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Sample records for molten chloride media

  1. Preliminary treatment of chlorinated streams containing fission products: mechanisms leading to crystalline phases in molten chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, D.

    2008-10-01

    The world of the nuclear power gets ready for profound modifications so that 'the atom' can aspire in conformance with long-lasting energy: it is what we call the development of generation IV nuclear systems. So, the new pyrochemical separation processes for the spent fuel reprocessing are currently being investigated. Techniques in molten chloride media generate an ultimate flow (with high chlorine content) which cannot be incorporated in conventional glass matrices. This flow is entirely water-soluble and must be conditioned in a chemical form which is compatible with a long-term disposal. This work of thesis consists in studying new ways for the management of the chlorinated streams loaded with fission products (FP). To do it, a strategy of selective FP extraction via the in situ formation of crystalline phases was retained. The possibility of extracting rare earths in the eutectic LiCl-KCl was demonstrated via the development of a new way of synthesis of rare earth phosphates (TRPO 4 ). As regards alkaline earths, the conversion of strontium and barium chlorides to the corresponding tungstates or molybdates was studied in different solvents. Mechanisms leading to the crystalline phases in molten chloride media were studied via the coupling of NMR and XRD techniques. First of all, it has been shown that these mechanisms are dependent on the stability of the used precursors. So in the case of the formation of rare earth phosphates the solvent is chemically active. On the other hand, in the case of the formation of alkaline earth tungstates it would seem that the solvent plays the role of structuring agent which can control the ability to react of chlorides. (author)

  2. Preparation of uranium coatings by electro deposition in molten chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxil, P.; Serrano, K.; Dugne, O.

    2001-01-01

    The electrodeposition of uranium is now a relevant topic for two kinds of applications: the preparation of this metal with compounds extracted from the mineral ores; the separation from lanthanides in the nuclear waste. This paper concerns the process of preparation of uranium metal on various substrates, using the electro deposition process in molten salts. The electrolyte consists of an eutectic mixture NaCl-KCl as solvent (fusion point 650 deg C) and a tetravalent uranium compound, UCl 4 as solute. We present the results, theoretical and practical, necessary to manage the process. So, the following points will be considered stepwise in this paper: the electrochemical behaviour of uranium III ions in the electrolyte, since it is now clearly established that uranium metal can be prepared by electrochemical reduction of UCl 3 in a NaCl-KCl mixture in a single step process: U III + 3 e → U 0 ; the crystallisation mode of uranium on the cathodic material; the preparation of uranium coatings with variables conditions: temperature, electrolyte concentration, current density and cathodic substrate; the observation of the crystal growth on the substrates, by using SEM micrographies. (authors)

  3. Interaction of calcium oxide with molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, A.V.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Ermakov, D.S.; Magurina, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium oxide solubility in molten lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium chlorides and their binary mixtures is determined in a temperature range of 973-1173 K by the method of isothermal saturation. Mechanisms of calcium oxide interaction with molten alkali metal chlorides are proposed

  4. Transfer characteristics of a lithium chloride–potassium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Mullen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing is an alternative method of reprocessing spent fuel, usually involving the dissolving spent fuel in a molten salt media. The National Nuclear Laboratory designed, built, and commissioned a molten salt dynamics rig to investigate the transfer characteristics of molten lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic salt. The efficacy and flow characteristics of a high-temperature centrifugal pump and argon gas lift were obtained for pumping the molten salt at temperatures up to 500°C. The rig design proved suitable on an industrial scale and transfer methods appropriate for use in future molten salt systems. Corrosion within the rig was managed, and melting techniques were optimized to reduce stresses on the rig. The results obtained improve the understanding of molten salt transport dynamics, materials, and engineering design issues and support the industrialization of molten salts pyroprocessing.

  5. Preliminary treatment of chlorinated streams containing fission products: mechanisms leading to crystalline phases in molten chloride media; Pretraitement pyrochimique de flux charges en produits de fission: mecanismes conduisant a l'obtention de phases cristallines en milieux chlorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudry, D

    2008-10-15

    The world of the nuclear power gets ready for profound modifications so that 'the atom' can aspire in conformance with long-lasting energy: it is what we call the development of generation IV nuclear systems. So, the new pyrochemical separation processes for the spent fuel reprocessing are currently being investigated. Techniques in molten chloride media generate an ultimate flow (with high chlorine content) which cannot be incorporated in conventional glass matrices. This flow is entirely water-soluble and must be conditioned in a chemical form which is compatible with a long-term disposal. This work of thesis consists in studying new ways for the management of the chlorinated streams loaded with fission products (FP). To do it, a strategy of selective FP extraction via the in situ formation of crystalline phases was retained. The possibility of extracting rare earths in the eutectic LiCl-KCl was demonstrated via the development of a new way of synthesis of rare earth phosphates (TRPO{sub 4}). As regards alkaline earths, the conversion of strontium and barium chlorides to the corresponding tungstates or molybdates was studied in different solvents. Mechanisms leading to the crystalline phases in molten chloride media were studied via the coupling of NMR and XRD techniques. First of all, it has been shown that these mechanisms are dependent on the stability of the used precursors. So in the case of the formation of rare earth phosphates the solvent is chemically active. On the other hand, in the case of the formation of alkaline earth tungstates it would seem that the solvent plays the role of structuring agent which can control the ability to react of chlorides. (author)

  6. Metallic oxide reduction in molten chlorides: electrochemical solvent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2005-11-01

    We consider the reaction MeO 2 + 2 Ca → Me + 2 CaO in CaCl 2 at 850 C. We want to re-use the molten media, which is a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at the end of the reaction. For that we want to de-oxidize it. When we electrolyse CaO we obtain Ca and O 2 ; it presents three difficult points that we want to solve: (1) it is difficult to oxidize O 2 - without oxidizing Cl - because their oxidation potential are very closed, (2) the chemical or electrochemical anodic corrosion, (3) the anodically produced gas dissolution in the mell One way of avoiding chlorine gas evolution is to prevent chloride ions from reaching the anode, for example using a selective membrane. Furthermore, the best prevention of the anodically produced gas dissolution in the melt can be done with a compartment, physically separating the anode from the rest of the reactional media. Thus in this work we have used an yttria stabilized zirconia membrane as a selective membrane for the deoxidation of a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at 850 C. (author)

  7. Zirconium and hafnium tetrachloride separation by extractive distillation with molten zinc chloride lead chloride solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    In an extractive distillation method for separating hafniuim tetrachloride from zirconium tetrachloride of the type wherein a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides is introduced into an extractive distillation column, which extractive distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a molten salt solvent is circulated into the reflux condenser and through the column to provide a liquid phase, and wherein molten salt solvent containing zirconium tetrachloride is taken from the reboiler and run through a stripper to remove zirconium tetrachloride product from the molten salt solvent and the stripped molten salt solvent is returned to the reflux condenser and hafnium tetrachloride enriched vapor is taken as product from the reflux condenser, the improvement is described comprising: the molten salt having a composition of at least 30 mole percent zinc chloride and at least 10 mole percent of lead chloride

  8. Catalysis in Molten Ionic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, Soghomon; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with catalysis in molten salts and ionic liquids, which are introduced and reviewed briefly, while an in-depth review of the oxidation catalyst used for the manufacturing of sulfuric acid and cleaning of flue gas from electrical power plants is the main topic of the chapter...

  9. Molten Triazolium Chloride Systems as New Aluminum Battery Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, B.; Bjerrum, Niels; Petrushina, Irina

    1993-01-01

    -170-degrees-C) depending on melt acidity and anode material. DMTC, being specifically adsorbed and reduced on the tungsten electrode surface, had an inhibiting effect on the aluminum reduction, but this effect was suppressed on the aluminum substrate. An electrochemical process with high current density (tens...... of milliamperes per square centimeter) was observed at 0.344 V on the acidic sodium tetrachloroaluminate background, involving a free triazolium radical mechanism. Molten DMTC-AlCl3 electrolytes are acceptable for battery performance and both the aluminum anode and the triazolium electrolyte can be used as active......The possibility of using molten mixtures of 1,4-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazolium chloride (DMTC) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) as secondary battery electrolytes was studied, in some cases extended by the copresence of sodium chloride. DMTC-AlCl, mixtures demonstrated high specific conductivity in a wide...

  10. Structure of partly quenched molten copper chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1995-09-01

    The structural modifications induced in a model of molten CuCl by quenching the chlorine component into a microporous disordered matrix are evaluated using the hypernetted-chain closure in Ornstein-Zernike relations for the pair distribution functions in random systems. Aside from obvious changes in the behaviour of long-wavelength density fluctuations, the main effect of partial quenching is an enhanced delocalization of the Cu + ions. The model suggests that the ionic mobility in a superionic glass is enhanced relative to the melt at the same temperature and density. Only very minor quantitative differences are found in the structural functions when the replica Ornstein-Zernike relations derived by Given and Stell for a partly quenched system are simplified to those given earlier by Madden and Glandt. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  11. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  12. Electrochemical properties of actinides in molten chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J.; Sanchez, S.; Picard, G.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and cerium chlorides have been studied in the fused CaCl 2 -NaCl equimolar mixture at 550 deg. C using a tungsten working electrode and a pO 2- indicator electrode. The standard potential of Pu(III)/Pu was determined using cyclic voltammetry. The solubility product of Pu 2 O 3 was calculated by potentiometric titration. The standard potential of Ce(III)/Ce have been determined by a potentiometry method. Potentiometric titrations of Ce(III) have been shown the existence of a soluble cerium oxychloride. All these data allowed us to draw the potential-pO 2- diagram which summarises the properties of plutonium and cerium compounds in the melt. (authors)

  13. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  14. Structure and thermodynamic properties of molten alkali chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.; Trieste Univ.

    1984-03-01

    Self-consistent calculations of partial pair distribution functions and thermodynamic properties are presented for molten alkali chlorides in a non-polarizable-ion model. The theory starts from the hypernetted chain approximation and analyzes the role of bridge diagrams both for a two-component ionic plasma on a neutralizing background and for a binary ionic liquid of cations and anions. A simple account of excluded-volume effects suffices for a good description of the pair distribution functions in the two-component plasma, in analogy with earlier work on one-component fluids. The interplay of Coulomb attractions and repulsions in the molten salt requires, on the other hand, the inclusion of (i) excluded-volume effects for the various ion pairs as in a mixture of hard spheres with non-additive radii and (ii) medium-range Coulomb effects reflected mainly in the like-ion correlations. All these effects are included approximately in an empirical evaluation of the bridge functions, with numerical results which compare very well with computer simulation data. A detailed discussion of the results against experimental structural data is then given in the case of molten sodium chloride. (author)

  15. Anodic and cathodic reactions in molten calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Calcium chloride is a very interesting electrolyte in that it is available, virtually free, in high purity form as a waste product from the chemical industry. It has a very large solubility for oxide ions, far greater than many alkali halides and other divalent halides and has the same toxicity as sodium chloride and also a very high solubility in water. Intuitively, on the passage of current, it is expected that calcium would be deposited at the cathode and chlorine would evolve at the anode. However, if calcium oxide is added to the melt, it is possible to deposit calcium and evolve oxygen containing gases at the anode, making the process far less polluting than when chlorine is evolved. This process is discussed in terms of the addition of calcium to molten lead. Furthermore, these reactions can be altered dramatically depending upon the electrode materials and the other ions dissolved in the calcium chloride. As calcium is only deposited at very negative cathodic potentials, there are several interesting cathodic reactions that can occur and these include the decomposition of the carbonate ion and the ionization of oxygen, sulphur, selenium and tellurium. For example, if an oxide is used as the cathode in molten calcium chloride, the favoured reaction is shown to be the ionization of oxygen O + 2e - → O 2- rather than Ca 2+ + 2 e- → Ca. The oxygen ions dissolve in the salt leaving the metal behind, and this leads to the interesting hypothesis that metal oxides can be reduced directly to the metal purely by the use of electrons. Examples are given for the reduction of titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, chromium oxide and niobium oxide and by mixing oxide powders together and reducing the mixed compact, alloys and intermetallic compounds are formed. Preliminary calculations indicate that this new process should be much cheaper than conventional metallothermic reduction for these elements. (author)

  16. Structure and thermodynamic properties of molten strontium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Ballone, P.; Tosi, M.P.; Trieste Univ.

    1985-05-01

    Self-consistent calculations of pair distribution functions and thermodynamic properties are presented for a pair-potentials model of molten strontium chloride. The calculations extend to a strongly asymmetric ionic liquid an earlier assessment of bridge diagrams in a modified hypernetted chain approach to the liquid structure of alkali halides. Good agreement is found with computer simulation data obtained by de Leeuw with the same set of pair potentials, showing that the present approach incorporates genuine general features of liquid structure theory for multicomponent liquids with strong relative ordering of the component species. It is further shown that the strong correlations between the divalent cations, both in the model and in real molten strontium chloride, can be approximately reproduced on the basis of a simple one-component-plasma model, provided that dielectric screening is allowed for in the real liquid. This allows us to tentatively attribute the significant level of disagreement between a pair potentials model of this liquid and the neutron diffraction data of McGreevy and Mitchell to many-body distortions of the electronic shells of the ions. (author)

  17. Sythesis of rare earth metal - GIC graphite intercalation compound in molten chloride system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds of ytterbium and neodymium have been prepared by interacting graphite and metals in molten chlorides. These rare earth metals can be suspended in molten chlorides in the presence of trichlorides via disproportionation reaction RE(0) + RE(III) = 2RE(II) at lower than 300 degC. Carbides-free compounds are obtained in these systems. (author)

  18. Hydrocracking mechanisms in molten zinc chloride. Isotope scrambling and pyrolysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.W.; Earnest, S.

    1979-01-01

    Bruceton coal was hydrocracked in molten zinc chloride using H 2 -D 2 mixtures. No H-D was observed. The pyrolysis of Bruceton coal and a lignite in molten zinc chloride and an inert salt was carried out and the tetrahydrofuran and pyridine extractability of the products determined. In the absence of H 2 , zinc chloride is not an effective cracking catalyst. It is tentatively concluded that the catalytically active species is formed from zinc chloride and something in the coal and H 2 . The interactions between zinc chloride and the lignite appear to be significantly different than the interactions between zinc chloride and the bituminous coal. (Auth.)

  19. Redox reactions in rare earth chloride molten electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, V.A.; Novoselova, A.V.; Nikolaeva, E.V.; Tkacheva, O.Yu.; Salyulev, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Rare earth (REM, Ln) solutions in chloride melts including MCI+LnCl 3 mixtures, where M - alkali metals, were investigated by potentiometry, voltammetry, conductometry in wide concentration and temperature intervals. Findings present complete and trusty information on the valent state of rare earths, structure and composition of complex ions affecting essentially on properties of electrolytes. It is demonstrated that the coexistence of rare earth ions with different oxidation level formed as a result of possible redox reactions: 2Ln 3+ + Ln ↔3Ln 2+ , Ln 2+ + Ln↔2Ln + and nM + + Ln↔nM + Ln n+ appears sharply in thermodynamic and transport properties of molten Ln-LnCl 3 and Ln-LnCl 3 -MCl systems [ru

  20. Continuous extraction of molten chloride salts with liquid cadmium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    A pyrochemical method is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide contnuous multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and liquid cadmium alloys at 500 degrees C. The extraction method will be used to recover transuranic (TRU) elements from the process salt in the electroretiner used in the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR is one of the Department of Energy's advanced power reactor concepts. The recovered TRU elements are returned to the electrorefiner. The extracted salt undergoes further processing to remove rare earths and other fission products so that most of the purified salt can also be returned to the electrorefiner, thereby extending the useful life of the process salt many times

  1. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  2. Chemical properties of some elements in a molten lithium chloride, potassium chloride eutectic (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, R.

    1961-12-01

    The increasing use of molten media especially in chemical preparations and for certain technological applications, has made it more necessary to have a knowledge of the chemical properties of elements in these solvents. Structural studies on molten solutions show the existence of certain species such as ions and complexes known to exist in aqueous solutions. This fact, together with certain experiments on chemical reactions in molten media has led us to establish a comparison between these media and aqueous solutions. We wish to show that the same fundamental phenomena occur in these media as are found in the chemistry of aqueous solutions and that this makes it possible to predict certain reactions. We have taken as examples the chemical properties of vanadium, uranium and sulphur in a LiCl-KCl eutectic melted at 480 deg. C. The first problem is to identify the various degrees of oxidation of these elements existing in the solvent chosen. We have tried to resolve it by comparing the absorption spectra obtained in aqueous solution and in the molten eutectic. We consider the possibilities of this method in a chapter on absorption spectrophotometry in the LiCl-KCl eutectic. During the study of the chemical properties we stress the various methods of displacing the equilibria: complex formation, variation of the oxidation-reduction properties with complex formation. The complexes of the O 2- ion are considered in particular. The study of the exchange of this particle is facilitated by the use of a classification of some of its complexes which we call the pO 2- scale by analogy with the pH scale; the value pO 2- is defined by the relationship: pO 2- = log O 2- Similarly, the use of apparent potential diagrams pO 2- makes it possible to predict and to interpret reactions involving the simultaneous exchange of electrons and O 2- ions between the various degrees of oxidation of the same element. It is possible, by studying some reactions of this type between two elements

  3. Pourbaix diagrams of actinides in molten chlorides using an indicating electrode for oxide ion activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochemical separation methods using high temperature molten salt media could emerge as promising and valuable routes compared with aqueous methods for separation and transmutation strategies for long-lived radionuclides. A good knowledge of the molten salt chemistry is essential for controlling these separations, and elementary data are required for molten halide salts, which can be readily provided by electrochemical methods. Applying the chemical principles of aqueous solutions to the molten salt media, Pourbaix diagrams - called in this case potential-oxo-acidity (pO 2- ) - can be plotted. They offer a rapid and comprehensive view of the thermodynamic properties of selected elements in a solvent of interest. Two methods are available for preparing these diagrams. The first is based on available thermodynamic data on pure element oxide (and oxychloride) compounds and on element chloride activity coefficients in melt (which can be electrochemically determined). In this method, we consider the oxide anion exchange reactions between the pure compounds, water and hydrogen chloride. The second method is a direct and experimental determination of the oxo-acidic properties of the studied element chlorides in melts. Use of an Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia Membrane (YSZM) electrode (oxide anion selective electrode) helps determine the nature of the stable oxide compounds in melts as well as their stabilities. The YSZM is used with a silver/silver chloride reference system, and was developed 25 years ago. Two examples of Potential-acidity diagrams. Employing the first method and the determination of the standard potential of plutonium in LiCl-KCl and NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures, potential-oxo-acidity diagrams were plotted for these melts at various temperatures. It was found that the stability domain for plutonium chloride depends on the melt composition (influence of oxide anion solvation). We also used the Omega acidity function - based on reaction (1) - which is a

  4. Recovery of metal chlorides from their complexes by molten salt displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process for recovering zirconium or hafnium chloride from a complex of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride and phosphorus oxychloride. The process comprising: introducing liquid complex of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride and phosphorus oxychloride into an upper portion of a feed column containing zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and phosphorus oxychloride vapor. The liquid complex absorbing zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and producing a bottoms liquid and also producing a phosphorus oxychloride vapor stripped of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride; introducing the bottoms liquid into a molten salt containing displacement reactor, the reactor containing molten salt comprising at least 30 mole percent lithium chloride and at least 30 mole percent of at least one other alkali metal chloride, the reactor being heated to 30-450 0 C to displace phosphorus oxychloride from the complex and product zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and phosphorus oxychloride vapor and zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride-containing molten salt; introducing the zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride vapor and the phosphorus oxychloride vapor into the feed column below the point of introduction of the liquid stream; introducing the zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride containing-molten salt into a recovery vessel where zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride is removed from the molten salt to produce zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride product and zirconium or hafnium chloride-depleted molten salt; and recycling the zirconium or hafnium tetachloride-depleted molten salt to the displacement reactor

  5. Electrolytic production of light lanthanides from molten chloride alloys on a large laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szklarski, W.; Bogacz, A.; Strzyzewska, M.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data relating to electrolytic production of rare earth metals are presented. Conditions and results are given of own investigations into the electrolytic process of light lanthanide chloride solutions (LA-Nd) in molten potassium and sodium chlorides conducted on a large laboratory scale using molybdenic, iron, cobaltic and zinc cathodes. Design schemes of employed electrolysers are enclosed. (author)

  6. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Medina, J.; Hernandez, P.; Barrado, E.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) ↔ Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al 3 Sm and Al 2 Sm.

  7. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  8. Hot corrosion behaviour of austenitic steel-303 in molten chloride and carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Misbahul Amin; Shamsul Baharin Jamaludin; Che Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali; Khairel Rafezi Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The investigations are presented for the hot corrosion behaviors of Austenitic Steel-303, under influence of the molten chloride and carbonate salts viz KCl and K 2 CO 3 , oxidised at 1123 K for the period of 60 hour at atmospheric condition. The oxidation kinetic are effect of molten chloride and carbonate salts deposition on the oxidation rate were determined. The susceptibility to suffer a deleterious attack on the alloy by internal corrosion increases with increasing the time. In general, the corrosion resistance austenitic steel-303 in molten carbonate salts is much higher than chloride melt, being an active oxidizing agent providing oxygen during fluxing reaction. However, due to profuse evolution of CO/ CO 2 heavy mass losses are observed during corrosion and scales are porous. The test included mass change monitoring and surface layers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. (author)

  9. Comparison of molten chloride and fluoride salts potentialities for An/Ln separation by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, A.; Peron, F.; Marrot, F.; Lacquement, J. [DRCP/SCPS/LPP - CEA/CEN Valrho - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is the comparison of molten fluoride and chloride salts potentialities for Am/Nd separation by electrodeposition on inert cathode, on a purely thermodynamic point of view. The molten LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic (77-23 mol.%, at 780 deg. C) was considered for this study. Cyclic voltammetry showed a one step Am(III)/Am reduction at a potential of {approx_equal}+0.5 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. A potential difference of 290 mV between Am and Nd metallic deposition was estimated by square-wave voltammetry. This Am/Nd potential difference is more important than in molten chlorides (220 mV in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 500 deg. C). Moreover in molten fluoride salt, the americium and neodymium (+II) oxidation state is not stable contrary to the molten chloride one where corrosion of deposited Am would be potential. However this larger potential difference in molten fluorides is quite balanced by the higher working temperature. (authors)

  10. Electrochemical reduction of lanthanum trichloride in a molten equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Polyakov, E.G.; Stangrit, P.T.

    1987-09-20

    The authors used linear voltamperometry for the investigation of the mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum. The mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride in molten equimolar NaCl-KCl may be seen as consisting of a slow irreversible electrode reaction with a subsequent rapid irreversible chemical reaction. Lanthanum ions in a lower oxidation state were not found upon the prolonged maintenance of metallic lanthanum in molten NaCl-KCl-LaCl/sub 3/. Only an increase in the concentration of lanthanum(III) chloride in the melt was noted. The appearance of oxygen anions in the melt does not lead to a change in the mechanism of the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride but reduces the concentration of this chloride due to the formation of lanthanum oxochloride which is insoluble in the melt.

  11. Structure and thermodynamic properties of molten rubidium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.; Trieste Univ.

    1984-02-01

    Self-consistent calculations of partial pair distribution functions and thermodynamic properties are presented for molten RbCl in a non-polarizable-ion model and compared with computer simulation data. The theory, which is quantitatively very successful, hinges on an empirical evaluation of bridge diagrams including both excluded-volume effects and long-range Coulomb effects. (author)

  12. Removal of alkaline-earth elements by a carbonate precipitation in a chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung-Zun Cho; In-Tae Kim; Hee-Chui Yang; Hee-Chui Eun; Hwan-Seo Park; Eung-Ho Kim

    2007-01-01

    Separation of some alkaline-earth chlorides (Sr, Ba) was investigated by using carbonate injection method in LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salts. The effects of the injected molar ratio of carbonate([K 2 (or Li 2 )CO 3 /Sr(or Ba)Cl 2 ]) and the temperature(450-750 deg.) on the conversion ratio of the Sr or Ba carbonate were determined. In addition, the form of the Sr and Ba carbonate resulting from the carbonation reaction with carbonates was identified via XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. In these experiments, the carbonate injection method can remove Sr and Ba chlorides effectively over 99% in both LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salt conditions. When Sr and Ba were co-presented in the eutectic molten salt, they were carbonated in a form of Ba 0.5 Sr 0.3 CO 3 . And when Sr was present in LiCl molten salt, it was carbonated in the form of SrCO 3 . Carbonation ratio increased with a decreasing temperature and it was more favorable in the case of a K 2 CO 3 injection than that of Li 2 CO 3 . Based on this experiment, it is postulated that carbonate precipitation method has the potential for removing alkali-earth chlorides from LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salts. (authors)

  13. Structure and thermodynamic properties of molten rare earth-alkali chloride mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    1999-01-01

    The dependence of the enthalpy of mixing on the structure of molten rare earth-alkali chloride mixtures has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The experimental enthalpy of the mixing with its negative and its dependence on the cation size was qualitatively reproduced. It became clear that the enthalpy of mixing depends on the structural features of short and medium range. (orig.)

  14. Review on the current status of molten chloride reactor and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Shin, Yukyung; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper has summarized and reviewed the current status of MCR as an online pyroprocessing reactor, and introduced the related works in UNIST. As the developments of the next generation nuclear energy systems require the fuel sustainability, passive operation safety, nuclear proliferation, and reduction of highly radioactive waste, only several types of nuclear reactor systems survive to the last. Among these, molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising concepts of next generation nuclear reactor system that deliver on these requirements. MSR have great advantages in the fuel cycle and reduction of nuclear waste, since MSR can serve the online reprocessing system for the reprocessing of spent fuel. Especially, MSR utilizing chloride-based fuel, called molten chloride reactor (MCR) has been recently highlighted in USA under the DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) program. Recently, the interests in the molten chloride salt have arisen. The use of chloride-based salt gives great advantages to the reactor operating in a fast spectrum. Then MCR can serve waste management functions or fuel cycle sustainability functions, which can solve the current issues in nuclear field. Thus, research plan was established in UNIST which includes the investigation of thermal-hydraulic characteristics of chloride salt and optimization of heat transport system of MCR, using both numerical method and experimental method.

  15. Review on the current status of molten chloride reactor and its future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Shin, Yukyung; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-01-01

    This paper has summarized and reviewed the current status of MCR as an online pyroprocessing reactor, and introduced the related works in UNIST. As the developments of the next generation nuclear energy systems require the fuel sustainability, passive operation safety, nuclear proliferation, and reduction of highly radioactive waste, only several types of nuclear reactor systems survive to the last. Among these, molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising concepts of next generation nuclear reactor system that deliver on these requirements. MSR have great advantages in the fuel cycle and reduction of nuclear waste, since MSR can serve the online reprocessing system for the reprocessing of spent fuel. Especially, MSR utilizing chloride-based fuel, called molten chloride reactor (MCR) has been recently highlighted in USA under the DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) program. Recently, the interests in the molten chloride salt have arisen. The use of chloride-based salt gives great advantages to the reactor operating in a fast spectrum. Then MCR can serve waste management functions or fuel cycle sustainability functions, which can solve the current issues in nuclear field. Thus, research plan was established in UNIST which includes the investigation of thermal-hydraulic characteristics of chloride salt and optimization of heat transport system of MCR, using both numerical method and experimental method

  16. Wetting of a Charged Surface of Glassy Carbon by Molten Alkali-Metal Chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    Values of the contact angle of wetting of a surface of glassy carbon by molten chlorides of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium are measured by the meniscus weight method to determine the common factors of wettability of solid surfaces by ionic melts upon a change in the salt phase composition and a jump in electric potential. It is found that with a potential shift in the positive direction the shape of the curve of the contact angle's dependence on the potential varies upon substitution of one salt by another: the angle of wetting shrinks monotonously in lithium chloride but remains constant in molten cesium chloride. This phenomenon is explained by the hypothesis that the nature of the halide anion adsorption on the positively charged surface of an electrode is chemical and not electrostatic. It is shown that the adsorption process is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface, with covalent bonding between the adsorbent and adsorbate.

  17. Lewis-Acid/Base Effects on Gallium Volatility in Molten Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that GaCl 3 can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl 3 is quite volatile (boiling point, 201 C), the behavior of GaCl 3 dissolved in chloride salts is different due to solution effects and is critically dependent on the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis-acid/base character). In this report, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis-acid and Lewis-base salts is compared. It was found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and enhanced in acidic melts. The implications of these results on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems are significant

  18. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Kudyakov, V Ya; Smirnov, M V; Moskalenko, N I [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1984-08-01

    The coefficient of HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl/sub 4/+HfCl/sub 4/). HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl.

  19. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Smirnov, M.V.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    The coefficient of HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl 4 +HfCl 4 ). HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl

  20. NMR study of thallium(I) ions in molten binary mixtures of nitrates and chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yoshio; Kitazawa, Yukiharu; Shimoji, Mitsuo; Shimokawa, Shigezo.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical shifts of 205 Tl NMR in molten binary mixtures of nitrates and those of chlorides have been measured as a function of composition and temperature. The shifts increase in the diamagnetic direction with decreasing the size of foreign cations and increase in the paramagnetic direction with increasing temperature. These results are interpreted by changes in the overlap of orbitals of the Tl + ion and the anion, which depend upon composition and temperature. (author)

  1. Actinide oxides synthesis in molten chloride. Structural studies and reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigier, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes are studied as potential alternatives to hydrochemical processes for spent nuclear fuel treatment. The CEA pyrochemical process led to a molten LiCl-CaCl 2 (30-70% mol) salt at 700 C with solubilized actinides at the oxidation state (III). The study developed in this thesis concerns actinide oxides synthesis in this media for nuclear fuel re-fabrication. This synthesis was done by wet argon sparging. First, this conversion method is described for neodymium (III) and cerium (III) co-conversion. The conversion rates are around 99.9%. The obtained powders contain mixed oxychloride Ce 1-x Nd x OCl as main component, with a small amount of mixed oxide Ce 1-x Nd x O 2-0,5x for the high cerium ratio. A second oxychloride CeIV(Nd 0.7 Ce 0.3 ) III O 3 Cl is obtained in specific conditions and in very low quantity. The structure of this oxychloride is described in this study. The partially oxidative property of the conversion method induces the oxidation of a part of cerium (III) to oxidation state (IV). In the case of uranium (III) conversion by wet argon sparging, all the uranium is oxidized and give the oxide UO 2 as single compound. The conversion rate for this element is over 99.9% in the molten chloride, but significant amount of uranium is lost by volatilization during the conversion. The study shows the oxygen sensitivity of uranium during the conversion, inducing oxidation over the oxidation state (IV), and giving UO 2+x or uranate CaUO 4 . As a consequence, oxygen led to calcium pollution in the precipitate. Finally, the U(III) and Pu(III) co-conversion study shows the highest precipitation sensitivity of uranium (III) in comparison with plutonium (III), responsible of a successive conversion of the two elements, giving an oxide mixture of UO 2 et PuO 2 with quantitative conversion rate. Surprisingly, the conversion of Pu(III) in the same conditions led to a mixture of PuO 2 and PuOCl, characteristic of a partial oxidation from Pu (III) to Pu

  2. Chemical and electrochemical properties in the molten lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delarue, G.

    1960-12-01

    We have studied the behaviour of several chemical species in the molten LiCI-KCI eutectic. The solubility of certain oxides and sulphides has made it possible for us to show the existence of O 2- and S 2- ions. We have been able to show the existence of a certain number of chemical reactions: oxido-reduction precipitation, complex formation; we have studied, amongst others, the oxidation of O 2- and of S 2- . (author) [fr

  3. Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten alkaline-earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalik, O.Yu.; Tkhaj, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten calcium, strontium and barium chlorides are measured and their temperature dependences are determined. It is stated that the corrosion potential of hafnium becomes more electropositive with an increase of the environment temperature. If the temperature is the same the potential shifts to the interval of more electronegative values in the row of CaCl 2 , SrCl 2 , BaCl 2 which corresponds to a lesser corrosion rate in environments positioned from left to right. the comparison of hafnium corrosion potentials with previously measured values for titanium and zirconium shows that a metal activity decrease results in a more electronegative corrosion potential [ru

  4. Highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane with supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.A.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2011-07-01

    Ethene production is one of the most important transformations in chemical industry, given that C{sub 2}H{sub 4} serves as building block for many mass-market products. Besides conventional thermal processes like steam cracking of ethane, ethane can be produced selectively by catalytic processes. One of the classes of catalysts that have been reported in literature as active and highly selective for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane is that of supported molten chloride catalysts, containing an alkali chloride overlayer on a solid support. This work deals with fundamental aspects of the catalytic action in latter class of catalysts. Results from kinetic reaction studies are related to observations in detailed characterization and lead to a comprehensive mechanistic understanding. Of fundamental importance towards mechanistic insights is the oxygen storage capacity of the catalysts that has been determined by transient step experiments. (orig.)

  5. Titanium electroplating of copper in molten salt media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Denis

    1985-01-01

    After a bibliographical survey on electroplating in molten salt media and on the electrolytic production of titanium, the author explains the reasons for the choice of the LiF-NaF-KF eutectic mix as solvent. He recalls the main properties which are used, and describes the conventional and convolutional processing of data obtained by linear volt-amperometry. He presents the electrolyte preparation mode which takes into account the existence of titanium ions with intermediate oxidation degree, and the reactivity of titanium with oxygenated species. Experimental results are discussed. Then, after the study of the mechanism of reduction of trivalent titanium into titanium on molybdenum (intermetallic diffusion is here negligible), he reports the study of this mechanism on copper (it is a more complicated situation, due to combinations between titanium and copper). The effect of different parameters (electrolyte purity, current density, electrode potential and temperature) is interpreted in order to identify optimal conditions for titanium electroplating of copper [fr

  6. Evidence for many-body interactions in the structure of molten alkali chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malescio, G.P.; Tosi, M.P.

    1985-02-01

    An inversion of the measured partial structure factors of molten sodium chloride is attempted in order to assess some qualitative features of interionic forces in the melt. We start from a calculation of liquid structure and thermodynamic properties by means of a refined theory based on interionic pair potentials determined from properties of the solid phase. This yields very good agreement with the measured values of the internal energy and the compressibility of the liquid, whereas discrepancies with the observed structure are mainly localized in the region of interionic distances outside the minimum of the cation-anion potential. These discrepancies, when interpreted in terms of effective pair potentials in the melt through inversion of the structural data, strongly suggest the presence of many-body effects, insofar as such effective pair potentials oscillate with the local liquid structure and are inconsistent with the measured thermodynamic quantities. A similar analysis of data on molten rubidium and cesium chloride, though harder to carry out quantitatively, supports the above conclusion. (author)

  7. In situ spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemistry of uranium in high-temperature alkali chloride molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovov, Ilya B; Volkovich, Vladimir A; Charnock, John M; Kralj, Brett; Lewin, Robert G; Kinoshita, Hajime; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A

    2008-09-01

    Soluble uranium chloride species, in the oxidation states of III+, IV+, V+, and VI+, have been chemically generated in high-temperature alkali chloride melts. These reactions were monitored by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium(VI) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was used to determine the immediate coordination environment about the uranium. The dominant species in the melt was [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). Further analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure data and Raman spectroscopy of the melts quenched back to room temperature indicated the possibility of ordering beyond the first coordination sphere of [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). The electrolytic generation of uranium(III) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was also investigated. Anodic dissolution of uranium metal was found to be more efficient at producing uranium(III) in high-temperature melts than the cathodic reduction of uranium(IV). These high-temperature electrolytic processes were studied by in situ electronic absorption spectroelectrochemistry, and we have also developed in situ X-ray absorption spectroelectrochemistry techniques to probe both the uranium oxidation state and the uranium coordination environment in these melts.

  8. Behaviour of metals and alloys in molten fluoride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, St.

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride salts are contemplated for Generation IV nuclear systems which structural materials need to resist corrosion at high temperatures. Corrosion of metals in molten fluorides has been investigated in support of the Molten Salt Reactor's development and led to an optimized alloy, Hastelloy-N, but it lacked fundamentals data for the comprehension of materials' degradation mechanisms. The main objective of this work is then to help with the understanding of the corrosion behaviour of nickel and its alloys in fluoride salts. An experimental method was built up using electrochemical techniques and enabled to investigate the thermochemical conditions of the media and the influence of different parameters (media, temperature and quantity of impurities) on the behaviour of the materials. Most tests were performed in LiF-NaF mixtures between 800 and 1000 C. Pure metals can be classified as follows: Cr ≤ Fe ≤ Ni ≤ Mo ≤ W in increasing stability order and two specific behaviours were evidenced: Cr and Fe corrode in the melt, whereas Ni, Mo and W are stable, underlining the significance level of the redox couple controlling the reactions in the mixture. Moreover, corrosion current densities increase with temperature, fluoro-acidity and the quantity of dissolved oxide in the melt. Binary Ni-Cr alloys were also tested; selective attack of Cr is first observed before both elements are oxidized. Combining thermochemical calculations and experimental results enables to propose an approach to establish an optimized composition for a stable alloy. Immersion tests were finally achieved in addition to the electrochemical tests: interpretations of both methods were compared and completed. (author)

  9. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  10. Development of pyrometallurgical partitioning technology of long-lived nuclides. Recovery of volatile chlorides for chlorination process using molten salt trap. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijikata, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Kyosei; Kurata, Masateru; Konagaya, Hideaki

    1997-01-01

    The dry process for partitioning of long-lived nuclides from high level radioactive waste has been developed. One of the subjects for development of this process is the recovering of the volatilization of chlorides for the chlorination process. We proposed that the volatile chlorides were recovered by the molten salt trap. We researched the behavior of volatile chlorides (ferric chloride, zirconium tetra-chloride and molybdenum pent-chloride) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. In this result, the volatile rate of these chlorides was slower than the volatile rate of undissolved chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Also, we make a prototype of molten salt trap for recovering the volatile chlorides and tested the performance of this experimental apparatus and recovering ratio of volatile chlorides. This trap has a good performance of recovering volatile chlorides. (author)

  11. Study of Reaction of Curium Oxy-Compound Formation in Molten Chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, A.G.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Bychkov, A.V. [Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region, 433510 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The method of potentiometric titration using oxygen sensors with solid electrolyte membrane was applied for the study of the interaction of curium cations with oxygen anions in the molten alkali metal chlorides in the temperature range of 450-850 C degrees depending on oxy-acidity of the environment. Assumptions were made concerning ion and phase composition of the obtained high-temperature compounds and chemical reactions taking place in the melts. This scheme assumes that as the basicity of the melt increases, initially the formation of soluble curium oxychlorides takes place in the melt (presumably CmO{sup -}) that is followed by formation of solid CmOCl and finally sesquioxide Cm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Basic thermodynamic values were calculated for the resultant curium oxy-compounds.

  12. High temperature corrosion of nickel alloys by molten calcium chloride in an oxidising environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Roger; Gittos, Mike

    2012-09-01

    A series of nickel alloys was submerged in molten calcium chloride (a molten salt proposed for and used in the nuclear industry for a variety of applications), at 850 deg. C for 72 hours under an oxidising environment. The samples were analysed in detail, in order to determine their corrosion behaviour and suitability for use under these conditions. 310 stainless steel was used as a reference material. Extensive corrosion occurred and the observed attack on the metal substrates was general and massive with corrosion rates ranging from 1.17 mm/year, for Haynes 214, to 13.3 mm/year, for 310 stainless steel. All materials showed selective leaching of chromium from the samples but the oxide layer formed was not protective, spalling away easily. The severity of the attack was not immediately visible from the corrosion rate alone: samples showed a friable scale on the surface and deep penetration of the attack beneath, up to 0.63 mm for 310 stainless steel. In some cases, the attack was clearly intergranular with chromium being depleted along the grain boundaries, whereas in others, the attack was more general. No simple correlation between alloying elements and corrosion rate was apparent, with additions of aluminium and silicon appearing to have little or no protective effect. Alloys 600 and Haynes HR-160 showed promise, with relatively low corrosion rates and penetration depths. (authors)

  13. Electrical conductivity of molten carbonate and carbonate-chloride systems coexisting with aluminium oxide powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V. [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural State Economic Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Bovet, Andrey L.; Zakiryanova, Irina D. [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2018-04-01

    The electrical properties of composite electrolytes (suspensions) composed of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder and molten carbonate eutectic (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} or molten carbonate-chloride mixture 0.72(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut}-0.28NaCl have been investigated by AC impedance method. This system shows a dependence of the electrical conductivity upon the temperature and the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The specific electrical conductivity of the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} system can be adequately described by the Maxwell equation for two-phase heterogeneous materials. The regression equation for the dependence of the specific conductivity of the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} composite on the aluminium oxide concentration and temperature was obtained.

  14. Environmental and energy gains from using molten magnesium–sodium–potassium chlorides for electro-metallisation of refractory metal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molten eutectic mixture of magnesium, sodium and potassium chlorides (MgCl2–NaCl–KCl has inappreciable solubility for oxide ions, and can help disengage a carbon anode from the oxide ions generated at a metal oxide cathode, and effectively avoid carbon dioxide formation. This “disengaging strategy” was successfully demonstrated in electro-reduction of solid oxides of zirconium and tantalum. It has led to significantly higher current efficiency (93%, and lower energy consumption (1.4 kW h kg−1 in electrolysis of tantalum oxide to tantalum metal compared to the conventional electrolysis in molten calcium chloride (e.g. 78% and 2.4 kW h/kg-Ta.

  15. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  16. Stabilization of molten salt materials using metal chlorides for solar thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, T O; Jarvis, D J; Voice, W E; Sullivan, J H

    2018-05-29

    The effect of a variety of metal-chlorides additions on the melting behavior and thermal stability of commercially available salts was investigated. Ternary salts comprised of KNO 3, NaNO 2, and NaNO 3 were produced with additions of a variety of chlorides (KCl, LiCl, CaCl 2 , ZnCl 2 , NaCl and MgCl 2 ). Thermogravimetric analysis and weight loss experiments showed that the quaternary salt containing a 5 wt% addition of LiCl and KCl led to an increase in short term thermal stability compared to the ternary control salts. These additions allowed the salts to remain stable up to a temperature of 630 °C. Long term weight loss experiments showed an upper stability increase of 50 °C. A 5 wt% LiCl addition resulted in a weight loss of only 25% after 30 hours in comparison to a 61% loss for control ternary salts. Calorimetry showed that LiCl additions allow partial melting at 80 °C, in comparison to the 142 °C of ternary salts. This drop in melting point, combined with increased stability, provided a molten working range increase of almost 100 °C in total, in comparison to the control ternary salts. XRD analysis showed the oxidation effect of decomposing salts and the additional phase created with LiCl additions to allow melting point changes to occur.

  17. Atomic size effects on local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatlipinar, H.; Akdeniz, Z.; Pastore, G.

    1992-08-01

    Structural correlations in molten trivalent metal chlorides are evaluated as functions of the metal ion size R M across the range from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A), using a charged soft-sphere model and the hypernetted chain approximation. Main attention is given to trends in the local liquid structure (partial radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and bond lengths) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the number-number and partial structure factors). The trend towards fourfold local coordination of the metal ions, the stabilization of their first-neighbour chlorine cage and the growth of medium range order are found to proceed in parallel as the size of the metal ion is allowed to decrease at constant number density and temperature. A tendency to molecular-type local structure and liquid-vapour phase separation is found within the hypernetted chain scheme at small metal ion sizes corresponding to AlCl 3 and is emphasized by decreasing the number density of the fluid. The predicted molecular units are rather strongly distorted Al 2 Cl 6 dimers, in agreement with observation. The calculated structural trends for other trichlorides are compared with diffraction and transport data. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  18. The measurement of metallic uranium solubility in lithium chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Choi, I. K.; Yeon, J. W.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of more precise solubility measurement of metallic uranium in lithium chloride melt, the effect of lithium chloride on uranium determination and and the change of oxidation state of metallic uranium in the media were investigated. Uranium of higher than 10 μg/g could be directly determined by ICP-AES. In the case of the lower concentration, the separation and concentration of uranium by anion exchanger was followed by ICP-AES, thereby extending the measurable concentration to 0.1 μg/g. The effects of lithium oxide, uranium oxides(UO 2 or U 3 O 8 ) and metallic lithium on the solubility of metallic uranium were individually investigated in glassy carbon or stainless steel crucibles under argon gas atmosphere. Since metallic uranium is oxidized to uranium(III) in the absence of metallic lithium, causing an increase in the solubility, metallic lithium as reducing agent should be present in the reaction media to obtain the more precise solubility. The metallic uranium solubilities measured at 660 and 690 .deg. C were both lower than 10 μg/g

  19. Electrodeposition behavior of nickel and nickel-zinc alloys from the zinc chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride low temperature molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Shiping; Sun, I.-W.

    2008-01-01

    The electrodeposition of nickel and nickel-zinc alloys was investigated at polycrystalline tungsten electrode in the zinc chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt. Although nickel(II) chloride dissolved easily into the pure chloride-rich 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic melt, metallic nickel could not be obtained by electrochemical reduction of this solution. The addition of zinc chloride to this solution shifted the reduction of nickel(II) to more positive potential making the electrodeposition of nickel possible. The electrodeposition of nickel, however, requires an overpotential driven nucleation process. Dense and compact nickel deposits with good adherence could be prepared by controlling the deposition potential. X-ray powder diffraction measurements indicated the presence of crystalline nickel deposits. Non-anomalous electrodeposition of nickel-zinc alloys was achieved through the underpotential deposition of zinc on the deposited nickel at a potential more negative than that of the deposition of nickel. X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometry measurements of the electrodeposits indicated that the composition and the phase types of the nickel-zinc alloys are dependent on the deposition potential. For the Ni-Zn alloy deposits prepared by underpotential deposition of Zn on Ni, the Zn content in the Ni-Zn was always less than 50 atom%

  20. The dissolution of chalcopyrite in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, T.; Velasquez, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to determinate the effects of parameters and additives on the kinetics of dissolution of chalcopyrite on moderated conditions by means of dissolutions test with chalcopyrite concentrate and pure chalcopyrite in shake flasks and instrumented stirred reactors. A study of the dissolution of chalcopyrite in chloride solutions has demonstrated that the rate of dissolution of chalcopyrite is strongly dependent on the potential of the solution within a range of 540 to 630 mV (versus SHE). Leaching at pH around 2.5 results in increased rates of copper dissolution suggesting the possibility to keep the solution potential within the range. Both pyrite and silver ions enhance the dissolution of chalcopyrite and this effect increases when both species are present. The MnO 2 has a negative effect on the dissolution increasing the solution potential to values where the rate decreases considerably. (Author)

  1. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, M.A., E-mail: marose@anl.gov [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Williamson, M.A.; Willit, J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl{sub 3}. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U{sup 3+} ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl{sub 3} or in the case of the eutectic salt for K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5}. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5} is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  2. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Li’an, E-mail: mr_zla@163.com; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (J{sub m}), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm{sup 2} (J{sub m}), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (R{sub a} 1.01 ± 0.09 μm) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of 〈1 1 1〉, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of molten mixtures of lithium, rubidium, cesium and beryllium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Podafa, B.P.; Dubovoj, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    e. m. f. in binary systems of beryllium chloride with rubidium and cesium chlorides were measured. Concentration dependences of thermodynamic functions (mixing entropy Gibbs free energy) of beryllium chloride in the systems as well as with the participation of lithium chloride were analysed

  4. Electrochemistry of vanadium(II and the electrodeposition of aluminum-vanadium alloys in the aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of vanadium(II was examined in the 66.7-33.3 mole percent aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing dissolved VCl2 at 353 K. Voltammetry experiments revealed that V(II could be electrochemically oxidized to V(III and V(IV. However at slow scan rates the V(II/V(III electrode reaction is complicated by the rapid precipitation of V(III as VCl3. The reduction of V(II occurs at potentials considerably negative of the Al(III/Al electrode reaction, and Al-V alloys cannot be electrodeposited from this melt. However electrodeposition experiments conducted in VCl2-saturated melt containing the additive, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, resulted in Al-V alloys. The vanadium content of these alloys increased with increasing cathodic current density or more negative applied potentials. X-ray analysis of Al-V alloys that were electrodeposited on a rotating copper wire substrate indicated that these alloys did not form or contain an intermetallic compound, but were non-equilibrium or metastable solid solutions. The chloride-pitting corrosion properties of these alloys were examined in aqueous NaCl by using potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Alloys containing ~10 a/o vanadium exhibited a pitting potential that was 0.3 V positive of that for pure aluminum.

  5. The Limiting Phenomena at the Anode of the Electrowinning of Zinc from Zinc Chloride in a Molten Chloride Electrolyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lans, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the possibilities and technological viability for the electrowinning of zinc from zinc chloride. This research contributes to development of an alternative process, because it provides: ⢠A clear understanding and overview of the present zinc

  6. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  7. Structure of tungsten electrodeposited from oxide chloride-fluoride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskij, V.A.; Reznichenko, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation results on the influence of electrolysis parameters and electrolyte composition on tungsten cathode deposit structure are presented. The electrolysis was performed in NaCl-NaF-WO 3 molten salts using tungsten and tungsten coated molybdenum cathodes. Morphological and metallographic studies of tungsten crystals were carrier out. Tungsten deposits were obtained in the form of crystalline conglomerates, sponge and high dispersity powder

  8. Investigation of the evaporation of rare earth chlorides in a LiCl-KCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung Bin Park; Dong Wook Cho; Moon Sik Woo; Sung Chan Hwang; Young Ho Kang; Jeong Guk Kim; Hansoo Lee

    2011-01-01

    Uranium dendrites which were deposited at a solid cathode of an electrorefiner contained a certain amount of salts. These salts should be removed for the recovery of pure metal using a cathode processor. In the uranium deposits from the electrorefining process, there are actinide chlorides and rare earth chlorides in addition to uranium chloride in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. The evaporation behaviors of the actinides and rare earth chlorides in the salts should be investigated for the removal of salts in the deposits. Experiments on the salt evaporation of rare earth chlorides in a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were carried out. Though the vapor pressures of the rare earth chlorides were lower than those of the LiCl and KCl, the rare earth chlorides were co-evaporized with the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. The Hertz-Langmuir relation was applied for this evaporation, and also the evaporation rates of the salt were obtained. The co-evaporation of the rare earth chlorides and LiCl-KCl eutectic were also discussed. (author)

  9. Cerium concentrate and mixed rare earth chloride by the oxidative decomposition of bastnaesite in molten sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Toshio; Kato, Kazuhiro; Kuno, Toyohiko; Okuwaki, Akitsugu; Umetsu, Yoshiaki; Okabe, Taijiro

    1993-01-01

    Bastnaesite was treated in molten NaOH at 623-777 K for 10-60 min under atmosphere. Cerium-(III) in the ore was easily oxidized 95% or more within 30 min to give an oxidation product composed of solid solutions of CeO 2 -rich and CeO 2 -lean phases and Ce-free rare earth oxide phase. Simultaneously fluoride ion was removed 97% or more. Cerium concentrate was prepared from the oxidation product by leaching with 0.1-3 M HCl solution. The yield of cerium concentrate and the CeO 2 content reached 55-57% and 70-72%, respectively. Mixed rare earth chloride is composed of about 90% rare earth chloride and 10% alkaline earth chloride, and the contents of CeCl 3 , LaCl 3 , NdCl 3 , and PrCl 3 are 11.5, 58.5, 14.4, and 5.4%, respectively. The particle size of resulting cerium concentrate was fairly uniform and about 0.1 μm

  10. Electrochemical investigations of La, Nd and Am in molten chloride salts in view of Am/Ln partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernel, C.; Serp, J.; Ougier, M.; Malmbeck, R.; Glatz, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of La, Nd and Am has been investigated in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic. La shows a reversible single reduction/oxidation step controlled by mass transfer. The electrochemical reduction of Nd and Am proceeds via a two steps process, i.e. the reduction of trivalent species (Nd(III) and Am(III)) leading to Nd(II) and Am(II) species which are reduced at more negative potentials to form metallic deposits. Diffusion coefficients of La, Nd and Am have been calculated and are in reasonable agreement with literature data. Electro-depositions of La and Nd have been carried out onto solid Ni and liquid Cd cathodes. Much higher deposition efficiency is obtained for La compared to Nd on a solid cathode. This is an effect of the multi-valent nature of Nd in the chloride melts. (author)

  11. Electrochemical investigations of La, Nd and Am in molten chloride salts in view of Am/Ln partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernel, C.; Serp, J.; Ougier, M.; Malmbeck, R.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, ITU, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of La, Nd and Am has been investigated in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic. La shows a reversible single reduction/oxidation step controlled by mass transfer. The electrochemical reduction of Nd and Am proceeds via a two steps process, i.e. the reduction of trivalent species (Nd(III) and Am(III)) leading to Nd(II) and Am(II) species which are reduced at more negative potentials to form metallic deposits. Diffusion coefficients of La, Nd and Am have been calculated and are in reasonable agreement with literature data. Electro-depositions of La and Nd have been carried out onto solid Ni and liquid Cd cathodes. Much higher deposition efficiency is obtained for La compared to Nd on a solid cathode. This is an effect of the multi-valent nature of Nd in the chloride melts. (author)

  12. Condensation mechanisms of tetravalent technetium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, F.

    2004-10-01

    In deep storage technetium can exist in degree IV or III. Recent studies on Tc(IV) have shown that Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ , Tc IV (μ-O) 2 Tc IV structure, is a precursor for precipitation of TcO 2 . Few data are available on Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ Subject of this thesis is the mechanism of condensation of Tc(IV) leading to this form. Kinetic studies have shown that the condensation of Tc IV Cl 5 (H 2 O) - in chloride media leads to a dimer. XAS studies resulted in a linear structure Tc IV -O-Tc IV . This compound, formulated as Tc 2 OCl 10 4- , is stable at pH = 0.3, it undergoes cyclization to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH =1.5 and is oxidized to TcO 4 - under α radiation. In 3 M chloride media, TcO 2 lead to formation Tc 2 OCl 10 4- at pH = 0.3 and to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH = 1.5. An electrochemical cell permitting 'in situ' XAS measurement was developed. XANES studies have shown that the reduction of Tc(VII) lead to a Tc(IV)/Tc(III) mixture. (author)

  13. Study on the phosphate reaction characteristics of lanthanide chlorides in molten salt with operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyo; Hwang, Taek-Sung; Cho, Yung-Zun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Park, Hwan-Seo; Park, Geun-Il; Son, Sung-Mo

    2013-01-01

    A minimization of waste salt is one of the most important issues for the optimization of pyroprocessing. The separation of fission products in waste salts and the reuse of purified waste salt are promising strategies for minimizing the waste salt amounts. The phosphate precipitation of lanthanide is currently being considered for eutectic (LiCl–KCl) waste salt purification. In this research, the effects of molten salt temperature (400–550°C) and reaction time (max. 180 min) upon conversion into the phosphate of lanthanides was investigated using 1 and 3 kg of eutectic salt. The conversion efficiency of lanthanides to molten salt-insoluble precipitates and phosphates was increased with an increase in molten salt temperature and operating time until it attained a specific temperature and time. K 3 PO 4 as a precipitant was more favorable than Li 3 PO 4 in terms of reactivity. To obtain over a 99% overall conversion efficiency, about 30 min was required in the case of using K 3 PO 4 at 450°C, but about 120 min in the case of using Li 3 PO 4 at 550°C. The lanthanide precipitates formed by a reaction with phosphate were a mixture of monoclinic structures, usually representing a polyhedron structure, and a tetragonal structure, representing a platelet structure. (author)

  14. Development of electrolytic process in molten salt media for light rare-earth metals production. The metallic cerium electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restivo, T.A.G.

    1994-01-01

    The development of molten salt process and the respective equipment aiming rare-earth metals recovery was described. In the present case, the liquid cerium metal electrodeposition in a molten electrolytes of cerium chloride and an equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides in temperatures near 800 C was studied. Due the high chemical reactivity of the rare-earth metals in the liquid state and their molten halides, an electrolytic cell was constructed with controlled atmosphere, graphite crucibles and anodes and a tungsten cathode. The electrolytic process variables and characteristics were evaluated upon the current efficiency and metallic product purity. Based on this evaluations, were suggested some alterations on the electrolytic reactor design and upon the process parameters. (author). 90 refs, 37 figs, 20 tabs

  15. Rechargeable lithium and sodium anodes in chloroaluminate molten salts containing thionyl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, J.; Osteryoung, R.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Carlin, R.T.

    1995-11-01

    Lithium and sodium deposition-stripping studies were performed in room temperature buffered neutral chloroaluminate melts containing low concentrations of thionyl chloride (SOCl{sub 2}). The SOCl{sub 2} solute promotes high cycling efficiencies of the alkali metals in these electrolytes. Staircase cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry show cycling efficiencies of approximately 90% for both lithium and sodium. High cycling efficiencies are maintained following extended exposure of the melt to the dry box atmosphere and after time delays at open circuit. The performance of the SOCl{sub 2}-promoted systems is substantially improved over previous studies in room temperature melts containing hydrogen chloride as the promoting solute.

  16. Uranium (III)-Plutonium (III) co-precipitation in molten chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2018-02-01

    Co-management of the actinides in an integrated closed fuel cycle by a pyrochemical process is studied at the laboratory scale in France in the CEA-ATALANTE facility. In this context the co-precipitation of U(III) and Pu(III) by wet argon sparging in LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) molten salt at 705 °C is studied. Pu(III) is prepared in situ in the molten salt by carbochlorination of PuO2 and U(III) is then introduced as UCl3 after chlorine purge by argon to avoid any oxidation of uranium up to U(VI) by Cl2. The oxide conversion yield through wet argon sparging is quantitative. However, the preferential oxidation of U(III) in comparison to Pu(III) is responsible for a successive conversion of the two actinides, giving a mixture of UO2 and PuO2 oxides. Surprisingly, the conversion of sole Pu(III) in the same conditions leads to a mixture of PuO2 and PuOCl, characteristic of a partial oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV). This is in contrast with coconversion of U(III)-Pu(III) mixtures but in agreement with the conversion of Ce(III).

  17. Electrochemical separation of cerium and yttrium in molten chlorides on liquid-metallic electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, L.F.; Lebedev, V.A.; Nichkov, I.F.

    1978-01-01

    An estimating calculation of the coefficients of separation of cerium and yttrium in the process of electrolysis in molten salts on liquid electrodes of aluminium, gallium, indium, lead, tin, antimonium and zinc is carried out. The calculation of the separation coefficients was carried out according to the known values of activation coefficients of cerium and yttrium in fusible metals. The electrolysis was carried out at 973 K in the argon air in the cell with an eutectic mixture of NaCl and KCl as an elactrolyte. It is shown that the salten phase is concentrated by yttrium, and the melallic one- by cerium on all the electrodes. The value of the separation coefficient of Ce and Y is considerably high and continuously increases on the fusible metals in the Zn, In, Ga, Al, Pb, Sn, Sb series. The experimental values of the separation coefficients practically coincide with the theoretically calculated ones, testifying to the possibility of the effective separation of elements even in a single-staged possibility of the effective separation of elements even in a single-staged process. An electrolysis of molten salts is not inferior in its selectivity to the universally recognized methods of the fine purification of substances permitting to separate Ce and Y with the Ksub(sep) approximately equal to 10

  18. Study of electrochemical processes for separation of the actinides and lanthanides in molten fluoride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvejskova, R.; Chuchvalcova Bimova, K.; Lisy, F.; Soucek, P.

    2005-01-01

    The technology of the Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) is developed for two possible applications: For one thing as the Molten Salt Transmutation Reactor (MSTR) incinerating plutonium and minor actinides within reprocessing of spent fuel from PWR or FBR and for another thing as electricity generating MSR working under thorium uranium fuel cycle. Electrochemical separation processes are one of promising pyrochemical techniques that should enable the on-line reprocessing of circulating fuel salt in MSR (fuel cycle back-end). The former application represents the Czech P and T concept, in which framework the electrolytic separation can be applied both in the front-end and back-end of the MSTR fuel cycle. Within the front-end electro separation should follow the Fluoride Volatility Method (FVM), which should separate 95 % of uranium from the spent fuel in the form of volatile uranium hexafluoride. The residual uranium and fission products (FP) are supposed to be separated among others also by electrochemical methods. The presented work comprises the results reached within development of electrochemical separation of the actinides and fission products from each other by electrolytic deposition method on solid cathode in molten fluoride media, that represent he carrier salts of MSR technology. The knowledge of electrochemical properties (red-ox potentials, mainly of deposition potentials) is necessary for determination of separation possibilities of individual components by electrolysis. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of chloride-ion-specific electrodes as in situ chemical sensors for monitoring total chloride concentration in aqueous solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1992-10-01

    Two commercially available chloride-ion-specific electrodes (CLISEs), a solid-state type and a membrane type, were evaluated as potential in situ chemical sensors for determining total chloride ion concentration in mixed sodium chloride/potassium chloride/hydrochloric acid solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations. Because the response of the solid-state CLISE was closer than was the response of the membrane-type CLISE to the theoretical response predicted by the Nernst equation, the solid-state CLISE was selected for further evaluation. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of the chloride system and the corresponding CLISE response to concentration changes suggested four methods by which the CLISE could be used either as a direct, in situ sensor or as an indirect sensor through which an analysis could be performed on-line with a sample extracted from the process solution

  20. Study of electrochemical behaviour of tantalum in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajmakov, A.N.; Ezrokhina, A.M.; Sashinina, O.A.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium potentials of metallic tantalum in the melt TaCl 5 +KCl-NaCl are studied. Are average degree of tantalum ion oxidation, which are in equilibrium with metallic tantalum, is determined. Anodic behaviour of tantalum in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodium chlorides with Ta and F ion additions is considered. An average degree of oxidation of Ta ions, which transfer into the melt, depending on current density, is determined. It is established that tantalum is dissolved in the regime of diffusional kinetics. It is shown that tantalum corrodes in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodiUm chlorides, at that, corrosion rate increases with introdUction of Ta and F ions into solution. The corrosion is of electrochemical nature and it proceeds in the regime of diffusional kinetics

  1. Saturated vapor pressure over molten mixtures of GaCl3 and alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Smolenskij, V.V.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    2004-01-01

    Volatilities of GaCl 3 and alkali metal chlorides over diluted (up to 3 mol %) solutions of GaCl 3 in LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl were measured at 1100 K by dynamic and indirect static methods. Chemical composition of saturated vapor over the mixed melts was determined. Partial pressures of the components were calculated. Their values depend essentially on specific alkali metal cation and on concentration of GaCl 3 ; their variation permits altering parameters of GaCl 3 distillation from the salt melt in a wide range [ru

  2. Quantitative analysis of trivalent uranium and lanthanides in a molten chloride by absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshiyuki Fujii; Akihiro Uehara; Hajimu Yamana

    2013-01-01

    As an analytical application for pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts, quantitative analysis of uranium and lanthanides by UV/Vis/NIR absorption spectrophotometry was performed. Electronic absorption spectra of LiCl-KCl eutectic at 773 K including trivalent uranium and eight rare earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd as fission product elements) were measured in the wavenumber region of 4,500-33,000 cm -1 . The composition of the solutes was simulated for a reductive extraction condition in a pyroreprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels, that is, about 2 wt% U and 0.1-2 wt% rare earth elements. Since U(III) possesses strong absorption bands due to f-d transitions, an optical quartz cell with short light path length of 1 mm was adopted in the analysis. The quantitative analysis of trivalent U, Nd, Pr, and Sm was possible with their f-f transition intensities in the NIR region. The analytical results agree with the prepared concentrations within 2σ experimental uncertainties. (author)

  3. Growth and Breakdown of Surface Films and Localized Corrosion of Aluminum in Concentrated Chloride Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jiajing

    1994-01-01

    ...) and mechanical stress for aluminum and titanium alloys in aggressive corrosion environments. This report presents results of some very preliminary experiments on aluminum alloys and titanium during anodic dissolution in chloride media...

  4. Electrochemistry of thulium on inert electrodes and electrochemical formation of a Tm-Al alloy from molten chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Bermejo, M.R.; Barrado, E.; Martinez, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of TmCl 3 solutions was studied in the eutectic LiCl-KCl in the temperature range 673-823 K using inert and reactive electrodes, i.e. W and Al, respectively. On an inert electrode, Tm(III) ions are reduced to metallic thulium through two consecutive steps: Tm(III) + 1e ↔ Tm(II) and Tm(II) + 2e ↔ Tm(0) The electroreduction of Tm(III) to Tm(II) was found to be quasi-reversible. The intrinsic rate constant of charge transfer, k 0 , as well as of the charge transfer coefficient, α, have been calculated by simulation of the cyclic voltammograms and logarithmic analysis of the convoluted curves. Electrocrystallization of thulium plays an important role in the electrodeposition process, being the nucleation mode affected by temperature. The diffusion coefficients of Tm(III) and Tm(II) ions have been found to be equal. The validity of the Arrhenius law was verified by plotting the variation of the logarithm of the diffusion coefficients vs. 1/T. The electrode reactions of Tm(III) solutions at an Al electrode were also investigated. The results showed that for the extraction of thulium from molten chlorides, the use of a reactive electrode made of aluminium leading to Al-Tm alloys seems to be a pertinent route. Potentiometric titrations of Tm(III) solutions with oxide donors, using a ytria stabilized zirconia electrode 'YSZE' as a pO 2- indicator electrode, have shown the formation of thulium oxychloride and thulium oxide and their corresponding solubility products have been determined at 723 K (pk s (TmOCl) = 8.0 ± 0.3 pk s (Tm 2 O 3 ) = 18.8 ± 0.7).

  5. Reinforcement corrosion in alkaline chloride media with reduced oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Fullea, J.; Toro, L.; Martinez, I.; Rebolledo, N.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly considered that the corrosion of steel in concrete is controlled by the oxygen content of the pore solution and there are service life models that relate the corrosion rate to the amount of oxygen. It is also commonly believed that in water saturated conditions the oxygen content in the pores is negligible and that underwater there is no risk of depassivation and the corrosion rate is very low. However, the available data on corrosion rates in immersed conditions do not indicate such performance; on the contrary corrosion develops when sufficient chloride reaches the reinforcement. In the present paper, results are presented for tests performed in alkaline chloride solutions that were purged with nitrogen to reduce the oxygen content. The results indicate that at very low oxygen concentrations, corrosion may develop in the presence of chlorides. The presence or absence of corrosion is influenced by the amount of chloride, the corrosion potential and the steel surface condition. (authors)

  6. Immobilization of fission products arising from pyrometallurgical reprocessing in chloride media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leturcq, G.; Grandjean, A.; Rigaud, D.; Perouty, P.; Charlot, M.

    2005-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing to recover energy-producing elements such as uranium or plutonium can be performed by a pyrochemical process. In such method, the actinides and fission products are extracted by electrodeposition in a molten chloride medium. These processes generate chlorinated alkali salt flows contaminated by fission products, mainly Cs, Ba, Sr and rare earth elements constituting high-level waste. Two possible alternatives are investigated for managing this wasteform; a protocol is described for dechlorinating the fission products to allow vitrification, and mineral phases capable of immobilizing chlorides are listed to allow specification of a dedicated ceramic matrix suitable for containment of these chlorinated waste streams. The results of tests to synthesize chlorosilicate phases are also discussed.

  7. Preview of DATACHOA Ver. 1.0: Database for Chemical and Physical Properties of Molten Chloride Salts Comprising Actinide and Lanthanide Chloride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Yun; Lee, Jin-Hong; Park, Tae-Hong; Bae, Sang-Eun; Cho, Young Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides molten salt database based on a world-wide-web (WWW) server. However, many data useful for the pyroprocess under development in Korea are missing. We have developed various measurement techniques for obtaining the chemical and physical data of the molten salts over the last four years: absorption spectra, emission spectra, molar absorptivity, Gibbs free energy, apparent potential, activity coefficient, exchange current density, solubility, electrical conductivity, density, surface tension, viscosity, melting point, diffusion coefficient, etc, which have been of our current interests. Those property data are essential in the understanding and the operation of the pyrochemical system. Some properties are intercorrelated, and multi-component molten salt systems can be understood by using a multivariate chemometric data analysis. Our final goal is to establish the 'Expert System', which is defined as a system that emulates the decision-making ability of a human expert. Although expert systems have been successful in the artificial intelligence, they are not known to chemists or chemical engineers for many years. The DATACHOA is the first step forward to the 'Expert System', although the amount of our property data is not currently enough to build up the 'Expert System'. DATACHOA is our first attempt to collect extensive basic and fundamental properties of molten salts of interest to pyroprocess chemists and engineers in Korea. DATACHOA ver. 1.0 will be released to the pyroprocess engineers within a few months.

  8. Redox reactions in rare earth chloride molten electrolytes; Okislitel'no-vosstanovitel'nye reaktsii v rasplavlennykh ehlektrolitakh, soderzhashchikh khloridy redkozemel'nykh metallov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokhlov, V A; Novoselova, A V; Nikolaeva, E V; Tkacheva, O Yu; Salyulev, A B [Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii UrO RAN, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    Rare earth (REM, Ln) solutions in chloride melts including MCI+LnCl{sub 3} mixtures, where M - alkali metals, were investigated by potentiometry, voltammetry, conductometry in wide concentration and temperature intervals. Findings present complete and trusty information on the valent state of rare earths, structure and composition of complex ions affecting essentially on properties of electrolytes. It is demonstrated that the coexistence of rare earth ions with different oxidation level formed as a result of possible redox reactions: 2Ln{sup 3+} + Ln {r_reversible}3Ln{sup 2+}, Ln{sup 2+} + Ln{r_reversible}2Ln{sup +} and nM{sup +} + Ln{r_reversible}nM + Ln{sup n+} appears sharply in thermodynamic and transport properties of molten Ln-LnCl{sub 3} and Ln-LnCl{sub 3}-MCl systems.

  9. Catalytic cracking of slack wax with molten mixtures containing aluminum chloride and bromide. [Wax obtained in the process of dewaxing lubricating oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Y; Oizumi, K; Tamai, Y

    1983-09-01

    The catalytic cracking of slack wax with molten mixtures of AlCl/sub 3/ (aluminum chloride) and AlBr/sub 3/ (aluminum bromide) was investigated in an atmospheric semi-batch reactor at low temperatures of 100 to 160/sup 0/C. The cracking rate was proportional to the amount of unreacted wax. The conversion at 135/sup 0/C reached 25 wt % under typical reaction conditions. About 95 wt % of the cracking products consisted of isobutane, 2-methylbutane, and methylpentanes, ca. 50% of these isoparaffins being isobutane. The difference in cracking activity between this catalyst and a solid acid catalyst is discussed based on the product distribution. Hardly any reaction took place without HCl, which shows that the presence of HCl is essential for this cracking. The cracking rate increased sharply with an increase in the amount of the catalyst. The rate did not depend on the composition of the AlCl/sub 3//sup -/ AlBr/sub 3/ catalyst, but the product distribution did depend on it and the content of the gasoline fraction in the products increased with an increase in the concentration of AlBr/sub 3/. The cracking residue was characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the cracking reaction probably occurs heterogeneously at the interface between the liquid wax and the molten catalyst. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  10. Analysis of an HVAC system for the molten cuprous chloride pouring operation in an industrial hydrogen production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandehariun, S.; Talimi, M.; Rosen, M.A.; Naterer, G.F. [University of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by thermochemical water decomposition from various heat sources. The copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle is a potential future cycle that could be linked with nuclear reactors to thermally decompose water into oxygen and hydrogen, through intermediate copper and chlorine compounds. Heat is transferred between various processes. Effective heat recovery from the molten CuCl within the cycle is important for achieving high efficiency. This paper described the fundamentals of a preliminary HVAC system design for the molten CuCl pouring operation in an industrial facility, and the use of air cleaning devices to remove contaminants before discharge to the outdoor air. Heat recovery from molten CuCl involves calculating duct diameters to provide the desired duct air velocity through the system. The fan size is determined by evaluating the static pressure. An adequate supply of make-up air must be provided to replace the air exhausted through the ventilation system. This paper described the economics of the ventilation system as well as ways to protect employee health and minimize the costs associated with exhaust ventilation. 20 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  11. Study of the Effect of Molten Copper Chloride Immersion Test on Alloys with High Nickel Content with and without Surface Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siantar, Edwin

    The demand for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier has increased greatly. The Cu-Cl cycle is a promising thermochemical cycle that is currently being developed to be the large-scale method of hydrogen production. The lifetime of materials for the pipes transporting molten CuCl is an important parameter for an economic design of a commercial thermochemical Cu-Cl hydrogen plant. This research is an examination of candidate materials following an immersion test in molten CuCl at 500 °C for 100 h. Two alloys, Ni based super-alloy (Inconel 625) and super austenitic stainless steel (AL6XN) were selected as the base metal. There were two types of coating applied to improve the corrosion resistance of the base metals during molten CuCl exposure. A metallic of Diamalloy 4006 and two ceramic of yttria stabilized zirconia and alumina coatings were applied to the base metal using thermal spray methods. An immersion apparatus was designed and constructed to perform an immersion test that has a condition similar to those in a hydrogen plant. After the immersion test, the materials were evaluated using an electrochemical method in combination with ex-situ surface analysis. The surface condition including elemental composition, film structure and resistivity of the materials were examined and compared. The majority of the coatings were damaged and fell off. Cracks were found in the original coated specimens indicating the sample geometry may have affected the integrity of the sprayed coating. When the coating cracked, it provided a pathway for the molten CuCl to go under the coating and react with the surface underneath the coating. Copper deposits and iron chloride that were found on the sample surfaces suggest that there were corrosion reactions that involved the metal dissolution and reduction of copper during immersion test. The results also suggest that Inconel 625 performed better than stainless steel AL6XN. Both Diamalloy 4006 and YSZ (ZrO2 18TiO2 10Y2O3) coatings seemed to

  12. Extraction of lanthanide elements and bismuth in molten lithium chloride-liquid bismuth-lithium alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Makoto; Adachi, Motonari; Kai, Yuichi; Koike, Kenichi

    1987-01-01

    The equilibrium distributions of neodymium and samarium between molten LiCl and liquid Bi-Li alloy were measured in a wide range of Li-mole fraction in the alloy phase, X Li . These lanthanide elements were extracted through redox reactions. In high X Li range, X Li > 0.03, the distributions of neodymium and bismuth in the salt phase increased markedly. The anomalous increase is attributed to the formation of the compound comprized of Nd, Li, Bi and oxygen in the salt phase. The reaction processes in samarium and neodymium were very fast and the extraction rates are controlled by the diffusion processes of the solutes and metallic lithium. (author)

  13. Mechanistic understanding and kinetic studies of highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over novel supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Ethene is one of the most important feedstocks for chemical industry, nowadays mainly produced via steam cracking. However, oxidative dehydrogenation becomes a more important process route, allowing to produce ethene selectively and at lower temperatures. Supported alkali chloride catalysts are promising materials. However, the ODH mechanism of this class of catalysts is not well investigated so far. The investigation of the reaction mechanism is thus the aim of this contribution. (orig.)

  14. Actinide-Lanthanide separation by an electrolytic method in molten salt media: feasibility assessment of a renewed liquid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, A.

    2009-12-01

    This study is part of a research program concerning the assessment of pyrochemical methods for the nuclear waste processing. The An-Ln partitioning could be achieved by an electrolytic selective extraction in molten salt media. It has been decided to focus on liquid reactive cathode which better suits to a group actinides co-recycling. The aim of the study is to propose, define and initiate the development of an electrolytic pyro-process dedicated to the quantitative and selective recovery of the actinides. Quantitativeness is related to technology, whereas selectivity is governed by chemistry. The first step consisted in selecting the adequate operating conditions, which enables a sufficient An-Ln separation. The first step consisted, by means of thermodynamic calculi and electrochemical investigations, in selecting a promising combination between molten electrolyte and cathodic material, regarding the process constraints. To improve the recovery yield, it is necessary to develop a disruptive technology: here comes the concept of a dynamic electrodeposition carried out onto liquid metallic drops. The next step consisted in designing and manufacturing a lab-scale device which enables dropping flow studies. Since interfacial phenomena are of primary meaning in such a concept, it has been decided to focus on high temperature liquid-liquid interfacial measurements. (author)

  15. Pourbaix diagrams of actinides in molten chlorides using an indicating electrode for oxide ion activity; Etablissement de diagrammes de Pourbaix des actinides dans les chlorures fondus au moyen d'une electrode indicatrice de l'activite des ions oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SPHA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    Pyrochemical separation methods using high temperature molten salt media could emerge as promising and valuable routes compared with aqueous methods for separation and transmutation strategies for long-lived radionuclides. A good knowledge of the molten salt chemistry is essential for controlling these separations, and elementary data are required for molten halide salts, which can be readily provided by electrochemical methods. Applying the chemical principles of aqueous solutions to the molten salt media, Pourbaix diagrams - called in this case potential-oxo-acidity (pO{sup 2-}) - can be plotted. They offer a rapid and comprehensive view of the thermodynamic properties of selected elements in a solvent of interest. Two methods are available for preparing these diagrams. The first is based on available thermodynamic data on pure element oxide (and oxychloride) compounds and on element chloride activity coefficients in melt (which can be electrochemically determined). In this method, we consider the oxide anion exchange reactions between the pure compounds, water and hydrogen chloride. The second method is a direct and experimental determination of the oxo-acidic properties of the studied element chlorides in melts. Use of an Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia Membrane (YSZM) electrode (oxide anion selective electrode) helps determine the nature of the stable oxide compounds in melts as well as their stabilities. The YSZM is used with a silver/silver chloride reference system, and was developed 25 years ago. Two examples of Potential-acidity diagrams. Employing the first method and the determination of the standard potential of plutonium in LiCl-KCl and NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures, potential-oxo-acidity diagrams were plotted for these melts at various temperatures. It was found that the stability domain for plutonium chloride depends on the melt composition (influence of oxide anion solvation). We also used the Omega acidity function - based on reaction (1) - which is a

  16. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya; Komarov, V E; Salyulev, A B [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1979-02-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10/sup -4/ T-(1.67-10/sup -4/T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10/sup -4/T-(0.71x10/sup -4/T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed.

  17. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Komarov, V.E.; Salyulev, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10 -4 T-(1.67-10 -4 T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10 -4 T-(0.71x10 -4 T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed

  18. Electrical Conductivity of Molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl Systems: An Approach to Structural Interpretations of Rare Earth Chloride Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yasuhiko; Ohkubo, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    Electrical conductivities (κs) of molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl systems were estimated by measuring the impedances of each mixture melt at any temperature and/or frequency. The molar volumes (Vms) were measured by dilatometry and represented as a polynomial empirical equation of temperature and composition. Due to both the properties, the molar conductivities (Λms) were calculated and their temperature and/or composition dependences were discussed from the standpoint of structural features as well. The κs increased curvilinearly with increasing temperature across the whole composition ranges. This trend was also applied to the Λms which was fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The relationship of Λms with melt composition was studied and the Λms were found to decrease with increasing composition of DyCl3. These findings were interpreted based on the results of structural science so far reported, and finally, the relationship between Λms and the structures of pure rare earth chloride melts was discussed.

  19. Determination of activity coefficient of lanthanum chloride in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt as a function of cesium chloride and lanthanum chloride concentrations using electromotive force measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagri, Prashant, E-mail: prashant.bagri@utah.edu; Simpson, Michael F.

    2016-12-15

    The thermodynamic behavior of lanthanides in molten salt systems is of significant scientific interest for the spent fuel reprocessing of Generation IV reactors. In this study, the apparent standard reduction potential (apparent potential) and activity coefficient of LaCl{sub 3} were determined in a molten salt solution of eutectic LiCl-KCl as a function of concentration of LaCl{sub 3}. The effect of adding up to 1.40 mol % CsCl was also investigated. These properties were determined by measuring the open circuit potential of the La—La(III) redox couple in a high temperature molten salt electrochemical cell. Both the apparent potential and activity coefficient exhibited a strong dependence on concentration. A low concentration (0.69 mol %) of CsCl had no significant effect on the measured properties, while a higher concentration (1.40 mol %) of CsCl caused an increase (become more positive) in the apparent potential and activity coefficient at the higher range of LaCl{sub 3} concentrations.

  20. Chemical properties of some elements in a molten lithium chloride, potassium chloride eutectic (1962); Proprietes chimiques de quelques elements dans l'eutectique chlorure de lithium-chlorure de potassium fondu (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-12-15

    The increasing use of molten media especially in chemical preparations and for certain technological applications, has made it more necessary to have a knowledge of the chemical properties of elements in these solvents. Structural studies on molten solutions show the existence of certain species such as ions and complexes known to exist in aqueous solutions. This fact, together with certain experiments on chemical reactions in molten media has led us to establish a comparison between these media and aqueous solutions. We wish to show that the same fundamental phenomena occur in these media as are found in the chemistry of aqueous solutions and that this makes it possible to predict certain reactions. We have taken as examples the chemical properties of vanadium, uranium and sulphur in a LiCl-KCl eutectic melted at 480 deg. C. The first problem is to identify the various degrees of oxidation of these elements existing in the solvent chosen. We have tried to resolve it by comparing the absorption spectra obtained in aqueous solution and in the molten eutectic. We consider the possibilities of this method in a chapter on absorption spectrophotometry in the LiCl-KCl eutectic. During the study of the chemical properties we stress the various methods of displacing the equilibria: complex formation, variation of the oxidation-reduction properties with complex formation. The complexes of the O{sup 2-} ion are considered in particular. The study of the exchange of this particle is facilitated by the use of a classification of some of its complexes which we call the pO{sup 2-} scale by analogy with the pH scale; the value pO{sup 2-} is defined by the relationship: pO{sup 2-} = log O{sup 2-} Similarly, the use of apparent potential diagrams pO{sup 2-} makes it possible to predict and to interpret reactions involving the simultaneous exchange of electrons and O{sup 2-} ions between the various degrees of oxidation of the same element. It is possible, by studying some reactions

  1. Local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides: The role of screening by the chlorine component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    Earlier work has identified the metal ion size R M as a relevant parameter in determining the evolution of the liquid structure of trivalent metal chlorides across the series from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A). Here we highlight the structural role of the chlorines by contrasting the structure of fully equilibrated melts with that of disordered systems obtained by quenching the chlorine component. Main attention is given to how the suppression of screening of the polyvalent ions by the chlorines changes trends in the local liquid structure (first neighbour coordination and partial radial distribution functions) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the partial structure factors). The main microscopic consequences of structural quenching of the chlorine component are a reduction in short range order and an enhancement of intermediate range order in the metal ion component, as well as the suppression of a tendency to molecular-type states at the lower end of the range of R M . (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  2. Experiments comparing the uptake of americium from chloride media using extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Schake, B.S.; Schulte, L.D.; Martinez, B.T.; Salazar, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    Clean-up of actinide effluent waste steams is of increasing importance at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility, TA-55, and removing the actinide elements to very low levels allows less radioactivity to go the Los Alamos National Laboratory Water Treatment Facility, TA-50, thus reducing the number of drums of TRU waste. Americium (Am) is a difficult element to remove from chloride media because the +3 state is difficult to oxidize and chelating resins work better with elements such as plutonium which are more readily oxidized to the +4 and/or +6 state. Currently in hydrochloric acid (HC1) media, the acidic liquid waste is neutralized with potassium hydroxide to precipitate the metal hydroxides, before disposal to TA-50. This process is not very efficient. The removal of Am from chloride media was compared using a series of resins, some commercial and some made in our laboratory, using different percentages by weight of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diiso- butylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO ) along with diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) or tributyl phosphate (TBP) as diluents. Resins were also made with no added diluent. Early comparisons using small-scale contact studies with 0.5 grams of resin in 0.1M-12M HC1, and subsequent small-scale flow experiments show a trend in which Am uptake is proportional to the amount of CMPO on the resins and the diluent plays a minor role in the uptake of Am from these solutions. Redox chemistry effects were also investigated. From these studies, it is possible to determine the best conditions for the removal of Am from HC1 media thus reducing the gross alpha content of the waste stream by a factor of 10-100 which reduces the number of barrels of waste produced at the Water Treatment Facility

  3. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohtash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic acid to test the suitability of austenitic stainless steels 654SMO, 265SMO, 2205, 317L and 316L. The performance of above stainless steels was evaluated through long term immersion tests and Electrochemical polarization measurements in peracetic acid (PAA bleach media at pH value 4 maintaining concentration 0.2 % as active oxygen along with three chloride levels 0, 500 and 1000 ppm in pulp-free laboratory. To study the effect of corrosion inhibitors with extending limit of chloride in liquors, measurements were also made with two types of chelants- EDTA & MgSO4. The results showed that corrosivity of PAA reduced by addition of chelant while increased with concentration of Cl¯. The results also exhibited that EDTA is better inhibitor than MgSO4.

  4. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  5. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  6. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for futur nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarisation phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  7. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for future nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarization phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  8. Pitting morphologies of zirconium base alloys in aqueous and non aqueous chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, G.C.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    Pitting morphology of zirconium and Zr-Cr alloys in aqueous chloride and nonaqueous methanol + 0.4 per cent HCl solution was investigated and observed to follow different modes in these two environments. While in aqueous chloride solution pitting was transgranular and randomly oriented, in methanol-chloride solution pits were observed to initiate and propagate along the grain boundaries. In aqueous chloride solution very irregular and sponge like zirconium metal was formed inside the pit while in methanol-chloride solution the pits were crystallographic in nature. Optical microscopy has revealed that pits preferentially initiate and propagate along scratch line in aqueous chloride solution, but such was not the case in nonaqueous methanol-chloride solution. The nature and the mechanism operating in the catastropic failure of these materials are investigated. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs

  9. Contribution to the study of the redox reactions and the speciation of technetium in chloride and carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Said, K.

    1999-11-01

    Technetium is important as a long half-life multi-valent radioelement within the framework of the nuclear waste storage especially in underground geological sites. So, the safety studies require the knowledge of the redox and of the chemical properties of this element in order to model its geochemical behaviour in the environment. Our studies deal with the redox behaviour and the speciation of technetium in chloride and carbonate media. Similar natural systems possess redox potentials likely to reduce Tc(VII) into Tc(V), Tc(IV) and Tc(III). The question of the standard redox potential of the Tc(VII)Tc(IV) couple is settled in non complexing media where Tc(IV) exists as TcO 2 (s) but is still a matter of debate in complexing media. The formal potential of the Tc(VII)/Tc(IV couple has been determined by an indirect method in 1.0 M HCl media where Tc(IV) exists as chloride complexes. The species formed by dissolving K 2 TcCl 6 (s) in chloride media have been characterised by complementary techniques of speciation (UV-visible and Raman spectrometry, X-rays absorption spectroscopy and polarography). Two chemical formulae have been proposed for the chloride species of Tc(IV) in 1.0 M HCl media as hydrolyzed TcCl 6 2- : TcCl 5 (H 2 O) - or TcCl 4 (H 2 O) 2 . The chemical or electrochemical reduction of pertechnetate in carbonate media leads to amorphous oxides or carbonate complexes of Tc(IV) and/or of Tc(III). In carbonate media, the stability of the species under γ irradiation has been estimated by UV/VIS spectrophotometry: Tc(VII) is stable but reduced into Tc(IV) in the presence of formate when the carbonate complex of Tc(IV) is oxidised into Tc(VII). So the most mobile valency Tc(VII) seems to be the stable one in irradiated carbonate media. (author)

  10. Study into complexing of anhydrous uranyl chloride with organic o-bases in nonaqueous media. Interaction with aliphatic sulfoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobets, L V; Buchikhin, E P; Klyshevich, R P; Belyachis, G F

    1982-01-01

    The methods of spectrophotometry, conductometry and calorimetry have been used to investigate interaction of uranyl chloride with dimethyl, diamil, dioctyl sulfoxides in the nonaqueous acetone media. Existence of complexes with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 composition for dimethyl sulfoxide and with 1:1, 1:2 composition for diamil-, dioctyl sulfoxides is revealed. The constants of formation and dissociation of these complexes are calculated; the enthalpies of their formation in acetone are determined.

  11. Study into complexing of anhydrous uranyl chloride with organic o-bases in nonaqueous media. Interaction with aliphatic sulfoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Buchikhin, E.P.; Klyshevich, R.P.; Belyachis, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    The methods of spectrophotometry, conductometry and calorimetry have been used to investigate interaction of uranyl chloride with dimethyl, diamil, dioctyl sulfoxides in the nonaqueous acetone media. Existence of complexes with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 composition for dimethyl sulfoxide and with 1:1, 1:2 composition for diamil-, dioctyl sulfoxides is revealed. The constants of formation and dissociation of these complexes are calculated; the enthalpies of their formation in acetone are determined

  12. Molten salt extractive distillation process for zirconium-hafnium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for zirconium-hafnium separation. It utilizes an extractive distillation column with a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides introduced into a distillation column having a top and bottom with hafnium enriched overheads taken from the top of the column and a molten salt solvent circulated through the column to provide a liquid phase, and with molten salt solvent containing zirconium chloride being taken from the bottom of the distillation column. The improvements comprising: utilizing a molten salt solvent consisting principally of lithium chloride and at least one of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides; stripping of the zirconium chloride taken from the bottom of the distillation column by electrochemically reducing zirconium from the molten salt solvent; and utilizing a pressurized reflux condenser on the top of the column to add the hafnium chloride enriched overheads to the molten salt solvent previously stripped of zirconium chloride

  13. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride

  14. Electrochemical oxidation of synthetic tannery wastewater in chloride-free aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carla Regina; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia; Olivi, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical treatment of a synthetic tannery wastewater, prepared with several compounds used by finishing tanneries, was studied in chloride-free media. Boron-doped diamond (Si/BDD), antimony-doped tin dioxide (Ti/SnO 2 -Sb), and iridium-antimony-doped tin dioxide (Ti/SnO 2 -Sb-Ir) were evaluated as anode. The influence of pH and current density on the treatment was assessed by means of the parameters used to measure the level of organic contaminants in the wastewater; i.e., total phenols, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), and absorbance. Results showed that faster decrease in these parameters occurred when the Si/BDD anode was used. Good results were obtained with the Ti/SnO 2 -Sb anode, but its complete deactivation was reached after 4 h of electrolysis at 25 mA cm -2 , indicating that the service life of this electrode is short. The Ti/SnO 2 -Sb-Ir anode is chemically and electrochemically more stable than the Ti/SnO 2 -Sb anode, but it is not suitable for the electrochemical treatment under the studied conditions. No significant changes were observed for electrolyses performed at different pH conditions with Si/BDD, and this electrode led to almost complete mineralization after 4 h of electrolysis at 100 mA cm -2 . The increase in current density resulted in faster wastewater oxidation, with lower current efficiency and higher energy consumption. Si/BBD proved to be the best electrodic material for the direct electrooxidation of tannery wastewaters.

  15. Mechanism of growth, composition and structure of oxide films formed on ferrous alloys in molten salt electrolytes - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzvetkoff, Tz.; Kolchakov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The growth kinetics, chemical composition and structure of scales formed during corrosion of Fe and its alloys in molten salts are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the effect of the composition of the molten salt mixture and the gas atmosphere on the stability and protective ability of corrosion layers. First, the thermodynamical background of the corrosion and oxidation of Fe-base engineering materials in molten salt media is briefly commented. A concise review of the growth kinetics of passivating oxide films is also presented. These two introductory chapters serve as a guide for the extensive survey of the growth mechanism, nature and properties of oxide and related scales on ferrous alloys in a range of molten electrolytes - chlorides, nitrates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides and mixtures thereof in gas atmospheres containing O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , SO 3 and HCl

  16. Application of the rotating cylinder electrode in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic containing uranium(III)- and magnesium(II)-chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappleye, Devin, E-mail: rappleye1@llnl.gov; Simpson, Michael F.

    2017-04-15

    The application of the rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) to molten LiCl-KCl eutectic mixtures for electroanalytical measurements is presented. This enabled the measurement of the limiting current which was observed to follow a linear trend with the rotational rate raised to 0.64–0.65 power on average, which closely agrees with existing RCE mass-transfer correlations. This is the first publication of electroanalytical RCE measurements in LiCl-KCl eutectic based molten salt mixtures, to our knowledge. These measurements were made in mixtures of molten LiCl-KCl eutectic containing UCl{sub 3} and MgCl{sub 2}. Kinetic parameters were calculated for Mg{sup 2+} in LiCl-KCl eutectic. The exchange current density (i{sub o}) of Mg{sup 2+} deposition varied with mole fraction (x) according to i{sub o}(A cm{sup −2}) = 1.64x{sup 0.689}. The parameters from RCE measurements were also applied in an electrochemical co-deposition model entitled DREP to detect and predict the deposition rate of U and Mg. DREP succeeded in detecting the co-deposition of U and Mg, even when Mg constituted less than 0.5 wt% of the deposit.

  17. Determination of the Optimum Conditions for Leaching of Zinc Cathode Melting Furnace Slag in Ammonium Chloride Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnajady, Bahram; Babaeidehkordi, Amin; Moghaddam, Javad

    2014-04-01

    This research is part of a continuing effort to leach zinc from zinc cathode melting furnace slags (ZCMFSs) to produce zinc oxide. The slag with an assay of 68.05 pct Zn was used in ammonium chloride leaching for zinc extraction. In this paper, the effects of influential factors on extraction efficiency of Zn from a ZCMFS were investigated. The Taguchi's method based on orthogonal array (OA) design has been used to arrange the experimental runs in order to maximize zinc extraction from a slag. The softwares named Excel and Design-Expert 7 have been used to design experiments and subsequent analysis. OA L 25 (55) consisting of five parameters, each with five levels, was employed to evaluate the effects of reaction time ( t = 10, 30, 50, 70, 90 minutes), reaction temperature [ T = 313, 323, 333, 343, 353 (40, 50, 60, 70, 80) K (°C)], pulp density ( S/ L = 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 g/L), stirring speed ( R = 300, 400, 500, 600, 700 rpm), and ammonium chloride concentration ( C = 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 pctwt), on zinc extraction percent. Statistical analysis, ANOVA, was also employed to determine the relationship between experimental conditions and yield levels. The results showed that the significant parameters affecting leaching of slag were ammonium chloride concentration and pulp density, and increasing pulp density reduced leaching efficiency of zinc. However, increasing ammonium chloride concentration promoted the extraction of zinc. The optimum conditions for this study were found to be t 4: 70 minutes, T 5: 353 K (80 °C), ( S/ L)2: 40 g/L, R 3: 500 rpm, and C 4: 25 pctwt. Under these conditions, the dissolution percentage of Zn in ammonium chloride media was 94.61 pct.

  18. Molten salt scrubbing of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.D.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous process for removing impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both from vaporous zirconium or hafnium chloride or both. It comprises: introducing impure zirconium or hafnium chloride vapor or both into a middle portion of an absorbing column containing a molten salt phase, the molten salt phase absorbing the impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both to produce chloride vapor stripped of zirconium or hafnium chloride; introducing sodium or potassium chloride or both into a top portion of the column; controlling the top portion of the column to between 300--375 degrees C.; heating a bottom portion of the column to 450--550 degrees C. To vaporize zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride from the molten salt; withdrawing molten salt substantially free of zirconium and hafnium chloride from the bottom portion of the column; and withdrawing zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride vapor substantially free of impurities of iron and aluminum chloride from the top of the column

  19. The evaluation of organic inhibitors for the protection of grade 5 titanium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion failures of titanium and titanium alloys are inevitably associated with the non-observance of environmental limits prescribed in corrosion handbooks, such as its use in solutions chloride. Titanium alloys are often used in the thermal transfer technology especially in the heat exchangers cooled with sea cooled water. However, it is not indicated its use in strong oxidant and any concentrated chloride environments. For the evaluation of grade 5 titanium alloy samples behaviour in solutions containing chloride ions in presence, respectively, absence of some organic inhibitors were performed by potentiodynamic polarization method. On the basis of our experimental results we consider that the most adequate inhibitor for the system Ti- 5 alloys/0 .083 M NaCl solution is the resorcinol. (authors)

  20. Thermogravimetric method of estimation of uranyl cation state in melts of alkali metal chlorides and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobej, M.P.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study the chloridizing of uranium oxides in molten media. The study of the uranium oxide chloridizing served as a basis for evaluating comparatively, using the DTA method, the uranyl-cation state in a melt. Using the alkali metals as example, it was shown that the decomposition of the frozen uranium oxychlorides proceeds with the formation of intermediate chlorouranates. The final product of the thermolysis are uranates Me 2 U 2 O 7 (Me-Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs). The time and the conditions of the change of uranium oxides to the oxyanion [UO 2 Cl 4 ] 2- were determined as a function of the chloridizing agent. The method can be employed for evaluating uranyl-ions in molten media where they are used as electrolytes in the extraction of uranium dioxide

  1. Plutonium scrap waste processing based on aqueous nitrate and chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of plutonium scrap aqueous waste processing technology at Rocky Flats is given. Nitric acid unit operations include dissolution and leaching, anion exchange purification and precipitation. Chloride waste processing consists of cation exchange and carbonate precipitation. Ferrite and carrier precipitation waste treatment processes are also described. 3 figs

  2. Electroanalytical measurements of binary-analyte mixtures in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic: Uranium(III)- and Magnesium(II)-Chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappleye, Devin, E-mail: rappleye1@llnl.gov; Newton, Matthew L.; Zhang, Chao; Simpson, Michael F.

    2017-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of MgCl{sub 2} in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was investigated to evaluate its suitability as a surrogate for PuCl{sub 3} in studies related to the eletrorefining of used nuclear fuel. The reduction of Mg{sup 2+} was found to be electrochemically reversible up to 300 mV s{sup −1} at 773 K. The diffusion coefficient for Mg{sup 2+} was calculated to be 1.74 and 2.17 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} with and without U{sup 3+} present, respectively, at 773 K using cyclic voltammetry (CV). Upon comparison to literature data, the diffusion coefficient of Mg{sup 2+} differs by only 8.8% (with U{sup 3+} present) from that of Pu{sup 3+} and the difference in peak potentials was only 79 mV. Binary-analyte mixtures of UCl{sub 3} and MgCl{sub 2} in eutectic LiCl-KCl were further investigated using CV, normal pulse voltammetry (NPV), chronoamperometry (CA) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements for the purpose of comparing each technique's accuracy in measuring U{sup 3+} and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations. Of all the techniques tested, NPV resulted in the lowest error which was, on average, 11.4% and 9.81% for U{sup 3+} and Mg{sup 2+}, respectively.

  3. Extraction and separation of zinc and cadmium chlorides by TOPO from mixed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Mousa, S.; Altakrory, A.; Abdel Raouf, M.W.; Alian, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of water-miscible alcohols and acetone on the extraction and separation of Cd and Zn chlorides by TOPO was systematically investigated. The maximum extraction of Zn chloride with 0.1 M TOPO decreases in the order: acetone> methanol> ethanol> 2-propanol> 2-butanol. For alcohols, the sequence of decreasing extractability is thus parallel to the order of their dielectric constants. This can be explained by the increase of HCl extraction by TOPO in the same direction. The presence of additives in the polar phase prevents the formation of a bulky white precipitate encountered during extraction of Zn Cl 2 from pure aqueous solutions. A decrease of Cd chloride extraction was generally noticed in presence of additives; this is more noticeable for the longer chain alcohols. The highest separation factor (E) for Zn Cl 2 and Cd Cl 2 in 0.4 M HCl is obtained from 30% methanol (13.8 compared to about 3.8 in absence of methanol) and from 10-20% acetone where it reaches 30

  4. Determination of the extent of reduction of dense UO{sub 2} cathodes from direct electrochemical reduction studies in molten chloride medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sri Maha Vishnu, D.; Sanil, N. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Murugesan, N. [Materials Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Shakila, L. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Ramesh, C. [Materials Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mohandas, K.S., E-mail: ksmd@igcar.gov.in [Fuel Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Nagarajan, K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Electro-reduction of solid UO{sub 2} to U has been studied with molten CaCl{sub 2} or LiCl as the electrolyte medium. Electro-reduction of thick (>3 mm), powder compacted and sintered pellets of UO{sub 2} showed incomplete reduction resulting in a mixture of uranium metal and UO{sub 2}. The extent of reduction of UO{sub 2} to U was determined by employing a novel method called 'metal estimation by hydrogen sensor (MEHS)', in which the hydrogen evolved during the reaction of U metal in the reduced product with con. HBr was measured using an in-house developed polymer electrolyte based amperometric hydrogen sensor. The results of our investigations on incompletely reduced UO{sub 2} pellets in both CaCl{sub 2} and LiCl melts showed that the extent of reduction of different regions of the oxide pellet was different. It varied from 88.3% on the surface of the pellet as against 3.7% towards the centre bulk during electro-reduction in CaCl{sub 2} (at 1173 K). The metallisation was found restricted to the surface of the pellets reduced in LiCl melt (at 923 K). Electro-reduction of small chunks of UO{sub 2} pellet in CaCl{sub 2} melt resulted in products with lower extent of reduction. Based on the measurements, a probable mechanism on the propagation of reduction through the solid UO{sub 2} matrix during the electrochemical reduction process has been proposed.

  5. On barium oxide solubility in barium-containing chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl 2 -NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl 2 -MCl systems.

  6. Chemical and electrochemical properties in the molten lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic; Proprietes chimiques et electrochimiques dans l'eutectique chlorure de lithium-chlorure de potassium fondu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delarue, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    We have studied the behaviour of several chemical species in the molten LiCI-KCI eutectic. The solubility of certain oxides and sulphides has made it possible for us to show the existence of O{sup 2-} and S{sup 2-} ions. We have been able to show the existence of a certain number of chemical reactions: oxido-reduction precipitation, complex formation; we have studied, amongst others, the oxidation of O{sup 2-} and of S{sup 2-}. (author) [French] Nous avons examine le comportement de quelques especes chimiques dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl fondu. La solubilite de certains oxydes et sulfures nous a permis de montrer l'existence des particules O{sup 2-} et S{sup 2-}. Nous avons pu mettre en evidence un certain nombre de reactions chimiques: oxydoreduction, precipitation, formation de complexes; nous avons etudie, entre autres, l'oxydation de O{sup 2-} et de S{sup 2-}. La prevision de ces reactions peut etre faite d'une facon semi-quantitive a l'aide de diagrammes potentiel pO{sup 2-} et potentiel pS{sup 2-}. Les raisonnements que l'on fait dans les milieux aqueux sont applicables dans le cas des sels fondus. (auteur)

  7. Modeling of the ionic transfers in saturated porous media: application to the penetration of chlorides through cementing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitab, Anwar

    2005-09-01

    In this work, the problem of ionic species transport through concrete porous media has been documented. Chloride ions penetration in cementitious materials is one of the processes widely responsible for the degradation of concrete structures. Therefore there exists an immense need for its correct understanding and quantification. Different research groups worldwide have proposed different chloride ingress models. Here, a one-dimensional model based on a multi-species approach of the ionic transport is presented. It is the new version of a previous model MsDiff developed a few years ago in our group that describes the diffusion of ionic species with the Nernst-Planck equation instead of Fick's laws. This newer version is named, the package version of MsDiff after it requires a package of five input data at any given age of concrete. With a multi-species approach, it is possible to take into account the interactions, which exist among different ionic species in pore solution of concrete. The numerical scheme of the model is based on finite difference method with Crank-Nickolson and Law-Wendroff techniques. In order to run MsDiff, we do need an input data. Several experiments were performed accordingly to provide experimental feedback to MsDiff. Standard immersion tests were conducted to validate the outcomes of MsDiff. Special attention is given to the diffusion coefficients of the ions and the interactions between the ionic species and the solid phase. In addition to MsDiff, some other existing models were also tried for the sake of comparison with the experimental chloride profiles. Certain experimentation was conducted to watch the effect of exposure period, concrete age at exposure and concentration in the environmental solution. In the end, the simulations were performed with MsDiff in order to calculate the chloride-induced corrosion initiation time using the experimental data already achieved while making use of different criteria adopted by different research

  8. The dissolution of chalcopyrite in chloride media; Lixiviacion de la calcopirita en medios clorurados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, T.; Velasquez, L.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this investigation is to determinate the effects of parameters and additives on the kinetics of dissolution of chalcopyrite on moderated conditions by means of dissolutions test with chalcopyrite concentrate and pure chalcopyrite in shake flasks and instrumented stirred reactors. A study of the dissolution of chalcopyrite in chloride solutions has demonstrated that the rate of dissolution of chalcopyrite is strongly dependent on the potential of the solution within a range of 540 to 630 mV (versus SHE). Leaching at pH around 2.5 results in increased rates of copper dissolution suggesting the possibility to keep the solution potential within the range. Both pyrite and silver ions enhance the dissolution of chalcopyrite and this effect increases when both species are present. The MnO{sub 2} has a negative effect on the dissolution increasing the solution potential to values where the rate decreases considerably. (Author)

  9. Effect of the chloride ions on the hydrolysis of praseodymium in a 2M ion force media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A.

    2004-01-01

    The constants of the product of solubility and the first of hydrolysis were determined of the Praseodymium in media 2M of NaClO 4 and 2M of NaCl, to 303 K and under conditions free of CO 2 . The diagram of solubility was obtained (pPr (ac) - pC H ), by means of a radiochemical method and with it was established the pC H that limit the saturation and non saturation areas; that diagram allowed, also, to calculate the constant of the product of solubility. Also, it was adjusted with the polynomial of solubility equation, that it allowed to determine and to check the values of the constants of the product of solubility and the first of hydrolysis. Independently, it was determined the first constant of hydrolysis of the element, by means of potentiometric titrations whose data were treated with the computer program named SUPERQUAD and with the adjustment of the equation of the average number of bonds. It was also calculates the log constant β Pr,Cl of the specie PrCI 2+ starting from the hydrolysis constants obtained in the perchlorate and chloride media. (Author)

  10. Corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetal in neutral chloride and acid sulphate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzini, B.; Serra, M.; Fanigliulo, A.; Bogani, F. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione; Gaudenzi, G.P. de [Harditalia s.r.l. (OMCD Group), Genova (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetals with Ni and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions is carried out. The aggressive environments are neutral and acidic aerated aqueous solutions of NaCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This study is based on electrochemical (linear sweep voltammery), compositional (surface EDX analyses, AAS analyses of attack solutions), structural (XRD) and morphological (SEM) investigations. Electrochemical figures of merit were computed from linear sweep voltammograms in order to rank the corrosion behaviour close to free-immersion conditions in the studied environments and with presence of oxidising agents. EDX and XRD analyses allow to accurately characterise the penetration depth of the attack as well as the preferential dissolution of the constituents. Binders containing Ni show a significantly improved corrosion resistance in the studied systems. The amount of Ni in the binder is the single most important factor affecting corrosion performance. Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions to hardmetals with lower-Ni binders cannot balance the effect of Ni, but give an improved resistance in neutral chloride-containing solutions. (orig.)

  11. Leaching of copper concentrates with high arsenic content in chlorine-chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, O.; Fuentes, G.; Quiroz, R.; Vinals, J.

    2003-01-01

    This work reports the results of copper concentrates leaching which have high arsenic concepts (up to 2.5%). The treatments were carried out using chlorine that forms from sodium hypochlorite and sulphuric acid. The aim of this work is to obtain a solution having high copper content 4 to 6 g/l and 5 to 7 g/l free acid in order to submit it directly to a solvent extraction stage. In addition, this solution should have minimum content of arsenic and chloride ions. To carry out this investigation, an acrylic reactor was constructed where the leaching tests were made at constant temperature in a thermostatic bath under atmospheric pressure. The concentrate samples were obtained from mineral processing plants from Antofagasta, Chile. Typical variables were studied, such as leaching agent concentration, leaching time, pulp density and temperature among others. Some of the residues were analyzed by XRD and EPS. On the other hand, the solutions were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The results indicate solutions having the contents stated above can be obtained. (Author) 19 refs

  12. Development of electrolytic process in molten salt media for light rare-earth metals production. The metallic cerium electrodeposition; Desenvolvimento de processo de eletrolise em meio de sais fundidos para a producao de metais de terras-raras leves. A obtencao do cerio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, T A.G.

    1994-12-31

    The development of molten salt process and the respective equipment aiming rare-earth metals recovery was described. In the present case, the liquid cerium metal electrodeposition in a molten electrolytes of cerium chloride and an equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides in temperatures near 800{sup C} was studied. Due the high chemical reactivity of the rare-earth metals in the liquid state and their molten halides, an electrolytic cell was constructed with controlled atmosphere, graphite crucibles and anodes and a tungsten cathode. The electrolytic process variables and characteristics were evaluated upon the current efficiency and metallic product purity. Based on this evaluations, were suggested some alterations on the electrolytic reactor design and upon the process parameters. (author). 90 refs, 37 figs, 20 tabs.

  13. Corrosion inhibition of Armco iron by 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in sodium chloride 3% media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amar, H.; Tounsi, A.; Makayssi, A.; Derja, A.; Benzakour, J.; Outzourhit, A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI) on the corrosion of Armco iron in NaCl media has been investigated in relation to the concentration of the inhibitor by various corrosion monitoring techniques. Surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results obtained revealed that 2MBI is a good anodic inhibitor. The addition of increasing concentrations of 2MBI moves the corrosion potential towards positive values and reduces the corrosion rate. EIS results show that the changes in the impedance parameters (R t and C dl ) with concentrations of 2MBI is indicative of the adsorption of these molecules leading to the formation of a protective layer on iron surface. The adsorption of this compound is also found to obey Langmuir's adsorption isotherm in NaCl

  14. Thermophysical properties of sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions and their effects on fluid flow in unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of NaNO 3 solutions on both salt concentration and temperature, which were determined by fitting from published measured data. Because the previous studies of thermophysical behavior of sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions can provide a basis for those of NaNO 3 solutions, we also present a comparison of thermophysical properties of both salt solutions. We have implemented the functional thermophysical properties of NaNO 3 solutions into a new TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG-NaNO 3 , which is modified from a previous TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG for NaCl. Using the simulation tool, we have investigated effects of the thermophysical properties on fluid flow in unsaturated media. The effect of density and viscosity of saline solutions has been long recognized. Here we focus our attention on the effect of vapor pressure lowering due to salinity. We present simulations of a one-dimensional problem to study this salinity-driven fluid flow. A number of simulations were performed using different values of thermal conductivity, permeability, and temperature, to illustrate conditions and parameters controlling these processes. Results indicate that heat conduction plays a very important role in this salinity-driven vapor diffusion by maintaining a nearly constant temperature. The smaller the permeability, the more water is transferred into the saline environment. Effects of permeability on water flow are also complicated by effects of capillary pressure and tortuosity. The

  15. A study on conductivity, density, and viscosity of molten salt systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kangjo

    1976-01-01

    A relation between the equivalent conductivity and density for molten salts is deduced with the aid of significant structures theory, and the solid state density at melting point is evaluated approximately for some rare-earth metal chlorides and the other chlorides. Furthermore, the relation among the equivalent conductivity, density, and viscosity for some molten salts is discussed. (auth.)

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-55 - Sulfur (molten).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-55 Sulfur (molten). (a.... Heat transfer media shall be steam, and alternate media will require specific approval of the... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur (molten). 151.50-55 Section 151.50-55 Shipping...

  17. Molten salt processes in special materials preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, N.; Suri, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    As a class, molten salts are the largest collection of non aqueous inorganic solvents. On account of their stability at high temperature and compatibility to a number of process requirements, molten salts are considered indispensable to realize many of the numerous benefits of high temperature technology. They play a crucial role and form the basis for numerous elegant processes for the preparation of metals and materials. Molten salt are considered versatile heat transfer media and have led to the evolution of many interesting reactor concepts in fission and possibly in fusion. They also have been the basis of thinking for few novel processes for power generation. While focusing principally on the actual utilization of molten salts for a variety of materials preparation efforts in BARC, this lecture also covers a few of the other areas of technological applications together with the scientific basis for considering the molten salts in such situations. (author)

  18. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R and D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium

  19. Cation exchange process for molten salt extraction residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    A new method, utilizing a cation exchange technique, has been developed for processing molten salt extraction (MSE) chloride salt residues. The developed ion exchange procedure has been used to separate americium and plutonium from gross quantities of magnesium, potassium, and sodium chloride that are present in the residues. The recovered plutonium and americium contained only 20 percent of the original amounts of magnesium, potassium, and sodium and were completely free of any detectable amounts of chloride impurity. (U.S.)

  20. Selective extraction of palladium with caffeine from acidic chloride media; Sansei enkabutsu yoeki karano kafuein ni yoru parajiumu no sentakuteki chushutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaikake, K.; Baba, Y. [Miyazaki University, Miyazaki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-06-10

    In order to examine the possibility of caffeine as an extractant, the extraction of metal ions from acidic chloride media was studied at 298 K using the mixture solvent of chloroform and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Caffeine has exhibited a high selectivity for palladium (2) over base metals such as copper (2), nickel (2), and iron (3), and over precious metal such as platinum (4). The stoichiometric relation in the extraction of palladium (2) with caffeine was elucidated by examining the effects of chloride ion, hydrogen ion, and caffeine concentrations on its extractability. In addition, palladium (2) was found to be extracted selectively with caffeine from the mixture containing a 25-fold amount of platinum (4) or copper (2). The stripping of palladium (2) was performed to an extent of 80% by a single batchwise treatment with an aqueous mixture solution of hydrochloric acid and thiourea. (author)

  1. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    MSBR Study Group formed in October 1974 has studied molten salt breeder reactor and its various aspects. Usage of a molten salt fuel, extremely interesting as reactor chemistry, is a great feature to MSBR; there is no need for separate fuel making, reprocessing, waste storage facilities. The group studied the following, and these results are presented: molten salt technology, molten salt fuel chemistry and reprocessing, reactor characteristics, economy, reactor structural materials, etc. (Mori, K.)

  2. Boric Ester-Type Molten Salt via Dehydrocoupling Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyoshi Matsumi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel boric ester-type molten salt was prepared using 1-(2-hydroxyethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride as a key starting material. After an ion exchange reaction of 1-(2-hydroxyethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride with lithium (bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl imide (LiNTf2, the resulting 1-(2-hydroxyethyl-3-methylimidazolium NTf2 was reacted with 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (9-BBN to give the desired boric ester-type molten salt in a moderate yield. The structure of the boric ester-type molten salt was supported by 1H-, 13C-, 11B- and 19F-NMR spectra. In the presence of two different kinds of lithium salts, the matrices showed an ionic conductivity in the range of 1.1 × 10−4–1.6 × 10−5 S cm−1 at 51 °C. This was higher than other organoboron molten salts ever reported.

  3. A study on the initiation of pitting corrosion in carbon steel in chloride-containing media using scanning electrochemical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Bin; Hu Ronggang; Ye Chenqing; Li Yan; Lin Changjian

    2010-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical probes of corrosion potential and chloride ions were developed for the in situ monitoring of localized corrosion processes of reinforcing steel in NaCl-containing solution. The results indicated that the chloride ions (Cl - ) preferentially adsorbed and accumulated at the imperfect/defective sites, resulting in initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion on the reinforcing steel surface. An electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA) was used to examine the corrosion morphology and elemental distribution at the corroded location to investigate the origins of the preferential Cl - adsorption and pitting corrosion. By combining the in situ and ex situ images, we concluded that manganese sulfide inclusions in reinforcing steel are the most susceptible defects to pitting corrosion in chloride-containing solution.

  4. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product

  5. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  6. Investigation of molten salt fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Konomura, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    On survey research for practicability strategy of fast reactor (FR) (phase 1), to extract future practicability image candidates of FR from wide options, in addition to their survey and investigation objects of not only solid fuel reactors of conventional research object but also molten salt reactor as a flowing fuel reactor, investigation on concept of molten salt FR plant was carried out. As a part of the first step of the survey research for practicability strategy, a basic concept on plant centered at nuclear reactor facility using chloride molten salt reactor capable of carrying out U-Pu cycle was examined, to perform a base construction to evaluate economical potential for a practical FBR. As a result, a result could be obtained that because of inferior fuel inventory and heat transmission to those in Na cooling reactor in present knowledge, mass of reactor vessel and intermediate heat exchanger were to widely increased to expect reduction of power generation unit price even on considering cheapness of its fuel cycle cost. Therefore, at present step further investigation on concept design of the chloride molten salt reactor plant system is too early in time, and it is at a condition where basic and elementary researches aiming at upgrading of economical efficiency such as wide reduction of fuel inventory, a measure expectable for remarkable rationalization effect of reprocessing system integrating a reactor to a processing facility, and so on. (G.K.)

  7. Application of molten salts in pyrochemical processing of reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Various mixes of chloride and fluoride salts are used as the media for conducting pyrochemical processes in the production and purification of reactive metals. These processes generate a significant amount of contaminated waste that has to be treated for recycling or disposal. Molten calcium chloride based salt systems have been used in this work to electrolytically regenerate calcium metal from calcium oxide for the in situ reduction of reactive metal oxides. The recovery of calcium is characterized by the process efficiency to overcome back reactions in the electrowinning cell. A thermodynamic analysis, based on fundamental rate theory, has been performed to understand the process parameters controlling the metal deposition, rate, behavior of the ceramic anode-sheath and influence of the back-reactions. It has been observed that the deposition of calcium is dependent on the ionic diffusion through the sheath. It has also been evidenced that the recovered calcium is completely lost through the back-reactions in the absence of a sheath. A practical scenario has also been presented where the electrowon metal can be used in situ as a reductant to reduce another reactive metal oxide

  8. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed

  9. Electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurry, L.E.; Moy, G.M.M.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides is of technological importance as a method of purification of plutonium. Previous authors have reported that plutonium can be purified by electrorefining impure plutonium in various molten haldies. Work to eluciate the mechanism of the plutonium reduction in molten halides has been limited to a chronopotentiometric study in LiCl-KCl. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the standard reduction potential for the plutonium (III) couple in various molten alkali metal halides. Initial cyclic voltammetric experiments were performed in molten KCL at 1100 K. A silver/silver chloride (10 mole %) in equimolar NaCl-KCl was used as a reference electrode. Working and counter electrodes were tungsten. The cell components and melt were contained in a quartz crucible. Background cyclic voltammograms of the KCl melt at the tungsten electrode showed no evidence of electroactive impurities in the melt. Plutonium was added to the melt as PuCl/sub 3/, which was prepared by chlorination of the oxide. At low concentrations of PuCl/sub 3/ in the melt (0.01-0.03 molar), no reduction wave due to the reduction of Pu(III) was observed in the voltammograms up to the potassium reduction limit of the melt. However on scan reversal after scanning into the potassium reduction limit a new oxidation wave was observed

  10. Reduction reaction of chlorine gas in an Al-Cl2 chemical cell composed of molten chloride salts; Enkabutsu yoyuenkei Al-Cl2 kagaku denchi ni okeru enso gas no kangen hanno kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konda, S.; Sasaki, T.; Ishikawa, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-05

    The molten salt system electrochemical cycle was proposed to reproduce pure Al from scrap Al. The cycle is composed of production of rough AlCl3 by chlorination of scrap Al, refining of rough AlCl3 mainly by sublimation, and electrolytic reproduction of pure Al from refined AlCl3. In production of AlCl3, the Al-Cl2 molten salt system cell composed of anode dissolution reaction of Al and cathode reduction reaction of chlorine gas can generate electric power for the electrolytic reproduction. Chlorine gas can be recycled as anode product. Various experiments were carried out to improve molten salt system cells. In analysis of cell output, voltage drop from open circuit voltage was divided into that due to electrolytic bath resistance, and that due to reaction resistance. The electrolytic bath resistance could be determined from transient characteristics of voltage change just after cutoff of output current. The product of the obtained reaction resistance and a meniscus length was constant regardless of a meniscus length, and useful to predict scale-up cell performance. Output characteristics dependent on meniscus position were also obtained. 16 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Cytotoxic effects of nanosilver are highly dependent on the chloride concentration and the presence of organic compounds in the cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Roesslein, Matthias; Diener, Liliane; Wichser, Adrian; Nowack, Bernd; Wick, Peter

    2017-01-06

    Nanosilver shows great promise for use in industrial, consumer or medical products because of its antimicrobial properties. However, the underlying mechanisms of the effects of silver nanoparticles on human cells are still controversial. Therefore, in the present study the influence of the chloride concentration and different serum content of culture media on the cytotoxic effects of nanosilver was systematically evaluated. Our results show that nanosilver toxicity was strongly affected by the composition of the culture media. The chloride concentration, as well as the carbon content affected the silver agglomeration and the complex formation. But also the dissolution of nanosilver and the availability of free silver ions (Ag + ) were severely affected by the compositions of the culture media. Cells, only exposed to silver particles in suspension and dissolved silver complexes, did not show any effects under all conditions. Nanosilver agglomerates and silver complexes were not very soluble. Thus, cells growing on the bottom of the culture dishes were exposed to sedimented nanosilver agglomerates and precipitated silver complexes. Locally, the concentration of silver on the cell surface was very high, much higher compared the silver concentration in the bulk solution. The cytotoxic effects of nanosilver are therefore a combination of precipitated silver complexes and organic silver compounds rather than free silver ions. Silver coatings are used in health care products due to their bacteriostatic or antibacterial properties. The assessment of the toxicity of a certain compound is mostly done using in vitro assays. Therefore, cytotoxicity studies of nanosilver using human cell cultures have to be undertaken under well controlled and understood cultivations conditions in order to improve the compatibility of different studies. Especially when eukaryotic versus prokaryotic systems are compared for the evaluation of the use of nanosilver as antibacterial coatings for

  12. Voltammetry of uranyl chloride in the LiCl - KCl eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondanaiche, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Spent UO 2 - PuO 2 fuels can be reprocessed in a molten salt media. Uranium dioxide can easily be dissolved as UO 2 Cl 2 in a molten salt bath using chlorine gas. A study of quantitative analysis of an uranyl chloride solution in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 400 C has been performed here using voltammetry (a large area-graphite indicator electrode has been employed). The precision which is obtained is around 6 per cent for concentrations below 10 -2 M. Precision decreases slightly for more concentrated solutions. The study of polarization curves allowed to give a reduction mechanism for the UO 2 ++ ion. For dilute solutions, this reduction proceeds through the UO 2 + ion. But interpretation of current-potential curves is made difficult by the dismutation reaction of the UO 2 ion and by the fact that the surface of the indicator electrode is not renewed. (author) [fr

  13. Deposition of niobium plate on niobium-titanium from molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matychenko, Eh.S.; Shevyrev, A.A.; Stolyarova, L.A.; Sukhorzhevskaya, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A possibility of using Nb-Ti alloys (50 and 34 mas.% of Ti) as substrates for deposition of niobium coating of chloride-fluoride and fluoride molten salts is studied. Corrosion behaviour of alloys indicates in the electrolytic bath within 970-1070 K interval, coating structure and state of coating-substrate boundary are investigated. Chloride-fluoride molten salt usefullness for making products with niobium coatings is shown

  14. Molten salt electrorefining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Shoji, Yuichi; Matsumaru, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    A molten cadmium phase (lower side) and a molten salt phase (upper side) are filled in an electrolytic bath. A basket incorporating spent nuclear fuels is inserted/disposed in the molten cadmium phase. A rotatable solid cathode is inserted/disposed in the molten salt phase. The spent fuels, for example, natural uranium, incorporated in the basket is dissolved in the molten cadmium phase. In this case, the uranium concentration in the molten salt phase is determined as from 0.5 to 20wt%. Then, electrolysis is conducted while setting a stirring power for stirring at least the molten salt phase of from 2.5 x 10 2 to 1 x 10 4 based on a reynolds number. Crystalline nuclei of uranium are precipitated uniformly on the surface of the solid cathode, and they grow into fine dendrites. With such procedures, since short-circuit between the cathode precipitates and the molten cadmium phase (anode) is scarcely caused, to improve the recovering rate of uranium. (I.N.)

  15. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  16. Molten salt reactors - safety options galore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Dodds, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    Safety features and attributes of molten salt reactors (MSR) are described. The unique features of fluid fuel reactors of on-line continuous processing and the ability for so-called external cooling result in simple and safe designs with low excess reactivity, low fission product inventory, and small source term. These, in turn, make a criticality accident unlikely and reduce the severity of a loss of coolant to where they are no longer severe accidents. A melt down is not an accident for a reactor that uses molten fuel. The molten salts are stable, non-reactive and efficient heat transfer media that operate at high temperatures at low pressures and are highly compatible with selected structural materials. All these features reduce the accident plethora. Freeze valves can be used for added safety. An ultimate safe reactor (U.S.R) is described with safety features that are passive, inherent and non-tamperable (PINT)

  17. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  18. Properties and performance of spin-on-glass coatings for the corrosion protection of stainless steels in chloride media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette H.; Din, Rameez U.

    2018-01-01

    Spin-on-glass deposition was investigated as viable alternative to increase the durability and performance of 316L steel in chloride environment. The buildup of a detrimental interface oxide was prevented by non-oxidative thermal curing of the coatings, which leads to a transformation...... silica. Electrochemical analysis by cyclic polarization indicated that the coatings behave as imperfect barrier coatings, which may enhance the passive properties of the substrates; however, there is still some statistical scatter in the quality of the coatings. While there is a tendency for an increase...... of the upper limit of the breakdown potential, there is also a decrease of the lower limit. It was found that such lower quality coatings showed, in association with substrate defects, unevenly distributed coating flaws, which may act as initiation points of pitting corrosion and decrease the corrosion...

  19. Fission product removal from molten salt using zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Babcock, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) can be treated in a molten salt electrorefiner for conversion into metal and mineral waste forms for geologic disposal. The fuel is dissolved in molten chloride salt. Non-transuranic fission products in the molten salt are ion-exchanged into zeolite A, which is subsequently mixed with glass and consolidated. Zeolite was found to be effective in removing fission product cations from the molten salt. Breakthrough of cesium and the alkaline earths occurred more rapidly than was observed for the rare earths. The effluent composition as a function of time is presented, as well as results for the distribution of fission products along the length of the column. Effects of temperature and salt flow rate are also discussed

  20. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  1. Chrono-potentiometry in molten chlorides. Application to the study of the electrochemical properties of uranium and plutonium in the LiCl-KCl eutectic; Chronopotentiometrie dans les chlorures fondus. Application a l'etude des proprietes electrochimiques de l'uranium et du plutonium dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseur, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-05-01

    Using solutions of cadmium chloride in the eutectic LiCl-KCl, a chrono-potentiometric method has been developed with a view to its application to the study of molten solutions. Particular attention has been paid to the choice of the indicator electrodes. The method makes it possible to analyze molten solutions quantitatively and to determine diffusion coefficients and their activation energies; it yields furthermore information about the nature and the behaviour of ionic species in solution. The method has been applied to the study of solutions of uranium and plutonium chloride in the eutectic LiCl-KCl. Linear chrono-amperometry has been used for studying these solutions quantitatively, but chrono-potentiometry, of which the theory is better developed, is better suited to a quantitative study. The results obtained have made it possible to determine the diffusion coefficients of the ions Cd{sup 2+}, U{sup 3+}, U{sup 4+} and U(IV) in the presence of F{sup -} and Pu{sup 3+} ions, as well as the activation energy of the diffusion coefficients. (author) [French] La mise au point de la chronopotentiometrie comme moyen d'etude des solutions fondues a ete effectuee avec des solutions de chlorure de cadmium dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl. Le probleme du choix des electrodes indicatrices a ete particulierement etudie. La methode permet l'analyse quantitative des solutions fondues ainsi que la determination des coefficients de diffusion et de leurs energies d'activation: elle donne en outre des renseignements sur la nature et le comportement des especes ioniques en solution. Elle a ete appliquee a l'etude des solutions des chlorures d'uranium et de plutonium dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl. La chronoamperometrie lineaire a ete utilisee pour l'etude qualitative de ces solutions, mais la chronopotentiometrie, dont la theorie est plus complete, convient mieux pour l'etude quantitative. Les resultats obtenus ont permis de determiner les

  2. Metalcasting: Filtering Molten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauren Poole; Lee Recca

    1999-01-01

    A more efficient method has been created to filter cast molten metal for impurities. Read about the resulting energy and money savings that can accrue to many different industries from the use of this exciting new technology

  3. Formation of a bioconjugate composed of hemin, smectite, and quaternary ammonium chloride that is soluble and active in hydrophobic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Masaru; Itoh, Tetsuji; Kodera, Yoh; Matsushima, Ayako; Hiroto, Misao; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Inada, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    Hemin (Fe(3+)) was adsorbed onto synthetic smectite (clay mineral) intercalated with a quaternary alkenylammonium compound, dioleyldimethylammonium chloride (DOA), to form a hemin-smectite-DOA conjugate. The hemin-smectite-DOA conjugate was soluble in organic solvents such as benzene and toluene to form a transparent colloidal solution with a light yellow color. Its absorption spectrum in benzene showed two bands, 600 and 568 nm, in the visible region and a sharp Soret band at 400 nm with the molar extinction coefficient of 7.5 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1). The formation of the conjugate of smectite and DOA was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis: the basal spacing, d(001), of hemin-smectite-DOA conjugate was 19 A which is an expansion of the interlayer space by 5 A based upon the basal spacing of smectite of 14 A. Hemin-smectite-DOA conjugate catalyzed the peroxidase-like reaction in organic solvents using benzoyl peroxide as the hydrogen acceptor and leucocrystal violet as the hydrogen donor. The temperature-dependent peroxidase-like activity of the conjugate was compared with peroxidase activity of horseradish peroxidase. The hemin-smectite-DOA conjugate exhibited higher activity as the temperature was increased from 30 to 70 degrees C, while horseradish peroxidase activity was reduced as the temperature was increased.

  4. Enhanced corrosion resistance of A3xx.x/SiCp composites in chloride media by La surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Feliu, S.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of silicon carbide particles (SiCp) proportion and matrix composition of aluminium metal matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp) modified by lanthanum-based conversion or electrolysis coating was evaluated in 3.5 wt% NaCl aerated solution. The intermetallic compounds were preferentially covered by lanthanum-based conversion coatings obtained by immersion in 50 deg. C solution of La(III) salt, and the intermetallic compounds, SiCp and aluminium matrix were covered by lanthanum electrolysis treatment. The corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) during immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl aerated solution. The composition of both La coating and corrosion products was analyzed before and after accelerated testing, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the influence of surface microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The corrosion process was more influenced by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement. Both lanthanum treated surfaces presented better behaviour to chloride solution corrosion than original composite surfaces without treatment; however, electrolysis afforded a higher degree of protection than the conversion treatment because the coating was more extensive

  5. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic acidosis ) or when a person hyperventilates (causing respiratory alkalosis ). A decreased level of blood chloride (called hypochloremia) ... disease , emphysema or other chronic lung diseases (causing respiratory ... metabolic alkalosis). An increased level of urine chloride can indicate ...

  6. Electrodeposition of antimony, tellurium and their alloys from molten acetamide mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Peng, X.; Murugan, G.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the electrodeposition of antimony (Sb), tellurium (Te) and their alloys from molten mixtures of acetamide - antimony chloride and tellurium chloride. The binary mixtures of acetamide with SbCl3 and TeCl 4 exhibit eutectic formation with large depressions of freezing points to below room

  7. Saturated vapor pressure over molten mixtures of GaCl{sub 3} and alkali metal chlorides; Davlenie nasyshchennykh parov rasplavlennykh smesej CaCl{sub 3} s khloridami shchelochnykh metallov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Smolenskij, V V; Moskalenko, N I [UrO RAN, Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii, Elaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Volatilities of GaCl{sub 3} and alkali metal chlorides over diluted (up to 3 mol %) solutions of GaCl{sub 3} in LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl were measured at 1100 K by dynamic and indirect static methods. Chemical composition of saturated vapor over the mixed melts was determined. Partial pressures of the components were calculated. Their values depend essentially on specific alkali metal cation and on concentration of GaCl{sub 3}; their variation permits altering parameters of GaCl{sub 3} distillation from the salt melt in a wide range.

  8. Saturated steams pressure of HfCl/sub 4/-KCl molten mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1980-02-01

    A bellows null pressure gauge and the dynamic method were used to measure the total and partial pressures of saturated vapors of individual components of molten HfCl/sub 4/-KCl mixtures, as a function of temperature (260 to 1000 deg C) and composition (1.9 to 64.3 mol.% HfCl/sub 4/). Empirical equations expressing the relationship between pressure and temperature are presented. It is shown that in molten mixtures of hafnium tetrachloride with chlorides of alkaline metals its partial pressure dramatically increases when potassium chloride substitutes for cesium chloride.

  9. Saturated steams pressure of HfCl4-KCl molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    A bellows null pressure gauge and the dynamic method were used to measure the total and partial pressures of saturated vapors of individual components of molten HfCl 4 -KCl mixtures, as a function of temperature (260 to 1000 deg C) and composition (1.9 to 64.3 mol.% HfCl 4 ). Empirical equations expressing the relationship between pressure and temperature are presented. It is shown that in molten mixtures of hafnium tetrachloride with chlorides of alkaline metals its partial pressure dramatically increases when potassium chloride substitutes for cesium chloride

  10. Study of the anodic process in the electrolysis of molten chlorides. Application to the chlorine electrode; Contribution a l'etude du processus anodique dans l'electrolyse des chlorures fondus. Application a l'electrode de chlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondanaiche, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-05-01

    The oxidation reaction of Cl{sup -} ions on a carbon electrode occurs with a very low over-voltage in molten LiCl-KCl, NaCl-KCl, CaCl{sub 2} and AgCl electrolytes and therefore the properties of the electrode 'polarized' anodically with a current density I are, as a first approximation, identical to those which it possesses at a chlorine pressure P (produced by the addition of external chlorine). This property of the Cl{sup -} ion oxidation reaction has enabled us to propose an electrochemical method for the study of the absorption equilibrium of the chlorine between a solid and a liquid phase. We can in effect replace this addition of outside chlorine at a pressure P by an electrolysis at a current density I. We have developed a mechanism which accounts for the reaction kinetic of the discharge of Cl{sup -} ions. It has been checked with the help of intensity-potential curves and potential-time curves which characterize the carbon depolarization in an open circuit. Two methods have been used for measuring the amount of chlorine adsorbed on the carbon. It has been possible to determine the nature of the bonds linking the adsorbed chlorine to the carbon, and the electrode-electrolyte surface exchange by varying the temperature and the nature of the electrode and of the electrolyte. Certain anomalies and in particular certain transient phenomena have been explained by the influence of the oxygen present in the molten salt in the form of O{sup 2-} ions and, on the electrode surface, in the form of chemisorption complexes. (author) [French] La reaction d'oxydation des ions Cl{sup -} sur une electrode de carbone s'effectue avec une surtension tres faible dans les electrolytes fondus LiCl-KCl, NaCl-KCl, CaCl{sub 2} et AgCl et par consequent les proprietes de l'electrode ''polarisee'' anodiquement avec une densite de courant I sont, en premiere approximation, identiques a celles qu'elle possede sous une pression de chlore P (creee par un apport exterieur de chlore). Cette

  11. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  12. Molten salt reactors: chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This work is a critical analysis of the 1000 MW MSBR project. Behavior of rare gases in the primary coolant circuit, their extraction from helium. Coating of graphite by molybdenum, chemistry of protactinium and niobium produced in the molten salt, continuous reprocessing of the fuel salt and use of stainless steel instead of hastelloy are reviewed [fr

  13. Inhibiting properties of benzimidazole films for Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction in chloride media studied by RDE and EQCN techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scendo, M. [Institute of Chemistry, Saint Cross Academy, ul. Checinska 5, 25020 Kielce (Poland)]. E-mail: scendo@pu.kielce.pl; Hepel, M. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York, Potsdam, NY 13676, USA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The effects of benzimidazole (BIM) and 2-methylbenzimidazole (MBIM) on the electroreduction of Cu(II) on a rotating Pt disk electrode in chloride media were investigated. These studies were undertaken in conjunction with earlier observation that these imidazole derivatives act as inhibitors of copper corrosion processes and are non-toxic. We have found that BIM and MBIM also form adsorption films on Pt, which are able to inhibit one-electron reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and prevent the development of convective diffusion limiting current wave. The inhibition was found to be controlled by field-assisted mass transfer in the film. The ingress of Cu(II) species into the film was detected using the EQCN technique. The EQCN measurements indicate that small fraction of Cu(I) formed in the film by reduction of Cu(II) is retained in the film, most likely in the form of CuCl. The uptake of CuCl by inhibitor films diminishes in strongly inhibiting films (e.g., in acidic medium). The inhibition effectiveness of Cu(II) reduction process by Pt vertical bar BIM and Pt vertical bar MBIM films increases strongly with increasing acidity of the medium in the pH range from 3.0 to 1.0. The mechanism of this remarkable pH effect has been proposed. It is based on charge and pH-induced film restructuring, including changes in orientation and protonation of BIM molecules in the film.

  14. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  15. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwall, Piyush, E-mail: Piyush.Sabharwall@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Hastelloy N and 242, shows corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures. • Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. • Thermal gradients and galvanic couples in the molten salts enhance corrosion rates. • Corrosion rates found were typically <10 mils per year. - Abstract: This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non-nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, that show good corrosion resistance in molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700 °C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in 58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF{sub 4} at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. Corrosion rates were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <100 μm per year after 1000 h of corrosion tests. No catastrophic corrosion was observed in the diffusion welded regions. For materials of construction, nickel-based alloys and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of the type of salt impurity and alloy composition, with respect to chromium and carbon, to better define the best conditions for corrosion resistance. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high-temperature components per American Society of Mechanical

  16. Contribution to the study of the vertical molten zone process (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzin, M.

    1963-01-01

    Construction and use of several molten zone apparatuses operating either vertically or horizontally. Efficient purification of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate but less successful in the case of other hydrated double salts and of zirconyl chloride in the hydrochloric gel form. Demonstration and study of the dissymmetry in the direction of the transport of the impurity during, the purification by a vertical molten zone process. (author) [fr

  17. Thermal energy storage using chloride salts and their eutectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Philip D.; Goswami, D. Yogi

    2016-01-01

    Achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sunshot initiative requires (1) higher operating temperatures for concentrating solar power (CSP) plants to increase theoretical efficiency, and (2) effective thermal energy storage (TES) strategies to ensure dispatchability. Current inorganic salt-based TES systems in large-scale CSP plants generally employ molten nitrate salts for energy storage, but nitrate salts are limited in application to lower temperatures—generally, below 600 °C. These materials are sufficient for parabolic trough power plants, but they are inadequate for use at higher temperatures. At the higher operating temperatures achievable in solar power tower-type CSP plants, chloride salts are promising candidates for application as TES materials, owing to their thermal stability and generally lower cost compared to nitrate salts. In light of this, a recent study was conducted, which included a preliminary survey of chloride salts and binary eutectic systems that show promise as high temperature TES media. This study provided some basic information about the salts, including phase equilibria data and estimates of latent heat of fusion for some of the eutectics. Cost estimates were obtained through a review of bulk pricing for the pure salts among various vendors. This review paper updates that prior study, adding data for additional salt eutectic systems obtained from the literature. Where possible, data are obtained from the thermodynamic database software, FactSage. Radiative properties are presented, as well, since at higher temperatures, thermal radiation becomes a significant mode of heat transfer. Material compatibility for inorganic salts is another important consideration (e.g., with regard to piping and/or containment), so a summary of corrosion studies with various materials is also presented. Lastly, cost data for these systems are presented, allowing for meaningful comparison among these systems and other materials for TES

  18. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sooby, E., E-mail: soobyes@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Baty, A. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Beneš, O. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Salanne, M. [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, Laboratoire PECSA, F-75005 Paris (France); Sattarov, A. [Texas A and M University, Accelerator Research Laboratory, 3380 University Dr. East, College Station, TX 77845 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Developing accelerator driven subcritical fission to destroy transuranics in SNF. • The core is a vessel containing a molten mixture of NaCl and transuranic chlorides. • Molecular dynamics used to calculate the thermophysical properties of the salt. • Density and molecular structure for actinide salts reported here. • The neutronics of ADS fission in molten salt are presented. -- Abstract: We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated.

  19. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sooby, E.; Baty, A.; Beneš, O.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Salanne, M.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Developing accelerator driven subcritical fission to destroy transuranics in SNF. • The core is a vessel containing a molten mixture of NaCl and transuranic chlorides. • Molecular dynamics used to calculate the thermophysical properties of the salt. • Density and molecular structure for actinide salts reported here. • The neutronics of ADS fission in molten salt are presented. -- Abstract: We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated

  20. Melting in trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; Scamehorn, C.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the liquid structure of YCl 3 and combine the structural data with macroscopic melting and transport data to contrast the behaviour of this molten salt with those of SrCl 2 , ZnCl 2 and AlCl 3 as prototypes of different melting mechanisms for ionic materials. A novel melting mechanism for trivalent metal chlorides, leading to a loose disordered network of edge-sharing octahedral units in the liquid phase, is thereby established. The various melting behaviours are related to bonding character with the help of Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Tsukada, Kineo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Oomichi, Toshihiko; Oono, Hideo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure, as well as improve the technical reliability and safety by the elimination of a proton beam entering window. Constitution: The nuclear reactor container main body is made of Hastelloy N and provided at the inner surface with two layers of graphite shields except for openings. An aperture was formed in the upper surface of the container, through which protons accelerated by a linear accelerator are directly entered to the liquid surface of molten salts such as 7LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 , 7LiF-NaF-ThF 4 , 7LiF-Rb-UF 4 , NaF-KF-UF 4 and the like. The heated molten salts are introduced by way of a pipeway into a heat exchanger where the heat is transferred to coolant salts and electric generation is conducted by way of heated steams. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  3. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  4. Method of processing chloride waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Tsunashima, Mikiyasu; Horie, Masaaki; Koyama, Masafumi; Sudo, Minoru; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Ogasawara, Tadashi.

    1991-01-01

    In a method of applying molten salt electrolysis to chloride wastes discharged from a electrolytic refining step of a dry reprocessing step for spent fuels, and removed with transuranium elements of long half-decaying time, metals capable of alloying with alkali and alkaline earth metals under melting by electrolysis are used as a cathode material, and an electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of salts in a molten salt electrolysis bath, to recover Li, Ca and Na as alloys with the cathode material in a first electrolysis step. Then, the electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of the chloride salts remained in the bath after the electrolysis step described above by using the cathode material, to recover Ba, Rb, Sr and Cs of nuclear fission products also as alloys with the cathode material in a second electrolysis step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes formed can be reduced, and the wastes contain no heat generating nuclear fission elements. (T.M.)

  5. Electrochemical studies on plutonium in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, G.; Lambertin, D.; Rochefort, S.; Delpech, S.; Picard, G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies on plutonium have been supporting the development of pyrochemical processes involving plutonium at CEA. The electrochemical properties of plutonium have been studied in molten salts - ternary eutectic mixture NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 , equimolar mixture NaCl-KCl and pure CaCl 2 - and in liquid gallium at 1073 K. The formal, or apparent, standard potential of Pu(III)/Pu redox couple in eutectic mixture of NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 at 1073 K determined by potentiometry is equal to -2.56 V (versus Cl 2 , 1 atm/Cl - reference electrode). In NaCl-KCl eutectic mixture and in pure CaCl 2 the formal standard potentials deduced from cyclic voltammetry are respectively -2.54 V and -2.51 V. These potentials led to the calculation of the activity coefficients of Pu(III) in the molten salts. Chronoamperometry on plutonium in liquid gallium using molten chlorides - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl/KCl - led to the determination of the activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga, log γ = -7.3. This new data is a key parameter to assess the thermodynamic feasibility of a process using gallium as solvent metal. By comparing gallium with other solvent metals - cadmium, bismuth, aluminum - gallium appears to be, with aluminum, more favorable for the selectivity of the separation at 1073 K of plutonium from cerium. In fact, compared with a solid tungsten electrode, none of these solvent liquid metals is a real asset for the selectivity of the separation. The role of a solvent liquid metal is mainly to trap the elements

  6. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  7. Molten fuel studies at Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.J.; Knowles, J.B.; Tattersall, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the experimental facilities available for molten fuel studies at Winfrith. These include a large facility capable of testing components at full LMFBR subassembly scale and also a high pressure facility for experiments at pressures up to 25 MPa, covering the whole range of temperatures and pressures of interest for the PWR. If the hypothetical accident conditions initiating the release of molten fuel do not produce an explosive transfer of thermal energy on contact of molten fuel with the reactor coolant, then an intermediate rate of heat transfer over several hundred milliseconds may occur. Theoretical work is described which is being carried out to predict the resulting pressurisation and the degree of mechanical loading on the reactor structure. Finally the current programme of molten fuel studies and recent progress are reviewed, and future plans, which are chiefly focussed on the study of thermal interactions between molten fuel and sodium coolant for the LMFBR are outlined. (author)

  8. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  9. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. This part describes the MSBR core (data presented are from ORNL 4541). The principal characteristics of the core are presented in tables together with plane and elevation drawings, stress being put upon the reflector, and loading and unloading. Neutronic, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics (core and reflectors) are more detailed. The reasons why a graphite with a tight graphite layer has been chosen are briefly exposed. The physical properties of the standard graphite (irradiation behavior) have been determined for an isotropic graphite with fine granulometry; its dimensional variations largely ressemble that of Gilsonite. The mechanical stresses computed (Wigner effect) do not implicate in any way the graphite stack [fr

  10. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. This part 'CIRCUITS' regroups under a condensed form - in French and using international units - the essential information contained in both basic documents of the American project for a molten-salt breeder power plant. This part is only dealing with things relating to the CEA-EDF workshop 'CIRCUITS'. It is not concerned with information on: the reactor and the moderator replacement, the primary and secondary salts, and the fuel salt reprocessing, that are dealt with in parts 'CORE' and 'CHEMISTRY' respectively. The possible evolutions in the data - and solutions - taken by the American designers for their successive projects (1970 to 1972) are shown. The MSBR power plant comprises three successive heat transfer circuits. The primary circuit (Hastelloy N), radioactive and polluted, containing the fuel salt, includes the reactor, pumps and exchangers. The secondary circuit (pipings made of modified Hastelloy N) contaminated in the exchanger, ensures the separation between the fuel and the fluid operating the turbo-alternator. The water-steam circuit feeds the turbine with steam. This steam is produced in the steam generator flowed by the secondary fluid. Some subsidiary circuits (discharge and storage of the primary and secondary salts, ventilation of the primary circuit ...) complete the three principal circuits which are briefly described. All circuits are enclosed inside the controlled-atmosphere building of the nuclear boiler. This building also ensures the biological protection and the mechanical protection against outer aggressions [fr

  11. The molten salt reactor adventure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF 4 -ThF 4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized

  12. Molten material-containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The molten material-containing vessel of the present invention comprises a vessel main body having an entrance opened at the upper end, a lid for closing the entrance, an outer tube having an upper end disposed at the lower surface of the lid, extended downwardly and having an closed lower end and an inner tube disposed coaxially with the outer tube. When a molten material is charged from the entrance to the inside of the vessel main body of the molten material-containing vessel and the entrance is closed by the lid, the outer tube and the inner tube are buried in the molten material in the vessel main body, accordingly, a fluid having its temperature elevated by absorption of the heat of the molten material rises along the inner circumferential surface of the outer tube, abuts against the lower surface of the lid and cooled by exchanging heat with the lid and forms a circulating flow. Since the heat in the molten material is continuously absorbed by the fluid, transferred to the lid and released from the lid to the atmospheric air, heat releasing efficiency can be improved compared with conventional cases. (N.H.)

  13. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases

  14. Polyvinyl chloride resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Jae

    1976-06-01

    This book contains polyvinyl chloride resin industry with present condition such as plastic industry and polyvinyl chloride in the world and Japan, manufacture of polyvinyl chloride resin ; suspension polymerization and solution polymerization, extruding, injection process, hollow molding vinyl record, vacuum forming, polymer powders process, vinyl chloride varnish, vinyl chloride latex, safety and construction on vinyl chloride. Each chapter has descriptions on of process and kinds of polyvinyl chloride resin.

  15. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 -UF 4 ) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate [fr

  16. Precipitation of lamellar gold nanocrystals in molten polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomba, M.; Carotenuto, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-aggregated lamellar gold crystals with regular shape (triangles, squares, pentagons, etc.) have been produced by thermal decomposition of gold chloride (AuCl) molecules in molten amorphous polymers (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)). Such covalent inorganic gold salt is high soluble into non-polar polymers and it thermally decomposes at temperatures compatible with the polymer thermal stability, producing gold atoms and chlorine radicals. At the end of the gold precipitation process, the polymer matrix resulted chemically modified because of the partial cross-linking process due to the gold atom formation reaction.

  17. Molten salt/metal extractions for recovery of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (EFR) is an advanced reactor concept that incorporates metallic driver and blanket fuels, an inherently safe, liquid-sodium-cooled, pool-type, reactor design, and on-site pyrochemical reprocessing (including electrorefining) of spent fuels and wastes. This paper describes a pyrochemical method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to recover transuranic elements from the EFR electrorefiner process salt. The method uses multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and cadmium metal at high temperatures. The chemical basis of the salt extraction method, the test equipment, and a test plan are discussed

  18. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  19. Effect of the chloride ions on the hydrolysis of praseodymium in a 2M ion force media; Efecto de los iones cloruro sobre la hidrolisis del praseodimio en medio de fuerza ionica 2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The constants of the product of solubility and the first of hydrolysis were determined of the Praseodymium in media 2M of NaClO{sub 4} and 2M of NaCl, to 303 K and under conditions free of CO{sub 2}. The diagram of solubility was obtained (pPr{sub (ac)} - pC{sub H}), by means of a radiochemical method and with it was established the pC{sub H} that limit the saturation and non saturation areas; that diagram allowed, also, to calculate the constant of the product of solubility. Also, it was adjusted with the polynomial of solubility equation, that it allowed to determine and to check the values of the constants of the product of solubility and the first of hydrolysis. Independently, it was determined the first constant of hydrolysis of the element, by means of potentiometric titrations whose data were treated with the computer program named SUPERQUAD and with the adjustment of the equation of the average number of bonds. It was also calculates the log constant {beta}{sub Pr,Cl} of the specie PrCI{sup 2+} starting from the hydrolysis constants obtained in the perchlorate and chloride media. (Author)

  20. Molten fuel-moderator interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Kynstautas, R.

    1987-02-01

    A critical review of the current understanding of vapor explosions was carried out. It was concluded that, on the basis of actual industrial accidents and large scale experiments, energetic high yield steam explosion cannot be regarded as an improbable event if large quantities of molten fuel and coolant are mixed together. This study also reviewed a hydrodynamic transient model proposed by Henry and Fauske Associates to assess a molten fuel-moderator interaction event. It was found that the proposed model negates a priori the possibility of a violent event, by introducing two assumptions: 1) fine fragmentation of the molten fuel, and ii) rapid heat transfer from the fine fragments to form steam. Using the Hicks and Menzies thermodynamic model, maximum work potential and pressure rise in the calandria were estimated. However, it is recommended that a more representative upper bound model based on an underwater explosion of a pressurized volume of steam be developed

  1. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  2. Aluminum titanate crucible for molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    An improved crucible for molten uranium is described. The crucible or crucible liner is formed of aluminum titanate which essentially eliminates contamination of uranium and uranium alloys during molten states thereof. (U.S.)

  3. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooby, E.; Baty, A.; Beneš, O.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Salanne, M.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated. A special thanks is due to Prof. Paul Madden for introducing the ADSMS group to the concept of using the molten salt as the spallation target, rather than a conventional heavy metal spallation target. This feature helps to optimize this core as a Pu/TRU burner.

  4. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  5. Leaching of copper concentrates with high arsenic content in chlorine-chloride media; Lixiviacion de concentrados de cobre con alto contenido de arsenico en medio cloro-cloruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreros, O.; Fuentes, G.; Quiroz, R.; Vinals, J.

    2003-07-01

    This work reports the results of copper concentrates leaching which have high arsenic concepts (up to 2.5%). The treatments were carried out using chlorine that forms from sodium hypochlorite and sulphuric acid. The aim of this work is to obtain a solution having high copper content 4 to 6 g/l and 5 to 7 g/l free acid in order to submit it directly to a solvent extraction stage. In addition, this solution should have minimum content of arsenic and chloride ions. To carry out this investigation, an acrylic reactor was constructed where the leaching tests were made at constant temperature in a thermostatic bath under atmospheric pressure. The concentrate samples were obtained from mineral processing plants from Antofagasta, Chile. Typical variables were studied, such as leaching agent concentration, leaching time, pulp density and temperature among others. Some of the residues were analyzed by XRD and EPS. On the other hand, the solutions were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The results indicate solutions having the contents stated above can be obtained. (Author) 19 refs.

  6. Molten salt destruction process for mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhye, R.S.; Wilder, J.G.; Karlsen, C.E.

    1993-04-01

    We are developing an advanced two-stage process for the treatment of mixed wastes, which contain both hazardous and radioactive components. The wastes, together with an oxidant gas, such as air, are injected into a bed of molten salt comprising a mixture of sodium-, potassium-, and lithium-carbonates, with a melting point of about 580 degree C. The organic constituents of the mixed waste are destroyed through the combined effect of pyrolysis and oxidation. Heteroatoms. such as chlorine, in the mixed waste form stable salts, such as sodium chloride, and are retained in the melt. The radioactive actinides in the mixed waste are also retained in the melt because of the combined action of wetting and partial dissolution. The original process, consists of a one-stage unit, operated at 900--1000 degree C. The advanced two-stage process has two stages, one for pyrolysis and one for oxidation. The pyrolysis stage is designed to operate at 700 degree C. The oxidation stage can be operated at a higher temperature, if necessary

  7. Behaviour of nickel and nickel oxide thin films in chloride media; Comportamiento de peliculas delgadas de niquel y oxido de niquel en NaCl al 3%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magana, C. R.; Angeles, M. E.; Rodriguez, F. J.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behaviour of both: a nickel thin film deposited on steel AISI 1018 (UNS G 10180) and a superior nickel oxide electrochemically obtained on the film; with the purpose of decreasing the corrosion rate of low carbon steel immersed in a solution of NaCl 3% wt, thus efficient anti corrosive protection could be obtained. Two film deposition techniques were used, electrochemical and magnetron DC sputtering; and the protective properties of deposited films exposed to the aggressive media, were evaluated. The characterization of different films was carried out by using electrochemical techniques: polarization curves and electrochemical impedance. (Author)

  8. Molten-salt converter reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    Molten-salt reactors appear to have substantial promise as advanced converters. Conversion ratios of 0.85 to 0.9 should be attainable with favourable fuel cycle costs, with 235 U valued at $12/g. An increase in 235 U value by a factor of two or three ($10 to $30/lb. U 3 O 8 , $75/SWU) would be expected to increase the optimum conversion ratio, but this has not been analyzed in detail. The processing necessary to recover uranium from the fuel salt has been partially demonstrated in the MSRE. The equipment for doing this would be located at the reactor, and there would be no reliance on an established recycle industry. Processing costs are expected to be quite low, and fuel cycle optimization depends primarily on inventory and burnup or replacement costs for the fuel and for the carrier salt. Significant development problems remain to be resolved for molten-salt reactors, notably the control of tritium and the elimination of intergranular cracking of Hastelloy-N in contact with tellurium. However, these problems appear to be amenable to solution. It is appropriate to consider separating the development schedule for molten-salt reactors from that for the processing technology required for breeding. The Molten-Salt Converter Reactor should be a useful reactor in its own right and would be an advance towards the achievement of true breeding in thermal reactors. (author)

  9. thermic oil and molten salt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A

    1 mai 2016 ... [27] Zavoico, AB. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document. Tech. rep, Sandia National. Laboratories, SAND2001-2100, 2001. How to cite this article: Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A. Performance simulation of parabolic trough solar collector using two fluids (thermic oil and molten salt).

  10. Effect of preparation temperature and cycling voltage range on molten salt method prepared SnO2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, MV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepared nano-sized tin (IV) oxide (SnO(sub2)) via molten-salt technique: heating a mixture of tin tetrachloride, lithium nitrate and lithium chloride at 280 °C in air. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission scanning...

  11. Density and electrical conductivity of NaCl-CoCl2 and NaCl-NiCl2 molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red'kin, A.A.; Salyulev, A.B.; Smirnov, M.V.; Khokhlov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The density and electrical conductivity of cobalt and nickel dichlorides and their solutions in molten sodium chloride have been measured. The density was measured by a dilatometric method, and the electrical conductivity by an AC technique. The molar volume and equivalent conductance were calculated. (orig.)

  12. AlN powder synthesis via nitriding reaction of aluminum sub-chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, T.; Nishida, T.; Sugiura, M. (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Graduate School); Fuwa, A. (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-06-01

    In order to obtain the pertinent properties of aluminium nitride in its sintered form, it is desirable to have powders of finer sizes with narrower size distribution and higher purity, thereby making the sintering processing easier and the final body denser. Instead of using sublimated aluminum tri-chloride vapor (AlCl3) as an aluminum source in the vapor phase nitriding reaction, the mixed aluminum chloride vapor consisted of aluminum tri-chloride, bi-chloride and mono-chloride are used in the reaction with ammonia at temperatures of 1000 and 1200K. The mixed chloride vapors are produced by reacting chlorine with molten aluminum at 1000 or 1200K under atmospheric pressure. The reaction of this mixed chloride vapor with ammonia is then experimentally investigated to study the aluminum nitride powder morphology. The aluminum nitride powders synthesized under various ammonia concentrations are characterized for size distribution, mean particle size and particle morphology. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of zirconium in molten alkali metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of zirconium during its interaction with molten lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates containing from 1 to 5 wt % additives to the salt phase are studied in a temperature range of 500-800°C using gravimetry, corrosion potential measurement, and anodic polarization. The substances decreasing the corrosion losses due to the strengthening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used as passivators. Sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate serve as corrosion stimulators (activators).

  14. Accelerator molten-salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Kuroi, Hideo; Kato, Yoshio; Oomichi, Toshihiko.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain fission products and to transmute transuranium elements and other radioactive wastes by the use of Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor. Constitution: Beams from an accelerator pipe at one end of a target vessel is injected through a window into target molten salts filled inside of the target vessel. The target molten salts are subjected to pump recycling or spontaneous convection while forcively cooled by blanket molten salts in an outer vessel. Then, energy is recovered from the blanket molten salts or the target molten salts at high temperatures through electric power generation or the like. Those salts containing such as thorium 232 and uranium 238 are used as the blanket molten salts so that fission products may be produced by neutrons generated in the target molten salts. PbCl 2 -PbF 2 and LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 can be used as the target molten salts and as the blanket molten salts respectively. (Seki, T.)

  15. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in a Novel Molten Salt Aerosol System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ammon N; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2017-04-01

    In the pyrochemical separation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), fission product, rare earth, and actinide chlorides accumulate in the molten salt electrolyte over time. Measuring this salt composition in near real-time is advantageous for operational efficiency, material accountability, and nuclear safeguards. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed and demonstrated as a potential analytical approach for molten LiCl-KCl salts. However, all the studies conducted to date have used a static surface approach which can lead to issues with splashing, low repeatability, and poor sample homogeneity. In this initial study, a novel molten salt aerosol approach has been developed and explored to measure the composition of the salt via LIBS. The functionality of the system has been demonstrated as well as a basic optimization of the laser energy and nebulizer gas pressure used. Initial results have shown that this molten salt aerosol-LIBS system has a great potential as an analytical technique for measuring the molten salt electrolyte used in this UNF reprocessing technology.

  16. Volume reduction of waste contaminated by fission product elements and plutonium using molten salt combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.E.; Grantham, L.F.; Paulson, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    In the Molten Salt Combustion Process, transuranic or β-γ organic waste and air are continuously introduced beneath the surface of a sodium carbonate-containing melt at a temperature of about 800 0 C. Complete combustion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and steam occurs without the conversion of nitrogen to nitrogen oxides. The noxious gases formed by combustion of the chloride, sulfur or phosphorus content of the waste instantly react with the melt to form the corresponding sodium compounds. These compounds as well as the ash and radionuclides are retained in the molten salt. The spent salt is either fused cast into an engineered disposal container or processed to recover salt and plutonium. Molten salt combustion reduces the waste to about 2% of its original volume. Many reactor or reprocessing wastes which cannot be incinerated without difficulty are readily combusted in the molten salt. A 50 kg/hr molten salt combustion system is being designed for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Construction of the combustor started during 1977, and combustor startup was scheduled for the spring of 1978

  17. Partially molten magma ocean model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model

  18. Wall heat transfer coefficient in a molten salt bubble column: testing the experimental setup

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available reactors that are highly exothermic or endothermic. This paper presents the design and operation of experimental setup used for measurement of the heat transfer coefficient in molten salt media. The experimental setup was operated with tap water, heat...

  19. Partial structures in molten AgBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroki [Department of Condensed Matter Chemistry and Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-mail: ueno@gemini.rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Tahara, Shuta [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Science, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2009-02-21

    The structure of molten AgBr has been studied by means of neutron and X-ray diffractions with the aid of structural modeling. It is confirmed that the Ag-Ag correlation has a small but well-defined first peak in the partial pair distribution function whose tail penetrates into the Ag-Br nearest neighbor distribution. This feature on the Ag-Ag correlation is intermediate between that of molten AgCl (non-superionic melt) and that of molten AgI (superionic melt). The analysis of Br-Ag-Br bond angle reveals that molten AgBr preserves a rocksalt type local ordering in the solid phase, suggesting that molten AgBr is clarified as non-superionic melt like molten AgCl.

  20. Chloride test - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum chloride test ... A greater-than-normal level of chloride is called hyperchloremia. It may be due to: Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (used to treat glaucoma) Diarrhea Metabolic acidosis Respiratory alkalosis (compensated) Renal ...

  1. Chloride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002417.htm Chloride in diet To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances ...

  2. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002474.htm Mercuric chloride poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It ...

  3. Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yibo; He, Canming; Lu, Jianfeng; Ding, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances of molten salt steam generator were experimentally studied. • Overall heat transfer coefficient reached maximum with optimal molten salt flow rate. • Energy efficiency first rose and then decreased with salt flow rate and temperature. • Optimal molten salt flow rate and temperature existed for good thermal performance. • High inlet water temperature benefited steam generating rate and energy efficiency. - Abstract: Molten salt steam generator is the key technology for thermal energy conversion from high temperature molten salt to steam, and it is used in solar thermal power station and molten salt reactor. A shell and tube type molten salt steam generator was set up, and its thermal performance and heat transfer mechanism were studied. As a coupling heat transfer process, molten salt steam generation is mainly affected by molten salt convective heat transfer and boiling heat transfer, while its energy efficiency is also affected by the heat loss. As molten salt temperature increased, the energy efficiency first rose with the increase of heat flow absorbed by water/steam, and then slightly decreased for large heat loss as the absorbed heat flow still rising. At very high molten salt temperature, the absorbed heat flow decreased as boiling heat transfer coefficient dropping, and then the energy efficiency quickly dropped. As the inlet water temperature increased, the boiling region in the steam generator remarkably expanded, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency both rose with the overall heat transfer coefficient increasing. As the molten salt flow rate increased, the wall temperature rose and the boiling heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased according to the boiling curve, so the overall heat transfer coefficient first increased and then decreased, and then the steam generation rate and energy efficiency of steam generator both had maxima.

  4. Stability constants of the Europium complexes with the chloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A.

    2000-01-01

    The stability constants of lanthanides complexes with chloride ions which were determined at the same ionic force but in different media, are significantly different. It does not exist a systematic study over these stability constants. The purpose of this work is to determine the stability constants of the europium complexes with chloride ions at 303 K, by the solvents extraction method. (Author)

  5. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zink, Peter A.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Serrano, Brenda E.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Cowan, Ben F.; Herrmann, Steven D.; Li, Shelly X.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-β(double p rime)-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-β(double p rime)-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in

  6. Low-temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline ZrC coatings on flake graphite by molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Jun, E-mail: dingjun@wust.edu.cn; Guo, Ding; Deng, Chengji; Zhu, Hongxi; Yu, Chao

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Uniform ZrC coatings are prepared on flake graphite at 900 °C. • ZrC coatings are composed of nanosized (30–50 nm) particles. • The template growth mechanism is believed to be dominant in the molten salt synthesis process. - Abstract: A novel molten salt synthetic route has been developed to prepare nanocrystalline zirconium carbide (ZrC) coatings on flake graphite at 900 °C, using Zr powder and flake graphite as the source materials in a static argon atmosphere, along with molten salts as the media. The effects of different molten salt media, the sintered temperature, and the heat preservation time on the phase and microstructure of the synthetic materials were investigated. The ZrC coatings formed on the flake graphite were uniform and composed of nanosized particles (30–50 nm). With an increase in the reaction temperature, the ZrC nanosized particles were more denser, and the heat preservation time and thickness of the ZrC coating also increased accordingly. Electron microscopy was used to observe the ZrC coatings on the flake graphite, indicating that a “template mechanism” played an important role during the molten salt synthesis.

  7. Metallurgical electrochemistry: the interface between materials science and molten salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Even though molten salt electrolysis finds application in the primary extraction of metals (electrowinning), the purification and recycling of metals (electrorefining), and in the formation of metal coatings (electroplating), the technology remains in many respects underexploited. Electrolysis in molten salts as well as other nonaqueous media has enormous potential for materials processing. First, owing to the special attributes of nonaqueous electrolytes electrochemical processing in these media has an important role to play in the generation of advanced materials, i.e., materials with specialized chemistries or tailored microstructures (electrosynthesis). Secondly, as environmental quality standards rise beyond the capabilities of classical metals extraction technologies to comply, molten salt electrolysis may prove to be the only acceptable route from ore to metal. Growing public awareness of pollution from the metals industry could stimulate a renaissance in molten salt electrochemistry. Challenges facing metallurgical electrochemistry as relates to the environment fall into two categories: (1) improving existing electrochemical technology, and (2) developing clean electrochemical technology to displace current nonelectrochemical technology. In both instances success hinges upon the discovery of advanced materials and the ecologically sound extraction of metals, the close coupling between materials science and molten salt chemistry is manifest. (author) 6 refs

  8. Molten salt processing of mixed wastes with offgas condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.F.; Brummond, W.; Celeste, J.; Farmer, J.; Hoenig, C.; Krikorian, O.H.; Upadhye, R.; Gay, R.L.; Stewart, A.; Yosim, S.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing an advanced process for treatment of mixed wastes in molten salt media at temperatures of 700--1000 degrees C. Waste destruction has been demonstrated in a single stage oxidation process, with destruction efficiencies above 99.9999% for many waste categories. The molten salt provides a heat transfer medium, prevents thermal surges, and functions as an in situ scrubber to transform the acid-gas forming components of the waste into neutral salts and immobilizes potentially fugitive materials by a combination of particle wetting, encapsulation and chemical dissolution and solvation. Because the offgas is collected and assayed before release, and wastes containing toxic and radioactive materials are treated while immobilized in a condensed phase, the process avoids the problems sometimes associated with incineration processes. We are studying a potentially improved modification of this process, which treats oxidizable wastes in two stages: pyrolysis followed by catalyzed molten salt oxidation of the pyrolysis gases at ca. 700 degrees C. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. Thorium valency in molten alkali halides in equilibrium with metallic thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic thorium is shown to corrode in molten alkali halides even in the absence of external oxidizing agents, alkali cations acting as oxidizing agents. Its corrosion rate grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl at constant temperature. Substituting halide anions for one another exerts a smaller influence, the rate rising slightly in going from chlorides to bromides and iodides, having the same alkali cations. Thorium valency is determined coulometrically, the metal being dissolved anodically in molten alkali halides and their mixtures. In fluoride melts it is equal to 4 but in chloride, bromide and iodide ones, as a rule, it has non-integral values between 4 and 2 which diminish as the temperature is raised, as the thorium concentration is lowered, as the radii of alkali cations decrease and those of halide anions increase. The emf of cells Th/N ThHlsub(n) + (1-N) MHl/MHl/C, Hlsub(2(g)) where Hl is Cl, Br or I, M is Li, Na, K, Cs or Na + K, and N < 0.05, is measured as a function of concentration at several temperatures. Expressions are obtained for its concentration dependence. The emf grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl, other conditions being equal. (author)

  10. Coulometric thermometric titration of halides in molten calcium nitrate tetrahydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsigrai, I J; Bartusz, D B

    1983-01-01

    A method for coulometric thermometric precipitation titrations of chloride, bromide and iodide in molten calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at 55 degrees with coulometrically generated silver ions has been developed. The change in temperature during the titration is followed with the aid of a thermistor bridge coupled to a recorder. To minimize the temperature effect of the passage of current through the melt, two thermistors are connected in opposition in the bridge, with one in the anodic and the other in the cathodic cell compartment. Amounts of 62-80 mumole of halide have been determined with relative error below 0.4% and relative standard deviation less than 2.7%. The relative error in determination of 40 mumole of iodide was + 2%.

  11. Co-ordination of heterovalent cation impurities in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, W.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The local liquid structure around heterovalent cation impurities in molten chlorides is discussed in relation to spectroscopic data on solutions of transition metal ions. A tightly packed, low co-ordination shell is shown to be favoured by Coulomb ionic interactions for physically reasonable values of the size of the impurity. A competition between these forces and ''crystal field'' interactions favouring octahedral co-ordination is thus to be expected for many transition metal ions, as suggested by Gruen and McBeth. The transition observed for some transition metal ions from higher to lower co-ordination with increasing temperature is attributed primarily to entropy differences, that are roughly estimated in a solid-like model. (author)

  12. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  13. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  14. Compatibility of molten salt and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    As the important factors for considering the compatibility of fuel salt and coolant salt with structural materials in molten salt reactors, there are the moisture remaining in molten salt and the fluorine potential in molten salt. In this study, as for the metals which are the main components of corrosion resistant alloys, the corrosion by the moisture remaining in molten salt and the dependence of the corrosion on fluorine potential were examined. As the molten salts, an eutectic molten salt LiF-BeF 2 was mainly used, and LiF-KF was used in combination. As the metallic materials, Cr, Ni and Cu which are the main components of corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloys, Hastelloy and Monel, were used. In the experiment, the metal pieces were immersed in the molten salt, and by sampling the molten salt, the change with time lapse of the concentration of the dissolved metals was examined. Besides, the electrochemical measurement was carried out for Cr, of which the corrosion was remarkable, and the change with time lapse of the dissolved ions was examined. The experimental setup, the experimental method, and the results of the immersion test and the electrochemical test are reported. The experiment on the corrosion of metals depending on fluorine potential is also reported. (K.I.)

  15. Compatibility of molten salt and structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Masahiro [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    As the important factors for considering the compatibility of fuel salt and coolant salt with structural materials in molten salt reactors, there are the moisture remaining in molten salt and the fluorine potential in molten salt. In this study, as for the metals which are the main components of corrosion resistant alloys, the corrosion by the moisture remaining in molten salt and the dependence of the corrosion on fluorine potential were examined. As the molten salts, an eutectic molten salt LiF-BeF{sub 2} was mainly used, and LiF-KF was used in combination. As the metallic materials, Cr, Ni and Cu which are the main components of corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloys, Hastelloy and Monel, were used. In the experiment, the metal pieces were immersed in the molten salt, and by sampling the molten salt, the change with time lapse of the concentration of the dissolved metals was examined. Besides, the electrochemical measurement was carried out for Cr, of which the corrosion was remarkable, and the change with time lapse of the dissolved ions was examined. The experimental setup, the experimental method, and the results of the immersion test and the electrochemical test are reported. The experiment on the corrosion of metals depending on fluorine potential is also reported. (K.I.).

  16. Fundamentals of molten-salt thermal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This book has been published by the Society of Molten-Salt Thermal Technology to publish a part of the achievement of its members. This book is composed of seven chapters. The chapter 1 is Introduction. The chapter 2 explains the physical properties of molten salts, such as thermal behavior, surface tension, viscosity, electrical conductivity and others. The chapter 3 presents the compatibility with construction materials. Corrosion in molten salts, the electrochemical behavior of fluoride ions on carbon electrodes in fluoride melts, the behaviors of hastelloy N and metals in melts are items of this chapter. The equipments and instruments for molten salts are described in chapter 4. The heat transfer in molten salts is discussed in chapter 5. The chapter 6 explains the application of molten salt technology. The molten salt technology can be applied not only to thermal engineering and energy engineering but also to chemical and nuclear engineerings, and the technical fundamentals, current development status, technical problems and the perspective for the future are outlined. The chapter 7 is the summary of this book. The commercialization of molten salt power reactors is discussed at the end of this book. (Kato, T.)

  17. Metal Production by Molten Salt Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.; Qingfeng, Li

    Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed.......Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed....

  18. Improvement to molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienvenu, Claude.

    1975-01-01

    The invention proposes a molten salt nuclear reactor whose core includes a mass of at least one fissile element salt to which can be added other salts to lower the melting temperature of the mass. This mass also contains a substance with a low neutron capture section that does not give rise to a chemical reaction or to an azeotropic mixture with these salts and having an atmospheric boiling point under that of the mass in operation. Means are provided for collecting this substance in the vapour state and returning it as a liquid to the mass. The kind of substance chosen will depend on that of the molten salts (fissile element salts and, where required, salts to lower the melting temperature). In actual practice, the substance chosen will have an atmospheric pressure boiling point of between 600 and 1300 0 C and a melting point sufficiently below 600 0 C to prevent solidification and clogging in the return line of the substance from the exchanger. Among the materials which can be considered for use, mention is made of magnesium, rubidium, cesium and potassium but metal cesium is not employed in the case of many fissile salts, such as fluorides, which it would reduced to the planned working temperatures [fr

  19. Reuse of spent fuel cladding Zr by molten salt toward advanced recycle society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Yasuike, Y.; Sato, Nobuaki

    2003-01-01

    Cladding tubes of zircaloy 95% generated from reprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels are to be chopped in about 3 cm length, compacted and solidified with cements. This paper reports the summary of investigation of the present possible techniques for zirconium recovery: (1) electrolysis of molten salts (Zr-chlorides and/or fluorides) and (2) separation as volatile zirconium chlorides (ZrCl 4 ) (chloride volatility process) followed by reaction with metallic magnesium at 900degC to produce sponged Zr (Kroll method). The feasibility are discussed from the point of view of reduction of secondary radioactive wastes, accumulation of such nuclides as Co-60 and Ni-63 in electrolytic basin, radioactivity estimation in the products, and also problems of cleaning and reducing chemicals. (S. Ohno)

  20. Density and electrical conductivity of NaCl-CoCl{sub 2} and NaCl-NiCl{sub 2} molten mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Red` kin, A A [Institute of High Temp. Electrochem., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Salyulev, A B [Institute of High Temp. Electrochem., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Smirnov, M V [Institute of High Temp. Electrochem., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, V A [Institute of High Temp. Electrochem., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    The density and electrical conductivity of cobalt and nickel dichlorides and their solutions in molten sodium chloride have been measured. The density was measured by a dilatometric method, and the electrical conductivity by an AC technique. The molar volume and equivalent conductance were calculated. (orig.)

  1. Thermochemical properties of media for pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yuji; Terai, Takayuki

    1998-01-01

    Molten chloride/cadmium system is considered to be applied to a solvent in pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In this work, phase diagrams for molten chloride systems were constructed, using NdCl 3 as an imitative substance in place of UCl 3 or PuCl 3 . Hastelloy-X (Ni/Cr21/Fe18/Mo9/W) was examined as a structural material for the corrosion-resistance against molten chloride baths containing NdCl 3 . The process of corrosion was thermochemically discussed and the form of the corrosion was illustrated. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was successfully applied to determine the elemental distribution profile of specimens tested on the compatibility with molten chloride mixture at elevated temperature. Ferritic steel was also examined as another candidate material for the compatibility with molten cadmium covered with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Variation of near-surface composition was observed by comparing the results of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy obtained before and after the dipping. (author)

  2. A analysis of molten salt separation system for nuclear wastes transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Soon; Park, Byung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Bum; Kwon, Ou Sung [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Typical molten salt separation is ANL-IFR pyroprocessing and ORNL-MSRE pyroprocessing. IFR pyroprocessing is based on Chloride chemistry and electrorefining. MSRE pyroprocessing is base on fluoride chemistry and reductive extraction. Major technologies of molten salt separation are electrorefining, electrowining, reductive extraction, and oxide reduction. Common characteristics of this technologies is to utilize reduction-oxidation phenomena in molten salt. Electrorefining process is modeled on the basis of diffusion layer theory and Butler-Volmor relation. This model is numerically solved by LSODA package. To acquire the technology of electrorefining process, 3-electrode electrochemical cell is developed where electrolyte is 500 degree C LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt, working electrodes are Ni and Au, and reference electrode is Ag/AgCl. We have investigated the stable potential range using cyclic voltammogram of Ni electrode. We have measured steady state polarization curve of Ni electrode. Then corrosion potential of Ni electrode is -0.38V{sub Ag/AgCl} and corrosion current is 1.23 x 10{sup -4} A/cm{sup 2}. 12 refs., 6 tabs., 24 figs. (author)

  3. Sampling device for radioactive molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masato

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for accurately sampling molten salts to which various kinds of metals in a molten salt storage tank are mixed for analyzing them during a spent fuel dry type reprocessing. Namely, the device comprises a sampling tube having an opened lower end to be inserted into the radioactive molten salts stored in a tank and keeps reduced pressure from the upper end, and a pressure reducing pipeline having one end connected to the sampling tube and other end connected to an evacuating pump. In this device, the top end of the sampling tube is inserted to a position for sampling the radioactive molten salts (molten salts). The pressure inside the evacuating pipeline connected to the upper portion of the sampling tube is reduced for a while. In this case, the inside of the pressure reducing pipeline is previously evacuated by the evacuating pump so as to keep a predetermined pressure. Since the pressure in the sampling tube is lowered, molten salts are inserted into the sampling tube, the sampling tube is withdrawn, and the molten salts flown in the sampling tube are analyzed. (I.S.)

  4. Kinetic studies on the removal of fission products from molten salt using Zeolite-4A. Contributed Paper RD-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Suheel; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Perumal, S.V.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is one of the nonaqueous processes, being developed for reprocessing metallic spent fuel. This process uses liquid metals and molten salts and is operated at elevated temperatures. In the electro-refining process, the spent fuel is used as the anode of the electro-refiner and the actinide elements in the spent fuel are electrotransported from the anode through the molten salt electrolyte onto a suitable cathode where they are collected as metals in pure form. After some batches are processed, chlorides of fission products such as alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metals accumulate in the electrolyte salt. The accumulated FPs in the salt will be removed by adsorption/ion-exchange by using zeolite columns. Hence, kinetic studies on the adsorption of Cs, Ba which are some of the major FP products in LiCI-KCI eutectic, have been carried out

  5. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.; Serp, J.; Fouletier, J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief article describes a pyrochemical process that is used by CEA to turn actinide oxides into metal actinides. This process is applied to Cerium oxides (CeO 2 ) that simulate actinide oxides well chemically as cerium belongs to the lanthanide family. The process is in fact an electrolysis of cerium oxide in a bath of molten calcium chloride salt whose temperature is between 800 and 900 Celsius degrees. At those temperatures calcium chloride becomes a ionic liquid (Ca 2+ and Cl - ) that is a good electrical conductor and is particularly well-adapted as solvent to an electrolytic process. The electrolysis current allows the transformation of solvent Ca 2+ ions into metal calcium which, in turn, can reduce cerium oxide into metal cerium through chromatically. Experimental data shows the reduction of up to 90% of 10 g samples of CeO 2 in a 6 hour long electrolysis while the best reduction rate ever known was 80% so far. This result is all the more promising that cerium oxides are more difficult to reduce than actinide oxides from the thermodynamical perspective

  6. Thermal conductivity of molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta-Martinez, Maria Vita

    2000-02-01

    A new instrument for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals has been designed, built and commissioned. The apparatus is based on the transient hot-wire technique and it is intended for operation over a wide range of temperatures, from ambient up to 1200 K, with an accuracy approaching 2%. In its present form the instrument operates up to 750 K. The construction of the apparatus involved four different stages, first, the design and construction of the sensor and second, the construction of an electronic system for the measurement and storage of data. The third stage was the design and instrumentation of the high temperature furnace for the melting and temperature control of the sample, and finally, an algorithm was developed for the extraction of the thermal conductivity from the raw measurement data. The sensor consists of a cylindrical platinum-wire symmetrically sandwiched between two rectangular plane sheets of alumina. The rectangular sensor is immersed in the molten metal of interest and a voltage step is applied to the ends of the platinum wire to induce heat dissipation and a consequent temperature rise which, is in part, determined by the thermal conductivity of the molten metal. The process is described by a set of partial differential equations and appropriate boundary conditions rather than an approximate analytical solution. An electronic bridge configuration was designed and constructed to perform the measurement of the resistance change of the platinum wire in the time range 20 {mu}s to 1 s. The resistance change is converted to temperature change by a suitable calibration. From these temperature measurements as a function of time the thermal conductivity of the molten metals has been deduced using the Finite Element Method for the solution of the working equations. This work has achieved its objective of improving the accuracy of the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals from {+-}20% to {+-}2%. Measurements

  7. Inertia-confining thermonuclear molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Yamanaka, Chiyoe; Nakai, Sadao; Imon, Shunji; Nakajima, Hidenori; Nakamura, Norio; Kato, Yoshio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the heat generating efficiency while improving the reactor safety and thereby maintaining the energy balance throughout the reactor. Constitution: In an inertia-confining type D-T thermonuclear reactor, the blanket is made of lithium-containing fluoride molten salts (LiF.BeF 2 , LiF.NaF.KF, LiF.KF, etc) which are cascaded downwardly in a large thickness (50 - 100 cm) along the inner wall of the thermonuclear reaction vessel, and neutrons generated by explosive compression are absorbed to lithium in the molten salts to produce tritium, Heat transportation is carried out by the molten salts. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Chloride ingress prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jens Mejer; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of chloride ingress into concrete is an important part of durability design of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride containing environment. This paper presents experimentally based design parameters for Portland cement concretes with and without silica fume and fly ash...... in marine atmospheric and submersed South Scandinavian environment. The design parameters are based on sequential measurements of 86 chloride profiles taken over ten years from 13 different types of concrete. The design parameters provide the input for an analytical model for chloride profiles as function...... of depth and time, when both the surface chloride concentration and the diffusion coefficient are allowed to vary in time. The model is presented in a companion paper....

  9. Structure and thermodynamics of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papatheodorou, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates single-component molten salts and multicomponent salt mixtures. Molten salts provide an important testing ground for theories of liquids, solutions, and plasmas. Topics considered include molten salts as liquids (the pair potential, the radial distribution function, methods of characterization), single salts (structure, thermodynamic correlations), and salt mixtures (the thermodynamics of mixing; spectroscopy and structure). Neutron and X-ray scattering techniques are used to determine the structure of molten metal halide salts. The corresponding-states theory is used to obtain thermodynamic correlations on single salts. Structural information on salt mixtures is obtained by using vibrational (Raman) and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge-symmetrical systems and charge-unsymmetrical systems are used to examine the thermodynamics of salt mixtures

  10. Waste treatment using molten salt oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Stewart, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    MSO technology can be characterized as a submerged oxidation process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The molten salt (usually sodium carbonate at 900-1000 C) provides four waste management functions: providing a heat transfer medium, catalyzing the oxidation reaction, preventing the formation of acid gases by forming stable salts, and efficiently capturing ash particles and radioactive materials by the combined effects of wetting, encapsulation and dissolution. The MSO process requires no wet scrubbing system for off-gas treatment. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous wastes). (author). 24 refs, 2 tabs, 2 figs

  11. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO 2 and PuO 2 in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  12. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  13. Controlling the discharge of molten material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geel, J. van; Dobbels, F.; Theunissen, W.

    1980-01-01

    A method and device are described for controlling the discharge of molten material from a melter or an intermediate vessel, in which a primary outflow is fed to an overflow system, the working level of which is regulated by means of pneumatic pressure on a communicating chamber pertaining to the overflow system. Molten material may be led into a primary overflow by means of a pneumatic lift. The material melted may be a glass used for disposing of radioactive liquid wastes. (author)

  14. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  15. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriko Asanuma; Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada; Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF 4 or NaF adsorbing UF 6 are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF 4 was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na 3 UO 2 F 5 . Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  17. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noriko Asanuma [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF{sub 4} or NaF adsorbing UF{sub 6} are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF{sub 4} was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na{sub 3}UO{sub 2}F{sub 5}. Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  18. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  19. Some Elements of Equilibrium Diagrams for Systems of Iron with Water above 100 deg C and with Simple Chloride, Carbonate and Sulfate Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Derek

    1971-05-01

    Some aspects of molten salts relevant to the nuclear power industry are discussed briefly and an approach is presented to the theoretical description of the electrochemical thermodynamics of corrosion, mass-transport and deposition processes in power-plant working on the water-cycle, and in homogenous molten-salt reactors. Diagrams are introduced, based on the parameter pe instead of the usual redox potential, that are useful for illustrating equilibrium data for aqueous systems at elevated temperatures and for molten salts. Systems including iron in water and in the eutectic mixtures of lithium and sodium chloride, carbonate and sulfate, are taken as examples

  20. Some Elements of Equilibrium Diagrams for Systems of Iron with Water above 100 deg C and with Simple Chloride, Carbonate and Sulfate Melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Derek

    1971-05-15

    Some aspects of molten salts relevant to the nuclear power industry are discussed briefly and an approach is presented to the theoretical description of the electrochemical thermodynamics of corrosion, mass-transport and deposition processes in power-plant working on the water-cycle, and in homogenous molten-salt reactors. Diagrams are introduced, based on the parameter pe instead of the usual redox potential, that are useful for illustrating equilibrium data for aqueous systems at elevated temperatures and for molten salts. Systems including iron in water and in the eutectic mixtures of lithium and sodium chloride, carbonate and sulfate, are taken as examples

  1. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  2. Diffusion, electrical mobility and ionic interactions in molten Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantelme, F.

    1965-05-01

    The diffusion and the electrical migration of ions in the molten alkali nitrates LiNO 3 , NaNO 3 and KNO 3 and in their mixtures have been examined using stable or radio-active isotope indicators. This experimental works shows that there are large differences in the diffusion coefficients and the electric mobilities when they are compared using the Nernst-Einstein formula. An interpretive model has been put forward which shows the role played by poly-ionic displacements: in a salt AC the particles moving are not only the free ions A - and C + but also the groups [A n C m ] (m-n)+ ... These results confirm the importance of electrostatic attraction and of the polarizability of the ions. This mechanisms, furthermore, explains the inversions of electrical mobilities often observed in liquid ionic media. (author) [fr

  3. Modelization of the SECM in molten salts environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.; Slim, C.; Di Caprio, D.; Delpech, S.; Stafiej, J.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a cellular automata simulation of SECM (Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy)experiments to study corrosion in molten salt media for generation IV nuclear reactors. The electrodes used in these experiments are cylindrical glass tips with a coaxial metal wire inside. As the result of simulations we obtain the current approach curves of the electrodes with geometries characterized by several values of the ratios of glass to metal area at the tip. We compare these results with predictions of the known analytic expressions, solutions of partial differential equations for flat uniform geometry of the substrate. We present also the results for other, more complicated substrate surface geometries e. g. regular saw modulated surface, or surface obtained by an Eden model process. We show that with a simple cellular automata model we can reasonably well simulate the results of SECM setup. The stochastic resolution of the diffusion equations is made possible by the parallel code implemented on GPU

  4. Physical properties of molten carbonate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, T.; Yanagida, M.; Tanimoto, K. [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Recently many kinds of compositions of molten carbonate electrolyte have been applied to molten carbonate fuel cell in order to avoid the several problems such as corrosion of separator plate and NiO cathode dissolution. Many researchers recognize that the addition of alkaline earth (Ca, Sr, and Ba) carbonate to Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} eutectic electrolytes is effective to avoid these problems. On the other hand, one of the corrosion products, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion is found to dissolve into electrolyte and accumulated during the long-term MCFC operations. This would affect the performance of MCFC. There, however, are little known data of physical properties of molten carbonate containing alkaline earth carbonates and CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We report the measured and accumulated data for these molten carbonate of electrical conductivity and surface tension to select favorable composition of molten carbonate electrolytes.

  5. Development of viscometers for molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Kato, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toru; Sato, Yuzuru.

    1997-06-01

    Viscometers specially designed for molten salts were made. One is a oscillating cup type and the other is a capillary type. In the case of the oscillating cup viscometer, the viscosity is determined absolutely through the period and the logarithmic decrement of oscillation with other physical parameters. The period and the logarithmic decrement are calculated from the time intervals between two photo-detectors' intercepts of the reflected laser beam. The capillary viscometer used is made of quartz and the sample is sealed under vacuum, which is placed in a transparent furnace. Efflux time is measured by direct visual observation. Cell constants are determined with distilled water as a calibrating liquid. Viscosities of molten KCl are measured with each viscometer. The differences between measured and standard values of molten KCl at several temperatures are within 5% for the oscillating cup viscometer and within 3% for the capillary viscometer. (author)

  6. Molten salt burner fuel behaviour and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.V.; Zakirov, R.Y.; Grebenkine, K.F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of molten salt reactor technology for treatment of Pu, minor actinides and fission products, when the reactor and fission product clean-up unit are planned as an integral system. This contribution summarises the available R and D which led to selection of the fuel compositions for the molten salt reactor of the TRU burner type (MSB). Special characteristics of behaviour of TRUs and fission products during power operation of MSB concepts are presented. The present paper briefly reviews the processing developments underlying the prior molten salt reactor programmes and relates them to the separation requirements of the MSB concept, including the permissible range of processing cycle times and removal times. Status and development needs in the thermodynamic properties of fluorides, fission product clean-up methods and container materials compatibility with the working fluids for the fission product clean-up unit are discussed. (authors)

  7. Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Lecocq, A.; Kato, Yoshio; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    In the next century, the 'fission breeder' concept will not be practical to solve the global energy problems, including environmental and North-South problems. As a new measure, a simple rational Th molten salt breeding fuel cycle system, named 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics (THORIMS-NES)', which composed of simple power stations and fissile producers, is proposed. This is effective to establish the essential improvement in issues of resources, safety, power-size flexibility, anti-nuclear proliferation and terrorism, radiowaste, economy, etc. securing the simple operation, maintenance, chemical processing, and rational breeding fuel cycle. As examples, 155 MWe fuel self-sustaining power station 'FUJI-II', 7 MWe pilot-plant 'miniFUJI-II', 1 GeV-300 mA proton Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder 'AMSB', and their combined fuel cycle system are explained. (author)

  8. Modelling of molten fuel/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, J.F.; Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete (CORCON) is being developed to provide quantitative estimates of fuel-melt accident consequences suitable for risk assessment of light water reactors. The principal features of CORCON are reviewed. Models developed for the principal interaction phenomena, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. Alternative models for the controlling phenomenon, heat transfer from the molten pool to the surrounding concrete, are presented. These models, formulated in conjunction with the development of CORCON, are characterized by the presence or absence of either a gas film or viscous layer of molten concrete at the melt/concrete interface. Predictions of heat transfer based on these models compare favorably with available experimental data

  9. R and D of On-line Reprocessing Technology for Molten-Salt Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, Jan; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included in the Generation IV reactors family. The reactor can be operated as the thorium breeder or as the actinide transmuter. However, the future deployment of Molten-Salt Reactors will be significantly dependent on the successful mastering of advanced reprocessing technologies dedicated to their fuel cycle. Here the on-line reprocessing technology connected with the fuel circuit of MSR is of special importance because the reactor cannot be operated for a long run without the fuel salt clean-up. Generally, main MSR reprocessing technologies are pyrochemical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. The proposed flow-sheets of MSR on-line reprocessing are based on a combination of molten-salt / liquid metal extraction and electro-separation processes, which can be added to the gas extraction process already verified during the MSRE project in ORNL. The crucial separation method proposed for partitioning of actinides from fission products is based on successive Anodic dissolution and Cathodic deposition processes in molten fluoride media. (authors)

  10. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Broadband phase difference method for ultrasonic velocimetry in molten glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikura, Hiroshige; Ihara, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry in molten glass. Realization of such a technique has two difficulties: ultrasonic transmission into molten salt and Doppler signal processing. Buffer rod technique was developed in our research to transmit ultrasound into high temperature molten glass. This article discusses newly developed signal processing technique named broadband phase difference method. (J.P.N.)

  13. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiesen, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a vessel for handling molten metal having an interior refractory lining, apparatus for continuous high temperature measurement of the molten metal. It comprises a thermowell; the thermowell containing a multiplicity of thermocouples; leads being coupled to a means for continuously indicating the temperature of the molten metal in the vessel

  14. On some regularities of metal oxide solubility in molten CsI at T = 973 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherginets, V.L., E-mail: v_cherginets@ukr.net [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 21 Frunze St., 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Rebrova, T.P.; Datsko, Yu.N.; Shtitelman, V.A. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Bryleva, E.Yu. [State Scientific Organization STC ' Institute for Single Crystals' , National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue, 60, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > CdO, ZnO, NiO, and EuO are insoluble in CsI melt at 973 K. > The oxide solubilities are lower than those in chloride melts. > The oxide solubilities reduce with the cation radius. > ZnO, NiO, and EuO are suitable for scavenging CsO from oxide ion traces. - Abstract: Solubility products of CdO (pK{sub s,CdO} = 6.80 {+-} 0.2), ZnO (pK{sub s,ZnO} = 10.0 {+-} 0.5), NiO (pK{sub s,NiO} = 11.2 {+-} 0.2) and EuO (pK{sub s,EuO} = 13.1 {+-} 0.2) in molten CsI at T = 973 K are determined by potentiometric titration of (0.02 to 0.03) mol . kg{sup -1} solutions of the corresponding metal chlorides by strong base (KOH) using a membrane oxygen electrode Pt(O{sub 2})|ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) as an indicator. On the basis of pK{sub s,MeO} values, all the oxides studied are referred to practically insoluble in molten CsI. The values of the oxide solubility in CsI melt are lower than the corresponding values in molten alkali metal chlorides. This can be explained by 'softer' basic properties of I{sup -} as compared with Cl{sup -} in the frames of the Pearson 'hard' and 'soft' acid-base concept. In the oxide samples studied, the values of the solubility fall with the decreasing cation radius. The correlation between pK{sub s,MeO} and the polarizing action by Goldshmidt (Zr{sub Me{sup 2+}}{sup -2}) of the cation is practically linear and may be proposed for estimation of the solubility of s- and d- element oxides in molten CsI on the basis of their cation radii.

  15. Hydrodynamic simulation of a lithium chloride salt system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C. S.; Herrmann, S. D.; Knighton, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    A fused lithium chloride salt system's constitutive properties were evaluated and compared to a number of fluid properties, and water was shown to be an excellent simulant of lithium chloride salt. With a simple flow model, the principal scaling term was shown to be a function of the kinematic viscosity. A water mock-up of the molten salt was also shown to be within a ±3% error in the scaling analysis. This made it possible to consider developing water scaled tests of the molten salt system. Accurate flow velocity and pressure measurements were acquired by developing a directional velocity probe. The device was constructed and calibrated with a repeatable accuracy of ±15%. This was verified by a detailed evaluation of the probe. Extensive flow measurements of the engineering scale mockup were conducted, and the results were carefully compared to radial flow patterns of a straight blade stirrer. The flow measurements demonstrated an anti-symmetric nature of the stirring, and many additional effects were also identified. The basket design was shown to prevent fluid penetration into the fuel baskets when external stirring was the flow mechanism

  16. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  17. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations

  18. Combined system of accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) apd molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.; Kato, Y.; Ohmichi, T.; Ohno, H.

    1983-01-01

    A design and research program is discUssed of the development of accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) consisting of a proton accelerator and a molten fluoride target. The target simultaneously serves as a blanket for fissionable material prodUction. An addition of some amoUnt of fissile nuclides to a melt expands the AMSB potentialities as the fissionable material production increases and the energy generation also grows up to the level of self-provision. Besides the blanket salts may be used as nuclear fuel for molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR). The combined AM SB+MSCR system has better parameters as compared to other breeder reactors, molten-salt breeder reactors (MSBR) included

  19. Electrochemical reduction of actinides oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive metals are currently produced from their oxide by multiple steps reduction techniques. A one step route from the oxide to the metal has been suggested for metallic titanium production by electrolysis in high temperature molten chloride salts. In the so-called FFC process, titanium oxide is electrochemically reduced at the cathode, generating O 2- ions, which are converted on a graphite anode into carbon oxide or dioxide. After this process, the spent salt can in principle be reused for several batches which is particularly attractive for a nuclear application in terms of waste minimization. In this work, the electrochemical reduction process of cerium oxide (IV) is studied in CaCl 2 and CaCl 2 -KCl melts to understand the oxide reduction mechanism. Cerium is used as a chemical analogue of actinides. Electrolysis on 10 grams of cerium oxide are made to find optimal conditions for the conversion of actinides oxides into metals. The scale-up to hundred grams of oxide is also discussed. (author) [fr

  20. Potentiometric study of samarium oxides formation from its chloride in a molten eutectic mixture of sodium and cesium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Bove, A.L.; Del'mukhamedov, R.D.; Borodina, N.P.; Gavrilov, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of trivalent samarium cations with oxide-ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt at 973 K has been studied by potentiometric method using electrochemical cell with two platinum-oxygen electrodes with a solid electrolyte membrane. The mechanism of the interaction and composition of the reaction products, depending on the medium oxyacidity, have been considered. Certain thermodynamic characteristics of the process have been calculated

  1. Recent electroanalytical studies in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, D.L.; Mamantov, G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes the voltametric and chronopotentiometric studies of Bi, Fe, Te, oxide and U(IV)/U(III) ratio determinations in molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 (72-16-12 mole percent) and LiF--BeF 2 --ZrF 4 (65.6-29.4-5.0 mole percent). 54 references, 11 figures

  2. Galvanic high energy cells with molten electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borger, W.; Kappus, W.; Kunze, D.; Laig-Hoerstebrock, H.; Panesar, H.; Sterr, G.

    1981-01-01

    To develop a galvanic cell with molten salt electrolyte for electric vehicle propulsion and load leveling as well as to fabricate ten prototype cells with a capacity of at least 150 Ah (5 hour rate) and an energy density of 80 Wh/kg was the objective of this project.

  3. Dynamic Reference Electrode development for redox potential measurements in fluoride molten salt at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Klie, Gabriela; Rodrigues, Davide; Delpech, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of redox potential in fluoride media is a major problem due to the difficulty to design a reference electrode with high stability, high mechanical resistance and high accuracy. In the frame of molten salt reactor studies, a dynamic reference electrode (DRE) is developed to measure redox potential in fluoride molten salt at high temperature. DRE is based on the in-situ generation of a transient redox system. The choice of the redox couple corresponds to the cathodic limit of the molten salt considered. As a preliminary step, the demonstration of feasibility of generating a DRE was done in LiF-NaF-KF (46.5–11.5–42 mol%) media at 500 °C. In this salt, the reference redox system generated by coulometry at applied current is KF/K, metallic potassium being electrodeposited on a tungsten wire electrode. The validation of the DRE response and the experimental optimization parameters for DRE generation were realized by following the NiF 2 /Ni redox potential evolution as a function of NiF 2 concentration in the fused salt. The current value applied for DRE generation was optimized. It depends on the amount of metallic cations contained in the fused salt and which can be electrochemically reduced simultaneously during the DRE generation. The current corresponding to the DRE generation has to be 4 times greater than the current corresponding to the reduction of the other elements.

  4. Bibliographical study for the development of an electrochemical preparation of plutonium molten salts; Etude bibliographique en vue de la mise au point d'une preparation electrochimique en sels fondus du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, J.

    1957-01-15

    Based on an analogy with methods of electrochemical preparation of uranium molten salts, this bibliographical study reports data of physical properties of plutonium (melting point, density, ranges of existence of the different plutonium phases, resistivity, resistivity variation coefficient), discusses the search for an electrolytic bath (properties of plutonium bromides, chlorides and fluorides), and the required apparatus (an electrolysis cell)

  5. Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Mitachi, Koshi

    2013-01-01

    The authors have been promoting nuclear energy technology based on thorium molten salt as Thorium Molten Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System (THORIMS-NES). This system is a combination of fission power reactor of Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Accelerator Molten Salt Breeder (AMSB) for production of fissile 233 U with connecting chemical processing facility. In this paper, concept of THORIMS-NES, advantages of thorium and molten salt recent MSR design results such as FUJI-U3 using 233 U fuel, FUJI-Pu, large sized super-FUJI, pilot plant miniFUJI, AMSB, and chemical processing facility are described. (author)

  6. Molten salt: Corrosion problems and electrometallurgy in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliographic survey is given of corrosion problems and electrometallurgical problems of molten salt in nuclear reactor applications. Due to the high potential to be achieved, their high ionic conductivity and the rapidity of reactions in a molten salt atmosphere, molten salts are interesting solvents for various electrometallurgical processes. Another important field of application is in the separation or electrolytical refining of various metals (Be, U, Pu, Th, Hf, Zr). However, these very characteristics of molten salts may also cause serious corrosion problems. Results obtained for the molten-salt reactor and the different causes of corrosion are reviewed an possible countermeasures analyzed. (orig.)

  7. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  8. The medical sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the institute was investigated the chemical composition of rock salt of some deposits of Tajikistan and was show the presence in it admixture of ions of Ca 2 + , Mg 2 + a nd SO 2 - a nd absence of heavy metals, ammonium salts, iron, potassium and arsenic. Was elaborated the fundamental instrument-technologic scheme of sodium chloride receiving

  9. Computer simulation on molten ionic salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Okada, I.

    1978-01-01

    The extensive advances in computer technology have since made it possible to apply computer simulation to the evaluation of the macroscopic and microscopic properties of molten salts. The evaluation of the potential energy in molten salts systems is complicated by the presence of long-range energy, i.e. Coulomb energy, in contrast to simple liquids where the potential energy is easily evaluated. It has been shown, however, that no difficulties are encountered when the Ewald method is applied to the evaluation of Coulomb energy. After a number of attempts had been made to approximate the pair potential, the Huggins-Mayer potential based on ionic crystals became the most often employed. Since it is thought that the only appreciable contribution to many-body potential, not included in Huggins-Mayer potential, arises from the internal electrostatic polarization of ions in molten ionic salts, computer simulation with a provision for ion polarization has been tried recently. The computations, which are employed mainly for molten alkali halides, can provide: (1) thermodynamic data such as internal energy, internal pressure and isothermal compressibility; (2) microscopic configurational data such as radial distribution functions; (3) transport data such as the diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity; and (4) spectroscopic data such as the intensity of inelastic scattering and the stretching frequency of simple molecules. The computed results seem to agree well with the measured results. Computer simulation can also be used to test the effectiveness of a proposed pair potential and the adequacy of postulated models of molten salts, and to obtain experimentally inaccessible data. A further application of MD computation employing the pair potential based on an ionic model to BeF 2 , ZnCl 2 and SiO 2 shows the possibility of quantitative interpretation of structures and glass transformation phenomena

  10. Liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride salt/liquid aluminium as a core of process for the An/Ln group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conocar, O.

    2007-06-01

    This report concerns a pyrochemical process based on liquid-liquid extraction in a molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system as a core process for actinide (An)/lanthanide (Ln) group separation, studied at CEA. The basic and demonstrative experiments have established the feasibility of the An/Ln group separation in the molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system (U, Pu, Np, Am, Cm traces from Nd, Ce, Eu, Sm, Eu, La - An/Ln separation factors over 1000 - An recovery yield over 98 % in one batch). The main experimental efforts must now be targeted on the recovery of actinides from the Al matrix. A thermodynamic and bibliographical survey has been done. It shows that back-extraction in a molten chloride melt could be a promising technique for this purpose

  11. Liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride salt/liquid aluminium as a core of process for the An/Ln group separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conocar, O

    2007-06-15

    This report concerns a pyrochemical process based on liquid-liquid extraction in a molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system as a core process for actinide (An)/lanthanide (Ln) group separation, studied at CEA. The basic and demonstrative experiments have established the feasibility of the An/Ln group separation in the molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system (U, Pu, Np, Am, Cm traces from Nd, Ce, Eu, Sm, Eu, La - An/Ln separation factors over 1000 - An recovery yield over 98 % in one batch). The main experimental efforts must now be targeted on the recovery of actinides from the Al matrix. A thermodynamic and bibliographical survey has been done. It shows that back-extraction in a molten chloride melt could be a promising technique for this purpose.

  12. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. The nonmetal-metal transition in solutions of metals in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1997-04-01

    Solutions of metals in molten salts present a rich phenomenology: localization of electrons in disordered ionic media, activated electron transport increasing with metal concentration towards a nonmetal-metal (NM-M) transition, and liquid-liquid phase separation. A brief review of progress in the study of these systems is given in this article, with main focus on the NM-M transition. After recalling the known NM-M behaviour of the component elements in the case of expanded fluid alkali metals and mercury and of solid halogens under pressure, the article focuses on liquid metal - molten salt solutions and traces the different NM-M behaviours of the alkalis in their halides and of metals added to polyvalent metal halides. (author). 51 refs, 2 figs

  14. Stability of oxaliplatin in chloride-containing carrier solutions used in hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehta, A M; Van den Hoven, J M; Rosing, H; Hillebrand, M J X; Nuijen, B; Huitema, A D R; Beijnen, J H; Verwaal, V J

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Oxaliplatin is increasingly becoming the chemotherapeutic drug of choice for the treatment of peritoneal malignancies using cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC). Oxaliplatin is unstable in chloride-containing media, resulting in the use of 5%

  15. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, Pattrick

    2010-01-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogeneous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R and D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part

  16. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  17. Symbiotic molten-salt systems coupled with accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) or inertial-confined fusion hybrid molten-salt breeder (IHMSB) and their comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of breeder systems are proposed. One is the combined system of Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder (AMSB) and Molten-Salt Converter Reactor (MSCR), and the other is the combined system of Inertial-confined Fusion Hybrid Molten-Salt Breeder (IHMSB) and modified MSCR. Both apply the molten-fluorides and have technically deep relations. AMSB would be much simpler and have already high technical feasibility. This will become economical the Th breeder system having a doubling time shorter than ten years and distributing any size of power stations MSCR. (orig.) [de

  18. Development of fuel cycle technology for molten-salt reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The Molten-Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising advanced reactor type assigned to the GEN IV reactor systems. It can be operated either as thorium breeder within the Th -133U fuel cycle or as actinide transmuter incinerating transuranium fuel. Essentially the main advantage of MSR comes out from the prerequisite, that this reactor type should be directly connected with the 'on-line' reprocessing of circulating liquid (molten-salt) fuel. This principle should allow very effective extraction of freshly constituted fissile material (233U). Besides, the on-line fuel salt clean up is necessary within a long run to keep the reactor in operation. As a matter of principle, it permits to clear away typical reactor poisons like xenon, krypton, lanthanides etc. and possibly also other products of burned plutonium and transmuted minor actinides. The fuel salt clean up technology should be linked with the fresh MSR fuel processing to continuously refill the new fuel (thorium or transuranics) into the reactor system. On the other hand, the technologies of fresh transuranium molten-salt fuel processing from the current LWR spent fuel and of the on-line reprocessing of MSR fuel represent two killing points of the whole MSR technology, which have to be successfully solved before MSR deployment in the future. There are three main pyrochemical partitioning techniques proposed for processing and/or reprocessing of MSR fuel: Fluoride volatilization processes, Molten salt / liquid metal extraction processes and Electrochemical separation processes. Two of them - Fluoride Volatility Method and Electrochemical separation process from fluoride media are under development in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez pic. R and D in the field of Fluoride Volatility Method is concentrated to the development and verification of experimental semi-pilot technology for LWR spent fuel reprocessing, which may result in a product the form and composition of which might be

  19. Light-induced reduction of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) on titanium dioxide dispersions and the selective photochemical separation and recovery of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in chloride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgarello, E.; Serpone, N.; Emo, G.; Harris, R.; Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C.

    1986-12-03

    Irradiation of aqueous TiO/sub 2/ dispersions containing palladium(II) or rhodium(III) chloride salts with AM1 simulated sunlight leads to the photoreduction of these metals, which are deposited on the semiconductor particle surface. Oxygen is detrimental to the photoreduction of rhodium(III) but not the photoreduction of palladium(II). However, in both cases the reduction process is most efficient if the solution contains CH/sub 3/OH, which acts to scavenge valence band holes of the illuminated TiO/sub 2/ semiconductor. The selective photoreduction and recovery of precious metals from a dilute solution (as might be found in industrial wastes) have been investigated for a mixture of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) chloride salts as a function of various parameters (pH, presence or absence of O/sub 2/, presence or absence of a hole scavenger, and the concentration of the semiconductor). At pH 0, gold is easily separated from platinum and rhodium. The rate of photoreduction of gold(III) on TiO/sub 2/ is nearly independent of the concentration of the semiconductor, under the experimental conditions employed; the limiting rate is 2.7 x 10/sup -7/ M s/sup -1/. The potential utility of this selective photochemical technique is discussed.

  20. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing atmosphere by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel. Corrosion research under chlorine gas condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Aose, Shinichi; Kato, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts (RIAR process) has been recently developed for spent nuclear oxide fuel and discussed in feasibility study. It is required to improve the corrosion resistance of equipments such as electrolyzer because the process is operated in severe corrosion environment. In this study, the corrosion resistance of ceramic materials was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas condition. And further consideration about the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides were evaluated in molten salt. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows most of ceramic oxides have good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride, however the standard Gibb's free energies with carbon have negative value. On the other hand, eleven kinds of ceramic materials were examined by corrosion test, then silicon nitride, mullite and cordierite have a good corrosion resistance less than 0.1 mm/y. Cracks were not observed on the materials and flexural strength did not reduce remarkably after 480 hours test in molten salt with Cl 2 -O 2 bubbling. In conclusion, these three ceramic materials are most applicable materials for the pyrochemical reprocessing process with chlorine gas condition. (author)

  1. The structure of molten CuCl: Reverse Monte Carlo modeling with high-energy X-ray diffraction data and molecular dynamics of a polarizable ion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, Olga; Trullàs, Joaquim; Tahara, Shuta; Kawakita, Yukinobu; Takeda, Shin’ichi

    2016-01-01

    The results of the structural properties of molten copper chloride are reported from high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements, reverse Monte Carlo modeling method, and molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable ion model. The simulated X-ray structure factor reproduces all trends observed experimentally, in particular the shoulder at around 1 Å −1 related to intermediate range ordering, as well as the partial copper-copper correlations from the reverse Monte Carlo modeling, which cannot be reproduced by using a simple rigid ion model. It is shown that the shoulder comes from intermediate range copper-copper correlations caused by the polarized chlorides.

  2. The structure of molten CuCl: Reverse Monte Carlo modeling with high-energy X-ray diffraction data and molecular dynamics of a polarizable ion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Olga; Trullàs, Joaquim, E-mail: quim.trullas@upc.edu [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Campus Nord UPC B4-B5, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Tahara, Shuta [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takeda, Shin’ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-09-07

    The results of the structural properties of molten copper chloride are reported from high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements, reverse Monte Carlo modeling method, and molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable ion model. The simulated X-ray structure factor reproduces all trends observed experimentally, in particular the shoulder at around 1 Å{sup −1} related to intermediate range ordering, as well as the partial copper-copper correlations from the reverse Monte Carlo modeling, which cannot be reproduced by using a simple rigid ion model. It is shown that the shoulder comes from intermediate range copper-copper correlations caused by the polarized chlorides.

  3. Dynamics of the Molten Contact Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, Ain A.; Duthaler, Gregg; Liu, Michael; Torresola, Javier; Qiu, Taiqing

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a basic understanding of how a molten material front spreads over a solid that is below its melting point, arrests, and freezes. Our hope is that the work will contribute toward a scientific knowledge base for certain new applications involving molten droplet deposition, including the "printing" of arbitrary three-dimensional objects by precise deposition of individual molten microdrops that solidify after impact. Little information is available at this time on the capillarity-driven motion and arrest of molten contact line regions. Schiaffino and Sonin investigated the arrest of the contact line of a molten microcrystalline wax spreading over a subcooled solid "target" of the same material. They found that contact line arrest takes place at an apparent liquid contact angle that depends primarily on the Stefan number S=c(T(sub f) -T(sub t)/L based on the temperature difference between the fusion point and the target temperature, and proposed that contact line arrest occurs when the liquid's dynamic contact angle approaches the angle of attack of the solidification front just behind the contact line. They also showed, however, that the conventional continuum equations and boundary conditions have no meaningful solution for this angle. The solidification front angle is determined by the heat flux just behind the contact line, and the heat flux is singular at that point. By comparing experiments with numerical computations, Schiaffino and Sonin estimated that the conventional solidification model must break down within a distance of order 0.1 - 1 microns of the contact line. The physical mechanism for this breakdown is as yet undetermined, and no first-principles theory exists for the contact angle at arrest. Schiaffino and Sonin also presented a framework for understanding how to moderate Weber number molten droplet deposition in terms of similarity laws and experimentation. The study is based on experiments with three molten

  4. Molten-salt reactor information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Cardwell, D.W.; Engel, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    The Molten-Salt Reactor Information System (MSRIS) is a computer-based file of abstracts of documents dealing with the technology of molten-salt reactors. The file is stored in the IBM-360 system at ORNL, and may be searched through the use of established interactive computer programs from remote terminals connected to the computer via telephone lines. The system currently contains 373 entries and is subject to updating and expansion as additional information is developed. The nature and general content of the data file, a general approach for obtaining information from it, and the manner in which material is added to the file are described. Appendixes provide the list of keywords currently in use, the subject categories under which information is filed, and simplified procedures for searching the file from remote terminals. (U.S.)

  5. Molten salt reactors. The AMSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnes, J.; Garzenne, C.; Lecarpentier, D.; Mouney, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the concept of actinide molten salt transmuter (AMSTER). This reactor is graphite-moderated and is dedicated to the burning of actinides. The main difference with a molten salt reactor is that its liquid fuel undergoes an on-line partial reprocessing in which fission products are extracted and heavy nuclei are reintroduced into the fuel. In order to maintain the reactivity regular injections of 235 U-salt are made. In classical reactors, fuel burn-up is limited by the swelling of the cladding and the radiation fuel pellets resistance, in AMSTER there is no limitation to the irradiation time of the fuel, so all the actinides can be burnt or transmuted. (A.C.)

  6. Analysis of a molten salt reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Biplab; Bajpai, Anil; Degweker, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our studies of an IAEA molten salt reactor (MSR) benchmark. The benchmark, proposed by Japan, involves burnup calculations of a single lattice cell of a MSR for burning plutonium and other minor actinides. We have analyzed this cell with in-house developed burnup codes BURNTRAN and McBURN. This paper also presents a comparison of the results of our codes and those obtained by the proposers of the benchmark. (author)

  7. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  8. Electrochemical studies in molten sodium fluoroborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Wagner, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Physical properties of sodium fluoroborate are recalled and first results obtained during experimental study of molten NaBF 4 are exposed. The system Cu/CuF is used as an indicator of fluoride ion activity and dissociation constant of the solvent is determined by adding NaF to NaBF 4 saturated with BF 3 at a pressure of 1 atm and found equal to 2.7x10 -3 [fr

  9. Corrosion of technical ceramics by molten aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, U.; Wolff, L.R.; Loo, van F.J.J.; Ziegler, G.

    1992-01-01

    The corrosion of 8 types of ceramics, i.e., 1 grade of hot isostatically pressed reaction-bonded Si3N4 (HIPRBSN), 3 grades of hot pressed Si3N4 (HPSN), and 4 grades of RBSN, and 2 types of SiC (HIPSiC and Si-impregnated SiC (SiSiC)) in molten Al (pure Al and AlZnMgCu1.5) was studied. The HIPRBSN and

  10. Thorium molten-salt nuclear energy synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo

    1989-01-01

    One of the most practical and rational approaches for establishing the idealistic Thorium resource utilization program has been presented, which might be effective to solve the principal energy problems, concerning safety, proliferation and terrorism, resource, power size and fuel cycle economy, for the next century. The first step will be the development of Small Molten-Salt Reactors as a flexible power station, which is suitable for early commercialization of Th reactors not necessarily competing with proven Large Solid-Fuel Reactors. Therefore, the more detailed design works and practical R and D planning should be performed under the international cooperations soon, soundly depending on the basic technology established by ORNL already. R and D cost would be surprisingly low. This reactor(MSR) seems to be idealistic not only in power-size, siting, safety, safeguard and economy, but also as an effective partner of Molten-Salt Fissile Breeders(MSB) in order to establish the simplest and economical Thorium molten-salt breeding fuel cycle named THORIMS-NES in all over the world including the developing countries and isolated areas. This would be one of the most practical replies to the Lilienthal's appeal of 'A NEW START' in Nuclear Energy. (author)

  11. Thermal interaction of molten copper with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental work was performed to study the thermal interaction between molten copper particles (in the range of temperature from the copper melting point to about 1800 0 C) and water from about 15-80 0 C. The transient temperatures of the copper particles and water before and during their thermal interaction were measured. The history of the phenomena was filmed by means of a high speed FASTAX camera (to 8000 f/s). Classification of the observed phenomena and description of the heat-transfer modes were derived. One among the phenomena was the thermal explosion. The necessary conditions for the thermal explosion are discussed and their physical interpretation is given. According to the hypothesis proposed, the thermal explosion occurs when the molten metal has the temperature of its solidification and the heat transfer on its surface is sufficiently intensive. The 'sharp-change' of the crystalline structure during the solidification of the molten metal is the cause of the explosion fragmentation. (author)

  12. The Experiences and Challenges in Drilling into Semi molten or Molten Intrusive in Menengai Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, A. K.; Mibei, G. K.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling in Menengai has experienced various challenges related to drilling operations and the resource itself i.e. quality discharge fluids vis a vis gas content. The main reason for these challenges is related to the nature of rocks encountered at depths. Intrusives encountered within Menengai geothermal field have been group into three based on their geological characteristics i.e. S1, S2 and S3.Detailed geology and mineralogical characterization have not been done on these intrusive types. However, based on physical appearances, S1 is considered as a diorite dike, S2 is syenite while S3 is molten rock material. This paper summarizes the experiences in drilling into semi molten or molten intrusive (S3).

  13. Molten salt engineering for thorium cycle. Electrochemical studies as examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    1998-01-01

    A Th-U nuclear energy system utilizing accelerator driven subcritical molten salt breeder reactor has several advantages compared to conventional U-Pu nuclear system. In order to obtain fundamental data on molten salt engineering of Th-U system, electrochemical study was conducted. As the most primitive simulated study of beam irradiation of molten salt, discharge electrolysis was investigated in molten LiCl-KCl-AgCl system. Stationary discharge was generated under atmospheric argon gas and fine Ag particles were obtained. Hydride ion (H - ) behavior in molten salts was also studied to predict the behavior of tritide ion (T - ) in molten salt fuel. Finally, hydrogen behavior in metals at high temperature was investigated by electrochemical method, which is considered to be important to confine and control tritium. (author)

  14. Tritium loss in molten flibe systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A. [Idaho National Eng. and Environ. Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scott Willms, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    2000-04-01

    An emerging issue relative to beryllium technology in fusion involves tritium interactions with molten beryllium-bearing salts. Innovative designs for fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertially confined, feature the molten salt mixture 2LiF.BeF{sub 2}, commonly called Flibe, as a tritium breeder and coolant. Tritium is bred in the Flibe as neutrons from the plasma are absorbed by Li atoms, which then transmute to tritium and helium. Transmutation of tritium from Be also occurs. Among the issues to be resolved for such coolant systems is the potential loss of tritium from the Flibe coolant to the walls of the system, particularly through heat exchanger tubes, and from there into secondary coolants or working fluids and the environment. Effectively removing tritium from Flibe in clean-up units is also important. In quiescent or low Reynolds number flow, tritium movement through Flibe is governed by diffusion. For Flibe in turbulent flow, as in heat exchanger tubes, transport is by turbulent mixing, and the same flow conditions and structural design features that maximize heat transfer to the heat exchanger walls will enhance the transport of tritium to those same surfaces. Analyses have been performed to estimate the fractional loss of tritium through heat exchanger tubes and release rates from Flibe droplets in vacuum disengagers in molten Flibe systems. The calculations suggest unacceptably large losses of tritium through heat exchanger tubes. The gravity of the implications of these estimates calls for experimental verification to determine if tritium losses through molten Flibe heat exchangers or other Flibe systems can really be so high and whether vacuum disengagers will really work. There is also a need for better information on evolution of tritium from Flibe droplets in a vacuum. Several experiments are presently being planned to address these issues and are discussed. These include experiments to induce tritium in Flibe using spontaneous fission neutrons

  15. Tritium loss in molten flibe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Scott Willms, R.

    2000-01-01

    An emerging issue relative to beryllium technology in fusion involves tritium interactions with molten beryllium-bearing salts. Innovative designs for fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertially confined, feature the molten salt mixture 2LiF.BeF 2 , commonly called Flibe, as a tritium breeder and coolant. Tritium is bred in the Flibe as neutrons from the plasma are absorbed by Li atoms, which then transmute to tritium and helium. Transmutation of tritium from Be also occurs. Among the issues to be resolved for such coolant systems is the potential loss of tritium from the Flibe coolant to the walls of the system, particularly through heat exchanger tubes, and from there into secondary coolants or working fluids and the environment. Effectively removing tritium from Flibe in clean-up units is also important. In quiescent or low Reynolds number flow, tritium movement through Flibe is governed by diffusion. For Flibe in turbulent flow, as in heat exchanger tubes, transport is by turbulent mixing, and the same flow conditions and structural design features that maximize heat transfer to the heat exchanger walls will enhance the transport of tritium to those same surfaces. Analyses have been performed to estimate the fractional loss of tritium through heat exchanger tubes and release rates from Flibe droplets in vacuum disengagers in molten Flibe systems. The calculations suggest unacceptably large losses of tritium through heat exchanger tubes. The gravity of the implications of these estimates calls for experimental verification to determine if tritium losses through molten Flibe heat exchangers or other Flibe systems can really be so high and whether vacuum disengagers will really work. There is also a need for better information on evolution of tritium from Flibe droplets in a vacuum. Several experiments are presently being planned to address these issues and are discussed. These include experiments to induce tritium in Flibe using spontaneous fission neutrons

  16. Study of chemical and electrochemical properties of some elements in molten NaAlCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermond, Alain

    1976-01-01

    We describe a study of the electrochemical and chemical properties in molten mixtures of Aluminium Chloride-Sodium chloride, at 210 deg. C and the concept of acidity, related to chloride activity, is previously summarized. In a first part, the study of Mercury and Cadmium by means of electro-analytical techniques, states the Hg 2+ 2 , Hg 2+ , Cd 2+ 2 and Cd 2+ ions and their acid properties. Some diagrams Equilibrium potential vs acidity are the synthesis of these results. In a second part, it is shown that a nickel electrode is an indicator of the presence of oxide ions; from interpretation of electrochemical results, O 2 appears to behave, in terms of the chloro-acido-basicity concept, as a strong di-base, giving the solvated form AlOCl - 2 , or a strong tri-base giving AlOCl. A saturation effect by Al 2 O 3 appears when the oxide concentration is increased; the solubility of Al 2 O 3 versus acidity is determined from the electrochemical results. In a third part, results for the Ni/Ni(II) or HCl/H 2 O systems are related to dissolved oxide ion presence in chloroaluminate melts; elimination of oxide ions, through H 2 O formation, by reaction with HCl is noteworthy. (author) [fr

  17. Electrochemical separation of actinides and fission products in molten salt electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Fusselman, S.P. [Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Molten salt electrochemical separation may be applied to accelerator-based conversion (ABC) and transmutation systems by dissolving the fluoride transport salt in LiCl-KCl eutectic solvent. The resulting fluoride-chloride mixture will contain small concentrations of fission product rare earths (La, Nd, Gd, Pr, Ce, Eu, Sm, and Y) and actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm). The Gibbs free energies of formation of the metal chlorides are grouped advantageously such that the actinides can be deposited on a solid cathode with the majority of the rare earths remaining in the electrolyte. Thus, the actinides are recycled for further transmutation. Rockwell and its partners have measured the thermodynamic properties of the metal chlorides of interest (rare earths and actinides) and demonstrated separation of actinides from rare earths in laboratory studies. A model is being developed to predict the performance of a commercial electrochemical cell for separations starting with PUREX compositions. This model predicts excellent separation of plutonium and other actinides from the rare earths in metal-salt systems.

  18. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  19. Molten salt power towers operating at 600–650 °C: Salt selection and cost benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vidal, Judith [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bauer, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    This analysis examines the potential benefit of adopting the supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycle at 600-650 degrees C compared to the current state-of-the-art power tower operating a steam-Rankine cycle with solar salt at approximately 574 degrees C. The analysis compares a molten-salt power tower configuration using direct storage of solar salt (60:40 wt% sodium nitrate: potassium nitrate) or single-component nitrate salts at 600 degrees C or alternative carbonate- or chloride-based salts at 650 degrees C.

  20. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir

  1. A basic study on electrodeposition of metal halogen mixture in fluoride/chloride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Z. H.; Kang, Y. H.; Hwang, S. C.; Woo, M. S.; Yoo, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    The electrodeposition experiments of metal mixture composed of U, Y, Gd, Nd and Ce were carried out in the KCl-LiCl and LiF-NaF-KF (FLINAK) eutectic melts at 500 .deg. C and 600 .deg. C, respectively. Uranium was major component in the cathode deposits, and the separation factors of uranium with respect to the rare earths (REs) are nearly same in both electrolytes. REs content in the cathode deposits increased sharply below -1.9V which is the decomposition voltage of the halogen compounds of REs. The current efficiency for electrodeposition of metals was inversely in proportion to the applied voltage in the range of -1.0 V to -1.9 V(vs. S.S. 304 or Ni)

  2. Influence of thermal treatment on supercooling of molten potasium lead chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nitsch, Karel; Rodová, Miroslava

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 50, 2/s (1999), s. 35-37 ISSN 1335-3632. [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education - DMS -RE 1998 /8./. Zlenice, 08.09.1998-10.09.1998] Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Compatibility studies of potential molten-salt breeder reactor materials in molten fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, J.R.

    1977-05-01

    The molten fluoride salt compatibility studies carried out during the period 1974--76 in support of the Molten-Salt Reactor Program are summarized. Thermal-convection and forced-circulation loops were used to measure the corrosion rate of selected alloys. Results confirmed the relationship of time, initial chromium concentration, and mass loss developed by previous workers. The corrosion rates of Hastelloy N and Hastelloy N modified by the addition of 1--3 wt percent Nb were well within the acceptable range for use in an MSBR. 13 figures, 3 tables

  4. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Accelerator molten-salt breeding and thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Kato, Yoshio; Ohno, Hideo; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    The recent efforts at the development of fission energy utilization have not been successful in establishing fully rational technology. A new philosophy should be established on the basis of the following three principles: (1) thorium utilization, (2) molten-salt fuel concept, and (3) separation of fissile-breeding and power-generating functions. Such philosophy is called 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics [THORIMS-NES]'. The present report first addresses the establishment of 233 U breeding fuel cycle, focusing on major features of the Breeding and Chemical Processing Centers and a small molten-salt power station (called FUJI-II). The development of fissile producing breeders is discussed in relation to accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB), impact fusion molten-salt breeder, and inertial-confined fusion hybrid molten-salt breeder. Features of the accelerator molten-salt breeder are described, focusing on technical problems with accelerator breeders (or spallators), design principle of the accelerator molten-salt breeder, selection of molten salt compositions, and nuclear- and reactor-chemical aspects of AMSB. Discussion is also made of further research and development efforts required in the future for AMSB. (N.K.)

  6. Crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, R.J.; Lee, S.J.; Sim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the crust formation and its effect on the molten pool coolability have been performed to examine the crust formation process as a function of boundary temperatures as well as to investigate heat transfer characteristics between molten pool and overlying water in order to evaluate coolability of the molten pool. The experimental test results have shown that the surface temperature of the bottom plate is a dominant parameter in the crust formation process of the molten pool. It is also found that the crust thickness of the case with direct coolant injection into the molten pool is greater than that of the case with a heat exchanger. Increasing mass flow rate of direct coolant injection to the molten pool does not affect the temperature of molten pool after the crust has been formed in the molten pool because the crust behaves as a thermal barrier. The Nusselt number between the molten pool and the coolant of the case with no crust formation is greater than that of the case with crust formation. The results of FLOW-3D analyses have shown that the temperature distribution contributes to the crust formation process due to Rayleigh-Benard natural convection flow.

  7. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  8. Studies on components for a molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejedly, M.; Matal, O.

    2003-01-01

    The aim is contribute to a design of selected components of molten salt reactors with fuel in the molten fluoride salt matrix. Molten salt reactors (MSRs) permit the utilization of plutonium and minor actinides as new nuclear fuel from a traditional nuclear power station with production of electric energy. Results of preliminary feasibility studies of an intermediate heat exchanger, a small power molten salt pump and a modular conception of a steam generator for a demonstration unit of the MSR (30 MW) are summarized. (author)

  9. Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

    1976-08-01

    A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

  10. Chloride Ingress in Chemically Activated Calcined Clay-Based Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mwiti Marangu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-laden environments pose serious durability concerns in cement based materials. This paper presents the findings of chloride ingress in chemically activated calcined Clay-Ordinary Portland Cement blended mortars. Results are also presented for compressive strength development and porosity tests. Sampled clays were incinerated at a temperature of 800°C for 4 hours. The resultant calcined clay was blended with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC at replacement level of 35% by mass of OPC to make test cement labeled PCC35. Mortar prisms measuring 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were cast using PCC35 with 0.5 M Na2SO4 solution as a chemical activator instead of water. Compressive strength was determined at 28th day of curing. As a control, OPC, Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, and PCC35 were similarly investigated without use of activator. After the 28th day of curing, mortar specimens were subjected to accelerated chloride ingress, porosity, compressive strength tests, and chloride profiling. Subsequently, apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp were estimated from solutions to Fick’s second law of diffusion. Compressive strength increased after exposure to the chloride rich media in all cement categories. Chemically activated PCC35 exhibited higher compressive strength compared to nonactivated PCC35. However, chemically activated PCC35 had the least gain in compressive strength, lower porosity, and lower chloride ingress in terms of Dapp, compared to OPC, PPC, and nonactivated PCC35.

  11. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  12. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  13. Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Zhimin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Making great efforts in development of nuclear energy is one of the long-term-plan in China's energy strategies. The advantages of Thorium-based nuclear energy are: rich resource in nature, less nuclear waste, low toxicity, nuclear non-proliferation and so on. Furthermore, China is a country with abundant thorium, thus it is necessary to develop the Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) in China. Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SINAP) had designed and constructed the first China's light-water reactor and developed a zero-power thorium-based molten salt reactor successfully in the early 1970s. The applied research project 'thorium molten salt reactor nuclear power system' by SINAP together with several other institutes had been accepted and granted by China government in 2011. The whole project has been divided into three stages: Firstly, built a 2 MW-zero-power high temperature solid molten salt reactor in 2015 and a 2 MW-zero-power high temperature liquid molten salt reactor in 2017. Secondly, in 2020 built a 10 MW high temperature liquid molten salt reactor. Thirdly, on the base of previous work, a 100 MW high temperature molten salt reactor should be achieving in 2030. After more than one years of efforts, a high quality scientific research team has been formed, which is able to design the molten salt reactor, the molten salt loop and related key equipment, the systems of molten salt preparation, purification and the radioactive gas removal. In the past one year, the initial physical design of high temperature molten salt reactor has been completed; the nuclear chemistry and radiation chemical laboratory has been built, a high temperature salt (HTS) loop and radioactive gas removal experiment device system have been successfully developed and constructed. Further, the preliminary study on reactor used carbon-carbon composite material has been investigated. (author)

  14. Degradation of organochloride pesticides by molten salt oxidation at IPEN: spin-off nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear spin-off has at least two dimensions. It may provide benefits to the society such as enlarge knowledge base, strengthen infrastructure and benefit technology development. Besides this, to emphasize that some useful technologies elapsed from nuclear activities can affect favorably the public opinion about nuclear energy. In this paper is described a technology developed initially by the Rockwell Int. company in the USA more than thirty years ago to solve some problems of nuclear fuel cycle wastes. For different reasons the technology was not employed. In the last years the interest in the technology was renewed and IPEN has developed his version of the method applicable mainly to the safe degradation of hazardous wastes. This study was motivated by the world interest in the development of advanced processes of waste decomposition, due to the need of safer decomposition processes, particularly for the POPs - persistent organic pollutants and particularly for the organ chlorides. A tendency observed at several countries is the adoption of progressively more demanding legislation for the atmospheric emissions, resultants of the waste decomposition processes. The suitable final disposal of hazardous organic wastes such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), pesticides, herbicides and hospital residues constitutes a serious problem. In some point of their life cycles, these wastes should be destroyed, in reason of the risk that they represent for the human being, animals and plants. The process involves using a chemical reactor containing molten salts, sodium carbonate or some alkaline carbonates mixtures to decompose the organic waste. The decomposition is performed by submerged oxidation and the residue is injected below the surface of a turbulent salt bath along with the oxidizing agent. Decomposition of halogenated compounds, among which some pesticides, is particularly effective in molten salts. The process presents properties such as intrinsically safe

  15. Polyamorphism and the evolution of intermediate-range order in molten ZnCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bevan K [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Wilson, Mark [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-18

    The pressure- and temperature-dependent properties of molten zinc chloride are investigated by means of molecular dynamics computer simulation. The potential model used is based on a pair potential augmented with a description of the (many-body) anion polarization. The static experimental and simulated structural properties are briefly reviewed. The structural properties obtained from the simulation model are compared with those obtained from experimental investigations and trends with the change in system pressure and temperature are discussed. Preliminary studies of the pressure behaviour of the simulated glassy states show the existence of low-and high-density amorphous states (LDA and HDA). The LDA/HDA coexistence line is established and its relationship to the underlying phase diagram is discussed.

  16. Effect of milling on morphology of molten salt synthesized Sr3Ti2O7 crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijamnajsuk, S.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Effect of milling liquid (acetone and ethanol, and milling times on morphology of Sr3Ti2O7 (ST7 crystals grow in molten potassium chloride salt at 1250oC for 4 h was investigated. Two kinds of crystals with different morphologies were found: ST7 crystals having a tabular shape of less than 20 μm diameter and small secondary-phase crystals having high symmetry. Milling starting materials in ethanol yielded ST7 crystals that were up to 3 times thinner than those milled with acetone, increasing the (00l Lotgering factor almost twice that when prepared with acetone. Large crystals become a bit smaller and the number of small crystals increased when the milling time increased.

  17. Applications of molten salts in plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium is efficiently recovered from scrap at Los Alamos by a series of chemical reactions and separations conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 900 0 C. These processes usually employ a molten salt or salt eutectic as a heat sink and/or reaction medium. Salts for these operations were selected early in the development cycle. The selection criteria are being reevaluated. In this article we describe the processes now in use at Los Alamos and our studies of alternate salts and eutectics

  18. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  19. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.; Silva, F.T. da

    1988-01-01

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author) [pt

  20. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.

    1997-01-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs

  1. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: → Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. → The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. → A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. → The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction from molten alkaline nitrates by using nitrogenous and organophosphorus derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittori, Olivier

    1971-01-01

    This research thesis reports the use of a system made of the LiNO 3 -KNO 3 eutectic at 160 deg. C and poly-phenyls in order to study the behaviour of phosphine and arsine oxides as extracting agents in a liquid-liquid process. In a first part, the author presents the studied system, its physical characteristics and its preparation, and the various analytical methods which have used. He discusses existing computation methods adapted to the separation of molten salts and organic phase, and proposes a specific method. Then, he reports the study of the behaviour of a phosphine oxide with Cobalt II and Nickel II, and discusses its application to the separation of this pair, Co II and Ni II. He highlights the different possibilities of three agents which are derivatives of phosphine and arsine in their ability to extract rare earths. A study of separation of rare earths is then addressed. The author reports the application of extraction equilibriums to the study of equilibriums in environments of molten salts with the Co II - chloride ions system. The author finally addresses the synergic phenomenon that pairs of neutral complexing agents of neighbouring structure or different donor central atom may display in liquid-liquid extraction

  3. Reactions of metal oxides with molten NaPO3 + NaCl mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskaya, E.N.; Mityakhina, V.S.; Rodionov, Yu.I.; Silin, M.Yu.

    1988-01-01

    We consider the dissolution mechanism for iron (III), europium(III), and tin(IV) oxides in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl that are responsible for the peak solubilities. We chose Fe 2 O 3 as the basic material since this occurs in large amounts around damaged metal structures in rock salt mines in a proposed zone for storing vitrified radioactive wastes. Solubility measurement and paper chromatography show that Fe 2 O 3 dissolves in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl in air by reaction with the solvent to give double iron and sodium diphosphates and monophosphates in accordance with the initial solution-in-the-melt composition, the degree of equilibration, and the temperature. The elevated solubilities for initial NaCl contents close to 30 mole % are due to sodium triphosphates and tricyclophosphates present in these melts. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirms that double iron, europium and tin diphosphates and monophosphates containing sodium occur in these chloride-polyphosphate melts

  4. Design study of advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehi, I.; Shirai, N.; Hatano, M.; Kajitani, M.; Yonezawa, S.; Kawai, T.; Kawamura, F.; Tobe, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1996-12-01

    For the purpose of developing the future nuclear fuel recycle system, the design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system is being conducted. This report describes intermediate accomplishments in the conceptual system study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Fundamental concepts of this system is the recycle system using molten salt which intend to break through the conventional concepts of purex and pellet fuel system. Contents of studies in this period are as follows, 1)feasibility study of the process by Cd-cathode for nitride fuel, 2)application study for the molten salt of low melting point (AlCl3+organic salt), 3)research for decladding (advantage of decladding by heat treatment), 4)behavior of FPs in electrorefining (behavior of iodine and volatile FP chlorides, FPs behavior in chlorination), 5)criticality analysis in electrorefiner, 6)drawing of off-gas flow diagram, 7)drawing of process machinery concept (cathode processor, vibration packing), 8)evaluation for the amounts of the high level radioactive wastes, 9)quality of the recycle fuels (FPs contamination of recycle fuel), 10)conceptual study of in-cell handling system, 11)meaning of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. The conceptual system study will be completed in describing concepts of the system and discussing issues for the developments. (author)

  5. Separation and recovery of uranium ore by chlorinating, chelate resin and molten salt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomohiro

    2000-12-01

    Three fundamental researches of separation and recovery of uranium from uranium ore are reported in this paper. Three methods used the chloride pyrometallurgy, sodium containing molten salts and chelate resin. When uranium ore is mixed with activated carbon and reacted for one hour under the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen at 950 C, more than 90% uranium volatilized and vaporization of aluminum, silicone and phosphorus were controlled. The best activated carbon was brown coal because it was able to control the large range of oxygen concentration. By blowing oxygen into the molten sodium hydroxide, the elution rate of uranium attained to about 95% and a few percent of uranium was remained in the residue. On the uranium ore of unconformity-related uranium deposits, a separation method of uranium, molybdenum, nickel and phosphorus from the sulfuric acid elusion solution with U, Ni, As, Mo, Fe and Al was developed. Methylene phosphonic acid type chelate resin (RCSP) adsorbed Mo and U, and then 100 % Mo was eluted by sodium acetate solution and about 100% U by sodium carbonate solution. Ni and As in the passing solution were recovered by imino-diacetic acid type chelate resin and iron hydroxide, respectively. (S.Y.)

  6. Molten salt synthesis of sodium lithium titanium oxide anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, S.Y., E-mail: yshy2004@hotmail.com [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Feng, C.Q. [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wu, S.J.; Liu, H.L.; Ke, B.Q. [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Zhang, K.L. [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, D.H. [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory for Catalysis and Material Science, College of Chemistry and Material Science, South Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 12} has been successfully synthesized via a molten salt route. • Calcination temperature is an important effect on the component and microstructure of the product. • Pure phase Na{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 12} could be obtained at 700 °C for 2 h. - Abstract: The sodium lithium titanium oxide with composition Na{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 14} has been synthesized by a molten salt synthesis method using sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixture as a flux medium. Synthetic variables on the synthesis, such as sintering temperature, sintering time and the amount of lithium carbonate, were intensively investigated. Powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy images of the reaction products indicates that pure phase sodium lithium titanium oxide has been obtained at 700 °C, and impure phase sodium hexatitanate with whiskers produced at higher temperature due to lithium evaporative losses. The results of cyclic voltammetry and discharge–charge tests demonstrate that the synthesized products prepared at various temperatures exhibited electrochemical diversities due to the difference of the components. And the sample obtained at 700 °C revealed highly reversible insertion and extraction of Li{sup +} and displayed a single potential plateau at around 1.3 V. The product obtained at 700 °C for 2 h exhibits good cycling properties and retains the specific capacity of 62 mAh g{sup −1} after 500 cycles.

  7. Molten salt fueled reactors with a fast salt draining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventre, Edmond; Blum, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a molten salt nuclear reactor which comprises a new arrangement for shutting it down in complete safety. This nuclear reactor has a molten salt primary circuit comprising, in particular, the core of this reactor. It includes a leak tight vessel the capacity of which is appreciably greater than that of the molten salt volume of the circuit and placed so that the level of the molten salt, when all the molten salt of the circuit is contained in this vessel, is less than that of the base of the core. There are facilities for establishing and maintaining an inert gas pressure in the vessel above the molten salt, for releasing the compressed gas and for connecting the vessel to the primary circuit entering this vessel at a lower level than that of the molten salt and enabling molten salt to enter or leave the vessel according to the pressure of the inert gas. The particular advantage of this reactor is that it can be shut down safely since the draining of the primary circuit no longer results from a 'positive action' but from the suppression of an arrangement essential for the operation of the reactor consisting of the build-up of the said inert gas pressure in the said vessel [fr

  8. Advancing Molten Salts and Fuels at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-26

    SNL has a combination of experimental facilities, nuclear engineering, nuclear security, severe nuclear accidents, and nuclear safeguards expertise that can enable significant progress towards molten salts and fuels for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs). The following areas and opportunities are discussed in more detail in this white paper.

  9. On the ionic equilibrium between complexes in molten fluoroaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Tankeshwar, K.; Tosi, M.P.

    1991-02-01

    We discuss theoretically (i) the effect of the alkali cation species on the ionic equilibrium between (AlF 6 ) 3- and (AlF 4 ) - complexes in molten alkali fluoroaluminates, and (ii) the possible presence of (AlF 5 ) 2 - complexes in molten cryolite, in relation to very recent Raman scattering experiments by Gilbert and Materne. (author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  10. Valyl benzyl ester chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Dutkiewicz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 1-benzyloxy-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-aminium chloride, C12H18NO2+·Cl−, the ester group is approximately planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.040 (2 Å from the least-squares plane, and makes a dihedral angle of 28.92 (16° with the phenyl ring. The crystal structure is organized by N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds which join the two components into a chain along the b axis. Pairs of chains arranged antiparallel are interconnected by further N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, forming eight-membered rings. Similar packing modes have been observed in a number of amino acid ester halides with a short unit-cell parameter of ca 5.5 Å along the direction in which the chains run.

  11. Chloride on the Move

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2017-01-09

    Chloride (Cl−) is an essential plant nutrient but under saline conditions it can accumulate to toxic levels in leaves; limiting this accumulation improves the salt tolerance of some crops. The rate-limiting step for this process – the transfer of Cl− from root symplast to xylem apoplast, which can antagonize delivery of the macronutrient nitrate (NO3−) to shoots – is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and is multigenic. Until recently the molecular mechanisms underpinning this salt-tolerance trait were poorly defined. We discuss here how recent advances highlight the role of newly identified transport proteins, some that directly transfer Cl− into the xylem, and others that act on endomembranes in ‘gatekeeper’ cell types in the root stele to control root-to-shoot delivery of Cl−.

  12. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere

  13. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. E-mail: niti-npc@sbor.net; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V

    2001-12-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere.

  14. Measurement and analyses of molten Ni-Co alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; K. MUKAI; FANG Liang; FU Ya; YANG Ren-hui

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful mathematical modeling techniques for material phenomena, there is renewed interest in reliable data for the density of the Ni-based superalloys. Up to now, there has been few report on the density of molten Ni-Co alloy.In order to obtain more accurate density data for molten Ni-Co alloy, the density of molten Ni-Co alloy was measured with a modified sessile drop method, and the accommodation of different atoms in molten Ni-Co alloy was analyzed. The density of alloy is found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of molten Ni-Co alloy increases with increasing Co concentration. The molar volume of Ni-Co alloy determined shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume, and the deviation of molar volume from ideal mixing increases with increasing Co concentration over the experimental concentration range.

  15. Advances in molten salt electrochemistry towards future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    This review article describes some selected novel molten salt electrochemical processes which have been created/developed by the author and his coworkers, with emphasis on the applications towards future energy systems. After showing a perspective of the applications of molten salt electrochemistry from the viewpoints of energy and environment, several selected topics are described in detail, which include nitride fuel cycle in a nuclear field, hydrogen energy system coupled with ammonia economy, thermally regenerative fuel cell systems, novel Si production process for solar cell and novel molten salt electrochemical processes for various energy and environment related functional materials including nitrides, rare earth-transition metal alloys, fine particles obtained by plasma-induced electrolysis, and carbon film. And finally, the author stresses again, the importance and potential of molten salt electrochemistry, and encourages young students, scientists and researchers to march in a procession hand in hand towards a bright future of molten salts. (author)

  16. Molten core material holding device in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of cooling to hold molten core materials in a molten core material holding device. Constitution: Plenum structures are formed into a pan-like configuration, in which liners made of metal having high melting point and relatively high heat conductivity such as tantalum, tungsten, rhenium or alloys thereof are integrally appended to hold and directly cool the molten reactor core materials. Further, a plurality of heat pipes, passing through the plenum structures, facing the cooling portion thereof to the coolants at the outer side and immersing the heating portion into the molten core materials fallen to deposit in the inner liners are disposed radially. Furthermore, heat pipes embodded in the plenum structure are disposed in the same manner below the liners. Thus, the plenum structures and the molten reactor core materials can be cooled at a high efficiency. (Seki, T.)

  17. Fuel processing for molten-salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Research devoted to development of processes for the isolation of protactinium and for the removal of fission products from molten-salt breeder reactors is reported. During this report period, engineering development progressed on continuous fluorinators for uranium removal, the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal, the fuel reconstitution step, and molten salt--bismuth contactors to be used in reductive extraction processes. The metal transfer experiment MTE-3B was started. In this experiment all parts of the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal are demonstrated using salt flow rates which are about 1 percent of those required to process the fuel salt in a 1000-MW(e) MSBR. During this report period the salt and bismuth phases were transferred to the experimental vessels, and two runs with agitator speeds of 5 rps were made to measure the rate of transfer of neodymium from the fluoride salt to the Bi--Li stripper solution. The uranium removed from the fuel salt by fluorination must be returned to the processed salt in the fuel reconstitution step before the fuel salt is returned to the reactor. An engineering experiment to demonstrate the fuel reconstitution step is being installed. In this experiment gold-lined equipment will be used to avoid introducing products of corrosion by UF 6 and UF 5 . Alternative methods for providing the gold lining include electroplating and mechanical fabrication

  18. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  19. Formation of titanium diboride coatings during the anodic polarization of titanium in a chloride melt with a low boron oxide content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Malkov, V. B.; Molchanova, N. G.

    2015-02-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of titanium in a molten eutectic mixture of cesium and sodium chlorides containing up to 1 wt % boron oxide is studied in the temperature range 810-870 K in an argon atmosphere. The potential, the current, and the rate of titanium corrosion are determined. The optimum conditions of forming a dense continuous titanium diboride coating on titanium with high adhesion to the metallic base are found for the anodic activation of titanium in the molten electrolyte under study.

  20. Stabilization/Solidification of radioactive molten salt waste by using xSiO2-yAl2O3-zP2O5 material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwan-Seo Park; In-Tae Kim; Yong-Zun Cho; Seong-Won Park; Eung-Ho Kim

    2008-01-01

    Molten salt waste generated from the electro metallurgical process to recover uranium and transuranic elements is considered as one of problematic wastes to be difficult to immobilize into a durable for final disposal. As an alternative, this study suggested a new method performed at molten state, where dechlorination was achieved with a new inorganic material containing SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and P 2 O 5 (SAP). The SAP as a reactive material to molten salt was prepared by a conventional sol-gel process. The prepared SAPs were reacted with each metal chloride, LiCl, CsCl, SrCl 2 and CeCl 3 at 650 deg. C for 6 hours and also were reacted with simulated salt waste consisting of 90 wt% LiCl, 6.8 wt% CsCl and 3.2 wt% SrCl 2 at different waste loading. All the reactions were carried out in oxidative atmosphere and metal chlorides were effectively converted into stable products under a reasonable reaction ratio

  1. The preparation and certification of zirconyl chloride CRM-inhouse from process result of zircon mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samin; Sajimo; Supriyanto; Isman Mulyadi T

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and certification of the zirconyl chloride certified reference material (CRM) has been carried out from the row material of the zircon mineral. The zircon mineral was processing in the Feeder with the velocity of 17 kg/hour and produced the zircon concentrate. The zircon concentrate was mixed with NaOH, NaF, Na 2 CO 3 and H 2 O. The mixture was melted in the Furnace at 750°C for 2 hours. The results of molten was pressed with aquadest and then was participated for 24 hours. The solid was separated from the filtrate, and then it was dried in the Oven at 105°C for 3 hours, those result was called sodium zirconate. Sodium zirconate was leaching with HCl, it was found the zirconyl chloride solution and then was evaporated it was found the zirconyl chloride concentrated solution. This solution was crystallized, then obtained the zirconyl chloride crystal. It was washed with ethanol, so retrieved the crystal white zirconyl chloride. The crystal white zirconyl chloride was dried in the Oven at 90°C, it was crushed with stainless steel powder and sieved to 200 mesh of the particle size. The crystal white zirconyl chloride was stirred up to homogenous in the Homogenizer. Next was treated the homogenization and the stabilisation testing with statistically method. Zirconyl chloride crystals was standardized by using standard ZrOCl 2 8 H 2 O made in E. Merck, were include the chemical compounds test with XRD Spectrometry, the composition the content of crystals and the specific gravity. From the evaluation of the homogenization and stabilisation testing, the crystal zirconyl chloride was homogeneous, stable and it was fulfil to physically behavior as CRM. Compared with the standard zirconyl chloride, ZrOCl 2 8 H 2 O, the XRD spectra and chemical composition (96,263%), the content of crystals (98,625%). and specific gravity (97,190%) of the zirconyl chloride crystal were nearly same respectively. Certificate of the parameters testing results in the CRM the

  2. Chloride metallurgy for uranium recovery: concept and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.C.; Ritcey, G.M.; Joe, E.G.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and radium are all effectively solubilized in chloride media. This provides a means to separate and isolate these species for ultimate sale or disposal. The laboratory work on the applications of hydrochloric acid leaching, chlorine assisted leaching and high temperature chlorination is reviewed. An indication of costs and benefits is provided to enable the evaluation of this technology as an option for reducing the environmental impact of tailings

  3. Cerium(terbium, erbium)chloride-choline chloride aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Bikbaeva, G.G.; Domrachev, V.N.; Vanskova, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    To clarify the effect of rare earth nature on mutual solubility of rare earth salts and amines the solubility of solid phases in the systems, consisting of choline chloride, water and cerium, terbium, erbium chlorides, has been studied. It is established, that solubility isotherms of all the systems, testify to the formation of new solid phases of the composition: Ce(Tb, Er)xCl 3 x2C 5 H 14 ONClx3H 2 O. Individuality of new solid phases is proved by DTA method, the composition is confirmed by chemical analysis and data of PMR spectra, for choline chloride and its complexes with rare earth chlorides of the given composition PMR and IR spectra are studied

  4. Molten salt based nanofluids based on solar salt and alumina nanoparticles: An industrial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Belén; Nieto-Maestre, Javier; Guerreiro, Luis; Julia, José Enrique; Collares-Pereira, Manuel; García-Romero, Ana

    2017-06-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and its associated dispatchability is extremely important in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants since it represents the main advantage of CSP technology in relation to other renewable energy sources like photovoltaic (PV). Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 600°C. Their main problems are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve the thermal properties of molten salts is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. Additionally, the use of molten salt based nanofluids as TES materials and Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) has been attracting great interest in recent years. The addition of tiny amounts of nanoparticles to the base salt can improve its specific heat as shown by different authors1-3. The application of these nano-enhanced materials can lead to important savings on the investment costs in new TES systems for CSP plants. However, there is still a long way to go in order to achieve a commercial product. In this sense, the improvement of the stability of the nanofluids is a key factor. The stability of nanofluids will depend on the nature and size of the nanoparticles, the base salt and the interactions between them. In this work, Solar Salt (SS) commonly used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3 wt.) was doped with alumina nanoparticles (ANPs) at a solid mass concentration of 1% wt. at laboratory scale. The tendency of nanoparticles to agglomeration and sedimentation is tested in the molten state by analyzing their size and concentration through the time. The specific heat of the nanofluid at 396 °C (molten state) is measured at different times (30 min, 1 h, 5 h). Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms of agglomeration. A good understanding of the interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the ionic media would provide

  5. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: Anas@uniten.edu.my [Centre of Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector [School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering (MACE), University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  6. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer of the Tb(III)-Nd(III) Binary System in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, J. I. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The lanthanides act as a neutron poison in nuclear reactor with large neutron absorption cross section. For that reason, very low amount of lanthanides is required in the recovered U/TRU ingot product from pyrochemical process. In view of that, the investigation of thermodynamic properties and chemical behaviors of lanthanides in molten chloride salt are necessary to estimate the performance efficiency of pyrochemical process. However, there are uncertainties about knowledge and understanding of basic mechanisms in pyrochemical process, such as chemical speciation and redox behaviors due to the lack of in-situ monitoring methods for high temperature molten salt. The spectroscopic analysis is one of the probable techniques for in-situ qualitative and quantitative analysis. Recently, a few fluorescence spectroscopic measurements on single lanthanide element in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic have been investigated. The fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of Tb(III) were decreased as increasing the concentration of Nd(III), demonstrating collisional quenching between donor ions and acceptor ions. The Forster distance (..0) of Tb(III)-Nd(III) binary system in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was determined in the specific range of .... (0.1-1.0) and .. (1.387-1.496)

  7. Study of behaviour of lanthanum- and yttrium electrodes in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkol'nikov, S.I.; Tolypin, E.S.; Yur'ev, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made on the lanthanum- and yttrium behaviour in a mixture of molten potassium- and sodium chlorides at various temperatures. It is shown that the lanthanum- and yttrium behaviour in KCl-NaCl melt is similar to the behaviour of other metals. Their corrosion rate is much higher as compared to other metals and it grows rapidly with increasing melt temperature. The temperature growth by 200 deg C results in an increase in the corrosion rate almost by an order. The potentials of lanthanum- and yttrium electrodes at the instant they are immersed in the melt have more negative values than the potentials of alkali metals under similar conditions

  8. High-temperature corrosion of lanthanum in equimole mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Obozhina, R.N.; Dragoshanskaya, T.I.; Startsev, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of investigation into the process of lanthanum corrosion in the molted equimole NaCl-KCl mixture after the change of test time, temperature and lanthanum trichloride were summarized. It was shown that polarization of lanthanum anode in equimole NaCl-KCl melt is controlled by La 3+ diffusion from near-electrode layer to electrolyte depth, which results in decrease of corrosion rate in time. The established electrochemical properties of metallic lanthanum in equimole NaCl-KCl mixture must be considered when improving the technology of electrochemical production of lanthanum or its alloys of molten chlorides of lanthanum and alkaline metals

  9. Fast Thorium Molten Salt Reactors Started with Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Le Brun, C.; Brissot, R.; Liatard, E.; Meplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Mathieu, L.

    2006-01-01

    One of the pending questions concerning Molten Salt Reactors based on the 232 Th/ 233 U fuel cycle is the supply of the fissile matter, and as a consequence the deployment possibilities of a fleet of Molten Salt Reactors, since 233 U does not exist on earth and is not yet produced in the current operating reactors. A solution may consist in producing 233 U in special devices containing Thorium, in Pressurized Water or Fast Neutrons Reactors. Two alternatives to produce 233 U are examined here: directly in standard Molten Salt Reactors started with Plutonium as fissile matter and then operated in the Th/ 233 U cycle; or in dedicated Molten Salt Reactors started and fed with Plutonium as fissile matter and Thorium as fertile matter. The idea is to design a critical reactor able to burn the Plutonium and the minor actinides presently produced in PWRs, and consequently to convert this Plutonium into 233 U. A particular reactor configuration is used, called 'unique channel' configuration in which there is no moderator in the core, leading to a quasi fast neutron spectrum, allowing Plutonium to be used as fissile matter. The conversion capacities of such Molten Salt Reactors are excellent. For Molten Salt Reactors only started with Plutonium, the assets of the Thorium fuel cycle turn out to be quickly recovered and the reactor's characteristics turn out to be equivalent to Molten Salt Reactors operated with 233 U only. Using a combination of Molten Salt Reactors started or operated with Plutonium and of Molten Salt Reactors started with 233 U, the deployment capabilities of these reactors fully satisfy the condition of sustainability. (authors)

  10. Corrosion study in molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Rangarajan, S.; Gupta, V.K.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of two alloys viz. Inconel 625 and Inconel 617 were tested in molten fluoride salts of lithium, sodium and potassium (FLiNaK) in the temperature range of 550-750 ℃ in a nickel lined Inconel vessel. Electrochemical polarization (Tafel plot) technique was used for this purpose. For both alloys, the corrosion rate was found to increase sharply beyond 650 ℃ . At 600 ℃ , Inconel 625 showed a decreasing trend in the corrosion rate over a period of 24 hours, probably due to changes in the surface conditions. After fifteen days, re-testing of Inconel 625 in the same melt showed an increase in the corrosion rate. Inconel 625 was found to be more corrosion resistant than Inconel 617. (author)

  11. The Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, D. [Terrestrial Energy, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The Integral Molten Salt Reactor is a simple burner or converter design that seeks to maximize passive and inherent safety features in order to minimize development time and achieve true cost innovation. Its integration of all primary systems into a unit sealed for the design life of the reactor will be reviewed with focus on the unique design aspects that make this a pragmatic approach. The IMSR is being developed by Terrestrial Energy in a range of power outputs with initial focus on an 80 MWth (32.5 MWe) unit primarily for remote energy needs. Similar units of modestly larger dimension and up to 600 MWth (291 MWe) are planned that remain truck transportable and able to compete in base load electricity markets worldwide. (author)

  12. The Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, D., E-mail: dleblanc@terrestrialenergy.com [Terrestrial Energy, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The Integral Molten Salt Reactor is a simple burner or converter design that seeks to maximize passive and inherent safety features in order to minimize development time and achieve true cost innovation. Its integration of all primary systems into a unit sealed for the design life of the reactor will be reviewed with focus on the unique design aspects that make this a pragmatic approach. The IMSR is being developed by Terrestrial Energy in a range of power outputs with initial focus on an 80 MWth (32.5 MWe) unit primarily for remote energy needs. Similar units of modestly larger dimension and up to 600 MWth (291 MWe) are planned that remain truck transportable and able to compete in base load electricity markets worldwide. (author)

  13. Terrestrial Energy bets on molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial Energy is a Canadian enterprise, founded in 2013, for marketing the integral molten salt reactor (IMSR). A first prototype (called MSRE and with an energy output of 8 MW) was designed and operated between 1965 and 1969 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. IMSR is a small, modular reactor with a thermal energy output of 400 MW. According to Terrestrial Energy the technology of conventional power reactors is too complicated and too expensive. On the contrary IMSR's technology appears to be simple, easy to operate and affordable. With a staff of 30 people Terrestrial Energy appears to be a start-up in the nuclear sector. A process of pre-licensing will be launched in 2016 with the Canadian nuclear safety authority. (A.C.)

  14. SOCIAL MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESPONSIBILITY CENTCOM COALITION MEDIA SOCIAL MEDIA NEWS ARTICLES PRESS RELEASES IMAGERY VIDEOS TRANSCRIPTS VISITORS AND PERSONNEL FAMILY CENTER FAMILY READINESS CENTCOM WEBMAIL SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY ACCOUNTABILITY HomeMEDIASOCIAL MEDIA Social Media CENTCOM'S ENGLISH SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS There are many U.S. military commands

  15. Fuel processing for molten-salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the development of processes for the isolation of protactinium and for the removal of fission products from molten-salt breeder reactors. The metal transfer experiment MTE-3 (for removing rare earths from MSRE fuel salt) was completed and the equipment used in that experiment was examined. The examination showed that no serious corrosion had occurred on the internal surfaces of the vessels, but that serious air oxidation occurred on the external surfaces of the vessels. Analyses of the bismuth phases indicated that the surfaces in contact with the salts were enriched in thorium and iron. Mass transfer coefficients in the mechanically agitated nondispersing contactors were measured in the Salt/Bismuth Flow-through Facility. The measured mass transfer coefficients are about 30 to 40 percent of those predicted by the preferred literature correlation, but were not as low as those seen in some of the runs in MTE-3. Additional studies using water--mercury systems to simulate molten salt-bismuth systems indicated that the model used to interpret results from previous measurements in the water--mercury system has significant deficiencies. Autoresistance heating studies were continued to develop a means of internal heat generation for frozen-wall fluorinators. Equipment was built to test a design of a side arm for the heating electrode. Results of experiments with this equipment indicate that for proper operation the wall temperature must be held much lower than that for which the equipment was designed. Studies with an electrical analog of the equipment indicate that no regions of abnormally high current density exist in the side arm. (JGB)

  16. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    OpenAIRE

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450?470??C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, a...

  17. Mechanical structure and problem of thorium molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi accident, there became great interest in Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) for the safety as station blackout leading to auto drainage of molten salts with freeze valve. This article described mechanical structure of MSR and problems of materials and pipes. Material corrosion problem by molten salts would be solved using modified Hastelloy N with Ti and Nb added, which should be confirmed by operation of an experimental reactor. Trends in international activities of MSR were also referred including China declaring MSR development in January 2011 to solve thorium contamination issues at rare earth production and India rich in thorium resources. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Indian programme on molten salt cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuIera, I.V.; Vijayan, P.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is developing a 600 MWth pebble bed high temperature reactor, cooled by natural circulation of molten fluoride salts and is capable of supplying process heat at 1000 ℃ to facilitate hydrogen production by splitting water. BARC has also initiated studies for a reactor concept in which salts of molten fluoride fuel and coolant in fluid form, flows through the reactor core of graphite moderator, resulting in nuclear fission within the molten salt. For thorium fuel cycle, this concept is very attractive, since the fuel can be re-processed on-line, enabling it to be an efficient neutron breeder. (author)

  19. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  20. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Ph.; Noel, D.; Gras, J.M.; Prieux, B.

    1997-10-01

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author)

  1. Rare Earth Electrochemical Property Measurements and Phase Diagram Development in a Complex Molten Salt Mixture for Molten Salt Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Guo, Shaoqiang

    2018-03-30

    novel process using a galvanic couple between a cathode basket made of stainless steel and a Gd rod is investigated in LiCl-KCl-UCl3-MgCl2. The process shows rapid reduction of UCl3 to U and MgCl2 to Mg without any co-reduction of LaCl3, NdCl3, or CeCl3 because of the higher standard potential of Gd3+/Gd. Electrolysis of the molten salt results in a perturbation of the composition, which in turn can affect the equilibrium phase behavior. Studies on phase behavior in more complex salt mixtures as will be encountered in real electrorefiner salt drawdown are very limited. In present research, the solidus and liquidus temperatures for four quaternary LiCl-KCl-CsCl-RECl3 (RE = La, Nd, Ce, and Gd) salt systems are analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. The presence of CsCl causes a slight depression in the liquidus temperature for all of the four rare earth chloride mixtures when compared to the corresponding ternary system liquidus temperatures in the absence of any CsCl. Thermodynamic assessment for the LiCl-KCl-LnCl3 ternary system(here Gd as a reprehensive of Ln) has been carried out by CALPHAD method using two-sublattice model. From the optimized phase diagram, the solubility of GdCl3 in LiCl-KCl eutectic is obtained. This model can also be applied to other salt system to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of other REs in pyroprocessing salt systems with more components. In the end, an electrolysis model is developed to predict the electrolysis process for RE drawdown from LiCl-KCl salt. The model considers both the diffusion in electrolyte and Faraday process on the electrode surface and a surface layer is introduced to account for the fact that diffusion current is not necessarily equal to the current due to the Butler-Volmer equation. Using the fundamental data obtained from this study, the proposed model is validated by chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry experimental data.

  2. Contribution to the study of the vertical molten zone process (1963); Contribution a l'etude du procede de la zone fondue verticale (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenzin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Construction and use of several molten zone apparatuses operating either vertically or horizontally. Efficient purification of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate but less successful in the case of other hydrated double salts and of zirconyl chloride in the hydrochloric gel form. Demonstration and study of the dissymmetry in the direction of the transport of the impurity during, the purification by a vertical molten zone process. (author) [French] Construction et utilisation de plusieurs appareils de zone fondue travaillant soit en vertical, soit en horizontal. Purification efficace du nitrate d'uranyle hexahydrate mais peu significative dans le cas des autres couples de sels hydrates et du chlorure de zirconyle a l'etat de gel chlorhydrique. Mise en evidence et etude de la dissymetrie sur le sens de transport de l'impurete au cours de la purification par zone fondue verticale. (auteur)

  3. Dynamic electrochemical measurement of chloride ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement,

  4. Producing ammonium chloride from coal or shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, O L

    1921-02-25

    Process of producing ammonium chloride consists of mixing the substance to be treated with a chloride of an alkali or alkaline earth metal, free silica, water and free hydrochloric acid, heating the mixture until ammonium chloride distills off and collecting the ammonium chloride.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The...

  6. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375... CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No....1666 of this chapter, at a concentration of 1.5 times that of cetylpyridinium chloride. (c) The...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... hydrochloric acid solution and crystallizing out magnesium chloride hexahydrate. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  9. Interaction of steel, titanium and zirconium with melted chlorides containing copper and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeryanaya, I.N.; Manukhina, T.I.; Shibanov, B.S.

    1976-01-01

    Cu and Zn coatings were obtained by contact displacement of their molten chlorides. Cu was deposited on Kh18N10T stainless steel, and Zn was deposited on Ti or Zr at 400-550 0 . Cu was displaced from the electrolyte by all components in the steel. A smooth coating exhibited high adhesion. According to metallography there was a transition layer of a Ni-Cr solid solution between the surface Cu layer and steel. With electronegetiol Ti and Zr, contact deposition of Zn or Cu from chloride melts was possible. The coatings were multilayer and exhibited adequate adhesion. The coating consisted of an intermetallic compound of Ti or Zr with Zn

  10. Dynamics and control of molten-salt breeder reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results of the dynamic analysis of a two-fluid molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR system are presented. Based on an earlier work on the preliminary dynamic model of the concept, the model presented here is nonlinear and has been revised to accurately reflect the design exemplified in ORNL-4528. A brief overview of the model followed by results from simulations performed to validate the model is presented. Simulations illustrate stable behavior of the reactor dynamics and temperature feedback effects to reactivity excursions. Stable and smooth changes at various nodal temperatures are also observed. Control strategies for molten-salt reactor operation are discussed, followed by an illustration of the open-loop load-following capability of the molten-salt breeder reactor system. It is observed that the molten-salt breeder reactor system exhibits “self-regulating” behavior, minimizing the need for external controller action for load-following maneuvers.

  11. Conceptual design of Indian molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Basak, A.; Dulera, I.V.; Vaze, K.K.; Basu, S.; Sinha, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    The fuel in a molten salt breeder reactor is in the form of a continuously circulating molten salt. Fluoride based salts have been almost universally proposed. A crucial part for achieving reasonable breeding in such reactors is the need to reprocess the salt continuously, either online or in batch mode. This constitutes a major technological challenge for this type of reactors. India has recently started carrying out fundamental studies so as to arrive at a conceptual design of Indian Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (IMSBR). Presently various design options and possibilities are being studied from the point of view of reactor physics and thermal hydraulic design. In parallel fundamental studies as regards various molten salts have also been initiated. This paper would discuss conceptual design of these reactors, as well as associated issues and technologies

  12. Dynamics and control of molten-salt breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing, Vikram; Lish, Matthew R.; Chvala, Ondrej; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Preliminary results of the dynamic analysis of a two-fluid molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR) system are presented. Based on an earlier work on the preliminary dynamic model of the concept, the model presented here is nonlinear and has been revised to accurately reflect the design exemplified in ORNL-4528. A brief overview of the model followed by results from simulations performed to validate the model is presented. Simulations illustrate stable behavior of the reactor dynamics and temperature feedback effects to reactivity excursions. Stable and smooth changes at various nodal temperatures are also observed. Control strategies for molten-salt reactor operation are discussed, followed by an illustration of the open-loop load-following capability of the molten-salt breeder reactor system. It is observed that the molten-salt breeder reactor system exhibits “self-regulating” behavior, minimizing the need for external controller action for load-following maneuvers.

  13. Advanced Additive Manufacturing Feedstock from Molten Regolith Electrolysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate the feasibility of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) Reactor start by initiating resistive-heating of the regolith past its melting point using...

  14. High Surface Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith...

  15. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34... chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a) Copper, aluminum, magnesium, mercury, silver, and their alloys shall... equipment that may come in contact with vinyl chloride liquid or vapor. (b) Valves, flanges, and pipe...

  17. 40 CFR 61.65 - Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. 61.65 Section 61.65 Protection of Environment... AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.65 Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of an ethylene dichloride...

  18. Density and Structure Analysis of Molten Ni-W Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng XIAO; Liang FANG

    2004-01-01

    Density of molten Ni and Ni-W alloys was measured in the temperature range of 1773~1873 K with a sessile drop method.The density of molten Ni and Ni-W alloys trends to decrease with increasing temperature. The density and molar volume of the alloys trend to increase with increasing W concentration in the alloys. The calculation result shows an ideal mixing of Ni-W alloys.

  19. Molten fluoride mixtures as possible fission reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Molten mixtures of fluorides with UF 4 as a component have been used as combined fuel and primary heat transfer agent in experimental high-temperature reactors and have been proposed for use in breeders or converters of 233 U from thorium. Such use places stringent and diverse demands upon the fluid fuel. A brief review of chemical behavior of molten fluorides is given to show some of their strengths and weaknesses for such service

  20. Internal cation mobilities in molten lithium. Potassium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Haruaki; Ohashi, Ryo; Chou, Pao-Hwa; Takagi, Ryuzo

    2006-01-01

    Relative differences between internal cation mobilities in molten (Li, K) F have been measured by countercurrent electromigration (Klemm method) at 1023 K. Internal mobilities of K + are larger than those of Li + in all composition on which we have measured so far. More striking feature is that the isotherms have minimum of mobilities at ca. x K =0.5. The local structural parameters would be highly related to the ionic conduction behavior in molten fluorides. (author)

  1. Measurement of emittance of metal interface in molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, N.; Makino, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for measuring the total normal emittance of a metal in a semi-transparent liquid has been proposed and this technique has been applied to measure the emittance of stainless steel (SUS304), nickel, and gold in molten potassium nitrate KNO 3 . These emittance data are indispensable to analyzing the radiative heat transfer between a metal and a semitransparent liquid, such as a molten salt

  2. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride...

  3. Preparation of pure anhydrous rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kova, N.L.; Slastenova, N.M.; Batyaev, I.M.; Solov'ev, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been suggested for obtaining extra-pure anhydrous REE chlorides by chloridizing corresponding oxalates by chlorine in a fluid bed, the chloridizing agents being diluted by an inert gas in a ratio of 2-to-1. The method is applicable to the manufacture of quality chlorides not only of light, but also of heavy REE. Neodymium chloride has an excited life of tau=30 μs, this evidencing the absence of the damping impurities

  4. Hydrogen permeation through Flinabe fluoride molten salts for blanket candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiumi, Ryosuke, E-mail: r.nishiumi@aees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fukada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Akira; Katayama, Kazunari

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2} diffusivity, solubility and permeability in Flinabe as T breeder are determined. • Effects in composition differences among Flibe, Fnabe and Flinabe are compared. • Changes of pressure dependence of Flinabe permeation rate are clarified. - Abstract: Fluoride molten salt Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for the liquid blanket of a nuclear fusion reactor, because of its large advantages of tritium breeding ratio and heat-transfer fluid. Since its melting point is higher than other liquid candidates, another new fluoride molten salt Flinabe (LiF + NaF + BeF{sub 2}) is recently focused on because of its lower melting point while holding proper breeding properties. In this experiment, hydrogen permeation behavior through the three molten salts of Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}), Fnabe (NaF + BeF{sub 2}) and Flinabe are investigated in order to clarify the effects of their compositions on hydrogen transfer properties. After making up any of the three molten salts and purifying it using HF, hydrogen permeability, diffusivity and solubility of the molten salts are determined experimentally by using a system composed of tertiary cylindrical tubes. Close agreement is obtained between experimental data and analytical solutions. H{sub 2} permeability, diffusivity and solubility are correlated as a function of temperature and are compared among the three molten salts.

  5. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.

  6. Thermohydraulic behaviour and heat transfer in the molten core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineke, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Increasing the application of nuclear reactors to produce electrical power extremely unprobable accidents should be investigated too. In the Federal Republic of Germany, a research program is performed for some years engaged in accidents at light water reactors in which the melting of the reactor core is presumed. A part of this program is to investigate the thermohydraulic and the heat transfer behavior in an accumulation of molten core material. The knowledge of these events is necessary to analyse the accident exactly. Further on the results of this work are of great importance to build a catcher for the molten core material. As a result of the decay heat the molten material is heated up and the density differences induce a free convection motion. In this work the thermohydraulic behavior and the distribution of the escaping heat fluxes for several accumulations of molten core material were determined. The numerical methods for solving the system of partial differential equation were used to develop computer codes, able to compute the average and local heat fluxes at the walls enclosing the molten core material and the inside increase of the temperature. The numerical computations were confirmed and verified by experimental investigations. In these investigations the molten core material was always assumed as a homogeneous fluid. In this case, the results could be reproduced by simple power laws

  7. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept. • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L. • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  8. Study on mechanical interaction between molten alloy and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    Simulant experiments using low melting point molten alloy and water have been conducted to observe both fragmentation behavior of molten jet and boiling phenomena of water, and to measure both particle size and shape of fragmented solidified jet, focusing on post-pin-failure molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCl) which was important to evaluate the sequence of the initiating phase for metallic fueled FBR. In addition, characteristics of coolant boiling phenomena on FCIs have been investigated, focusing on the boiling heat transfer in the direct contact heat transfer mode. As a results, it is concluded that the fragmentation of poured molten alloy jet is affected by a degree of boiling of water and is classified into three modes by thermal conditions of both the instantaneous contact interface temperature of two liquids and subcooling of water. In the case of forced convection boiling in direct contact mode, it is found that the heat transfer performance is enhanced by increase of the heat transfer area, due to oscillation of the surface and fragmentation of molten alloy. As a results of preliminary investigation of FCI behavior for metallic fuel core based on these results, it is expected that the ejected molten fuel is fragmented into almost spherical particles due to the developed boiling of sodium. (author)

  9. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wishau, R.

    1998-05-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a {sup 238}Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of {sup 238}Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of {sup 238}Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious {sup 238}Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further {sup 238}Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious {sup 238}Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose {sup 238}Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment.

  10. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishau, R.

    1998-05-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a 238 Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of 238 Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of 238 Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious 238 Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of 238 Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further 238 Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious 238 Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose 238 Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment

  11. Reaction of calcium chloride with alkali metal chlorides in melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, V.D.; Mikhajlova, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Thermochemical characteristics of CaCl 2 reaction with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium chlorides in melts at 890 deg C are determined. The values of formation enthalpies of infinitely diluted by CaCl 2 solutions (ΔH) in the chloride row increase from -22 in NaCl to -47 kJ/mol of CaCl 2 in CsCl. With increasing the concentration of calcium chloride in the solution the ΔH values decrease. The regularities of separation from the solution of the CaCl 2 -CsCl system at 890 deg C of the CaCl 2 x CsCl in solid are studied. Formation enthalpies under the given conditions constitutes -70+-3 kJ/mol

  12. Conductometric study of lanthanum chloride interaction with potash soaps of higher fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sazonova, V.F.; Kornelli, M.Eh.; Shumilina, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Interaction of lanthanum chloride with potassium salts of higher aliphatic acids, containing from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, at room temperature in weakly acid media (pH=5.5) gives rise to neutral soaps of the La[CHsub(3)(CHsub(2))sub(n)COO]sub(3) composition, while in alkaline media (pH=8.0) base soaps of the LaOH[CHsub(3)(CHsub(2))sub(n)COO]sub(2) composition are formed. In acid solutions (pH=2.0) no interaction of lanthanum chloride with potassium soaps of the above carboxylic acids is observed

  13. Research on electrochemical methods for concentration measurement of dissolved ion in molten salt to apply to electrolytic process control. Innovative research adopted in 2002 fiscal year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Takayuki

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish the online (in-situ) technique for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in the molten salt, and this technique is due to the electrochemical method for the concentration measuring of dissolved ion in solutions like the polarization curve measurement. This research executed the following four items. 1) Examination of possibility for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in molten salt by cyclic voltammetry. 2) Examination of possibility for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in molten salt by various electrochemical methods. 3) Examination of suitable electrochemical method for concentration measuring of dissolved ion. 4) Confirmation of selected electrochemical method for concentration measuring of dissolved ion. It has been understood that the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) is a promising electrochemical technique for the concentration measuring of dissolved ion in the molten salt as a result of this research. An appropriate measurement condition is as follows, the potential sweep rate is -0.1 V/s, the pulse cycle is 0.1 s, the pulse width is 10 ms, and the pulse voltage is 50 mV. As for the electrodes, the platinum working electrode, the glassy carbon counter electrode, and silver/silver chloride reference electrode are suitable. Moreover, the molar absorptivities of U 3+ , U 4+ , UO 2 + , UO 2 2+ , and the standard redox potentials of couples of U 4+ /U 3+ and UO 2 2+ /UO 2 + were acquired as a basic data of the uranium and the uranyl ion in molten NaCl-2CsCl. (author)

  14. Molten Salt Breeder Reactor Analysis Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinsu; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Utilizing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle shows considerable potential for the possibility of MSR. The concept of MSBR should be revised because of molten salt reactor's advantage such as outstanding neutron economy, possibility of continuous online reprocessing and refueling, a high level of inherent safety, and economic benefit by keeping off the fuel fabrication process. For the development of MSR research, this paper provides the MSBR single-cell, two-cell and whole core model for computer code input, and several calculation results including depletion calculation of each models. The calculations are carried out by using MCNP6, a Monte Carlo computer code, which has CINDER90 for depletion calculation using ENDF-VII nuclear data. From the calculation results of various reactor design parameters, the temperature coefficients are all negative at the initial state and MTC becomes positive at the equilibrium state. From the results of core rod worth, the graphite control rod alone cannot makes the core subcritical at initial state. But the equilibrium state, the core can be made subcritical state only by graphite control rods. Through the comparison of the results of each models, the two-cell method can represent the MSBR core model more accurately with a little more computational resources than the single-cell method. Many of the thermal spectrum MSR have adopted a multi-region single-fluid strategy.

  15. Materials testing for molten carbonate fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, F.; Frangini, S.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike conventional generation systems fuel cells use an electrochemical reaction between a fossil fuel and an oxidant to produce electricity through a flame less combustion process. As a result, fuel cells offer interesting technical and operating advantages in terms of conversion efficiencies and environmental benefits due to very low pollutant emissions. Among the different kinds of fuel cells the molten carbonate fuel cells are currently being developed for building compact power generation plants to serve mainly in congested urban areas in virtue of their higher efficiency capabilities at either partial and full loads, good response to power peak loads, fuel flexibility, modularity and, potentially, cost-effectiveness. Starting from an analysis of the most important degradative aspects of the corrosion of the separator plate, the main purpose of this communication is to present the state of the technology in the field of corrosion control of the separator plate in order to extend the useful lifetime of the construction materials to the project goal of 40,000 hours

  16. Fragmentation of molten core material by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1982-01-01

    A series of scoping experiments was performed to study the fragmentation of prototypic high temperature melts in sodium. The quantity of melt involved was at least one order of magnitude larger than previous experiments. Two modes of contact were used: melt streaming into sodium and sodium into melt. The average bulk fragment size distribution was found to be in the range of previous data and the average size distribution was found to be insensitive to mode of contact. SEM studies showed that the metal component typically fragmented in the molten phase while the oxide component fragmented in the solid phase. For UO 2 -ZrO 2 /stainless steel melts no sigificant spatial separation of the metal and oxide was observed. The fragment size distribution was stratified vertically in the debris bed in all cases. While the bulk fragment size showed generally consistent trends, the individual experiments were sufficiently different to cause different degrees of stratification in the debris bed. For the highly stratified beds the permeability can decrease by as much as a factor of 20 from the bottom to the top of the bed

  17. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  18. Molten salt reactor related research in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krepel, Jiri; Hombourger, Boris; Fiorina, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Switzerland represented by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is a member of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). In the past, the research at PSI focused mainly on HTR, SFR, and GFR. Currently, a research program was established also for Molten Salt Reactors (MSR). Safety is the key point and main interest of the MSR research at the Nuclear Energy and Safety (NES) department of PSI. However, it cannot be evaluated without knowing the system design, fuel chemistry, salt thermal-hydraulics features, safety and fuel cycle approach, and the relevant material and chemical limits. Accordingly, sufficient knowledge should be acquired in the other individual fields before the safety can be evaluated. The MSR research at NES may be divided into four working packages (WP): WP1: MSR core design and fuel cycle, WP2: MSR fuel behavior at nominal and accidental conditions, WP3: MSR thermal-hydraulics and decay heat removal system, WP4: MSR safety, fuel stream, and relevant limits. The WPs are proposed so that there are research topics which can be independently studied within each of them. The work plan of the four WPs is based on several ongoing or past national and international projects relevant to MSR, where NES/PSI participates. At the current stage, the program focuses on several specific and design independent studies. The safety is the key point and main long-term interest of the MSR research at NES. (author)

  19. Actuation method of molten carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Kimoto, Mamoru; Murakami, Shuzo; Furukawa, Nobuhiro

    1987-10-17

    A molten carbonate fuel cell uses reformed gas of crude fuel as fuel gas, but in this gas, CO/sub 2/ is contained in addition to H/sub 2/ and CO which participate the reaction in its fuel electrode. In order to make the reaction of the cell by these gases smoothly, CO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas from the fuel electrode must be introduced efficiently to its oxygen electrode, however since unreacted H/sub 2/ and CO are contained in the above exhaust gas, they are oxidated and burned once in a boiler and transformed into H/sub 2/O (steam) and CO/sub 2/, then CO/sub 2/ generated in the fuel electrode is added thereto, and afterwards these gases with the air are introduced into the oxygen electrode. However, since this method hinders the high power generation efficiency, in this invention, the exhaust gas from the fuel electrode which burns the reformed gas is introduced into separation chambers separated with CO/sub 2/ permselective membranes, and the mixture of CO/sub 2/ in the above exhaust gas separated with the aforementioned permeable membranes and the air is supplied to the oxygen electrode. At the same time, H/sub 2/ and CO in the above exhaust gas which were not separated with the above permeable membranes are recirculated to the above fuel electrode. (3 figs)

  20. Molten fuel behaviour during slow overpower transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, Y.; Boidron, M.

    1985-01-01

    In large commercial reactors as Super-Phenix, if we take into account all the uncertainties on the pins and on the core, it is no longer possible to guarantee the absence of fuel melting during incidental events such as slow overpower transients. We have then to explain what happens in the pins when fuel melting occurs and to demonstrate that a limited amount of molten fuel generates no risk of clad failure. For that purpose, we may use the results of a great number of experiments (about 40) that have been performed at C.E.A., most of them in thermal reactor, but some experiments have also been performed in Rapsodie, especially during the last run of this reactor. In a great part of these experiments, fuel melting occurred at beginning of life, but we have also some results at different burnups up to 5 at %. It is not the aim of this paper to describe all these experiments and the results of their post irradiation examination, but to summarize the main conclusions that have been set out of them and that have enabled us to determine the main characteristics of fuel element behaviour when fuel melting occurs

  1. Electrochemical Chloride extraction using external electrodes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical methods for the removal of chloride from concrete have been developed and the methods are primarily designed for situations where corrosion has started due to an increased chloride concentration in the vicinity of the reinforcement. In these methods the reinforcement is used...... as the cathode. However, some unwanted side effects can occur, including alkali-silica reaction and in some cases hydrogen embrittlement. It is also suggested also to use electrochemical chloride extraction in a preventive way in constructions where chloride induced corrosion is likely to be a problem after...... a period of time, i.e. remove the chlorides before the chloride front reaches the reinforcement. If the chlorides are removed from outer few centimetres from the surface, the chloride will not reach the reinforcement and cause damage. By using the electrochemical chloride removal in this preventive way...

  2. UV-VIS absorption spectra of molten AgCl and AgBr and of their mixtures with group I and II halide salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greening, Giorgio G.W. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie

    2015-07-01

    The UV-VIS absorption spectra of (Ag{sub 1-X}[Li-Cs, Ba]{sub X})Cl and of (Ag{sub 1-X}[Na, K, Cs]{sub X})Br at 823 K at the concentrations X=0.0, 0.1, 0.2 have been measured. The findings show that on adding the respective halides to molten silver chloride and silver bromide, shifts of the fundamental absorption edge to shorter wavelengths result. A correlation between the observed shifts and the expansion of the silver sub-lattice is found, which is valid for both silver halide systems studied in this work.

  3. Experimental studies on natural circulation in molten salt loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Borgohain, A.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Molten salts are increasingly getting attention as a coolant and storage medium in solar thermal power plants and as a liquid fuel, blanket and coolant in Molten Salt Reactors (MSR’s). Two different test facilities named Molten Salt Natural Circulation Loop (MSNCL) and Molten Active Fluoride salt Loop (MAFL) have been setup for thermal hydraulics, instrument development and material related studies relevant to MSR and solar power plants. The working medium for MSNCL is a molten nitrate salt which is a mixture of NaNO 3 and KNO 3 in 60:40 ratio and proposed as one of the coolant option for molten salt based reactor and coolant as well as storage medium for solar thermal power application. On the other hand, the working medium for MAFL is a eutectic mixture of LiF and ThF 4 and proposed as a blanket salt for Indian Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR). Steady state natural circulation experiments at different power level have been performed in the MSNCL. Transient studies for startup of natural circulation, loss of heat sink, heater trip and step change in heater power have also been carried out in the same. A 1D code LeBENC, developed in-house to simulate the natural circulation characteristics in closed loops, has been validated with the experimental data obtained from MSNCL. Further, LeBENC has been used for Pretest analysis of MAFL. This paper deals with the description of both the loops and experimental studies carried out in MSNCL. Validation of LeBENC along with the pretest analysis of MAFL using the same are also reported in this paper. (author)

  4. Validation of the TRACE code for the system dynamic simulations of the molten salt reactor experiment and the preliminary study on the dual fluid molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xun

    2016-01-01

    MSR concept using the mathematic tools. In particular, the aim of the first part is to demonstrate the suitability of the TRACE code for the similar MSR designs by using a modified version of the TRACE code to implement the simulations for the steady-state, transient and accidental conditions. The basic approach of this part is to couple the thermal-hydraulic model and the modified point-kinetic model. The equivalent thermal-hydraulic model of the MSRE was built in 1D with three loops including all the critical main components. The point-kinetic model was improved through considering the precursor drift in order to produce more practical results in terms of the delayed neutron behavior. Additionally, new working fluids, namely the molten salts, were embedded into the source code of TRACE. Most results of the simulations show good agreements with the ORNL's reports and with another recent study and the errors were predictable and in an acceptable range. Therefore, the necessary code modification of TRACE appears to be successful and the model will be refined and its functions will be extended further in order to investigate new MSR design. Another part of this thesis is to implement a preliminary study on a new concept of molten salt reactor, namely the Dual Fluid Reactor (DFR). The DFR belongs to the group of the molten salt fast reactors (MSFR) and it is recently considered to be an option of minimum-waste and inherently safe operation of the nuclear reactors in the future. The DFR is using two separately circulating fluids in the reactor core. One is the fuel salt based on the mixture of tri-chlorides of uranium and plutonium (UCl_3-PuCl_3), while another is the coolant composed of the pure lead (Pb). The current work focuses on the basic dynamic behavior of a scaled-down DFR with 500 MW thermal output (DFR-500) instead of its reference design with 3000 MW thermal output (DFR-3000). For this purpose 10 parallel single fuel channels, as the representative samples

  5. Validation of the TRACE code for the system dynamic simulations of the molten salt reactor experiment and the preliminary study on the dual fluid molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xun

    2016-06-14

    one is about the demonstration of a new MSR concept using the mathematic tools. In particular, the aim of the first part is to demonstrate the suitability of the TRACE code for the similar MSR designs by using a modified version of the TRACE code to implement the simulations for the steady-state, transient and accidental conditions. The basic approach of this part is to couple the thermal-hydraulic model and the modified point-kinetic model. The equivalent thermal-hydraulic model of the MSRE was built in 1D with three loops including all the critical main components. The point-kinetic model was improved through considering the precursor drift in order to produce more practical results in terms of the delayed neutron behavior. Additionally, new working fluids, namely the molten salts, were embedded into the source code of TRACE. Most results of the simulations show good agreements with the ORNL's reports and with another recent study and the errors were predictable and in an acceptable range. Therefore, the necessary code modification of TRACE appears to be successful and the model will be refined and its functions will be extended further in order to investigate new MSR design. Another part of this thesis is to implement a preliminary study on a new concept of molten salt reactor, namely the Dual Fluid Reactor (DFR). The DFR belongs to the group of the molten salt fast reactors (MSFR) and it is recently considered to be an option of minimum-waste and inherently safe operation of the nuclear reactors in the future. The DFR is using two separately circulating fluids in the reactor core. One is the fuel salt based on the mixture of tri-chlorides of uranium and plutonium (UCl{sub 3}-PuCl{sub 3}), while another is the coolant composed of the pure lead (Pb). The current work focuses on the basic dynamic behavior of a scaled-down DFR with 500 MW thermal output (DFR-500) instead of its reference design with 3000 MW thermal output (DFR-3000). For this purpose 10 parallel

  6. Radioisotopes as tracers for reactions in molten fluoride media; Les radioisotopes comme indicateurs des reactions se produisant dans des milieux de fluorures fondus; Ispol'zovanie radioizotopov v kachestve indikatorov dlya reaktsij v rasplavlennoj ftoristoj srede; Los radioisotopos como indicadores de las reacciones que tienen lugar en un medio de fluoruros fundidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, W R; Shaffer, J H; Strehlow, R A; Ward, W T; Watson, G M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1962-03-15

    Chemical reactions which may be useful for removing certain constituents from molten fluoride solution have been examined by use of appropriate radioisotopes and standard counting procedures. Classes of reactions studied have included (1) isotopic exchange between solute tracer and insoluble compound, (2) partition of solute between the melt and a solid solution of a similar compound, and (3) precipitation of the radioisotope as insoluble compound. In typical experiments, radiotracer LaF{sub 3} in LiF-NaF melts was shown to exchange rapidly with inactive La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A similar rapid exchange in this solvent occurred between radiotracer CeF{sub 3} and inactive CeO{sub 2}; the electron transfer required in the latter case is apparently no barrier to the reaction. Addition of inactive CeF{sub 3} to each system increased the radiotracer content of the solution in accordance with the mass-action principle. When certain LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts containing CeF{sub 3} and rare-earth fluorides are cooled the primary phase is a solid solution of the trifluorides. Equilibria, between molten solution and solid solution, have been evaluated for various fluoride pairs. No significant deviations from the simple mass-action principle have been observed. Separations of various species by selective precipitation of oxides from molten fluoride solutions have also been demonstrated. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie, au moyen do radioisotopes appropries et des procedes de comptage habituels, les reactions chimiques qui peuvent contribuer a l'elimination do certains constituants en solution dans des fluorures fondus. Les categories de reactions etudiees comprenaient 1. L'echange isotopique entre indicateurs dissous et composes insolubles; 2. La repartition du solute entre la masse fondue et la solution solide d'un compose analogue; 3. La precipitation du radioisotope comme compose insoluble. Des experiences caracteristiques ont montre que, dans les echantillons de LiF-NaF, il

  7. Recovery of Platinum from Dilute Chloride Media Using Biosorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytuncu, B.; Morcali, M. H.; Yucel, O.

    Pistachio nut shells and Rice husk, a biomass residue, were investigated as adsorbents for the platinum uptake from synthetically prepared dilute chloroplatinic acid solutions. The effects of the different uptake parameters on platinum uptake (%) were studied in detail on a batch sorption. Before the pistachio nut shell material was activated, platinum uptake (%) was poor compared with rice husk. However, after the pistachio nut shell material was activated at 1000°C under an argon atmosphere, the platinum uptake (%) increased two-fold. The pistachio nut shell (inactivated and activated) and rice husk were characterized by Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

  8. LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

    2008-12-11

    The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

  9. LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.; Brown, N.; Caro, A.; Farmer, J.; Halsey, W.; Kaufman, L.; Kramer, K.; Latkowski, J.; Powers, J.; Shaw, H.; Turchi, P.

    2008-01-01

    The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

  10. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  11. Simulation of Molten Salt Reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krepel, J.; Rohde, U.; Grundmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Dynamics of the Molten Salt Reactor - one of the 'Generation IV' concepts - was studied in this paper. The graphite-moderated channel type MSR was selected for the numerical simulation of the reactor with liquid fuel. The MSR dynamics is very specific because of two physical peculiarities of the liquid fueled reactor: the delayed neutrons precursors are drifted by the fuel flow and the fission energy is immediately released directly into the coolant. Presently, there are not many accessible numerical codes appropriate for the MSR simulation, therefore the DYN3D-MSR code was developed based on the FZR in-house code DYN3D. It allows calculating of full 3D transient neutronics in combination with parallel channel type thermal-hydraulics. By means of DYN3D-MSR, several transients typical for the liquid fuel system were analyzed. Those transients were initiated by reactivity insertion, by overcooling of fuel at the core inlet, by the fuel pump start-up or coast-down, or by the blockage of selected fuel channels. In these considered transients, the response of the MSR is characterized by the immediate change of the fuel temperature with changing power and fast negative temperature feedback to the power. The response through the graphite temperature is slower. Furthermore, for big MSR cores fueled with U233 the graphite feedback coefficient can be positive. In this case the addition of erbium to the graphite can ensure the inherent safety features. The DYN3D-MSR code has been shown to be an effective tool for MSR dynamics studies. (author)

  12. Development of High Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is one of the the most promising technologies for the advanced fuel cycle with favorable economic potential and intrinsic proliferation-resistance. The electrorefining process, one of main processes which is composed of pyroprocess to recover the useful elements from spent fuel, is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a sub process of the pyrochemical treatment of spent PWR fuel. High-temperature molten salt transport technologies are required because a molten salt should be transported from the electrorefiner to electrowiner after the electrorefining process. Therefore, in pyrometallurgical processing, the development of high-temperature molten salt transport technologies is a crucial prerequisite. However, there have been a few transport studies on high-temperature molten salt. In this study, an apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high temperature transport technology for molten salt, and the performance test of the apparatus was performed. And also, predissolution test of the salt was carried out using the reactor with furnace in experimental apparatus

  13. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-01-01

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li 2 O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes

  14. Steam gasification of plant biomass using molten carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathaway, Brandon J.; Honda, Masanori; Kittelson, David B.; Davidson, Jane H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of molten alkali-carbonate salts as a reaction and heat transfer medium for steam gasification of plant biomass with the objectives of enhanced heat transfer, faster kinetics, and increased thermal capacitance compared to gasification in an inert gas. The intended application is a solar process in which concentrated solar radiation is the sole source of heat to drive the endothermic production of synthesis gas. The benefits of gasification in a molten ternary blend of lithium, potassium, and sodium carbonate salts is demonstrated for cellulose, switchgrass, a blend of perennial plants, and corn stover through measurements of reaction rate and product composition in an electrically heated reactor. The feedstocks are gasified with steam at 1200 K in argon and in the molten salt. The use of molten salt increases the total useful syngas production by up to 25%, and increases the reactivity index by as much as 490%. Secondary products, in the form of condensable tar, are reduced by 77%. -- Highlights: ► The presence of molten salt increases the rate of gasification by up to 600%. ► Reaction rates across various feedstocks are more uniform with salt present. ► Useful syngas yield is increased by up to 30% when salt is present. ► Secondary production of liquid tars are reduced by 77% when salt is present.

  15. Natural convection heat transfer in the molten metal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.; Choi, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical studies using the FLOW-3D computer program have been performed on natural convection heat transfer of a high density molten metal pool, in order to evaluate the coolability of the corium pool. The FLOW-3D results on the temperature distribution and the heat transfer rate in the molten metal pool region have been compared and evaluated with the experimental data. The FLOW-3D results have shown that the developed natural convection flow contributes to the solidified crust formation of the high density molten metal pool. The present FLOW-3D results, on the relationship between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region, are more similar to the calculated results of Globe and Dropkin's correlation than any others. The natural convection heat transfer in the low aspect ratio case is more substantial than that in the high aspect ratio case. The FLOW-3D results, on the temperature profile and on the heat transfer rate in the molten metal pool region, are very similar to the experimental data. The heat transfer rate of the internal heat generation case is higher than that of the bottom heating case at the same heat supply condition. (author)

  16. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  17. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    : On the basis of five included studies, the ED10 values of aqueous cobalt chloride ranged between 0.0663 and 1.95 µg cobalt/cm(2), corresponding to 30.8-259 ppm. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis provides an overview of the doses of cobalt that are required to elicit allergic cobalt contactdermatitis in sensitized...

  18. Surface Chloride Levels in Colorado Structural Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This project focused on the chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in structural concrete. The primary goal of this project is to analyze the surface chloride concentration level of the concrete bridge decks throughout Colorado. The study in...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of vinyl chloride in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Laib, R.J.; Kappus, H.; Buchter, A.

    1977-01-01

    When rats are exposed to [ 14 C]vinyl chloride in a closed system, the vinyl chloride present in the atmosphere equilibrates with the animals' organism within 15 min. The course of equilibration could be determined using rats which had been given 6-nitro-1,2,3-benzothiadiazole. This compound completely blocks metabolism of vinyl chloride. The enzymes responsible for metabolism of vinyl chloride are saturated at an atmospheric concentration of vinyl chloride of 250 ppm. Pharmacokinetic analysis shows that no significant cumulation of vinyl chloride or its major metabolites is to be expected on repeated administration of vinyl chlorides. This may be consistent with the theory that a reactive, shortly living metabolite which occurs in low concentration only, may be responsible for the toxic effects of vinyl chloride

  20. Voltammetry of uranyl chloride in the LiCl - KCl eutectic; Voltammetrie du chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondanaiche, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Spent UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} fuels can be reprocessed in a molten salt media. Uranium dioxide can easily be dissolved as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in a molten salt bath using chlorine gas. A study of quantitative analysis of an uranyl chloride solution in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 400 C has been performed here using voltammetry (a large area-graphite indicator electrode has been employed). The precision which is obtained is around 6 per cent for concentrations below 10{sup -2} M. Precision decreases slightly for more concentrated solutions. The study of polarization curves allowed to give a reduction mechanism for the UO{sub 2}{sup ++} ion. For dilute solutions, this reduction proceeds through the UO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. But interpretation of current-potential curves is made difficult by the dismutation reaction of the UO{sub 2} ion and by the fact that the surface of the indicator electrode is not renewed. (author) [French] Le traitement des combustibles a base d'oxydes (UO{sub 2} - PUO{sub 2}) peut etre effectue au moyen des sels fondus. Le bioxyde d'uranium passe aisement en solution sous forme de UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} dans un bain de sels fondus par action du chlore. Nous avons etudie ici l'analyse quantitative d'une solution de chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KCl a 400 C par voltammetrie (electrode indicatrice de graphite d'assez grande surface). La precision est d'environ 6 pour cent pour les concentrations inferieures a 10{sup -2} M; elle est legerement moins bonne pour les solutions plus concentrees. L'examen des courbes de polarisation a permis de donner un mecanisme de reduction de l'ion UO{sub 2}: pour les solutions diluees, cette reduction se fait par l'intermediaire de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +}. Mais l'interpretation des courbes intensite-potentiel est rendue delicate par la reaction de dismutation de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +} et par le fait que la surface de l'electrode indicatrice n'est pas renouvelee. (auteur)

  1. Stability constants of the Europium complexes with the chloride ions; Constantes de estabilidad de los complejos del europio con los iones cloruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The stability constants of lanthanides complexes with chloride ions which were determined at the same ionic force but in different media, are significantly different. It does not exist a systematic study over these stability constants. The purpose of this work is to determine the stability constants of the europium complexes with chloride ions at 303 K, by the solvents extraction method. (Author)

  2. Electrochemical noise measurements of steel corrosion in the molten NaCl-K2SO4 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm; Bjerrum, Niels; Petrushina, Irina

    2005-01-01

    -called active corrosion (i.e., the corrosion proceeds with no passivation due to the influence of chlorine), characterized by the formation of volatile metal chlorides as a primary corrosion product. It was found possible to obtain an empirical separation of general and intergranular corrosion using kurtosis (a......Electrochemical noise measurements have been carried out on AISI347, 10CrMo910, 15Mo3, and X20CrMoV121 steels in molten NaCl-K2SO4 at 630 degrees C. Different types of current noise have been identified for pitting, intergranular and peeling corrosion. The corrosion mechanism was the so...... statistical parameter calculated from the electrochemical noise data). It was found that average kurtosis values above 6 indicated intergranular corrosion and average values below 6 indicated general corrosion. The response time for localized corrosion detection in in-plant monitoring was approximately 90 min...

  3. Dechlorination and Stabilization of Molten Salt Waste by Using xSiO2-yAl2O3- zP2O5 at Melting Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hwanseo; Kim, Intae; Kim, Hwanyoung; Kim, Joonhyung

    2007-01-01

    Molten salt waste, which is generated from the pyroprocess to separate uranium and trans-uranium elements from spent nuclear fuel, has been interested to researchers in the radioactive waste management. For its final disposal, direct immobilization into a suitable host matrix or indirect solidification by other chemical routes requires the control of chlorides and its volatility since molten salt wastes mainly consist of volatile metal chlorides. Glass-bonded sodalite (Na 6 M 2 Al 6 Si 6 O 24 Cl 2 , 1-5) suggested by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), to the present, could be a practical solution to the immobilization of this waste, where waste form can be fabricated at about 915 .deg., lower than the melting temperature of many borosilicate glasses ( -1150 .deg.). A wet dechlorination to oxides or a thermal conversion into borate glass was suggested to remove Cl from salt waste (6-7) and it seemed that the preference of radionuclides for the intended chemical conversions or immobilizations described above could be hardly accomplished or failed, except the phosphate precipitation method suggested by Volkovich and his co-workers (8). Our research group suggested a novel method to treat molten salt waste, named GRSS (Gel-Route Stabilization/Solidification) using Si-P-Al system as a gel-forming system. This showed little vaporization during high temperature process and good leach resistance on Cs and Sr. As another method, this study suggested a method to stabilize molten salt wastes by using xSiO 2 -yAl 2 O 3 - zP 2 O 5 material. GRSS method is considered as a 'reaction system' to completely convert salt waste into stable product while the inorganic material used in this study is a stabilizer for salt wastes. Using this material, this study investigated the reactivity on different metal chlorides, thermal stability, leach-resistance and etc

  4. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  5. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Nannhein, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Altos, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  6. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  7. New rational nuclear energy system composed of accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) and molten-salt power stations (MSCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    For the next century, it was predicted that some rational fission energy system breeding in significantly short doubling time less than 10 years should be developed replacing the fossil fuels. In practice, this rationality, that is, simplicity and high economy could be realized by the natural combination of: molten salt fuel concept; accelerator (spallation) breeding concept; and Thorium fuel cycle concept, in the symbiont system of Accelerator Molten-Salt breeders and Molten-Salt Power Stations. The economy of this system might significantly become better than the other breeder systems, although the prediction in Chapter 6 was too much conservative. Its more important aspect is the low cost of future R and D, which depend on the rational character of Molten-Fluoride Technology and really is verified by the basic R and D cost (only $0.13 B) in Oak Ridge N.L. It is interesting that molten-salt technology will be able to apply to chemical processing of U-Pu oxide fuels by the developing effort by USSR in near future. This fact and the demand of small power stations such as 150MWe MSCR presented here will be able to bridge between the present and the next century

  8. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  9. Performance of the mesh-type liquid cadmium cathode structure for the electrodeposition of uranium from the molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, S.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, H.; Ahn, D.H.; Yoon, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    A mesh-type liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) structure has been devised to improve the performance of the electro-winning process for the recovery of actinides in a molten chloride system. For the verification of its performance, electrodeposition experiments of uranium from the molten LiCl-KCl-UCl 3 salt were conducted at 773 K for different current densities using the mesh-type LCC structure. Uranium was successfully collected over 5 wt. % in the LCC without growing uranium dendrites. The mesh-type LCC structure prevented the uncontrolled growth of uranium dendrites into the electrolyte phase above the cadmium surface and caused the LCC deposit to accumulate at the higher in the cadmium phase over uranium solubility in cadmium. After cooling the LCC crucible, its solid deposits were identified as an intermetallic compound UCd 11 by EPMA and XRD analysis. The cathode potential profiles from the electrochemical experiments and the chemical structure of the LCC deposits showed that it could be applied practically to recover the actinides above their solubility in cadmium. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of corrosion performance of grade 316 and grade 347H stainless steels in molten nitrate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, M. C.; Goods, S. H.; Bradshaw, R. W.

    2016-05-01

    Stainless steel samples machined from SA-312 TP316 and SA-213 TP347H pipe were exposed to a molten nitrate salt environment at 600°C (1112°F) for up to 3000 hours in order to generate corrosion rates for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) facilities. Descaled weight loss measurements were made at 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours, with optical and scanning electron microscopy being performed on samples at the longest exposure time. The 316 and 347H alloys exhibited metal losses of 4.4 and 4.8 um respectively at 3000 hours. A linear fit to the data sets yielded annualized metal loss rates of 8.4 and 8.8 um/yr. The oxides were relatively uniform in thickness and multilayered. The inner layer consisted of a (Fe, Cr)-spinel with appreciable amounts of Mn while the outer layer was an oxide composed of only Fe. No pitting, intergranular attack, or other localized attack was found, despite the presence of a sensitized microstructure in both alloys and chloride impurity in the salt mixture. The observations presented here indicate that the two alloys perform quite comparably with respect to molten salt-induced corrosion and in that regard; either would be expected to perform satisfactorily in the intended application.

  11. Critical survey on electrode aging in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, K.

    1979-12-01

    To evaluate potential electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells, we reviewed the literature pertaining to these cells and interviewed investigators working in fuel cell technology. In this critical survey, the effect of three electrode aging processes - corrosion or oxidation, sintering, and poisoning - on these potential fuel-cell electrodes is presented. It is concluded that anodes of stabilized nickel and cathodes of lithium-doped NiO are the most promising electrode materials for molten carbonate fuel cells, but that further research and development of these electrodes are needed. In particular, the effect of contaminants such as H/sub 2/S and HCl on the nickel anode must be investigated, and methods to improve the physical strength and to increase the conductivity of NiO cathodes must be explored. Recommendations are given on areas of applied electrode research that should accelerate the commercialization of the molten carbonate fuel cell. 153 references.

  12. Propagating particle density fluctuations in molten NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmel, F.; Hosokawa, S.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Lorenzen, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the observation of acoustic modes in the spectra of molten NaCl measured over a large momentum transfer range using synchrotron radiation. A surprisingly large positive dispersion was deduced with a mode velocity exceeding the adiabatic value by nearly 70%. The large effect seems to be describable as a viscoelastic reaction of the liquid. Additionally, the derived dispersion resembles the Q-ω relation of the acoustic modes in liquid sodium. As an explanation for the large positive dispersion we propose that the density fluctuations in molten NaCl can be interpreted as a decoupled motion of the lighter and smaller cations on a nearly resting anionic background. These molten alkali halide measurements are the first experimental evidences for the so-called fast sound in a binary ionic liquid

  13. Workshop on large molten pool heat transfer summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The CSNI Workshop on Large Molten Heat Transfer held at Grenoble (France) in March 1994 was organised by CSNI's Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases (PWG4) with the cooperation of the Principal Working Group on Coolant System Behaviour (FWG2) and in collaboration with the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre of the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Conclusions and recommendations are given for each of the five sessions of the workshops: Feasibility of in-vessel core debris cooling through external cooling of the vessel; Experiments on molten pool heat transfer; Calculational efforts on molten pool convection; Heat transfer to the surrounding water - experimental techniques; Future experiments and ex-vessel studies (open forum discussion)

  14. Behaviour of molten reactor fuels under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier Swamikannu, A.; Mathews, C.K.

    1980-01-01

    The behaviour of molten reactor fuels under accident conditions has received considerable importance in recent times. The chemical processes that occur in the molten state among the fuel, the clad components and the concrete of the containment building under the conditions of a core melt down accident in oxide fuelled reactors have been reviewed with the purpose of identifying areas of developmental work required to be performed to assess and minimize the consequences of such an accident. This includes the computation and estimation of vapour pressure of various gaseous species over the fuel, the clad and the coolant, providing of sacrificial materials in the concrete in order to protect the containment building in order to prevent release of radioactive gases into the atmosphere and understanding the distribution and chemical state of fission products in the molten fuel in order to provide for the effective removal of their decay heats. (auth.)

  15. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan; Xu, Yu-Ping; Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Oya, Yasuhisa; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Min; Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  16. Basic studies for molten-salt reactor engineering in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, R.; Sugiyama, K.; Sakashita, H.

    1985-01-01

    A research project of nuclear engineering for the molten-salt reactor is underway which is supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of the Ministry of Education of Japan. At present, the major effort is devoted only to basic engineering problems because of the limited amount of the grant. The reporters introduce these and related studies that have been carrying out in Japanese universities. Discussions on the following four subjects are summerized in this report: a) Vapour explosion when hight temperature molten-salts are brought into direct contact with water. b) Measurements of exact thermophysical properties of molten-salt. c) Free convection heat transfer with uniform internal heat generation and a constant heating rate from the bottem. d) Stability of frozen salt film on the container surface. (author)

  17. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xu, Yu-Ping [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Mao, Hong-Min [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  18. Molten salt reactors. Synthesis of studies realized between 1973 and 1983. Chemistry file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The chemistry of molten salt reactors was first acquired by foreign literature and developed by experimental studies. Salt preparation, analysis, chemical and electrochemical properties, interaction with metals or graphites and use of molten lead for direct cooling are examined. [fr

  19. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following conditions: (a) In spice oleoresins as a residue from...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  7. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color...

  8. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must be...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  13. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a...

  14. Compatibility of AlN ceramics with molten lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Sato, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ., Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    AlN ceramics were a candidate for electrically insulating materials and facing materials against molten breeder in a nuclear fusion reactor. In the nuclear fusion reactor, interactions of various structural materials with solid and liquid breeder materials as well as coolant materials are important. Therefore, corrosion tests of AlN ceramics with molten lithium were performed. AlN specimens of six kinds, different in sintering additives and manufacturing method, were used. AlN specimens were immersed into molten lithium at 823 K. Duration for the compatibility tests was about 2.8 Ms (32 days). Specimens with sintering additive of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} by about 5 mass% formed the network structure of oxide in the crystals of AlN. It was considered that the corrosion proceeded by reduction of the oxide network and the penetration of molten lithium through the reduced pass of this network. For specimens without sintering additive, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing by about 1.3% in raw material was converted to fine oxynitride particles on grain boundary or dissolved in AlN crystals. After immersion into lithium, these specimens were found to be sound in shape but reduced in electrical resistivity. These degradation of the two types specimens were considered to be caused by the reduction of oxygen components. On the other hand, a specimen sintered using CaO as sintering additive was finally became appreciably high purity. This specimen showed good compatibility for molten lithium at least up to 823 K. It was concluded that the reduction of oxygen concentration in AlN materials was essential in order to improve the compatibility for molten lithium. (author)

  15. Effects of ethylene inhibitors, silver nitrate (AgNO3), cobalt chloride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant increase in shoot regeneration, leaf chlorophyll content and rooting occurred when silver nitrate (AgNO3), cobalt chloride (CoCl2) or aminooxyacetic acid (AOA) were added to banana culture medium. The highest numbers of shoots per explants shoot length and leaf surface area was obtained when media were ...

  16. Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 in chloride and sulfate solutions at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Mingyu; Yu Geping

    1993-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 was examined in chloride and sulfate solutions through usage of potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The effects of chloride and sulfate concentration were investigated in the range of 0.0001 to 0.1 M. Increasing chloride concentrations resulted in active shifts of the pit nucleation potential. Immunity to pitting corrosion was evident at a chloride level below 0.005 M. Increasing sulfate concentrations resulted in improved pitting resistance of Inconel 600 in chloride solutions. Detrimental effects associated with pitting were evident with low-level sulfate being added to dilute chloride media. The density of pits increased with increasing chloride concentrations or temperature between room temperature and 70 C. Systematic trends for the depth of pits were not evident. The observations of pitting corrosion in open immersion were consistent with those in polarization methods. Corrosion products contained in the pits were enriched in nickel, chromium and iron with a small amount of titanium and silicon. The enrichment of chlorine or sulfur was still, however, not found. (orig.)

  17. Antisense oligonucleotides suppress cell-volume-induced activation of chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwentner, M; Nagl, U O; Wöll, E; Schmarda, A; Ritter, M; Paulmichl, M

    1995-08-01

    Cell volume regulation is an essential feature of most cells. After swelling in hypotonic media, the simultaneous activation of potassium and chloride channels is believed to be the initial, time-determining step in cell volume regulation. The activation of both pathways is functionally linked and enables the cells to lose ions and water, subsequently leading to cell shrinkage and readjustment of the initial volume. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts efficiently regulate their volume after swelling and bear chloride channels that are activated by decreasing extracellular osmolarity. The chloride current elicited in these cells after swelling is reminiscent of the current found in oocytes expressing an outwardly rectifying chloride current termed ICln. Introduction of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to the first 30 nucleotides of the coding region of the ICln channel into NIH 3T3 fibroblasts suppresses the activation of the swelling-induced chloride current. The experiments directly demonstrate an unambiguous link between a volume-activated chloride current and a cloned protein involved in chloride transport.

  18. Beryllium research on FFHR molten salt blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sze, D.-K.

    2000-01-01

    Force-free helical reactor, FFHR, is a demo-relevant heliotron-type D-T fusion reactor based on the great amount of R and D results obtained in the LHD project. Since 1993, collaboration works have made great progress in design studies of FFHR with standing on the major advantage of current-less steady operation with no dangerous plasma disruptions. There are two types of reference designs, FFHR-1 and FFHR-2, where molten Flibe (LiF-BeF2) is utilized as tritium breeder and coolant. In this paper, we present the outline of FFHR blanket design and some related R and D topics focusing on Be utilization. Beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier in the design and Be pebbles are placed in the front part of the tritium breeding zone. In a Flibe blanket, HF (TF) generated due to nuclear transmutation will be a problem because of its corrosive property. Though nickel-based alloys are thought to be intact in such a corrosive environment, FFHR blanket design does not adopt the alloys because of their induced radioactivity. The present candidate materials for the structure are low-activated ferritic steel (JLF-1), V-4Cr-4Ti, etc. They are capable to be corroded by HF in the operation condition, and Be is expected to work as a reducing agent in the system as well. Whether Be pebbles placed in a Flibe flow can work well or not is a very important matter. From this point, Be solubility in Flibe, reaction rate of the Redox reaction with TF in the liquid and on the surface of Be pebbles under irradiation, flowing behavior of Flibe through a Be pebble bed, etc. should be investigated. In 1997, in order to establish more practical and new data bases for advanced design works, we started a collaboration work of R and D on blanket engineering, where the Be research above mentioned is included. Preliminary dipping-test of Be sheets and in-situ tritium release experiment from Flibe with Be sheets have got started. (orig.)

  19. The introduction of the safety of molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jiaxu; Zhang Chunming

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the generation TV Nuclear Energy Systems and molten salt reactor which is the only fluid fuel reactor in the Gen-TV. Safety features and attributes of MSR are described. The supply of fuel and the minimum of waste are described. The clean molten salt in the secondary heat transport system transfers the heat from the primary heat exchanger to a high-temperature Brayton cycle that converts the heat to electricity. With the Brayton cycle, the thermal efficiency of the system will be improved. Base on the MSR, the thorium-uranium fuel cycle is also introduced. (authors)

  20. Calculation of β-effective of a molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, N.; Sakaba, H.

    1987-01-01

    A method to calculate the β eff of a molten salt reactor was developed taking the effect of the flow of the molten salt into account. The method was applied to the 1000MW MSR design made by ORNL. The change in β eff due to the change in the residence time outside of the core of the fuel salt and to the change in the flow velocity when the total amount of the fuel salt is kept constant were investigated. It was found that β eff was reduced to 47.9% of the value when the fuel salt is at rest for the present design. (author)

  1. Subcritical enhanced safety molten-salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P.N.; Ignatiev, V.V.; Men'shikov, L.I.; Prusakov, V.N.; Ponomarev-Stepnoy, N.N.; Subbotin, S.A.; Krasnykh, A.K.; Rudenko, V.T.; Somov, L.N.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear power and its fuel cycle safety requirements can be met in the main by providing nuclear power with subcritical molten salt reactors (SMSR) - 'burner' with an external neutron source. The utilized molten salt fuel is the decisive advantage of the SMSR over other burners. Fissile and fertile nuclides in the burner are solved in a liquid salt in the form of fluorides. This composition acts simultaneously as: a) fuel, b) coolant, c) medium for chemical partitioning and reprocessing. The effective way of reducing the external source power consists in the cascade neutron multiplication in the system of coupled reactors with suppressed feedback between them. (author)

  2. Metallic materials corrosion problems in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, G.; Dixmier, J.; Jarny, P.

    1977-01-01

    The USA forecastings concerning the molten salt reactors are reviewed (mixtures of fluorides containing the fuel, operating between 560 and 700 0 C). Corrosion problems are important in these reactors. The effects of certain characteristic factors on corrosion are analyzed: humidity and metallic impurities in the salts, temperature gradients, speed of circulation of salts, tellurium from fission products, coupling. In the molten fluorides and experimental conditions, the materials with high Ni content are particularly corrosion resistant alloys (hastelloy N). The corrosion of this material is about 2.6 mg.cm -2 at 700 0 C [fr

  3. Study of an F center in molten KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1984-01-15

    It is shown that a discretized version of Feynman's path integral provides a convenient tool for the numerical investigation of the properties of an electron solvated in molten KCl. The binding energy, the magnetic susceptibility, and the pair correlation functions are calculated. The local structure around the solute electron appears to be different from that of an F center in the solid. The Feynman path of the electron dissolved in molten KCl is highly localized thus justifying the F center model. The effect of varying the e/sup -/-K/sup +/ pseudopotential is also reported.

  4. Molten core debris-sodium interactions: M-Series experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Gabor, J.D.; Pavlik, J.R.; Cassulo, J.C.; Cook, C.J.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Five new kilogram-scale experiments have been carried out. Four of the experiments simulated the situation where molten core debris flows from a breached reactor vessel into a dry reactor cavity and is followed by a flow of sodium (Ex-vessel case) and one experiment simulated the flow of core debris into an existing pool of sodium (In-vessel case). The core debris was closely simulated by a thermite reaction which produced a molten mixture of UO 2 , ZrO 2 , and stainless steel. There was efficient fragmentation of the debris in all experiments with no explosive interactions observed

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cell integral matrix tape and bubble barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    A molten carbonate fuel cell matrix material is described made up of a matrix tape portion and a bubble barrier portion. The matrix tape portion comprises particles inert to molten carbonate electrolyte, ceramic particles and a polymeric binder, the matrix tape being flexible, pliable and having rubber-like compliance at room temperature. The bubble barrier is a solid material having fine porosity preferably being bonded to the matrix tape. In operation in a fuel cell, the polymer binder burns off leaving the matrix and bubble barrier providing superior sealing, stability and performance properties to the fuel cell stack

  6. Thermal conditions and functional requirements for molten fuel containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper discusses the configuration and functional requirements for the molten fuel containment system (MFCS) in the GCFR demonstration plant design. Meltdown conditions following a loss of shutdown cooling (LOSC) accident were studied to define the core debris volume for a realistic meltdown case. Materials and thicknesses of the molten fuel container were defined. Stainless steel was chosen as the sacrificial material and magnesium oxide was chosen as the crucible material. Thermal conditions for an expected quasi-steady state were analyzed. Highlights of the functional requirements which directly affect the MFCS design are discussed

  7. High-frequency dynamics in a molten binary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Bermejo, F.J.; Verkerk, P.; Roessli, B.

    1999-01-01

    The nature of the finite wavelength collective excitations in liquid binary mixtures composed of atoms of very different masses has been of interest for more than a decade. The most prominent fact is the high frequencies at which they appear, well above those expected for a continuation to large wave vector of hydrodynamic sound. To better understand the microscopic dynamics of such systems, an inelastic neutron scattering experiment was performed on the molten alloy Li 4 Pb. We present the high-frequency excitations of molten Li 4 Pb which indeed show features substantially deviating from those expected for the propagation of an acoustic mode. (authors)

  8. Compatibility tests between molten salts and metal materials (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki

    2003-08-01

    Latent heat storage technology using molten salts can reduce temperature fluctuations of heat transfer fluid by latent heat for middle and high temperature regions. This enables us to operate several heat utilization systems in cascade connected to High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) from high to low temperature range by setting the latent heat storage system after a heat utilization system to reduce thermal load after the heat utilization systems. This latent heat technology is expected to be used for effective use of heat such as equalization of electric load between night and daytime. In the application of the latent heat technology, compatibility between molten salts and metal materials is very important because molten salts are corrosive, and heat transfer pipes and vessels will contact with the molten salts. It will be necessary to prevail the latent heat storage technique that normal metal materials can be used for the pipes and vessels. However, a few studies have been reported of compatibility between molten salts and metals in middle and high temperature ranges. In this study, four molten salts, range of the melting temperature from 490degC to 800degC, are selected and five metals, high temperature and corrosion resistance steels of Alloy600, HastelloyB2, HastelloyC276, SUS310S and pure Nickel are selected for the test with the consideration of metal composition. Test was performed in an electric furnace by setting the molten salts and the metals in melting pots in an atmosphere of nitrogen. Results revealed excellent corrosion resistance of pure Nickel and comparatively low corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys such as Alloy600 and Hastelloys against Li 2 CO 3 . Corrosion resistance of SUS310S was about same as nickel based alloys. Therefore, if some amount of corrosion is permitted, SUS310S would be one of the candidate alloys for structure materials. These results will be used as reference data to select metals in latent heat technology

  9. Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

  10. Molten salt reactors. Synthesis of studies realized between 1973 and 1983. General synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, M.; Lecocq, A.

    1983-03-01

    After a brief recall of the MSBR project, French studies on molten salt reactors are summed up. Theoretical and experimental studies for a graphite moderated 1000 MWe reactor using molten Li, Be, Th and U fluorides cooled by salt-lead direct contact are given. These studies concern the core, molten salt chemistry, graphite, metals (molybdenum, alloy TZM), corrosion, reactor components [fr

  11. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of

  12. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  13. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Electrolytic recovery of calcium from molten CaO-CaCl2 salt-mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Calciothermic reduction of plutonium oxide is an industrial process for producing plutonium metal. The process is carried out in a molten calcium chloride medium which has a significantly high solubility for calcium oxide. However, the CaO-CaCl 2 salt-mix is radioactively contaminated and can not be discarded as such. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated mix has been carried out using graphite anode and steel cathode to produce calcium. The dissolved calcium in CaCl 2 salt can be used insitu to reduce plutonium oxide. The primary difficulty in obtaining a cathodic calcium deposit was the use of graphite anose which indirectly controls all the back-reactions in the cell through which the deposited calcium is lost. A porous ceramic sheath has been used to essentially keep the anodic and cathodic products separate. The porosity of the sheath has been optimized by measuring its diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. The influence of a porous sheath on the cell potential has been also analyzed

  15. Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced

  16. Next generation molten NaI batteries for grid scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Eccleston, Alexis; Lamb, Joshua; Read, Andrew C.; Robins, Matthew; Meaders, Thomas; Ingersoll, David; Clem, Paul G.; Bhavaraju, Sai; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2017-08-01

    Robust, safe, and reliable grid-scale energy storage continues to be a priority for improved energy surety, expanded integration of renewable energy, and greater system agility required to meet modern dynamic and evolving electrical energy demands. We describe here a new sodium-based battery based on a molten sodium anode, a sodium iodide/aluminum chloride (NaI/AlCl3) cathode, and a high conductivity NaSICON (Na1+xZr2SixP3-xO12) ceramic separator. This NaI battery operates at intermediate temperatures (120-180 °C) and boasts an energy density of >150 Wh kg-1. The energy-dense NaI-AlCl3 ionic liquid catholyte avoids lifetime-limiting plating and intercalation reactions, and the use of earth-abundant elements minimizes materials costs and eliminates economic uncertainties associated with lithium metal. Moreover, the inherent safety of this system under internal mechanical failure is characterized by negligible heat or gas production and benign reaction products (Al, NaCl). Scalability in design is exemplified through evolution from 0.85 to 10 Ah (28 Wh) form factors, displaying lifetime average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.45% and energy efficiencies of 81.96% over dynamic testing lasting >3000 h. This demonstration promises a safe, cost-effective, and long-lifetime technology as an attractive candidate for grid scale storage.

  17. Removal of chloride from MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Fang-Chih; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Tsai, Min-Shing; Ko, Chun-Han

    2012-10-30

    The high levels of alkali chloride and soluble metal salts present in MSWI fly ash is worth noting for their impact on the environment. In addition, the recycling or reuse of fly ash has become an issue because of limited landfill space. The chloride content in fly ash limits its application as basis for construction materials. Water-soluble chlorides such as potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and calcium chloride hydrate (CaCl(2) · 2H(2)O) in fly ash are easily washed away. However, calcium chloride hydroxide (Ca(OH)Cl) might not be easy to leach away at room temperature. The roasting and washing-flushing processes were applied to remove chloride content in this study. Additionally, air and CO(2) were introduced into the washing process to neutralize the hazardous nature of chlorides. In comparison with the water flushing process, the roasting process is more efficient in reducing the process of solid-liquid separation and drying for the reuse of Cl-removed fly ash particles. In several roasting experiments, the removal of chloride content from fly ash at 1050°C for 3h showed the best results (83% chloride removal efficiency). At a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 the water-flushing process can almost totally remove water-soluble chloride (97% chloride removal efficiency). Analyses of mineralogical change also prove the efficiency of the fly ash roasting and washing mechanisms for chloride removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Media Komunitas dan Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawito .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This essay deals with community media in relation to media literacy. After a short discussion on a number of community media characters is made the essay goes further with somewhat detail theoretical presumptions of the roles of media community with respect primarily to the development as Amartya Sen mentioned about. The author suggests that community media may play some significant roles in the development including (a disseminating information (from varieties of perspective, (b facilitating public discussion, (c helping to reach solutions of problems, (d encouraging participations, and (e encouraging the development of media literacy. Regarding the last point the author remarks that media community may have a dual-roles i.e facilitating community’s member in media participation and facilitating community’s member in media education.

  19. Stabilization/Solidification of radioactive molten salt waste by using xSiO{sub 2}-yAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}-zP{sub 2}O{sub 5} material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwan-Seo Park; In-Tae Kim; Yong-Zun Cho; Seong-Won Park; Eung-Ho Kim [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute: 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Molten salt waste generated from the electro metallurgical process to recover uranium and transuranic elements is considered as one of problematic wastes to be difficult to immobilize into a durable for final disposal. As an alternative, this study suggested a new method performed at molten state, where dechlorination was achieved with a new inorganic material containing SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (SAP). The SAP as a reactive material to molten salt was prepared by a conventional sol-gel process. The prepared SAPs were reacted with each metal chloride, LiCl, CsCl, SrCl{sub 2} and CeCl{sub 3} at 650 deg. C for 6 hours and also were reacted with simulated salt waste consisting of 90 wt% LiCl, 6.8 wt% CsCl and 3.2 wt% SrCl{sub 2} at different waste loading. All the reactions were carried out in oxidative atmosphere and metal chlorides were effectively converted into stable products under a reasonable reaction ratio.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Superalloys in Hot Lithium Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng; Hur, Jin-Mok; Seo, Chung-Seok; Park, Seoung-Won

    2006-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at ∼ 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of metals in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of superalloys have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under oxidation condition