the wire is coated by the molten material; and cooling the coated wire to solidify the molten material to form the superconductive flexible composite wire without need of further annealing

  8. Plasma spheroidization and high temperature stability of lanthanum phosphate and its compatibility with molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Sreekumar, K.P.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Satpute, R.U.; Krishnan, K.; Kulkarni, N.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanum phosphate has excellent thermal stability and corrosion resistance against many molten metals and other chemically corrosive environments. Lanthanum phosphate (LaPO 4 ) was synthesized from lanthanum oxalate by thermal dissociation of the oxalate to the oxide, followed by conversion to hydrated lanthanum phosphate (LaPO 4 .0.5H 2 O). Thermal treatment of LaPO 4 .0.5H 2 O above 773 K resulted in the irreversible transformation of the hydrated phase to the stable monazite phase. Thermal and chemical stability of monazite was studied by plasma spheroidization experiments using a DC thermal plasma reactor set up. Compatibility of monazite with molten uranium was studied by thermal analysis. Results showed that monazite is thermally stable up to its melting point and also is resistant towards attack by molten uranium. Adherent coatings of LaPO 4 could be deposited onto various substrates by atmospheric plasma spray technique

  9. Estimation of zirconium in various process streams in molten salt electrorefining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganthi, S.; Vandarkuzhali, S.; Venkatesh, P.; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is a non-aqueous pyrochemical process suitable for reprocessing spent metallic fuel. In this process the spent fuel is taken at the anode and the fuel elements are selectively electrotransported to a suitable cathode (either a solid steel cathode or liquid cadmium cathode) using molten LiCl-KCI as electrolyte. We have demonstrated electrorefining of UZr alloy at engineering scale level. 1 Kg U-6%Zr alloy was taken at the anode and pure uranium was recovered at a steel cathode using molten LiCIKCI-5%UCI 3 as electrolyte at 773 K. In this paper we present the method of dissolution, sample preparation and estimation of zirconium in various process streams in the electrorefining experiments carried out in our laboratory

  10. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO 2 and PuO 2 in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  11. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  12. Controlling the discharge of molten material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geel, J. van; Dobbels, F.; Theunissen, W.

    1980-01-01

    A method and device are described for controlling the discharge of molten material from a melter or an intermediate vessel, in which a primary outflow is fed to an overflow system, the working level of which is regulated by means of pneumatic pressure on a communicating chamber pertaining to the overflow system. Molten material may be led into a primary overflow by means of a pneumatic lift. The material melted may be a glass used for disposing of radioactive liquid wastes. (author)

  13. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  14. Hot corrosion behavior of plasma-sprayed partially stabilized zirconia coatings in a lithium molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seong; Park, Byung Heong; Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo

    2008-01-01

    The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. It is essential to choose the optimum material for the process equipment handling molten salt. IN713LC is one of the candidate materials proposed for application in electrolytic reduction process. In this study, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) top coat was applied to a surface of IN713LC with an aluminized metallic bond coat by an optimized plasma spray process, and were investigated the corrosion behavior at 675 .deg. C for 216 hours in the molten salt LiCl-Li 2 O under an oxidizing atmosphere. The as-coated and tested specimens were examined by OM, SEM/EDS and XRD, respectively. The bare superalloy reveals obvious weight loss, and the corrosion layer formed on the surface of the bare superalloy was spalled due to the rapid scale growth and thermal stress. The top coatings showed a much better hot-corrosion resistance in the presence of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt when compared to those of the uncoated superalloy and the aluminized bond coatings. These coatings have been found to be beneficial for increasing to the hot-corrosion resistance of the structural materials for handling high temperature lithium molten salts

  15. Deployment of quasi-digital sensor for high temperature molten salt level measurement in pyroprocessing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanga, Ramesh; Agarwal, Sourabh; Sivaramakrishna, M.; Rao, G. Prabhakara

    2018-04-01

    Development of a liquid molten salt level sensor device that can detect the level of liquid molten salt in the process vessels of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent metallic fuels is detailed. It is proposed to apply a resistive-type pulsating sensor-based level measurement approach. There are no commercially available sensors due to limitations of high temperature, radiation, and physical dimensions. A compact, simple, rugged, low power, and high precise pulsating sensor-based level probe and simple instrumentation for the molten salt liquid level sensor to work in the extreme conditions has been indigenously developed, with high precision and accuracy. The working principle, design concept, and results have been discussed. This level probe is mainly composed of the variable resistor made up of ceramic rods. This resistor constitutes the part of resistance-capacitance-type Logic Gate Oscillator (LGO). A change in the molten salt level inside the tank causes a small change in the resistance which in turn changes the pulse frequency of the LGO. Thus the frequency, the output of the instrument that is displayed on the LCD of an embedded system, is a function of molten salt level. In the present design, the range of level measurement is about 10 mm. The sensitivity in position measurement up to 10 mm is ˜2.5 kHz/mm.

  16. Postaccident heat removal: large-scale molten-fuel-sodium interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.; Pavlik, J.R.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1975-02-01

    Kilogram-scale interactions between molten UO 2 and sodium were performed in an unrestrained geometry to study the resulting energetics and fragmentation. The molten UO 2 was producted by the exothrmic reaction between uranium and MoO 3 powders. Under the conditions of the experiments completed to date, the short-rise-time pressure pulses created in the liquid phase had negligible work potential, and their magnitude did not increase with the amount of molten fuel. No significant gas-phase shock pressures were generated. The largest potential for mechanical work was the sodium vapor generated over a period of roughly 1 sec. About 20 percent of the heat was effective in generating vapor. The ex- perimental results show a marked tendency of molten UO 2 to form particulate after passage through only a few inches of sodium. Particle size distributions obtained under the conditions of the experiments were not significantly different from those obtained in prior small-scale tests and in TREAT tests. Also, the results indicate that the metallic component of the molten mixture formed larger particles than the oxide component. (U.S.)

  17. Theoretical study of energetic interactions between high temperature molten materials and a low temperature fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical models are developed to predict the hydrodynamical transients resulting from the energetic interactions between a high temperature molten material and a low temperature liquid coolant. Initially, the molten material at high temperature and pressure is separated from the low temperature fluid by a solid metal barrier. Upon contact between the molten material and solid barrier, thermal attack occurs eventually resulting in a loss of barrier integrity. Subsequently, the molten material is injected into the liquid pool resulting in energetic interactions. The analytical models integrate a wide variety of potentially mutually-interacting transport phenomena which dominate the transient process into a deterministic scheme to predict the hydrodynamic transient process into a deterministic scheme to predict the hydrodynamic transient process. The model calculations are compared with the existing experimental results to show its engineering accuracy and adequacy in predicting such energetic interactions. Two models are formulated to bracket the transport of molten material to the rupture site for the reactor system. The stratified model minimized the rate of transport of material to the break location while the dispersed model maximized such transport. These two models are applied to a reference pressure tube reactor to evaluate the pressure transients and the potential structural damages as a result of a postulated severe primary coolant blockage in a power channel

  18. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-12-01

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  20. A Theory of Immersion Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2017-01-01

    Immersion freezing is likely involved in the initiation of precipitation and determines to large extent the phase partitioning in convective clouds. Theoretical models commonly used to describe immersion freezing in atmospheric models are based on the classical nucleation theory which however neglects important interactions near the immersed particle that may affect nucleation rates. This work introduces a new theory of immersion freezing based on two premises. First, immersion ice nucleation is mediated by the modification of the properties of water near the particle-liquid interface, rather than by the geometry of the ice germ. Second, the same mechanism that leads to the decrease in the work of germ formation also decreases the mobility of water molecules near the immersed particle. These two premises allow establishing general thermodynamic constraints to the ice nucleation rate. Analysis of the new theory shows that active sites likely trigger ice nucleation, but they do not control the overall nucleation rate nor the probability of freezing. It also suggests that materials with different ice nucleation efficiency may exhibit similar freezing temperatures under similar conditions but differ in their sensitivity to particle surface area and cooling rate. Predicted nucleation rates show good agreement with observations for a diverse set of materials including dust, black carbon and bacterial ice nucleating particles. The application of the new theory within the NASA Global Earth System Model (GEOS-5) is also discussed.

  1. Modelization of the SECM in molten salts environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.; Slim, C.; Di Caprio, D.; Delpech, S.; Stafiej, J.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a cellular automata simulation of SECM (Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy)experiments to study corrosion in molten salt media for generation IV nuclear reactors. The electrodes used in these experiments are cylindrical glass tips with a coaxial metal wire inside. As the result of simulations we obtain the current approach curves of the electrodes with geometries characterized by several values of the ratios of glass to metal area at the tip. We compare these results with predictions of the known analytic expressions, solutions of partial differential equations for flat uniform geometry of the substrate. We present also the results for other, more complicated substrate surface geometries e. g. regular saw modulated surface, or surface obtained by an Eden model process. We show that with a simple cellular automata model we can reasonably well simulate the results of SECM setup. The stochastic resolution of the diffusion equations is made possible by the parallel code implemented on GPU

  2. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

    2012-09-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 °C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700

  3. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  4. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL

    2010-09-21

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  5. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L.

    2007-09-11

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  6. Saturated vapor pressure over molten mixtures of GaCl{sub 3} and alkali metal chlorides; Davlenie nasyshchennykh parov rasplavlennykh smesej CaCl{sub 3} s khloridami shchelochnykh metallov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Smolenskij, V V; Moskalenko, N I [UrO RAN, Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii, Elaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Volatilities of GaCl{sub 3} and alkali metal chlorides over diluted (up to 3 mol %) solutions of GaCl{sub 3} in LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl were measured at 1100 K by dynamic and indirect static methods. Chemical composition of saturated vapor over the mixed melts was determined. Partial pressures of the components were calculated. Their values depend essentially on specific alkali metal cation and on concentration of GaCl{sub 3}; their variation permits altering parameters of GaCl{sub 3} distillation from the salt melt in a wide range.

  7. Medical and social egg freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemant, Camille; Vassard, Ditte; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Until recently, limited options for preserving fertility in order to delay childbearing were available. Although egg freezing and successful thawing is now possible, it remains unclear to what extent women are aware of the availability of this technique, their attitudes towards its...... use, or the circumstances under which this technique may be considered. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was designed to investigate knowledge and attitudes of women in Denmark and the UK on egg freezing and their potential intentions regarding the procedure. RESULTS: Data...... was collected from September 2012 to September 2013 and the responses of 973 women were analyzed. In total, 83% of women reported having heard of egg freezing, and nearly all considered it acceptable for medical indications, whilst 89% considered it acceptable for social reasons. Overall, 19% expressed active...

  8. Freeze-dried microarterial allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, J.; Hargrave, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts were implanted to bridge arterial defects using New Zealand White rabbits as the experimental model. Segments of artery from the rabbit ear and thigh were harvested and preserved for a minimum of 2 weeks after freeze-drying. These allografts, approximately 1 mm in diameter and ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in length, were rehydrated and then implanted in low-pressure and high-pressure arterial systems. Poor patency was noted in low-pressure systems in both allografts and autografts, tested in 12 rabbits. In the high-pressure arterial systems, allografts that were freeze-dried and reconstituted failed in a group of 10 rabbits with an 8-week patency rate of 30 percent. Gamma irradiation in an effort to reduce infection and antigenicity of grafts after freeze-drying was associated with a patency rate of 10 percent at 8 weeks in this system in another group of 10 rabbits. Postoperative cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a patency rate of 22.2 percent in the high-pressure arterial system in a 9-rabbit group. Control autografts in this system in a group of 10 rabbits showed a 100 percent patency at 8 weeks. Microarterial grafts depend on perfusion pressure of the vascular bed for long-term patency. Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts do not seem to function well in lengths of 1 to 2.5 cm when implanted in a high-pressure arterial system. Freeze-dried arterial allografts are probably not antigenic

  9. Chemical interactions and thermodynamic studies in aluminum alloy/molten salt systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh

    The recycling of aluminum and aluminum alloys such as Used Beverage Container (UBC) is done under a cover of molten salt flux based on (NaCl-KCl+fluorides). The reactions of aluminum alloys with molten salt fluxes have been investigated. Thermodynamic calculations are performed in the alloy/salt flux systems which allow quantitative predictions of the equilibrium compositions. There is preferential reaction of Mg in Al-Mg alloy with molten salt fluxes, especially those containing fluorides like NaF. An exchange reaction between Al-Mg alloy and molten salt flux has been demonstrated. Mg from the Al-Mg alloy transfers into the salt flux while Na from the salt flux transfers into the metal. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that the amount of Na in metal increases as the Mg content in alloy and/or NaF content in the reacting flux increases. This is an important point because small amounts of Na have a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the Al-Mg alloy. The reactions of Al alloys with molten salt fluxes result in the formation of bluish purple colored "streamers". It was established that the streamer is liquid alkali metal (Na and K in the case of NaCl-KCl-NaF systems) dissipating into the melt. The melts in which such streamers were observed are identified. The metal losses occurring due to reactions have been quantified, both by thermodynamic calculations and experimentally. A computer program has been developed to calculate ternary phase diagrams in molten salt systems from the constituting binary phase diagrams, based on a regular solution model. The extent of deviation of the binary systems from regular solution has been quantified. The systems investigated in which good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental phase diagrams included NaF-KF-LiF, NaCl-NaF-NaI and KNOsb3-TINOsb3-LiNOsb3. Furthermore, an insight has been provided on the interrelationship between the regular solution parameters and the topology of the phase

  10. Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Charles H.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical

  11. Measurements of void fraction in a water-molten tin system by X-ray absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Michael C.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Corradini, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    A facility has been developed to study the explosive interactions of gas-water injection into a molten tin pool. The experimental apparatus allows for variable nitrogen gas and water injection into the base of a steel tank containing up to 25 kg of molten tin. Due to the opaque nature of the molten metal-gas-water mixture and steel tank, a visualization and measurement technique using continuous high energy x-rays had to be developed. Visualization of the multiphase mixture can be done at 220 Hz with 256x256 pixel resolution or at 30 Hz with 480x1128 pixel resolution. These images are stored digitally and subsequently processed to obtain two dimensional mappings of the chordal average void fraction in the mixture. The image processing method has been used to measure void fraction in experiments that did not include water in the injection mixture. This work includes a comparison to previous studies of integral void fraction data in pools of molten metal with gas injection. (author)

  12. Ultra-fast boriding of metal surfaces for improved properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Servet; Kartal, Guldem; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Erdemir, Ali

    2015-02-10

    A method of ultra-fast boriding of a metal surface. The method includes the step of providing a metal component, providing a molten electrolyte having boron components therein, providing an electrochemical boriding system including an induction furnace, operating the induction furnace to establish a high temperature for the molten electrolyte, and boriding the metal surface to achieve a boride layer on the metal surface.

  13. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed

  14. Physical properties of molten carbonate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, T.; Yanagida, M.; Tanimoto, K. [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Recently many kinds of compositions of molten carbonate electrolyte have been applied to molten carbonate fuel cell in order to avoid the several problems such as corrosion of separator plate and NiO cathode dissolution. Many researchers recognize that the addition of alkaline earth (Ca, Sr, and Ba) carbonate to Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} eutectic electrolytes is effective to avoid these problems. On the other hand, one of the corrosion products, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion is found to dissolve into electrolyte and accumulated during the long-term MCFC operations. This would affect the performance of MCFC. There, however, are little known data of physical properties of molten carbonate containing alkaline earth carbonates and CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We report the measured and accumulated data for these molten carbonate of electrical conductivity and surface tension to select favorable composition of molten carbonate electrolytes.

  15. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten aluminum in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.; Ueda, N.; Sugiyama, K. I.

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of fragmentation of the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions, which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum and sodium under the condition that the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt does not occur. The melting point of aluminum (933K) is roughly equivalent to the liquefaction temperature between the U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel and the SUS cladding (about 923K). The thermal fragmentation of a molten aluminum with a solid crust in the sodium pool is caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the solid crust even under the condition that the instantaneous contact interface temperature between the melt and the sodium is below the boiling point of sodium. This indicates the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt. The transient pressurization within the melt is considered to be caused by following two mechanisms. i) the overheating of the coolant entrapped hydrodynamically inside the aluminum melt confined by solid crust ii) the progression of solid crust inward and the squeeze of inner liquid part of the aluminum melt confined by solid crust It is found that the degree of fragmentation defined by mass median diameter has the same tendency for different dropping modes (drop or jet) with different mass and ambient Weber number of the melt in the present experimental conditions

  16. Anodic and cathodic reactions in molten calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Calcium chloride is a very interesting electrolyte in that it is available, virtually free, in high purity form as a waste product from the chemical industry. It has a very large solubility for oxide ions, far greater than many alkali halides and other divalent halides and has the same toxicity as sodium chloride and also a very high solubility in water. Intuitively, on the passage of current, it is expected that calcium would be deposited at the cathode and chlorine would evolve at the anode. However, if calcium oxide is added to the melt, it is possible to deposit calcium and evolve oxygen containing gases at the anode, making the process far less polluting than when chlorine is evolved. This process is discussed in terms of the addition of calcium to molten lead. Furthermore, these reactions can be altered dramatically depending upon the electrode materials and the other ions dissolved in the calcium chloride. As calcium is only deposited at very negative cathodic potentials, there are several interesting cathodic reactions that can occur and these include the decomposition of the carbonate ion and the ionization of oxygen, sulphur, selenium and tellurium. For example, if an oxide is used as the cathode in molten calcium chloride, the favoured reaction is shown to be the ionization of oxygen O + 2e - → O 2- rather than Ca 2+ + 2 e- → Ca. The oxygen ions dissolve in the salt leaving the metal behind, and this leads to the interesting hypothesis that metal oxides can be reduced directly to the metal purely by the use of electrons. Examples are given for the reduction of titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, chromium oxide and niobium oxide and by mixing oxide powders together and reducing the mixed compact, alloys and intermetallic compounds are formed. Preliminary calculations indicate that this new process should be much cheaper than conventional metallothermic reduction for these elements. (author)

  17. Effect of magnetic field on food freezing

    OpenAIRE

    村田, 圭治; 奥村, 太一; 荒賀, 浩一; 小堀, 康功

    2010-01-01

    [Abstract] This paper presents an experimental investigation on effects of magnetic field on food freezing process. Although purpose of food freezing is to suppress the deterioration of food, freezing breaks food tissue down, and some nutrient and delicious element flow out after thawing. Recently, a few of refrigeration equipments with electric and magnetic fields have attracted attention from food production companies and mass media. Water and tuna were freezed in magnetic field (100kH, 1.3...

  18. Freeze out in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, Laszlo P.; Lazar, Zs.I.; Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.

    1998-01-01

    In fluid dynamical models the freeze out of particles across a three dimensional space-time hypersurface is discussed. The calculation of final momentum distribution of emitted particles is described for freeze out surfaces, with both space-like and time-like normals, taking into account conservation laws across the freeze out discontinuity. Generally the conservation laws lead to a change of temperature, baryon density and flow velocity at freeze out. (author)

  19. Characterization of acoustic cavitation in water and molten aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey; Oda, Kazuhiro; Ishiwata, Yasuo; Dezhkunov, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    High-intensive ultrasonic vibrations have been recognized as an attractive tool for refining the grain structure of metals in casting technology. However, the practical application of ultrasonics in this area remains rather limited. One of the reasons is a lack of data needed to optimize the ultrasonic treatment conditions, particularly those concerning characteristics of cavitation zone in molten aluminum. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the intensity and spectral characteristics of cavitation noise generated during radiation of ultrasonic waves into water and molten aluminum alloys, and to establish a measure for evaluating the cavitation intensity. The measurements were performed by using a high temperature cavitometer capable of measuring the level of cavitation noise within five frequency bands from 0.01 to 10MHz. The effect of cavitation treatment was verified by applying high-intense ultrasonic vibrations to a DC caster to refine the primary silicon grains of a model Al-17Si alloy. It was found that the level of high frequency noise components is the most adequate parameter for evaluating the cavitation intensity. Based on this finding, it was concluded that implosions of cavitation bubbles play a decisive role in refinement of the alloy structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality changes and freezing time prediction during freezing and thawing of ginger

    OpenAIRE

    Singha, Poonam; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Effects of different freezing rates and four different thawing methods on chemical composition, microstructure, and color of ginger were investigated. Computer simulation for predicting the freezing time of cylindrical ginger for two different freezing methods (slow and fast) was done using ANSYS ? Multiphysics. Different freezing rates (slow and fast) and thawing methods significantly (P?

  1. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section 590.536 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  2. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the...

  3. Development of viscometers for molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Kato, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toru; Sato, Yuzuru.

    1997-06-01

    Viscometers specially designed for molten salts were made. One is a oscillating cup type and the other is a capillary type. In the case of the oscillating cup viscometer, the viscosity is determined absolutely through the period and the logarithmic decrement of oscillation with other physical parameters. The period and the logarithmic decrement are calculated from the time intervals between two photo-detectors' intercepts of the reflected laser beam. The capillary viscometer used is made of quartz and the sample is sealed under vacuum, which is placed in a transparent furnace. Efflux time is measured by direct visual observation. Cell constants are determined with distilled water as a calibrating liquid. Viscosities of molten KCl are measured with each viscometer. The differences between measured and standard values of molten KCl at several temperatures are within 5% for the oscillating cup viscometer and within 3% for the capillary viscometer. (author)

  4. Molten salt burner fuel behaviour and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.V.; Zakirov, R.Y.; Grebenkine, K.F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of molten salt reactor technology for treatment of Pu, minor actinides and fission products, when the reactor and fission product clean-up unit are planned as an integral system. This contribution summarises the available R and D which led to selection of the fuel compositions for the molten salt reactor of the TRU burner type (MSB). Special characteristics of behaviour of TRUs and fission products during power operation of MSB concepts are presented. The present paper briefly reviews the processing developments underlying the prior molten salt reactor programmes and relates them to the separation requirements of the MSB concept, including the permissible range of processing cycle times and removal times. Status and development needs in the thermodynamic properties of fluorides, fission product clean-up methods and container materials compatibility with the working fluids for the fission product clean-up unit are discussed. (authors)

  5. Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Lecocq, A.; Kato, Yoshio; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    In the next century, the 'fission breeder' concept will not be practical to solve the global energy problems, including environmental and North-South problems. As a new measure, a simple rational Th molten salt breeding fuel cycle system, named 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics (THORIMS-NES)', which composed of simple power stations and fissile producers, is proposed. This is effective to establish the essential improvement in issues of resources, safety, power-size flexibility, anti-nuclear proliferation and terrorism, radiowaste, economy, etc. securing the simple operation, maintenance, chemical processing, and rational breeding fuel cycle. As examples, 155 MWe fuel self-sustaining power station 'FUJI-II', 7 MWe pilot-plant 'miniFUJI-II', 1 GeV-300 mA proton Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder 'AMSB', and their combined fuel cycle system are explained. (author)

  6. Modelling of molten fuel/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, J.F.; Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete (CORCON) is being developed to provide quantitative estimates of fuel-melt accident consequences suitable for risk assessment of light water reactors. The principal features of CORCON are reviewed. Models developed for the principal interaction phenomena, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. Alternative models for the controlling phenomenon, heat transfer from the molten pool to the surrounding concrete, are presented. These models, formulated in conjunction with the development of CORCON, are characterized by the presence or absence of either a gas film or viscous layer of molten concrete at the melt/concrete interface. Predictions of heat transfer based on these models compare favorably with available experimental data

  7. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zink, Peter A.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Serrano, Brenda E.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Cowan, Ben F.; Herrmann, Steven D.; Li, Shelly X.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-β(double p rime)-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-β(double p rime)-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in

  8. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Electrochemical reduction of actinides oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive metals are currently produced from their oxide by multiple steps reduction techniques. A one step route from the oxide to the metal has been suggested for metallic titanium production by electrolysis in high temperature molten chloride salts. In the so-called FFC process, titanium oxide is electrochemically reduced at the cathode, generating O 2- ions, which are converted on a graphite anode into carbon oxide or dioxide. After this process, the spent salt can in principle be reused for several batches which is particularly attractive for a nuclear application in terms of waste minimization. In this work, the electrochemical reduction process of cerium oxide (IV) is studied in CaCl 2 and CaCl 2 -KCl melts to understand the oxide reduction mechanism. Cerium is used as a chemical analogue of actinides. Electrolysis on 10 grams of cerium oxide are made to find optimal conditions for the conversion of actinides oxides into metals. The scale-up to hundred grams of oxide is also discussed. (author) [fr

  11. Broadband phase difference method for ultrasonic velocimetry in molten glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikura, Hiroshige; Ihara, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry in molten glass. Realization of such a technique has two difficulties: ultrasonic transmission into molten salt and Doppler signal processing. Buffer rod technique was developed in our research to transmit ultrasound into high temperature molten glass. This article discusses newly developed signal processing technique named broadband phase difference method. (J.P.N.)

  12. Development of metal-carbon eutectic cells for application as high temperature reference points in nuclear reactor severe accident tests: Results on the Fe-C, Co-C, Ti-C and Ru-C alloys' melting/freezing transformation temperature under electromagnetic induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente J.; Journeau, Christophe; Parga, Clemente J.; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the high temperature measurement uncertainty of nuclear reactor severe accident experimental tests at the PLINIUS platform in Cadarache Research Centre, France, a variety of graphite cells containing a metal-carbon eutectic mix have been tested to assess the melting/freezing temperature reproducibility and their feasibility as calibration cells for thermometers. The eutectic cells have been thermally cycled in an induction furnace to assess the effect of heating/cooling rate, metal purity, graphite crucible design, and binary system constituents on the eutectic transformation temperature. A bi-chromatic pyrometer was used to perform temperature measurements in the graphite cell black cavity containing the metal-carbon eutectic mix. The eutectic points analyzed are all over 1100 C and cover an almost thousand degree span, i.e. from the Fe-Fe 3 C to the Ru-C eutectic. The induction heating permitted the attainment of heating and cooling rates of over 200 C/min under an inert atmosphere. The conducted tests allowed the determination of general trends and peculiarities of the solid. liquid transformation temperature under non-equilibrium and non-steady-state conditions of a variety of eutectic alloys (Fe-C, Co-C, Ti-C and Ru-C binary systems). (authors)

  13. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases

  14. Detection of Fluorescence for Lanthanides in LiCl-KCl Molten Salt Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Hee Jung; Kim, Tack Jin; Song, Kyu Seok; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2007-01-01

    In the electrorefining step of the pyrochemical process, actinide ions dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt are recovered as pure actinide metals at a cathode for a re-use as a nuclear fuel from the aspect of its nonproliferation of the nuclear fuel cycles. The lanthanide species dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt play an important role in an effective metal purification during the electrorefining step, so it is necessary to understand the chemical and physical behaviors of lanthanides in molten salt. The in situ spectroscopic measurement system and studies according to temperature changes are essential for better understandable information. To our knowledge, the absorption studies of lanthanides at high temperatures have been reported before, but the fluorescence studies of those at high temperature are not reported yet. We will discuss here the fluorescence behaviors of lanthanides in LiCl-KCl molten salt medium according to a changing temperature

  15. Sn/MWCNT Nanocomposites Fabricated by Ultrasonic Dispersion of Ni-Coated MWCNTs in Molten Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Md Muktadir; Chen, Quanfang

    2018-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as a desirable filler to develop advanced composites including advanced solders due to their exceptional mechanical properties. However, some issues remain unsolved for metallic composites owing to "wetting" and nonuniform dispersion of CNTs. In this study, electroless nickel coating onto CNTs was used to overcome these issues. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used for this study, and Ni-coated MWCNTs were dispersed in molten Sn assisted by sonication and compared with MWCNTs without Ni coating. Adding 3 wt.% Ni-coated MWCNTs, which corresponds to 0.6 wt.% pure CNTs, resulted in an increase in tensile strength by 95% and hardness by 123%. Nickel coating also prevented separation of the CNTs from the molten metal due to buoyancy effects, leading to more uniform dispersion.

  16. Chemical consequences of compaction within the freezing front of a crystallizing magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier-Majumder, S.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal and compositional evolution of planetary magma oceans have profound influences on the early development and differentiation of terrestrial planets. During crystallization, rejection of elements incompatible in precipitating solids leads to petrologic and geochemical planetary differentiation, including potentially development of a compositionally stratified early mantle and evolution of thick overlying atmospheres. In cases of extremely efficient segregation of melt and crystals, solidified early mantles can be nearly devoid of key incompatible species including heat-producing (U, Th, K) and volatile (H,C,N,& noble gas) elements. A key structural component of a crystallizing magma ocean is the partially molten freezing front. The dynamics of this region influences the distribution of incompatible elements between the earliest mantle and the initial surficial reservoirs. It also can be the locus of heating owing to the dissipation of large amounts of tidal energy potentially available from the early Moon. The dynamics are influenced by the solidification rate, which is coupled to the liberation of volatiles owing to the modulating greenhouse effects in the overlying thick atmosphere. Compaction and melt retention in the freezing front of a magma ocean has received little previous attention. While the front advances during the course of crystallization, coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy within the front controls distribution and retention of melt within this layer. Due to compaction within this layer, melt distribution is far from uniform, and the fraction of melt trapped within this front depends on the rate of freezing of the magma ocean. During phases of rapid freezing, high amount of trapped melt within the freezing front retains a larger quantity of dissolved volatiles and the reverse is true during slow periods of crystallization. Similar effects are known from inferred trapped liquid fractions in layered mafic intrusions. Here we

  17. Redox reactions in rare earth chloride molten electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, V.A.; Novoselova, A.V.; Nikolaeva, E.V.; Tkacheva, O.Yu.; Salyulev, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Rare earth (REM, Ln) solutions in chloride melts including MCI+LnCl 3 mixtures, where M - alkali metals, were investigated by potentiometry, voltammetry, conductometry in wide concentration and temperature intervals. Findings present complete and trusty information on the valent state of rare earths, structure and composition of complex ions affecting essentially on properties of electrolytes. It is demonstrated that the coexistence of rare earth ions with different oxidation level formed as a result of possible redox reactions: 2Ln 3+ + Ln ↔3Ln 2+ , Ln 2+ + Ln↔2Ln + and nM + + Ln↔nM + Ln n+ appears sharply in thermodynamic and transport properties of molten Ln-LnCl 3 and Ln-LnCl 3 -MCl systems [ru

  18. Electrochemical study in molten sodium fluoroborate at 4200C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    By analysing the behavior of the electrochemical system Cu (I)/Cu it was possible to study the acid-base properties of molten sodium fluoroborate. The anion of the solvent BF 4 - is shown to undergo a strong dissociation according to the equilibrium BF 4 - BF 3 (g) + F - , the Ki constant at 420 0 C being evaluated at 1.58 x 10 -2 mol kg -1 atm. The acidity variations of sodium fluoroborate at this temperature are limited to about two pF units (pKi=1.8). A potentiometric study of the copper, silver and nickel systems showed that the corresponding metallic cations are little complexed by fluoride ions in spite of the strong dissociation of the solvent [fr

  19. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  20. Impregnation of leather during "freeze-drying"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Mikkel; Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Hovmand, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a recognized method for the preservation of waterlogged objects. Naturally, freeze-drying has also been used for waterlogged archaeological leather often after treatment with Na2.EDTA and impregnation with PEG; but the treated leather sometimes suffers from “excessive drying......” becoming too stiff and brittle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a conventional freeze-drying method against an alternative freeze-drying method that preserves the natural moisture content of the leather. Both new and archaeological waterlogged leather were included in the study...... suggest that the process which takes place within the leather during the freeze-drying in not actual freeze-drying, but rather a sophisticated way of distributing the impregnating agent. The pure ice phase freezes out, but the impregnating agent remains liquid as the temperature does not become low enough...

  1. Separation of calcium isotopes by counter-current electromigration in molten salts (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menes, F.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.

    1962-01-01

    The method of counter-current electromigration in molten salts has been applied to calcium bromide with an alkali metal bromide added to the cathode compartment. Enrichments on calcium-46 greater than a factor of two were obtained at the anode. The mass effect was found to be about 0.06. An estimation of the cost of energy for a process based on this method has been made. (authors) [fr

  2. Combined system of accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) apd molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.; Kato, Y.; Ohmichi, T.; Ohno, H.

    1983-01-01

    A design and research program is discUssed of the development of accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) consisting of a proton accelerator and a molten fluoride target. The target simultaneously serves as a blanket for fissionable material prodUction. An addition of some amoUnt of fissile nuclides to a melt expands the AMSB potentialities as the fissionable material production increases and the energy generation also grows up to the level of self-provision. Besides the blanket salts may be used as nuclear fuel for molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR). The combined AM SB+MSCR system has better parameters as compared to other breeder reactors, molten-salt breeder reactors (MSBR) included

  3. Nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for the electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor attached to a ceramic electrode body by a metal bond on a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  4. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G., E-mail: erla.hafsteinsdottir@gmail.com [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); White, Duanne A., E-mail: duanne.white@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Gore, Damian B., E-mail: damian.gore@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Stark, Scott C., E-mail: scott.stark@aad.gov.au [Environmental Protection and Change, Australian Antarctic Division, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Tasmania 7050 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] or sodium phosphate [Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}]) reacts with lead (PbSO{sub 4} or PbCl{sub 2}) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: > Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. > Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. > Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. > Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  5. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G.; White, Duanne A.; Gore, Damian B.; Stark, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ] or sodium phosphate [Na 3 PO 4 ]) reacts with lead (PbSO 4 or PbCl 2 ) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO 4 and Na 3 PO 4 were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: → Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. → Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. → Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. → Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  6. Recent electroanalytical studies in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, D.L.; Mamantov, G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes the voltametric and chronopotentiometric studies of Bi, Fe, Te, oxide and U(IV)/U(III) ratio determinations in molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 (72-16-12 mole percent) and LiF--BeF 2 --ZrF 4 (65.6-29.4-5.0 mole percent). 54 references, 11 figures

  7. Investigation of molten salt fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Konomura, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    On survey research for practicability strategy of fast reactor (FR) (phase 1), to extract future practicability image candidates of FR from wide options, in addition to their survey and investigation objects of not only solid fuel reactors of conventional research object but also molten salt reactor as a flowing fuel reactor, investigation on concept of molten salt FR plant was carried out. As a part of the first step of the survey research for practicability strategy, a basic concept on plant centered at nuclear reactor facility using chloride molten salt reactor capable of carrying out U-Pu cycle was examined, to perform a base construction to evaluate economical potential for a practical FBR. As a result, a result could be obtained that because of inferior fuel inventory and heat transmission to those in Na cooling reactor in present knowledge, mass of reactor vessel and intermediate heat exchanger were to widely increased to expect reduction of power generation unit price even on considering cheapness of its fuel cycle cost. Therefore, at present step further investigation on concept design of the chloride molten salt reactor plant system is too early in time, and it is at a condition where basic and elementary researches aiming at upgrading of economical efficiency such as wide reduction of fuel inventory, a measure expectable for remarkable rationalization effect of reprocessing system integrating a reactor to a processing facility, and so on. (G.K.)

  8. Galvanic high energy cells with molten electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borger, W.; Kappus, W.; Kunze, D.; Laig-Hoerstebrock, H.; Panesar, H.; Sterr, G.

    1981-01-01

    To develop a galvanic cell with molten salt electrolyte for electric vehicle propulsion and load leveling as well as to fabricate ten prototype cells with a capacity of at least 150 Ah (5 hour rate) and an energy density of 80 Wh/kg was the objective of this project.

  9. Development of Lower Plenum Molten Pool Module of Severe Accident Analysis Code in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong-Ha; Park, Rae-Jun; Bae, Jun-Ho; Shim, Suk-Ku; Marigomen, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    To simulate a severe accident progression of nuclear power plant and forecast reactor pressure vessel failure, we develop computational software called COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software) for whole physical phenomena inside the reactor pressure vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure. As a part of COMPASS project, in the first phase of COMPASS development (2011 - 2014), we focused on the molten pool behavior in the lower plenum, heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. Input from the core module of COMPASS is relocated melt composition and mass in time. Molten pool behavior is described based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers in between oxidic, metallic molten pools, overlying water, steam and debris bed are considered in the present study. The models and correlations used in this study are appropriately selected by the physical conditions of severe accident progression. Interaction between molten pools and reactor vessel wall is also simulated based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers between oxidic pool, thin crust of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall are considered and we solve simple energy balance equations for the crust thickness of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall. As a result, we simulate a benchmark calculation for APR1400 nuclear power plant, with assumption of relocated mass from the core is constant in time such that 0.2ton/sec. We discuss about the molten pool behavior and wall ablation, to validate our models and correlations used in the COMPASS. Stand-alone SIMPLE program is developed as the lower plenum molten pool module for the COMPASS in-vessel severe accident analysis code. SIMPLE program formulates the mass and energy balance for water, steam, particulate debris bed, molten corium pools and oxidic crust from the first principle and uses models and correlations as the constitutive relations for the governing equations. Limited steam table and the material properties are provided

  10. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF 2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized

  11. R and D of On-line Reprocessing Technology for Molten-Salt Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, Jan; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included in the Generation IV reactors family. The reactor can be operated as the thorium breeder or as the actinide transmuter. However, the future deployment of Molten-Salt Reactors will be significantly dependent on the successful mastering of advanced reprocessing technologies dedicated to their fuel cycle. Here the on-line reprocessing technology connected with the fuel circuit of MSR is of special importance because the reactor cannot be operated for a long run without the fuel salt clean-up. Generally, main MSR reprocessing technologies are pyrochemical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. The proposed flow-sheets of MSR on-line reprocessing are based on a combination of molten-salt / liquid metal extraction and electro-separation processes, which can be added to the gas extraction process already verified during the MSRE project in ORNL. The crucial separation method proposed for partitioning of actinides from fission products is based on successive Anodic dissolution and Cathodic deposition processes in molten fluoride media. (authors)

  12. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF 2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized

  13. Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Mitachi, Koshi

    2013-01-01

    The authors have been promoting nuclear energy technology based on thorium molten salt as Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES). This system is a combination of fission power reactor of Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Accelerator Molten Salt Breeder (AMSB) for production of fissile 233 U with connecting chemical processing facility. In this paper, concept of THORIMS-NES, advantages of thorium and molten salt recent MSR design results such as FUJI-U3 using 233 U fuel, FUJI-Pu, large sized super-FUJI, pilot plant miniFUJI, AMSB, and chemical processing facility are described. (author)

  14. Computer simulation on molten ionic salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Okada, I.

    1978-01-01

    The extensive advances in computer technology have since made it possible to apply computer simulation to the evaluation of the macroscopic and microscopic properties of molten salts. The evaluation of the potential energy in molten salts systems is complicated by the presence of long-range energy, i.e. Coulomb energy, in contrast to simple liquids where the potential energy is easily evaluated. It has been shown, however, that no difficulties are encountered when the Ewald method is applied to the evaluation of Coulomb energy. After a number of attempts had been made to approximate the pair potential, the Huggins-Mayer potential based on ionic crystals became the most often employed. Since it is thought that the only appreciable contribution to many-body potential, not included in Huggins-Mayer potential, arises from the internal electrostatic polarization of ions in molten ionic salts, computer simulation with a provision for ion polarization has been tried recently. The computations, which are employed mainly for molten alkali halides, can provide: (1) thermodynamic data such as internal energy, internal pressure and isothermal compressibility; (2) microscopic configurational data such as radial distribution functions; (3) transport data such as the diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity; and (4) spectroscopic data such as the intensity of inelastic scattering and the stretching frequency of simple molecules. The computed results seem to agree well with the measured results. Computer simulation can also be used to test the effectiveness of a proposed pair potential and the adequacy of postulated models of molten salts, and to obtain experimentally inaccessible data. A further application of MD computation employing the pair potential based on an ionic model to BeF 2 , ZnCl 2 and SiO 2 shows the possibility of quantitative interpretation of structures and glass transformation phenomena

  15. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal-metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Finely divided powders are prepared by first reacting an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea. After the reaction of water in the solution with urea is complete, the resulting molten urea solution is heated to cause metal values in solution to precipitate. The resulting mixture containing precipitated metal values is heated to evaporate volatile material, leaving a dry powder containing the metal values. Detailed examples are given. (U.K.)

  16. Symbiotic molten-salt systems coupled with accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) or inertial-confined fusion hybrid molten-salt breeder (IHMSB) and their comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of breeder systems are proposed. One is the combined system of Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder (AMSB) and Molten-Salt Converter Reactor (MSCR), and the other is the combined system of Inertial-confined Fusion Hybrid Molten-Salt Breeder (IHMSB) and modified MSCR. Both apply the molten-fluorides and have technically deep relations. AMSB would be much simpler and have already high technical feasibility. This will become economical the Th breeder system having a doubling time shorter than ten years and distributing any size of power stations MSCR. (orig.) [de

  17. Cermet materials prepared by combustion synthesis and metal infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Joseph B.; Dunmead, Stephen D.; Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic-metal composites (cermets) are made by a combination of self-propagating high temperature combustion synthesis and molten metal infiltration. Solid-gas, solid-solid and solid-liquid reactions of a powder compact produce a porous ceramic body which is infiltrated by molten metal to produce a composite body of higher density. AlN-Al and many other materials can be produced.

  18. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.; Serp, J.; Fouletier, J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief article describes a pyrochemical process that is used by CEA to turn actinide oxides into metal actinides. This process is applied to Cerium oxides (CeO 2 ) that simulate actinide oxides well chemically as cerium belongs to the lanthanide family. The process is in fact an electrolysis of cerium oxide in a bath of molten calcium chloride salt whose temperature is between 800 and 900 Celsius degrees. At those temperatures calcium chloride becomes a ionic liquid (Ca 2+ and Cl - ) that is a good electrical conductor and is particularly well-adapted as solvent to an electrolytic process. The electrolysis current allows the transformation of solvent Ca 2+ ions into metal calcium which, in turn, can reduce cerium oxide into metal cerium through chromatically. Experimental data shows the reduction of up to 90% of 10 g samples of CeO 2 in a 6 hour long electrolysis while the best reduction rate ever known was 80% so far. This result is all the more promising that cerium oxides are more difficult to reduce than actinide oxides from the thermodynamical perspective

  19. Five-dimensional imaging of freezing emulsions with solute effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedovets, Dmytro; Monteux, Cécile; Deville, Sylvain

    2018-04-20

    The interaction of objects with a moving solidification front is a common feature of many industrial and natural processes such as metal processing, the growth of single crystals, the cryopreservation of cells, or the formation of sea ice. Interaction of solidification fronts with objects leads to different outcomes, from total rejection of the objects to their complete engulfment. We imaged the freezing of emulsions in five dimensions (space, time, and solute concentration) with confocal microscopy. We showed that the solute induces long-range interactions that determine the solidification microstructure. The local increase of solute concentration enhances premelting, which controls the engulfment of droplets by the front and the evolution of grain boundaries. Freezing emulsions may be a good analog of many solidification systems where objects interact with a solidification interface. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Electrolytic production of metals using a resistant anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcy, G.P.; Gavasto, T.M.; Ray, S.P.

    1986-11-04

    An electrolytic process is described comprising evolving oxygen on an anode in a molten salt, the anode comprising an alloy comprising a first metal and a second metal, both metals forming oxides, the oxide of the first metal being more resistant than the second metal to attack by the molten salt, the oxide of the second metal being more resistant than the first metal to the diffusion of oxygen. The electrode may also be formed of CuAlO[sub 2] and/or Cu[sub 2]O. 2 figs.

  1. The electrochemical reduction processes of solid compounds in high temperature molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua

    2014-05-21

    Solid electrode processes fall in the central focus of electrochemistry due to their broad-based applications in electrochemical energy storage/conversion devices, sensors and electrochemical preparation. The electrolytic production of metals, alloys, semiconductors and oxides via the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds (especially solid oxides) in high temperature molten salts has been well demonstrated to be an effective and environmentally friendly process for refractory metal extraction, functional materials preparation as well as spent fuel reprocessing. The (electro)chemical reduction of solid compounds under cathodic polarizations generally accompanies a variety of changes at the cathode/melt electrochemical interface which result in diverse electrolytic products with different compositions, morphologies and microstructures. This report summarizes various (electro)chemical reactions taking place at the compound cathode/melt interface during the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds in molten salts, which mainly include: (1) the direct electro-deoxidation of solid oxides; (2) the deposition of the active metal together with the electrochemical reduction of solid oxides; (3) the electro-inclusion of cations from molten salts; (4) the dissolution-electrodeposition process, and (5) the electron hopping process and carbon deposition with the utilization of carbon-based anodes. The implications of the forenamed cathodic reactions on the energy efficiency, chemical compositions and microstructures of the electrolytic products are also discussed. We hope that a comprehensive understanding of the cathodic processes during the electrochemical reduction of solid compounds in molten salts could form a basis for developing a clean, energy efficient and affordable production process for advanced/engineering materials.

  2. Analysis of a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV at a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    2005-01-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident, reactor fuel rods and structures supporting them are melted and relocated in the lower head of the reactor vessel. These relocated molten materials could be separated by their density difference and construct metal/oxide stratified pools in the lower head. A decay heat generated from the fuel material is transferred to the vessel wall and upper structures remaining in the reactor vessel by natural convection. As shown in Fig. 1 two-layered stratified molten pool is developed in the reactor lower vessel. The oxidic pool usually constructed by the mixture of uranium oxide and zirconium oxide. The melting temperature of the oxidic material is very high compared to the steel vessel and metallic layer. And highly turbulent natural convection generated by the decay heat enhances heat transfer to the boundary of the oxidic pool. By this thermal mechanism, oxide curst is developed around the oxidic layer as shown in Fig. 1. The oxidic pool is bounded thermally and fluid-dynamically by the developed crust. By this boundedness, the heat transfer structure in the stratified oxidic/metallic pool can be solved separately. The thermal boundary condition of the oxidic pool is isothermal with constant melting temperature of the oxidic material. The decay heat is transfer to side wall and upper interface between oxidic and metallic layer. Turbulent natural convection is dominant heat transfer mechanism in the oxidic pool. The heat transferred from the bottom oxidic layer is imposed to the upper metallic layer. This transferred heat in the metallic pool is removed through side and upper surface, which is augmented also by natural convection developed in the pool. In this study, a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV during a severe accident is simulated using the Lilac code and the calculated heat flux distribution on the reactor vessel wall is compared with a lumped-parameter (LP) prediction

  3. Transition from natural-convection-controlled freezing to conduction-controlled freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparrow, E.M.; Ramsey, J.W.; Harris, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the transition between freezing controlled by natural convection in the liquid adjacent to a freezing interface and freezing controlled by heat conduction in the solidified material. The freezing took place on a cooled vertical tube immersed in an initially superheated liquid contained in an adiabatic-walled vessel. At early and intermediate times, temperature differences throughout the liquid induce a vigorous natural convection motion which retards freezing, but the temperature differences diminish with time and natural convection ebbs. At large times, the freezing rate is fully controlled by heat conduction in the solidified material. The frozen specimens for short and intermediate freezing times are smooth-surfaced and tapered, while those for large times are straight-sided and have surfaces that are overlaid with a thicket of large discrete crystals. These characteristics correspond respectively to those of natural-convection- controlled freezing and conduction-controlled freezing. At early times, the measured mass of the frozen material is identical to that for natural-convection-controlled freezing and conduction-controlled freezing. At early times, the measured mass of the frozen material is identical to that for natural-convection-controlled freezing. At later times, the frozen mass tends to approach that for conduction-controlled freezing, but a residual deficit remains

  4. Sequential Strangeness Freeze-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellwied, Rene

    2018-02-01

    I will describe the latest results from lattice QCD pertaining to a potential flavour hierarchy in the hadronic freeze-out from the QCD crossover region. I will compare these results to a variety of improved hadronic resonance gas calculations and to experimental data of fluctuations of net-charge, net-proton and net-kaon multiplicity distributions, which serve as a proxy for the susceptibilities of conserved quantum numbers on the lattice. I will conclude that there is intriguing evidence for a flavour dependent freezeout, and I will suggest expansions to the experimental program at RHIC and the LHC that could potentially demonstrate the impact of a flavour separation during hadronization.

  5. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  6. Freezing and melting line invariants of the Lennard-Jones system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    The invariance of several structural and dynamical properties of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) system along the freezing and melting lines is interpreted in terms of isomorph theory. First the freezing/melting lines of the LJ system are shown to be approximated by isomorphs. Then we show...... that the invariants observed along the freezing and melting isomorphs are also observed on other isomorphs in the liquid and crystalline phases. The structure is probed by the radial distribution function and the structure factor and dynamics are probed by the mean-square displacement, the intermediate scattering...... function, and the shear viscosity. Studying these properties with reference to isomorph theory explains why the known single-phase melting criteria hold, e.g., the Hansen–Verlet and the Lindemann criteria, and why the Andrade equation for the viscosity at freezing applies, e.g., for most liquid metals. Our...

  7. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  8. Freeze dehydration of milk using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souda, K.B.; Akyel, C.; Bilgen, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on heat and mass transfer during a microwave freeze dehydration process. An experimental system and procedure was developed to freeze dry milk. A 2500-W microwave system with an appropriate wave guide was set up and instrumented, and a procedure was experimentally developed to obtain milk powder first by freezing milk and then dehydrating it at low pressure using microwave energy. An unsteady-state analysis was used to derive a one-dimensional mathematical model of the freeze dehydration process in a microwave electromagnetic field

  9. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process for the extraction of oxygen for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements for use in fabrication on the Moon. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis is ideal for extraction, since the electron is the only practical reducing agent. MOE has several advantages over other extraction methods. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. Alternatively, MOE requires no import of consumable reagents (e.g. fluorine and carbon) as other processes do, and does not rely on interfacing multiple processes to obtain refined products. Electrolytic processing has the advantage of selectivity of reaction in the presence of a multi-component feed. Products from lunar regolith can be extracted in sequence according to the stabilities of their oxides as expressed by the values of the free energy of oxide formation (e.g. chromium, manganese, Fe, Si, Ti, Al, magnesium, and calcium). Previous work has demonstrated the viability of producing Fe and oxygen from oxide mixtures similar in composition to lunar regolith by molten oxide electrolysis (electrowinning), also called magma electrolysis having shown electrolytic extraction of Si from regolith simulant. This paper describes recent advances in demonstrating the MOE process by a joint project with participation by NASA KSC and

  10. Phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd, and Nd extraction from magnet scraps using molten silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, O.; Okabe, T.H.; Umetsu, Y.

    2004-01-01

    To develop a new recycling process, we examined the direct extraction of neodymium (Nd) metal from Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps using molten silver (Ag) as an extraction medium. Prior to the extraction experiment, the phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd was investigated to estimate the theoretical extraction limit. It was observed that the Fe/Nd 2 Fe 17 mixture equilibrates with the molten Ag-Nd alloy containing 50-52 mol% Nd (57-59 mass% Nd) at 1363 K. The experimental results were in good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation based on literature values. By reacting Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps with molten silver at 1273 K, more than 90% of the neodymium in the scrap was extracted, and an Ag-Nd alloy containing 40-50 mass% Nd was obtained. The neodymium in the Ag-Nd alloy was separated from silver as Nd 2 O 3 by oxidizing the obtained alloy in air. Although the wettability of Nd 2 O 3 with molten silver caused some difficulties in the separation of neodymium from silver, molten silver is shown to be an effective medium for neodymium extraction from magnet scrap

  11. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product

  12. Molten-salt reactor information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Cardwell, D.W.; Engel, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    The Molten-Salt Reactor Information System (MSRIS) is a computer-based file of abstracts of documents dealing with the technology of molten-salt reactors. The file is stored in the IBM-360 system at ORNL, and may be searched through the use of established interactive computer programs from remote terminals connected to the computer via telephone lines. The system currently contains 373 entries and is subject to updating and expansion as additional information is developed. The nature and general content of the data file, a general approach for obtaining information from it, and the manner in which material is added to the file are described. Appendixes provide the list of keywords currently in use, the subject categories under which information is filed, and simplified procedures for searching the file from remote terminals. (U.S.)

  13. Molten salt reactors. The AMSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnes, J.; Garzenne, C.; Lecarpentier, D.; Mouney, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the concept of actinide molten salt transmuter (AMSTER). This reactor is graphite-moderated and is dedicated to the burning of actinides. The main difference with a molten salt reactor is that its liquid fuel undergoes an on-line partial reprocessing in which fission products are extracted and heavy nuclei are reintroduced into the fuel. In order to maintain the reactivity regular injections of 235 U-salt are made. In classical reactors, fuel burn-up is limited by the swelling of the cladding and the radiation fuel pellets resistance, in AMSTER there is no limitation to the irradiation time of the fuel, so all the actinides can be burnt or transmuted. (A.C.)

  14. A comparison of freezing-damage during isochoric and isobaric freezing of the potato

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, Chenang; Nastase, Gabriel; Ukpai, Gideon; Serban, Alexandru; Rubinsky, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Background Freezing is commonly used for food preservation. It is usually done under constant atmospheric pressure (isobaric). While extending the life of the produce, isobaric freezing has detrimental effects. It causes loss of food weight and changes in food quality. Using thermodynamic analysis, we have developed a theoretical model of the process of freezing in a constant volume system (isochoric). The mathematical model suggests that the detrimental effects associated with isobaric freez...

  15. Structure of polyvalent metal halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1990-12-01

    A short review is given of recent progress in determining and understanding the structure of molten halide salts involving polyvalent metal ions. It covers the following three main topics: (i) melting mechanisms and types of liquid structure for pure polyvalent-metal chlorides; (ii) geometry and stability of local coordination for polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of their halides with alkali halides; and (iii) structure breaking and electron localization on addition of metal to the melt. (author). 28 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  16. Dynamic Reference Electrode development for redox potential measurements in fluoride molten salt at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Klie, Gabriela; Rodrigues, Davide; Delpech, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of redox potential in fluoride media is a major problem due to the difficulty to design a reference electrode with high stability, high mechanical resistance and high accuracy. In the frame of molten salt reactor studies, a dynamic reference electrode (DRE) is developed to measure redox potential in fluoride molten salt at high temperature. DRE is based on the in-situ generation of a transient redox system. The choice of the redox couple corresponds to the cathodic limit of the molten salt considered. As a preliminary step, the demonstration of feasibility of generating a DRE was done in LiF-NaF-KF (46.5–11.5–42 mol%) media at 500 °C. In this salt, the reference redox system generated by coulometry at applied current is KF/K, metallic potassium being electrodeposited on a tungsten wire electrode. The validation of the DRE response and the experimental optimization parameters for DRE generation were realized by following the NiF 2 /Ni redox potential evolution as a function of NiF 2 concentration in the fused salt. The current value applied for DRE generation was optimized. It depends on the amount of metallic cations contained in the fused salt and which can be electrochemically reduced simultaneously during the DRE generation. The current corresponding to the DRE generation has to be 4 times greater than the current corresponding to the reduction of the other elements.

  17. Analysis of a molten salt reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Biplab; Bajpai, Anil; Degweker, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our studies of an IAEA molten salt reactor (MSR) benchmark. The benchmark, proposed by Japan, involves burnup calculations of a single lattice cell of a MSR for burning plutonium and other minor actinides. We have analyzed this cell with in-house developed burnup codes BURNTRAN and McBURN. This paper also presents a comparison of the results of our codes and those obtained by the proposers of the benchmark. (author)

  18. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  19. Electrochemical studies in molten sodium fluoroborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Wagner, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Physical properties of sodium fluoroborate are recalled and first results obtained during experimental study of molten NaBF 4 are exposed. The system Cu/CuF is used as an indicator of fluoride ion activity and dissociation constant of the solvent is determined by adding NaF to NaBF 4 saturated with BF 3 at a pressure of 1 atm and found equal to 2.7x10 -3 [fr

  20. Corrosion of technical ceramics by molten aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, U.; Wolff, L.R.; Loo, van F.J.J.; Ziegler, G.

    1992-01-01

    The corrosion of 8 types of ceramics, i.e., 1 grade of hot isostatically pressed reaction-bonded Si3N4 (HIPRBSN), 3 grades of hot pressed Si3N4 (HPSN), and 4 grades of RBSN, and 2 types of SiC (HIPSiC and Si-impregnated SiC (SiSiC)) in molten Al (pure Al and AlZnMgCu1.5) was studied. The HIPRBSN and

  1. Thorium molten-salt nuclear energy synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo

    1989-01-01

    One of the most practical and rational approaches for establishing the idealistic Thorium resource utilization program has been presented, which might be effective to solve the principal energy problems, concerning safety, proliferation and terrorism, resource, power size and fuel cycle economy, for the next century. The first step will be the development of Small Molten-Salt Reactors as a flexible power station, which is suitable for early commercialization of Th reactors not necessarily competing with proven Large Solid-Fuel Reactors. Therefore, the more detailed design works and practical R and D planning should be performed under the international cooperations soon, soundly depending on the basic technology established by ORNL already. R and D cost would be surprisingly low. This reactor(MSR) seems to be idealistic not only in power-size, siting, safety, safeguard and economy, but also as an effective partner of Molten-Salt Fissile Breeders(MSB) in order to establish the simplest and economical Thorium molten-salt breeding fuel cycle named THORIMS-NES in all over the world including the developing countries and isolated areas. This would be one of the most practical replies to the Lilienthal's appeal of 'A NEW START' in Nuclear Energy. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  3. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  4. Electrochemical reduction of lanthanum trichloride in a molten equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Polyakov, E.G.; Stangrit, P.T.

    1987-09-20

    The authors used linear voltamperometry for the investigation of the mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum. The mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride in molten equimolar NaCl-KCl may be seen as consisting of a slow irreversible electrode reaction with a subsequent rapid irreversible chemical reaction. Lanthanum ions in a lower oxidation state were not found upon the prolonged maintenance of metallic lanthanum in molten NaCl-KCl-LaCl/sub 3/. Only an increase in the concentration of lanthanum(III) chloride in the melt was noted. The appearance of oxygen anions in the melt does not lead to a change in the mechanism of the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride but reduces the concentration of this chloride due to the formation of lanthanum oxochloride which is insoluble in the melt.

  5. Behaviour of molten beryllium with ITER reference CFC SEPCARB NB31 under moisture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/Cadarache-DSM/DRFC, Euratom-Association, Saint Paul Lez Durance F-13108 (France)], E-mail: manfred.lipa@cea.fr; Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom-Association, Juelich D-52425 (Germany); Martin, G. [CEA/Cadarache-DSM/DRFC, Euratom-Association, Saint Paul Lez Durance F-13108 (France); Wessel, E. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom-Association, Juelich D-52425 (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    A dramatic exothermic reaction has been observed in Tore Supra with molten aluminium enclosed in a thermally loaded 2D carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) tile, exposed after component removal to atmospheric moisture. This led to an important local destruction of the graphite matrix and fibre texture. Beryllium, as aluminium, a carbide forming metal, is foreseen for the ITER first wall armour. Since it can be expected that sputtered, molten and/or evaporated beryllium material will be transported to the hot CFC based divertor surface during normal and off-normal plasma operation, a preliminary reaction experiment has been performed in order to investigate to which extent the Be contaminated graphite matrix and fibre texture of 3D-CFC SEPCARB NB31 could be locally damaged ('erosion') following a subsequent long lasting air venting or a supposed in-vessel ingress of coolant (steam) event (ICE)

  6. Production of molten UO2 pools by internal heating: apparatus and preliminary experimental heat transfer results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasanov, M.G.; Gunther, W.H.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The capability for removal of heat from a pool of molten fuel under postaccident conditions is an important consideration in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor safety analysis. No experimental data for pool heat transfer from molten UO 2 under conditions simulating internal heat generation by fission product decay have been reported previously in the literature. An apparatus to provide such data was developed and used to investigate heat transfer from pools containing up to 7.5 kg of UO 2 ; the internal heat generation rates and pool depths attained cover most of the ranges of interest for postaccident heat removal analysis. It was also observed in these studies that the presence of simulated fission products corresponding to approximately 150,000 kW-day/kg burnup had no significant effect on the observed heat transfer

  7. The Experiences and Challenges in Drilling into Semi molten or Molten Intrusive in Menengai Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, A. K.; Mibei, G. K.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling in Menengai has experienced various challenges related to drilling operations and the resource itself i.e. quality discharge fluids vis a vis gas content. The main reason for these challenges is related to the nature of rocks encountered at depths. Intrusives encountered within Menengai geothermal field have been group into three based on their geological characteristics i.e. S1, S2 and S3.Detailed geology and mineralogical characterization have not been done on these intrusive types. However, based on physical appearances, S1 is considered as a diorite dike, S2 is syenite while S3 is molten rock material. This paper summarizes the experiences in drilling into semi molten or molten intrusive (S3).

  8. Thermodynamic analysis for molten stratification test MASCA with ionic liquid U-Zr-Fe-O-B-C-FPs database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Masanori; Tamura, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The molten corium stratification tested in the OECD MASCA project was analyzed with our thermo-dynamic database and the database was verified to be effective for the stratification analysis. The MASCA test shows that the molten corium can be stratified with the metal layer under the oxide when sub-oxidized corium including iron was retained in the lower head of the reactor vessel. This stratification is caused by the increased density of the metal layer attributed to a transfer of uranium metal that was reduced from uranium oxide by zirconium. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations with the database, which was developed for the corium U-Zr-Fe-O-B-C-FPs system using the ionic two-sublattice model for liquid, show quantitative agreements with the MASCA test, such as the composition of each layer, fission product (FP) partitioning between the layers and B 4 C effect on the stratification. (author)

  9. Tritium loss in molten flibe systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A. [Idaho National Eng. and Environ. Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scott Willms, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    2000-04-01

    An emerging issue relative to beryllium technology in fusion involves tritium interactions with molten beryllium-bearing salts. Innovative designs for fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertially confined, feature the molten salt mixture 2LiF.BeF{sub 2}, commonly called Flibe, as a tritium breeder and coolant. Tritium is bred in the Flibe as neutrons from the plasma are absorbed by Li atoms, which then transmute to tritium and helium. Transmutation of tritium from Be also occurs. Among the issues to be resolved for such coolant systems is the potential loss of tritium from the Flibe coolant to the walls of the system, particularly through heat exchanger tubes, and from there into secondary coolants or working fluids and the environment. Effectively removing tritium from Flibe in clean-up units is also important. In quiescent or low Reynolds number flow, tritium movement through Flibe is governed by diffusion. For Flibe in turbulent flow, as in heat exchanger tubes, transport is by turbulent mixing, and the same flow conditions and structural design features that maximize heat transfer to the heat exchanger walls will enhance the transport of tritium to those same surfaces. Analyses have been performed to estimate the fractional loss of tritium through heat exchanger tubes and release rates from Flibe droplets in vacuum disengagers in molten Flibe systems. The calculations suggest unacceptably large losses of tritium through heat exchanger tubes. The gravity of the implications of these estimates calls for experimental verification to determine if tritium losses through molten Flibe heat exchangers or other Flibe systems can really be so high and whether vacuum disengagers will really work. There is also a need for better information on evolution of tritium from Flibe droplets in a vacuum. Several experiments are presently being planned to address these issues and are discussed. These include experiments to induce tritium in Flibe using spontaneous fission neutrons

  10. Tritium loss in molten flibe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Scott Willms, R.

    2000-01-01

    An emerging issue relative to beryllium technology in fusion involves tritium interactions with molten beryllium-bearing salts. Innovative designs for fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertially confined, feature the molten salt mixture 2LiF.BeF 2 , commonly called Flibe, as a tritium breeder and coolant. Tritium is bred in the Flibe as neutrons from the plasma are absorbed by Li atoms, which then transmute to tritium and helium. Transmutation of tritium from Be also occurs. Among the issues to be resolved for such coolant systems is the potential loss of tritium from the Flibe coolant to the walls of the system, particularly through heat exchanger tubes, and from there into secondary coolants or working fluids and the environment. Effectively removing tritium from Flibe in clean-up units is also important. In quiescent or low Reynolds number flow, tritium movement through Flibe is governed by diffusion. For Flibe in turbulent flow, as in heat exchanger tubes, transport is by turbulent mixing, and the same flow conditions and structural design features that maximize heat transfer to the heat exchanger walls will enhance the transport of tritium to those same surfaces. Analyses have been performed to estimate the fractional loss of tritium through heat exchanger tubes and release rates from Flibe droplets in vacuum disengagers in molten Flibe systems. The calculations suggest unacceptably large losses of tritium through heat exchanger tubes. The gravity of the implications of these estimates calls for experimental verification to determine if tritium losses through molten Flibe heat exchangers or other Flibe systems can really be so high and whether vacuum disengagers will really work. There is also a need for better information on evolution of tritium from Flibe droplets in a vacuum. Several experiments are presently being planned to address these issues and are discussed. These include experiments to induce tritium in Flibe using spontaneous fission neutrons

  11. Scaling options for integral experiments for molten salt fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe Bardet; Per F Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Molten fluoride salts have potentially large benefits for use in high-temperature heat transport in fission and fusion energy systems, due to their very very low vapor pressures at high temperatures. Molten salts have high volumetric heat capacity compared to high-pressure helium and liquid metals, and have desirable safety characteristics due to their chemical inertness and low pressure. Therefore molten salts have been studied extensively for use in fusion blankets, as an intermediate heat transfer fluid for thermochemical hydrogen production in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, as a primary coolant for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor, and as a solvent for fuel in the Molten Salt Reactor. This paper presents recent progress in the design and analysis of scaled thermal hydraulics experiments for molten salt systems. We have identified a category of light mineral oils that can be used for scaled experiments. By adjusting the length, velocity, average temperature, and temperature difference scales of the experiment, we show that it is possible to simultaneously match the Reynolds (Re), Froude (Fr), Prandtl (Pr) and Rayleigh (Ra) numbers in the scaled experiments. For example, the light mineral oil Penreco Drakesol 260 AT can be used to simulate the molten salt flibe (Li 2 BeF 4 ). At 110 deg. C, the oil Pr matches 600 deg. C flibe, and at 165 deg. C, the oil Pr matches 900 deg. C flibe. Re, Fr, and Ra can then be matched at a length scale of Ls/Lp = 0.40, velocity scale of U s /U p = 0.63, and temperature difference scale of ΔT s /ΔT p = 0.29. The Weber number is then matched within a factor of two, We s /We p = 0.7. Mechanical pumping power scales as Qp s /Qp p = 0.016, while heat inputs scale as Qh s /Qh p = 0.010, showing that power inputs to scaled experiments are very small compared to the prototype system. The scaled system has accelerated time, t s /t p = 0.64. When Re, Fr, Pr and Ra are matched, geometrically scaled

  12. Oxidation mechanism and passive behaviour of nickel in molten carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossen, J.P.T. (ECN Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands)); Ament, P.C.H.; De Wit, J.H.W. (Div. of Corrosion, Lab. for Maaterials Sceince, Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands))

    1994-07-01

    The oxidation and passivation mechanism and the passive behaviour of nickel in molten carbonate have been investigated with impedance measurements. The oxidation of nickel proceeds according to a dissolution and reprecipitation process. The slowest steps in the reaction sequence are the dissociation reaction of the carbonate and the diffusion of the formed NiO to the metal surface. In the passive range, dissolution of Ni[sup 2+] proceeds after diffusion of Ni[sup 2+] through the oxide layer. The Ni[sup 2+] is formed at the metal/oxide interface. The slowest process is the diffusion of bivalent nickel ions through the passive scale. The formation of trivalent nickel ions probably takes place at the oxide/melt interface. This reaction is accompanied by the incorporation of an oxygen ion and a nickel vacancy in the NiO lattice. The trivalent nickel ions and the nickel vacancy diffuse to the bulk of the oxide scale. The slowest step in this sequence is the dissociation of the carbonate ions and the incorporation of the oxygen ion in the NiO lattice. 9 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs.

  13. Compatibility studies of potential molten-salt breeder reactor materials in molten fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, J.R.

    1977-05-01

    The molten fluoride salt compatibility studies carried out during the period 1974--76 in support of the Molten-Salt Reactor Program are summarized. Thermal-convection and forced-circulation loops were used to measure the corrosion rate of selected alloys. Results confirmed the relationship of time, initial chromium concentration, and mass loss developed by previous workers. The corrosion rates of Hastelloy N and Hastelloy N modified by the addition of 1--3 wt percent Nb were well within the acceptable range for use in an MSBR. 13 figures, 3 tables

  14. Open Zinc Freezing-Point Cell Assembly and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žužek, V.; Batagelj, V.; Drnovšek, J.; Bojkovski, J.

    2014-07-01

    An open metal freezing-point cell design has been developed in the Laboratory of Metrology and Quality. According to our design, a zinc cell was successfully assembled. The paper presents the needed parts for the cell, the cleaning process, and sealing of the cell. The assembled cell was then evaluated by comparison with two commercial closed zinc cells of different manufacturers. The freezing plateaus of the cells were measured, and a direct cell comparison was made. It was shown that the assembled open cell performed better than the used closed cell and was close to the brand new closed cell. The nominal purity of the zinc used for the open cell was 7 N, but the freezing plateau measurement suggests a higher impurity concentration. It was assumed that the zinc was contaminated to some extent during the process of cutting as its original shape was an irregular cylinder. The uncertainty due to impurities for the assembled cell is estimated to be 0.3 mK. Furthermore, the immersion profile and the pressure coefficient were measured. Both results are close to their theoretical values.

  15. Accelerator molten-salt breeding and thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Kato, Yoshio; Ohno, Hideo; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    The recent efforts at the development of fission energy utilization have not been successful in establishing fully rational technology. A new philosophy should be established on the basis of the following three principles: (1) thorium utilization, (2) molten-salt fuel concept, and (3) separation of fissile-breeding and power-generating functions. Such philosophy is called 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics [THORIMS-NES]'. The present report first addresses the establishment of 233 U breeding fuel cycle, focusing on major features of the Breeding and Chemical Processing Centers and a small molten-salt power station (called FUJI-II). The development of fissile producing breeders is discussed in relation to accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB), impact fusion molten-salt breeder, and inertial-confined fusion hybrid molten-salt breeder. Features of the accelerator molten-salt breeder are described, focusing on technical problems with accelerator breeders (or spallators), design principle of the accelerator molten-salt breeder, selection of molten salt compositions, and nuclear- and reactor-chemical aspects of AMSB. Discussion is also made of further research and development efforts required in the future for AMSB. (N.K.)

  16. Crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, R.J.; Lee, S.J.; Sim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability have been performed to examine the crust formation process as a function of boundary temperatures as well as to investigate heat transfer characteristics between molten pool and overlying water in order to evaluate coolability of the molten pool. The experimental test results have shown that the surface temperature of the bottom plate is a dominant parameter in the crust formation process of the molten pool. It is also found that the crust thickness of the case with direct coolant injection into the molten pool is greater than that of the case with a heat exchanger. Increasing mass flow rate of direct coolant injection to the molten pool does not affect the temperature of molten pool after the crust has been formed in the molten pool because the crust behaves as a thermal barrier. The Nusselt number between the molten pool and the coolant of the case with no crust formation is greater than that of the case with crust formation. The results of FLOW-3D analyses have shown that the temperature distribution contributes to the crust formation process due to Rayleigh-Benard natural convection flow.

  17. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  18. Studies on components for a molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejedly, M.; Matal, O.

    2003-01-01

    The aim is contribute to a design of selected components of molten salt reactors with fuel in the molten fluoride salt matrix. Molten salt reactors (MSRs) permit the utilization of plutonium and minor actinides as new nuclear fuel from a traditional nuclear power station with production of electric energy. Results of preliminary feasibility studies of an intermediate heat exchanger, a small power molten salt pump and a modular conception of a steam generator for a demonstration unit of the MSR (30 MW) are summarized. (author)

  19. Freeze concentration of lime juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampawan Tansakul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to study the effects of processing conditions, i.e. cooling medium temperature (-6, -12 and -18C and scraper blade rotational speed (50, 100 and 150 rpm on the freeze concentration of lime juice. The initial soluble solid content of lime juice was 7.6 Brix. Results showed that soluble solid content of lime juice increased as cooling medium temperature decreased while scraper blade rotational speed increased. It was also found that the processing condition with -18˚C cooling medium temperature and 150 rpm rotational speed of the scraper blade was the best among all studied conditions, although the loss of the soluble solids with ice crystals during ice separation was relatively high at 35%.

  20. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  1. Proposals on the organization of a fuel cycle of the cascade sub-critical molten salt reactor (CSMSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.; Melnik, M.I.; Babikov, L.G.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    2002-01-01

    At present the approach of burning out long-lived radioactive waste (RW) in the reactor core neutron flux is the most feasible one. Currently the way of closing nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) on the basis of the nuclear chemical concept of the cascade sub-critical molten salt reactor (CSMSR) is considered as the most promising one. It is characterised by a number of advantages. CSMSR controlled by a beam of protons or electrons is the optimal reactor for closing the NFC using non-aqueous fluoride methods of fuel reprocessing. They, in comparison with aqueous methods, are characterised by a small waste quantity and are less laborious because of the absence of severe requirements to the product purity. A high productivity of high-temperature electrochemical processes allows the implementation of the fuel recycling process as part of the CSMSR total technological cycle. It can be conducted in the 'on-line' mode in the bypass molten salt circuit that brings the transportation volume of high-activity materials to a minimum. In order to reprocess the CSMSR irradiated molten salt fuel on the basis of salt composition LiF-NaF-(BeF 2 ) an option, based on the following three main operations of the melt treatment, was proposed at SSC RF RIAR: (i) On-line argon treatment of molten salt fuel for removal of gaseous fission products (FP) and also FP that form volatile fluorides and aerosols; (ii) Organisation of the fuel-active metal (probably with a fine-dispersed plutonium alloy) interaction in the on-line mode for removal of 'noble' and 'semi-noble' FP and corrosion products such as Ni, Fe, Cr (when using Pu alloy it allows to regenerate at the same time of the burned-out plutonium component); (iii) Portion-by-portion (fuel composition partially being removed from the CSMSR molten salt circuit) pyroelectrochemical reprocessing of the molten salt composition aimed at the removal of lanthanides - FP followed by a return of actinides to the CSMSR fuel cycle. This technology will allow

  2. Freezing during tapping tasks in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delval, Arnaud; Defebvre, Luc; Tard, Céline

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait also experience sudden motor blocks (freezing) during other repetitive motor tasks. We assessed the proportion of patients with advanced PD and freezing of gait who also displayed segmental "freezing" in tapping tasks. Fifteen Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait were assessed. Freezing of gait was evaluated using a standardized gait trajectory with the usual triggers. Patients performed repetitive tapping movements (as described in the MDS-UPDRS task) with the hands or the feet in the presence or absence of a metronome set to 4 Hz. Movements were recorded with a video motion system. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of segmental freezing in these tapping tasks. The secondary endpoints were (i) the relationship between segmental episodic phenomena and FoG severity, and (ii) the reliability of the measurements. For the upper limbs, freezing was observed more frequently with a metronome (21% of trials) than without a metronome (5%). For the lower limbs, the incidence of freezing was higher than for the upper limbs, and was again observed more frequently in the presence of an auditory cue (47%) than in its absence (14%). Although freezing of the lower limbs was easily assessed during an MDS-UPDRS task with a metronome, it was not correlated with the severity of freezing of gait (as evaluated during a standardized gait trajectory). Only this latter was a reliable measurement in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

  3. Theoretical analysis of thermal molten metal-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, W.

    1982-01-01

    In experiments with greater masses (kg-scale) two extreme cases had been oberved during the course of reaction when hot melt reacted with a vaporizable cooler liquid. Relatively mild hot interactions with slow pressure build-up and small pressure peak in the reaction volume often occurred but there were also some very violent reactions (steam explosions) where a remarkable portion of thermal energy had been transformed into mechanical energy with high pressure peaks. For the two types of reactions overall models for water as a coolant are developed here. Based on calculations and on comparisons with corresponding experiments it is shown that a relatively mild course of reaction can be explained by a fragmentation of the melt under following violent evaporation of the cooling medium. Pressures only with small reaction volumes up to the MPa range can be found in these reactions. The calculations, for example of Bird and Millington, showed a pressure maximum of 1 MPa after 170 ms of the start of the reaction; this agrees very well with the result of the experiment of 1.08 MPa. (orig./GL) [de

  4. Equipment for printing of high viscosity liquids and molten metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The common denominator of this thesis is the quest for processing a wider range of materials using inkjet technology, to allow for the realization of innovative manufacturing methods based on the precisely controlled placement in time and space of small portions of possibly different materials in

  5. Intelligent Sensors for Atomization Processing of Molten Metals and Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    20ff. 12. Hirleman, Dan E. Particle Sizing by Optical , Nonimaging Techniques. Liquid Particle Size Measurement Techniques, ASTM, 1984, pp. 35ff. 13...sensors are based on electric, electromagnetic or optical principles, the latter being most developed in fields obviously related to atomization. Optical ...beams to observe various interference, diffraction, and heterodyning effects, and to observe, with high signal-to-noise ratio, even weak optical

  6. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareg, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for confining molten metal. It comprises: containment means having an open side; a magnet capable of generating a mainly horizontal alternating magnetic field. The the magnet is located adjacent to the open side of the containment means whereby the field generated by the magnet is capable of inducing eddy currents in a thin layer at the surface of the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field producing a force that can contain the molten metal within the containment means; wherein the magnet includes: magnetic poles located adjacent to the open side of the confinement means; a core connecting the poles; a coil encircling the core, the coil capable of being responsive to a current source; whereby an alternating magnetic field can be generated between the poles and parallel to the open side of the containment means so that a molten metal can be confined within the confinement means

  7. Decontamination method of contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Sato, Chikara; Komori, Itaru.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate radioactive materials from molten metals in dry-processing method by heating metals contaminated with radioactive materials at a temperature below melting point to oxidize the surface thereof, then heating them to melt and include the radioactive materials into the oxides. Method: Metals contaminated with radioactive materials are heated at a temperature below the melting point thereof in an oxidizing atmosphere to oxidize the surface. Thereafter they are heated to melt at temperature above the melting point of the metals, and the molten metals are separated with the radioactive materials included in the oxides. For instance, radiation-contaminated aluminum pipe placed on the bed of an electrical heating furnace, and heated at 500 0 C which is lower than the melting point 660 0 C of aluminum for 1 - 2 hours while supplying air from an air pipe into the furnace, and an oxide film is formed on the surface of the aluminum pipe. Then, the furnace temperature is increased to 750 0 C wherein molten aluminum is flown down to a container and the oxide film is separated by floating it as the slug on the molten aluminum. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Zhimin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Making great efforts in development of nuclear energy is one of the long-term-plan in China's energy strategies. The advantages of Thorium-based nuclear energy are: rich resource in nature, less nuclear waste, low toxicity, nuclear non-proliferation and so on. Furthermore, China is a country with abundant thorium, thus it is necessary to develop the Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) in China. Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SINAP) had designed and constructed the first China's light-water reactor and developed a zero-power thorium-based molten salt reactor successfully in the early 1970s. The applied research project 'thorium molten salt reactor nuclear power system' by SINAP together with several other institutes had been accepted and granted by China government in 2011. The whole project has been divided into three stages: Firstly, built a 2 MW-zero-power high temperature solid molten salt reactor in 2015 and a 2 MW-zero-power high temperature liquid molten salt reactor in 2017. Secondly, in 2020 built a 10 MW high temperature liquid molten salt reactor. Thirdly, on the base of previous work, a 100 MW high temperature molten salt reactor should be achieving in 2030. After more than one years of efforts, a high quality scientific research team has been formed, which is able to design the molten salt reactor, the molten salt loop and related key equipment, the systems of molten salt preparation, purification and the radioactive gas removal. In the past one year, the initial physical design of high temperature molten salt reactor has been completed; the nuclear chemistry and radiation chemical laboratory has been built, a high temperature salt (HTS) loop and radioactive gas removal experiment device system have been successfully developed and constructed. Further, the preliminary study on reactor used carbon-carbon composite material has been investigated. (author)

  9. Applications of molten salts in plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium is efficiently recovered from scrap at Los Alamos by a series of chemical reactions and separations conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 900 0 C. These processes usually employ a molten salt or salt eutectic as a heat sink and/or reaction medium. Salts for these operations were selected early in the development cycle. The selection criteria are being reevaluated. In this article we describe the processes now in use at Los Alamos and our studies of alternate salts and eutectics

  10. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  11. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.

    1997-01-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs

  12. Well-plate freeze-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trnka, Hjalte; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Freeze-drying in presence of excipients is a common practice to stabilize biomacromolecular formulations. The composition of this formulation is known to affect the quality of the final product. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-drying in well-plates as a h......Abstract Context: Freeze-drying in presence of excipients is a common practice to stabilize biomacromolecular formulations. The composition of this formulation is known to affect the quality of the final product. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-drying in well......-plates as a high throughput platform for formulation screening of freeze-dried products. Methods: Model formulations consisting of mannitol, sucrose and bovine serum albumin were freeze-dried in brass well plates, plastic well plates and vials. Physical properties investigated were solid form, residual moisture......, cake collapse and reconstitution time. Results: Samples freeze-dried in well-plates had an acceptable visual cake appearance. Solid form analysis by high throughput X-ray powder diffraction indicated comparable polymorphic outcome independent of the container. The expected increase in moisture level...

  13. Using Power Ultrasound to Accelerate Food Freezing Processes: Effects on Freezing Efficiency and Food Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peizhi; Zhu, Zhiwei; Sun, Da-Wen

    2018-05-31

    Freezing is an effective way of food preservation. However, traditional freezing methods have the disadvantages of low freezing efficiency and generation of large ice crystals, leading to possible damage of food quality. Power ultrasound assisted freezing as a novel technique can effectively reduce the adverse effects during freezing process. This paper gives an overview on recent researches of power ultrasound technique to accelerate the food freezing processes and illustrates the main principles of power ultrasound assisted freezing. The effects of power ultrasound on liquid food, model solid food as well as fruit and vegetables are discussed, respectively, from the aspects of increasing freezing rate and improving microstructure. It is shown that ultrasound assisted freezing can effectively improve the freezing efficiency and promote the formation of small and evenly distributed ice crystals, resulting in better food quality. Different inherent properties of food samples affect the effectiveness of ultrasound application and optimum ultrasound parameters depend on the nature of the samples. The application of ultrasound to the food industry is more likely on certain types of food products and more efforts are still needed to realize the industrial translation of laboratory results.

  14. Compact, Lightweight Electromagnetic Pump for Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Palzin, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A proposed direct-current electromagnetic pump for circulating a molten alkali metal alloy would be smaller and lighter and would demand less input power, relative to currently available pumps of this type. (Molten alkali metals are used as heat-transfer fluids in high-temperature stages of some nuclear reactors.) The principle of operation of this or any such pump involves exploitation of the electrical conductivity of the molten metal: An electric current is made to pass through the liquid metal along an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the flow channel, and a magnetic field perpendicular to both the longitudinal axis and the electric current is superimposed on the flowchannel region containing the electric current. The interaction between the electric current and the magnetic field produces the pumping force along the longitudinal axis. The advantages of the proposed pump over other such pumps would accrue from design features that address overlapping thermal and magnetic issues.

  15. Melting-decontamination method for radioactive contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Noboru; Iba, Hajime.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate uranium components remaining in metals even after the uranium-contaminated metals are melted. Method: Metal wastes contaminated with actinide element or its compound as nuclear fuel substance are melted in a crucible. Molten metals are fallen through a filter disposed at the bottom of the crucible into another receiving crucible. Uranium compounds are still left in the molten metal fallen in the receiving crucible. The residual uranium compounds are concentrated by utilizing the principle of the zone-refining process. That is, a displaceable local-heating heater is disposed to the receiving crucible, by which metals once solidified in the receiving crucible is again heated locally to transfer from solid to molten phase in a quasi-equibilized manner. In this way, by eliminating the end of the metal rod at which the uranium is segregated, the contaminating coefficient can be improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Development of fuel cycle technology for molten-salt reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The Molten-Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising advanced reactor type assigned to the GEN IV reactor systems. It can be operated either as thorium breeder within the Th -133U fuel cycle or as actinide transmuter incinerating transuranium fuel. Essentially the main advantage of MSR comes out from the prerequisite, that this reactor type should be directly connected with the 'on-line' reprocessing of circulating liquid (molten-salt) fuel. This principle should allow very effective extraction of freshly constituted fissile material (233U). Besides, the on-line fuel salt clean up is necessary within a long run to keep the reactor in operation. As a matter of principle, it permits to clear away typical reactor poisons like xenon, krypton, lanthanides etc. and possibly also other products of burned plutonium and transmuted minor actinides. The fuel salt clean up technology should be linked with the fresh MSR fuel processing to continuously refill the new fuel (thorium or transuranics) into the reactor system. On the other hand, the technologies of fresh transuranium molten-salt fuel processing from the current LWR spent fuel and of the on-line reprocessing of MSR fuel represent two killing points of the whole MSR technology, which have to be successfully solved before MSR deployment in the future. There are three main pyrochemical partitioning techniques proposed for processing and/or reprocessing of MSR fuel: Fluoride volatilization processes, Molten salt / liquid metal extraction processes and Electrochemical separation processes. Two of them - Fluoride Volatility Method and Electrochemical separation process from fluoride media are under development in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez pic. R and D in the field of Fluoride Volatility Method is concentrated to the development and verification of experimental semi-pilot technology for LWR spent fuel reprocessing, which may result in a product the form and composition of which might be

  17. Preliminary Study of Single-Phase Natural Circulation for Lab-scaled Molten Salt Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yukyung; Kang, Sarah; Kim, In Guk; Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Advanced reactors such as MSR (FHR), VHTR and AHTR utilized molten salt as a coolant for efficiency and safety which has advantages in higher heat capacity, lower pumping power and scale compared to liquid metal. It becomes more necessary to study on the characteristics of molten salt. However, due to several characteristics such as high operating temperature, large-scale facility and preventing solidification, satisfying that condition for study has difficulties. Thus simulant fluid was used with scaling method for lab-scale experiment. Scaled experiment enables simulant fluid to simulate fluid mechanics and heat transfer behavior of molten salt on lower operating temperature and reduced scale. In this paper, as a proof test of the scaled experiment, simplified single-phase natural circulation loop was designed in a lab-scale and applied to the passive safety system in advanced reactor in which molten salt is considered as a major coolant of the system. For the application of the improved safety system, prototype was based on the primary loop of the test-scale DRACS, the main passive safety system in FHR, developed at the OSU. For preliminary experiment, single-phase natural circulation under low power was performed. DOWTHERM A and DOWTHERM RP were selected as simulant candidates. Then, study of feasibility with simulant was conducted based on the scaling law for heat transfer characteristics and geometric parameters. Additionally, simulation with MARS code and ANSYS-CFX with the same condition of natural circulation was carried out as verification. For the accurate code simulation, thermo-physical properties of DOWTHERM A and RP were developed and implemented into MARS code. In this study, single-phase natural circulation experiment was performed with simulant oil, DOWTHERM RP, based on the passive safety system of FHR. Feasibility of similarity experiment for molten salt with oil simulant was confirmed by scaling method. In addition, simulation with two

  18. Molten fuel-coolant interaction behaviours of various fast reactor fuels (Paper No. HMT-45-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric computational model of molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) including a particle size distribution is developed and employed to analyse behaviours of various possible reactor fuels, such as oxide, carbide and metal in MFCI scenario. It is observed that while higher thermal conductivity and lower specific heat of carbide compared to oxide is responsible for higher peak pressure and work done per unit mass, the trend is not observed in the metal fuel. The reason for this is the lower operation temperature and latent heat of metallic fuel. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  19. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple ;crossover model; without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  20. Molten salt fueled reactors with a fast salt draining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventre, Edmond; Blum, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a molten salt nuclear reactor which comprises a new arrangement for shutting it down in complete safety. This nuclear reactor has a molten salt primary circuit comprising, in particular, the core of this reactor. It includes a leak tight vessel the capacity of which is appreciably greater than that of the molten salt volume of the circuit and placed so that the level of the molten salt, when all the molten salt of the circuit is contained in this vessel, is less than that of the base of the core. There are facilities for establishing and maintaining an inert gas pressure in the vessel above the molten salt, for releasing the compressed gas and for connecting the vessel to the primary circuit entering this vessel at a lower level than that of the molten salt and enabling molten salt to enter or leave the vessel according to the pressure of the inert gas. The particular advantage of this reactor is that it can be shut down safely since the draining of the primary circuit no longer results from a 'positive action' but from the suppression of an arrangement essential for the operation of the reactor consisting of the build-up of the said inert gas pressure in the said vessel [fr