WorldWideScience

Sample records for molinai reptilia liolaeminae

  1. Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maia Dias Ledo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil. This paper presents a list of necrophagous insects associated with small size carrions of two reptiles and one amphibian, found in areas of riparian forests and Cerrado sensu stricto physiognomies in a Conservation Unit located in Brasilia, Distrito Federal. We found seven species of insects related to these carcasses, being five Sarcophagidae, one Calliphoridae and one Braconidae parasitoid wasp. Lucilia eximia and Peckia (Pattonella intermutans were the most abundant species in the study, corroborating with other studies that suggests that these species have specializations for colonization of small size animal carcasses.

  2. Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil Sarcophagidae e Calliphoridae associados às carcaças de Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes e Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia em Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maia Dias Ledo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil. This paper presents a list of necrophagous insects associated with small size carrions of two reptiles and one amphibian, found in areas of riparian forests and Cerrado sensu stricto physiognomies in a Conservation Unit located in Brasilia, Distrito Federal. We found seven species of insects related to these carcasses, being five Sarcophagidae, one Calliphoridae and one Braconidae parasitoid wasp. Lucilia eximia and Peckia (Pattonella intermutans were the most abundant species in the study, corroborating with other studies that suggests that these species have specializations for colonization of small size animal carcasses.Sarcophagidae e Calliphoridae associados às carcaças de Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes e Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia em Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brasil. Este trabalho apresenta uma lista de insetos decompositores associados a carcaças de pequeno porte de dois répteis e de um anfíbio, encontrados em áreas de matas de galeria e de cerrado sensu stricto em unidades de conservação do Distrito Federal. Foram encontradas sete espécies de insetos associados a essas carcaças, sendo cinco sarcofagídeos, um califorídeo e uma vespa parasitóide Braconidae. Lucilia eximia e Peckia (Pattonella intermutans foram as espécies mais abundantes, corroborando com outros estudos que sugerem que estas espécies apresentam especializações para a colonização de carcaças menores.

  3. High genetic differentiation within the Hemidactylus turcicus complex (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) in the Levant, with comments on the phylogeny and systematics of the genus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, J.; Kratochvíl, L.; Amr, Z. S.; Jandzik, D.; Šmíd, J.; Gvoždík, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2894, č. 0 (2011), s. 21-38 ISSN 1175-5326 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Reptilia * Gekkonidae * Hemidactylus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.927, year: 2011

  4. Radiography atlas of domestic animals. Small mammals, birds, reptilia, and amphibia. Atlas der Roentgendiagnostik bei Heimtieren. Kleinsaeuger, Voegel, Reptilien und Amphibien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebel, G.A.; Isenbuegel, E.; Wolvekamp, P. (eds.); Gabrisch, K.; Grimm, F.; Koblik, P.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Oschwald, C.P.; Schildger, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The 370 radiographs presented in the atlas together with notes and explanations give information on normal roentgenographic findings, physiological variations, and important pathological findings observed in small mammals, birds, reptilia and amphibia. Introductory notes to each chapter explain the principles of exposure techniques and the handling of the animals. (VHE).

  5. Selection of egg attachment sites by the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870 (Reptilia: Gekkonidae in Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sreekar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Some geckos lay eggs at communal egg deposition sites with as many as 300 eggs per site. Selection of egg deposition sites is important to avoid egg damage and predation. We investigated survival rates of communal egg clutches of the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae. Our results show that communal clutches have a higher survival rate in sites with water bodies and without anthropogenic activities, in comparison to sites having the opposite combination. These findings are discussed in the context of the status of this gecko.

  6. A new anoplocephalid (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from Gallotia atlantica (Reptilia, Lacertidae) in the Canary Islands, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, Pilar; Abreu-Acosta, Néstor; Casanova, Juan Carlos; Ribas, Alexis; Valladares, Basilio

    2009-06-01

    A new species of anoplocephalid cestode is described from Gallotia atlantica (Reptilia, Lacertidae) on the Canary Islands, Spain. Oochoristica feliui n. sp. belongs to the group of Oochoristica spp. having circular suckers and fewer than 25 testes in a single cluster: O. lygosomae Burt, 1933; O. lygosomatis Skinker, 1935; O. elongata Dupouy et Kechemir, 1973; O. jonnesi Bursey, McAllister and Freed, 1997; O. junkea Johri, 1950; O. macallisteri Bursey and Goldberg, 1996; O. novaezelandae Schmidt and Allison, 1985; O. parvogenitalis Dupouy and Kechemir, 1973; and O. sobolevi (Spasskii, 1948) Spaskii, 1951. Oochoristica feliui n. sp. differs from these species in a variety of characters such as the number of proglottids, size of the scolex and suckers, presence of a neck, size and shape of the ovary (divided into 5-6 lobules), ovoid shape of the vitelline gland, a spined cirrus, size of eggs, oncosphere and oncosphere hooks, and the presence of 2 osmoregulatory canals. Gallotia spp. are endemic to the Canary Islands. This is the first report of an adult cestode species in this lizard.

  7. Histologia geral dos intestinos do Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802 (Crocodilia: Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Jin

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available General histology of small intestine (duodenum and jejunum and the large intestine (colon and cloaca of C. c. yacare (Daudin, 1802 Crocodilia-Reptilia. A comparative description is made of the histology of the small and large intestine of C. c. yacare. In all segments mucosa, submucosa, muscularis and serosa tunics were observed. The duodenum as very long villi, wich are well-developed and attached together to form irregular transverse ridges, covered with simple columnar epithelium with marginal and goblet cells. In the jejunum, the villi are shorter and less frequent. The colon as few folds, covered with the same epithelium; the lamina própria contains straight tubular glands with absortive cells, goblet and Paneth cells. The cloaca is very complex, with three well-defined regions: coprodeum, urodeum and proctodeum. In the coprodeum, the wall is folded, less muscular and the thin mucosa is covered by an epithelium with a few basal cells and mucosal cells. The urodeum as an additional external muscular tunic, with striated muscle fibers and a stritifield cylindrical epithelium with goblet cells. The proctodeum includes the free part of the penis in the male and, laterally, the ducts of a pair of holocrine cloacal glands. Near the opening of the ducts, the epithelium changes to a squamous keratinized type.

  8. Reptilia: Gekkonidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    independenl dcrivations is uncertain, owing to poor resolu- tion in the phylogeny of gekkonine geckos. Most of the originations of regional integumentary loss have ..... Husbandry 8: 96-102. MERTENS, R. 1960. The world of amphibians and reptiles. McGraw-Hili, New York. MEYER, W., BARTELS, T. & NEURAND, K. 1989.

  9. Reptilia: Cordylidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1986-10-24

    Oct 24, 1986 ... motivation (FitzSimons 1943; Broadley 1971; Visser 1971;. Branch 1981). In the Cape Province five races, i.e. e. c. ... Ca/yptoprymnus verecundus, described by De Vis (1905) on a single specimen, presumably from the Solomon ...... 3318 CD Cape Town. JEFB 1356 -1366; 9.1l.l985. SAM 43932 - 43935.

  10. Reptilia: Gekkonidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-03-13

    Mar 13, 1997 ... Fitzsimons 1935; Mertens 1946; Loveridge 1947; Brain. 1962; Oiess ..... longitudinal invagination, in which the left side of the trachea .... slightly to the right of the body long axis. .... motor control of central pattern generators.

  11. Reptilia; Cordylidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1986-10-31

    Oct 31, 1986 ... On the other hand the amelioratid'n of the climate during the interglacial allowed the warm- adapted daughter ... others see it as a subspecies (Rose 1926; Essex 1927;. Power 1930 ...... Figure 5 Proposed immigration route of the typical form of C. cordy/us into the western coastal lowlands. R eprod u ced.

  12. (REPTILIA, AGAMIDAE).

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    placed on a glass plate, three of which were glued in place; the lizard ..... which most efficiently effect the communication and arouse the female would be ..... perature, and when the thermal ceiling is reached they must actively seek shade.

  13. The international trade in reptiles (Reptilia)--the cause of the transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) to Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena

    2010-05-11

    The problem of the unnatural transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland is presented. In the period from 2003 to 2007, 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The reptiles most infested with ticks are imported to Poland from Ghana in Africa, and are the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius. As a result of the investigations, the transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland was confirmed. There were 2104 specimens of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Donitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum (Schulze, 1941), Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma sp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Amblyomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed in the ticks A. flavomaculatum, A. latum and H. aegyptium. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological considerations, and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Three new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) from the Marble-throated skink, Marmorosphax tricolor Bavay, 1869 (Reptilia: Scincidae), endemic to New Caledonia with a taxonomic revision of Eimeria spp. from scincid hosts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Modrý, David; Jirků, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 4 (2006), s. 419-428 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP524/03/D104; GA ČR GA524/00/P015; GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Coccdia * Reptilia * Eimeria Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2006

  15. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria: Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Dick

    Full Text Available We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria. We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction.

  16. An updated and annotated list of Indian lizards (Reptilia: Sauria based on a review of distribution records and checklists of Indian reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Venugopal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades many checklists of reptiles of India and adjacent countries have been published. These publications have furthered the growth of knowledge on systematics, distribution and biogeography of Indian reptiles, and the field of herpetology in India in general. However, the reporting format of most such checklists of Indian reptiles does not provide a basis for direct verification of the information presented. As a result, mistakes in the inclusion and omission of species have been perpetuated and the exact number of reptile species reported from India still remains unclear. A verification of the current listings based on distributional records and review of published checklists revealed that 199 species of lizards (Reptilia: Sauria are currently validly reported on the basis of distributional records within the boundaries of India. Seventeen other lizard species have erroneously been included in earlier checklists of Indian reptiles. Omissions of species by these checklists have been even more numerous than erroneous inclusions. In this paper, I present a plea to report species lists as annotated checklists which corroborate the inclusion and omission of species by providing valid source references or notes.

  17. The phylogeny of the family Lacertidae (Reptilia) based on nuclear DNA sequences: convergent adaptations to arid habitats within the subfamily Eremiainae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Werner; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2007-09-01

    The family Lacertidae encompasses more than 250 species distributed in the Palearctis, Ethiopis and Orientalis. Lacertids have been subjected in the past to several morphological and molecular studies to establish their phylogeny. However, the problems of convergent adaptation in morphology and of excessively variable molecular markers have hampered the establishment of well supported deeper phylogenetic relationships. Particularly the adaptations to xeric environments have often been used to establish a scenario for the origin and radiation of major lineages within lacertids. Here we present a molecular phylogenetic study based on two nuclear marker genes and representatives of 37 lacertid genera and distinct species groups (as in the case of the collective genus Lacerta). Roughly 1600 bp of the nuclear rag1 and c-mos genes were sequenced and analyzed. While the results provide good support to the hitherto suggested main subfamilies of Gallotiinae (Gallotia and Psammodromus), Eremiainae and Lacertinae [Harris, D.J., Arnold, E.N., Thomas, R.H., 1998. Relationships of lacertid lizards (Reptilia: Lacertidae) estimated from mitochondrial DNA sequences and morphology. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 265, 1939-1948], they also suggest unexpected relationships. In particular, the oriental genus Takydromus, previously considered the sister-group to the three subfamilies, is nested within Lacertinae. Moreover, the genera within the Eremiainae are further divided into two groups, roughly corresponding to their respective geographical distributions in the Ethiopian and the Saharo-Eurasian ranges. The results support an independent origin of adaptations to xeric conditions in different subfamilies. The relationships within the subfamily Lacertinae could not be resolved with the markers used. The species groups of the collective genus Lacerta show a bush-like topology in the inferred Bayesian tree, suggesting rapid radiation. The composition of the subfamilies Eremiainae and Lacertinae

  18. (reptilia: gekkonidae) in southern africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationships of this form, however, have proved to be problematical. ... habits. This decision by Loveridge (1947) seems all the more strange when it is .... This is chiefly due to the fact that there is usually no sharp break between the .... 1) so that the similarities between" Rhoptropella" and Phelsuma may be more easily.

  19. 14. Pisces, Reptilia and Aves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort, de L.F.

    1931-01-01

    In the following list of fishes and reptiles, known to occur as fossils in the Indoaustralian Archipelago, I have chiefly followed Smith Woodward (Bibl. 18) for the taxonomy. The teleosts, however, have been arranged according to Boulenger (The Cambridge Natural History, Vol. VII, 1904), with some

  20. MORFOLOGICAL AND HISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE SALIVARY GLANDS OF THE ALLIGATOR Caiman latirostris OBSERVAÇÕES MORFOLÓGICAS E HISTOQUÍMICAS SOBRE AS GLÂNDULAS SALIVARES DO JACARÉ Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Herbert de Faria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Using histological and histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, the present work on the salivary glands of the alligator Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia, was developed. On the bases of the results obtained, the authors believe that those glands are not well developed, appearing as unicellular structures goblet-like cells, in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oral cavity. Scattered glands alveolus without excretory tubules which extend directly with the epitelium were also present. By means of histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, it was possible to detect the glicoprotein and the sialic acid in the glandular formation of these animals.

    Empregando-se métodos histológicos e histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, desenvolveu-se um trabalho sobre glândulas salivares do jacaré Caiman latirostris. Com base nos resultados obtidos, constatou-se que estas glândulas são pouco desenvolvidas, aparecendo como estruturas unicelulares, semelhantes às células caliciformes, incluídas no epitélio estratificado pavimentoso da cavidade oral. Observou-se, ainda, a presença de esparsos alvéolos glandulares desprovidos de ductos excretores que continuam diretamente com o epitélio. Por meio de métodos histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, foi possível a detecção de glicoproteína e de ácido siálico nas formações glandulares desses animais.

  1. Intraspecific variation in a physiological thermoregulatory mechanism: the case of the lizard Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae Variación intraespecífica en un mecanismo termorregulatorio fisiológico: el caso del lagarto Liolaemus tenuis (Liolaeminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELA A VIDAL

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The interspecific variation of heating rates in Liolaemus lizards, suggests an adaptive value of this physiological thermoregulatory mechanism, which would allow lizards to cope with the environmental thermal restrictions, imposed to behavioral thermoregulation. This trend has barely been tested at intraspecific level, and here we explore if intraspecific variation in heating rates occurs in Liolaemus tenuis, a relative widely distributed species from central Chile. We test the hypothesis that heating rates are related to the thermal environmental conditions at which populations are exposed, by comparing the heating rates of three populations (from a latitudinal range, which inhabit under different thermal conditions. Additionally, we explore if the intrinsic factor, sex, also modulates heating rates. There was a significant intraspecific variation in heating rates, at population and gender level. These rates however, showed only a partial relationship with the environmental thermal conditions. We found that the northern population, inhabiting at higher temperature, heated slower, which might reduce the risk of overheating. On the other hand, independent of the population, females heated slower than males. The meaning of this sexual variation is unclear, but may be consequence of the significant differences in genders' social behavior. Because males defend a territory with a harem, by heating faster, they can allocate extra time in behaviors associated to the defense and maintenance of the territory.La variación interespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus pareciera ser un mecanismo fisiológico adaptativo que permitiría a los lagartos enfrentar restricciones térmicas ambientales impuestas a la termorregulación conductual. Esta tendencia ha sido raramente analizada a nivel intraespecífico y en este estudio exploramos si existe variación intraespecífica en las tasas de calentamiento de Liolaemus tenuis, una especie con rango de distribución relativamente amplio en Chile central. Probamos la hipótesis de que las tasas de calentamiento están relacionadas con la condición térmica ambiental, a través de comparaciones de las tasas de calentamiento de tres poblaciones (a lo largo de un rango latitudinal, que habitan en ambientes térmicos diferentes. Además, exploramos si el factor intrínseco, sexo, modula estas tasas de calentamiento. Las tasas de calentamiento tienen una variación intraespecífica significativa a nivel poblacional y sexual. Sin embargo, estas tasas están solo parcialmente relacionadas a las condiciones ambientales a la que están sometidas las poblaciones. La población norteña, que habita a más altas temperaturas, se calienta más lento, lo que podría reducir el riesgo de sobrecalentamiento. Por otra parte, independiente de la población, las hembras se calientan más lento que los machos. El significado de esta variación sexual no es claro, pero podría ser consecuencia de las significativas diferencias en las conductas sociales de ambos sexos. Debido a que los machos defienden un territorio con un harén, un calentamiento más rápido les permitiría asignar mayor tiempo a las conductas asociadas a la defensa y mantención del territorio.

  2. Stenocercus doellojuradoi (Iguanidae, Liolaeminae): una nueva especie para la provincia de San Juan, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Laspiur, Alejandro; Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    República Argentina, Provincia de San Juan, Depto. Valle Fértil, 3 km al norte de la localidad de Las Tumanas sobre la Ruta Provincial 510 (30°52’ S, 67°20’ W). COLECTOR: Alejandro Laspiur. FECHA: 25 /02/ 2006. MATERIAL DE REFERENCIA: Instituto y Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Juan: IMCNUNSJ 3000. Un ejemplar macho (LHC: 54 mm.).

  3. The oldest plesiosaur (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wilhelm Armin Kellner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic plesiosaurs are known from the Upper Cretaceous López de Bertodano and Snow Hill Island formations (Campanian to upper Maastrichtian, which crop out within the James Ross Basin region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here we describe the first plesiosaur fossils from the Lachman Crags Member of the Santa Marta Formation, north-western James Ross Island. This material constitutes the stratigraphically oldest plesiosaur occurrence presently known from Antarctica, extending the occurrence of plesiosaurians in this continent back to Santonian times (86.3–83.5 Mya. Furthermore, MN 7163-V represents the first plesiosaur from this region not referable to the Elasmosauridae nor Aristonectes, indicating a greater diversity of this group of aquatic reptiles in Antarctica than previously suspected.

  4. Lizards of Brazilian Amazonia (Reptilia: Squamata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila-Pires, T.C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Eighty-nine species of lizards, six of which polytypic (forming a total of 97 taxa), are presently known from Brazilian Amazonia. This number includes six species and one subspecies described as new to science in this paper: Stenocercus fimbriatus, Lepidoblepharis hoogmoedi, Leposoma osvaldoi, L.

  5. Dimorfismo sexual y morfometría de una población de Liolaemus olongasta (Iguania: Liolaeminae en La Laja, Albardón, San Juan, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canovas, M. Gabriela

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar el dimorfismo sexual en una población de Liolaemus olongasta, utilizando variables morfométricas y generar hipótesis apartir de los resultados obtenidos. Los ejemplares fueron capturados en La Laja, Departamento Albardón, Provincia de San Juan (31º 19'S, 68º 41'W, durante los años 2000 y 2001. Dicha localidad se encuentra ubicada fitogeográficamente en la Región Neotropical, Dominio Chaqueño, Provincia del Monte, donde predominan las estepas arbustivas xerófilas, psammófilas o halófitas.

  6. Anatomy of the digestive tube of sea turtles (Reptilia: Testudines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela dos S. Magalhães

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the morphology of the digestive tube of five species of sea turtles. We used specimens found dead along the coast of the state Rio Grande do Norte, as well as specimens accidentally killed as a result of pelagic longline fishing. Nineteen animals of the following species were analyzed: Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 9, Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholtz, 1829 (n = 6, Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 2, Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766 (n = 1 and Dermochelys coriacea (Vandelli, 1761 (n = 1. After opening the plastron, we removed the digestive organs and described the external and internal morphology of each organ. The esophagus of all species had pointed papillae on the mucosa. The stomach varied in shape among species. Differences were found in the mucosa of the small intestine. It was reticular in the duodenum, and longitudinal rectilinear in the jejunum/ileum. In all species an alternation of saccular and narrow regions was observed in the large intestine. The exception was D. coriacea, in which the mucosa of the entire large intestine had irregularly distributed folds. The pattern of the esophagus was the same in all species. The morphology of the stomach differed among species, and these differences reflect their diets. In addition, the distribution pattern of the folds on the mucosa of the small intestine varied between regions of the intestine and among species.

  7. a new record for ptenopus (reptilia: gekkonidae) from calitzdorp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that of normal stallions (mean = 175 I'm). It would thus appear that, as is the case with domes- tic livestock (Roberts 1958), zebra with unilateral testicular hypoplasia are not infertile. Nalbandov (1964) states that cryptorchidism occurs spontaneously in practically all mammalian species. It is, however, important and relatively.

  8. New records of snakes (Reptilia: Squamata) in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Mario; Pirani, Renata; Silva, Vinícius

    2013-01-01

    We report new records of three poorly-known species of snakes in Minas Gerais: Bothrops lutzi (Miranda- Ribeiro, 1915), Psomophis joberti (Sauvage, 1884), and Trilepida brasiliensis (Laurent, 1949). The new records represent important filling gaps for all three species or even southern extensions in the geographic distribution of B. lutzi and P. joberti. The new records are located in areas indicated as priority regions for biodiversity conservation in Cerrado. Maps of known records of these ...

  9. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae from North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack L Conrad

    Full Text Available A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma. Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America.

  10. Visceral vasculature in the family Cordylidae (Reptilia: Squamata)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-11-24

    Nov 24, 1992 ... Major circulatory patterns in lizards of the family Cordylidae are poorly known, but may serve as a source of characters for ... circulatory system, a large body of comparative data on circulatory ..... Confirmation of the evolution.

  11. The genera Rhoptropus and Phelsuma (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genus Rhoplropella Hewitt, 1937 is shown to be a junior synonym of Phelsuma Gray, 1825 and the genera Phelsumaand Rhoplropus Peters, 1869 are compared. It is pointed out that Phelsuma ocettata shows a great deal of convergence with Rhoplropus but that both of these forms exhibit their own distinctive derived ...

  12. Pythons in Burma: Short-tailed python (Reptilia: Squamata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, George R.; Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Short-tailed pythons, Python curtus species group, occur predominantly in the Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. The discovery of an adult female in Mon State, Myanmar, led to a review of the distribution of all group members (spot-mapping of all localities of confirmed occurrence) and an examination of morphological variation in P. brongersmai. The resulting maps demonstrate a limited occurrence of these pythons within peninsular Malaya, Sumatra, and Borneo with broad absences in these regions. Our small samples limit the recognition of regional differentiation in the morphology of P. brongersmai populations; however, the presence of unique traits in the Myanmar python and its strong allopatry indicate that it is a unique genetic lineage, and it is described as Python kyaiktiyo new species.

  13. Factors determining Gekkotan (Reptilia, Sauria distribution in Tunisia (North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wided Tlili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tunisian geckos count nine species (1 is insular relict, 1 is endemic, 2 are ubiquitous and 5 are enfeoffed. We aim to determine factors influencing their distributions. Surveys were founded on environmental divisions. Presence/absence data for 113 grids were analyzed using multivariate tools. 18 environmental variables were revealed and clustered into five factors to model species distributions. Established models were further projected on non-explored areas within Tunisian territory. The distribution of continental geckos follows an indirect bidirectional gradient; the South-northward one is physiologically stressful and the North-southward one is biologically stressful. Five biogeographic regions were established showing concordance with climatic and vegetation regionalization. The distribution of non-anthropophilic species is positively correlated to thermal amplitudes gradient. The distribution of anthropophilic taxa is positively correlated to agricultural land-use. Oasis, sebkhas and chotts are particular landscapes that disturb both distributions. Predicted areas follow the yielded distribution patterns despite some discrepancy for S. sthenodactylus. The niche characterizing shows that land use and altitude increase the probability of occurrence of H. turcicus and T. mauritanica. Alternatively, they decrease the probability of the presence of T. deserti, T. neglecta, T. tripolitanus and S. petrii. Models could also show that the absence of S. sthenodactylus in northern regions is attributed to high altitudes and cereal land-use. As to T. fascicularis, the displacement of the northern limits of its range is mostly attributed to an improvement of field investigations. Established model of its distribution shows a restricted area of probable occurrence in central Tunisia confirming its endemism.

  14. The relationship of Brookesia, Rhampholeon and Chamaeleo (Chamaeleonidae, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillenius, D.

    1986-01-01

    Comparing the species of Brookesia and Rhampholeon with Chamaeleo it is concluded that Brookesia + Rhampholeon form a monophyletic group, arising from a branch of Chamaeleo, probably most related to the group around Chamaeleo nasutus. The separation between Rhampholeon and Brookesia is confirmed.

  15. Reproduction by Uta stansburiana (reptilia, lacertilia, iguanidae) in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medica, P.A.; Turner, F.B.

    1976-01-01

    Monthly mean clutch sizes of Uta stansburiana in southern Nevada were measured over a 10-year period. Overall mean clutch sizes of female Uta >12 months of age were 4.40 (March-April), 3.80 (May), 3.04 (June), and 2.65 (July). Overall means of yearling females (<12 months of age) were about 82-90% of those of older females between April and June. Reproduction by Uta in 1973 surpassed that observed in any of nine previous years. The mean size of the first clutch laid by older females was 5.35, and some females deposited up to eight eggs. The minimum number of clutches laid was four and the maximum seven. The net reproductive rate (R/sub 0/) estimated for 1973 was 2.34, exceeding an earlier estimate for 1966 (1.65).

  16. On characteristics of hematological indices of reptiles (Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Gasso

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Content of the haemoglobin, erythrocytes, leucocytes and leukogram pattern in six reptile species of the central steppeDnieperregion are studied. Morphological features of the blood cells are described.

  17. Envenenamiento de Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia: Testudines por Tityus trivittatus (Scorpionida: Buthidae Envenomation of Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia: Testudines by Tityus trivittatus (Scorpionida: Buthidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo R de Roodt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el caso de un ejemplar de tortuga mordedora (Chelydra serpentina que fue hallada con los miembros tetanizados en extensión, midriasis y poca respuesta a estímulos externos, en cuyo recinto se encontró un ejemplar de escorpión Tityus trivittatus. Ante el claro cuadro de envenenamiento, se trató al quelonio con antiveneno escorpiónico específico retornando a un estado de relajación muscular a las seis horas y encontrándoselo totalmente normal a las 24 horas sin mostrar secuelas posteriores. Este es el primer comunicado sobre el envenenamiento de quelonios por escorpiones. Se discuten algunos aspectos de este envenenamiento escorpiónico y su tratamiento con antiveneno específico.We report the case of a snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina found tetanized, with the limbs in extension, mydriasis and poor response to external stimuli, in whose terrarium was found a Tityus trivittatus scorpion. Based on the clear clinical picture of envenoming, the turtle was treated with a specific scorpion antivenin, returning to a state of muscle relaxation after six hours of treatment and it was found totally normal at 24 hours, without envenoming sequelae. This is the first report on turtle envenomation by scorpion. The scorpion envenomation in reptiles and the treatment with specific antivenom is discussed.

  18. Current status of Marsh Crocodiles Crocodylus palustris (Reptilia: Crocodylidae in Vishwamitri River, Vadodara City, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vyas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Data presented here is based on a three year study (2008-2010 on a population of Mugger Crocodylus palustris inhabiting Vishwamitri River near Vadodara City, Gujarat State, India. In total, 155 Muggers were counted in the 25km river stretch during 2010. In all, 40 burrows were observed along the river bank, and the same were clumped in certain sections of the river. Muggers fed eight species of birds, and domestic livestock in addition to scavenging. Eight instances of human-crocodile conflicts were observed including four human causalities. A total 90 Muggers were rescued from the urban areas and the same were relocated elsewhere in the river system. Various types of threats to Mugger were also noticed including habitat loss, alteration and soil erosion and mortality due to rail traffic. The present study suggests further research to propose strategies to conserve this population.

  19. Primer caso de canibalismo registrado para el gecko de Lima, Phyllodactylus sentosus (Reptilia, Phyllodactylidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Valdez, Fernando; Cossios, E. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Se reporta un caso de canibalismo en el gecko de Lima, Phyllodactylus sentosus Dixon & Huey, 1970 donde un macho adulto devoró a un juvenil. Tras una búsqueda de literatura, no se encontró casos reportados en otras especies del mismo género, por lo que se considera que este es el primer reporte de canibalismo en Phyllodactylus. We report a case of cannibalism for the Lima leaf-toed gecko, Phyllodactylus sentosus, in which an adult male devoured a juvenile. No reported cases were found in o...

  20. A new small karst-dwelling species of Cyrtodactylus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, Awal; Bauer, Aaron M; Yudha, Donan Satria

    2014-04-07

    A new small karst-dwelling species of the genus Cyrtodactylus is described from East Java and Special Province of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Cyrtodactylus semiadii sp. nov. is a small species (SVL to 47.1 mm in females, 42.1 mm in males) distinguished from all other congeners by unique characters combination: short, robust, cylindrical tail, indistinct ventrolateral folds, absence of precloacal groove, absence of enlarged femoral scales, absence of precloacal and femoral pores and lack of enlarged median subcaudal scales. It is the third member of the genus recorded from Java. 

  1. Notes on Chameleons IV. A New Chameleon, from the Miocene of Fort Ternan, Kenya (Chamaeleonidae, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillenius, D.

    1978-01-01

    A new, fossil chameleon is described, † Chamaeleo intermedius, found on the surface at Fort Ternan, Kenya. Most probably it eroded from a layer of fossilized lahar, close to 14 million years old. † Chamaeleo intermedius possesses characters which still occur in recent chameleons, in fact it combines

  2. A new archosauriform (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Manda beds (Middle Triassic) of southwestern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Sterling J; Butler, Richard J; Gower, David J

    2013-01-01

    Archosauria and their closest relatives, the non-archosaurian archosauriforms, diversified in the Early and Middle Triassic, soon after the end-Permian extinction. This diversification is poorly documented in most Lower and Middle Triassic rock sequences because fossils of early groups of archosauriforms are relatively rare compared to those of other amniotes. The early Middle Triassic (? late Anisian) Manda beds of southwestern Tanzania form an exception, with early archosaur skeletons being relatively common and preserved as articulated or associated specimens. The Manda archosaur assemblage is exceptionally diverse for the Middle Triassic. However, to date, no non-archosaurian archosauriforms have been reported from these rocks. Here, we name a new taxon, Asperoris mnyama gen. et sp. nov., from the Manda beds and thoroughly describe the only known specimen. The specimen consists of a well-preserved partial skull including tooth-bearing elements (premaxilla, maxilla), the nasal, partial skull roof, and several incomplete elements. All skull elements are covered in an autapomorphic highly rugose sculpturing. A unique combination of character states indicates that A. mnyama lies just outside Archosauria as a stem archosaur within Archosauriformes, but more precise relationships of A. mnyama relative to other early archosauriform clades (e.g., Erythrosuchidae) cannot be determined currently. Asperoris mnyama is the first confirmed non-archosaurian archosauriform from the Manda beds and increases the morphological and taxonomic diversity of early archosauriforms known from the Middle Triassic. The direct association of A. mnyama with species referable to Archosauria demonstrates that non-archosaurian archosauriforms were present during the rise and early diversification of Archosauria. Non-archosaurian archosauriforms and archosaurs co-occur in fossil reptile assemblages across Pangaea from the late Early Triassic to the end of the Late Triassic.

  3. Temperature effects on snapping performance in the common snapper Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia, Testudines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervust, Bart; Brecko, Jonathan; Herrel, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the effect of temperature on whole-animal performance traits other than locomotion are rare. Here we investigate the effects of temperature on the performance of the turtle feeding apparatus in a defensive context. We measured bite force and the kinematics of snapping in the Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) over a wide range of body temperatures. Bite force performance was thermally insensitive over the broad range of temperatures typically experienced by these turtles in nature. In contrast, neck extension (velocity, acceleration, and deceleration) and jaw movements (velocity, acceleration, and deceleration) showed clear temperature dependence with peak acceleration and deceleration capacity increasing with increasing temperatures. Our results regarding the temperature dependence of defensive behavior are reflected by the ecology and overall behavior of this species. These data illustrate the necessity for carefully controlling T(b) when carrying out behavioral and functional studies on turtles as temperature affects the velocity, acceleration, and deceleration of jaw and neck extension movements. More generally, these data add to the limited but increasing number of studies showing that temperature may have important effects on feeding and defensive performance in ectotherms. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Notes on Anolis omiltemanus Davis, 1954 (Reptilia Squamata: Dactyloidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Gunther; Trejo Pérez, Raúl Gómez; García Pareja, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    During a short visit to the region of Omiltemi (Guerrero, Mexico), we observed Anoĩis omiĩtemanus in its natural habitat and collected 10 specimens. We provide a description of the external morphology of this species based on the newly collected specimens and 30 additional specimens from various ...

  5. Morfologia da junção atrioventricular em Iguana iguana (Reptilia-Iguanidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Jurado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The atrioventricular junctional area (AVJA, including atrioventricular (AV node and bundle was investigated in seven hearts of common or green iguana (Iguana iguana using the light microscopy. Adult animals, both sexes, were captured in the Pantanal, Brazil. All hearts were fixed in buffered formaldehyde 10% (pH 7.2 for 24 hours, embedded in paraplast according to routine methods, and serially cut at 5 µm thickness. In the Iguana iguana, the AVJA consists of a mass of the fibers intermingled with variable amount of connective tissue and blood vessels surrounded by adjacent myocardium and the attachment of the right atrioventricular valve in the fibrous skeleton. By light microscopy, conducting cells of the AV node and bundle can be distinguished from working cells by their much smaller size, paler staining reaction and the presence of a sheath of connective tissue. The AV node and bundle and its branches were found to constitute a continuous tract. Histochemically, we found elastic fibers between cells of the conduction, mainly in the AV node. The PAS method reveals absence of glycogen in specialized cells. The fibrous skeleton, mainly the right trigone, showed a well-developed chondroid tissue, made by hyaline like cartilage (binucleated condrocytes included in the big lacunas and extracellular matrix with fibrillar collagen. In conclusion, the nodal and Purkinje cells in heart iguana presented poorly morphological differentiation comparing mammals and birds, however the skeleton fibrous has a different cartilage kind.

  6. Nitrogen excretion during embryonic development of the green iguana, Iguana iguana (Reptilia; Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, M R; Taylor, E W; Abe, A S

    2012-10-01

    Development within the cleidoic egg of birds and reptiles presents the embryo with the problem of accumulation of wastes from nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia derived from protein catabolism is converted into the less toxic product urea or relatively insoluble uric acid. The pattern of nitrogen excretion of the green iguana, Iguana iguana, was determined during embryonic development using samples from allantoic fluid and from the whole homogenized egg, and in hatchlings and adults using samples of blood plasma. Urea was the major excretory product over the course of embryonic development. It was found in higher concentrations in the allantoic sac, suggesting that there is a mechanism present on the allantoic membrane enabling the concentration of urea. The newly hatched iguana still produced urea while adults produced uric acid. The time course of this shift in the type of nitrogen waste was not determined but the change is likely to be related to the water relations associated with the terrestrial habit of the adult. The green iguana produces parchment-shelled eggs that double in mass during incubation due to water absorption; the eggs also accumulate 0.02 mM of urea, representing 82% of the total measured nitrogenous residues that accumulate inside the allantois. The increase in egg mass and urea concentration became significant after 55 days of incubation then were unchanged until hatching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reptilia, Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae, Arthrosaura reticulata (O'Shaughnessy, 1881: Distribution extension and new state record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mott, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthrosaura reticulata (O´Shaugnessy, 1881 is reported from two localities in Mato Grosso, Brazil. It representsthe first state record for the species, extending its known distribution in 830 km southeastern of the southernmost recordin the state of Amazonas and 470 km eastern of the state of Rondônia, the southernmost record of the species.

  8. New insights into sex chromosome evolution in anole lizards (Reptilia, Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannotti, M; Trifonov, V A; Paoletti, A; Kichigin, I G; O'Brien, P C M; Kasai, F; Giovagnoli, G; Ng, B L; Ruggeri, P; Cerioni, P Nisi; Splendiani, A; Pereira, J C; Olmo, E; Rens, W; Caputo Barucchi, V; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2017-03-01

    Anoles are a clade of iguanian lizards that underwent an extensive radiation between 125 and 65 million years ago. Their karyotypes show wide variation in diploid number spanning from 26 (Anolis evermanni) to 44 (A. insolitus). This chromosomal variation involves their sex chromosomes, ranging from simple systems (XX/XY), with heterochromosomes represented by either micro- or macrochromosomes, to multiple systems (X 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 /X 1 X 2 Y). Here, for the first time, the homology relationships of sex chromosomes have been investigated in nine anole lizards at the whole chromosome level. Cross-species chromosome painting using sex chromosome paints from A. carolinensis, Ctenonotus pogus and Norops sagrei and gene mapping of X-linked genes demonstrated that the anole ancestral sex chromosome system constituted by microchromosomes is retained in all the species with the ancestral karyotype (2n = 36, 12 macro- and 24 microchromosomes). On the contrary, species with a derived karyotype, namely those belonging to genera Ctenonotus and Norops, show a series of rearrangements (fusions/fissions) involving autosomes/microchromosomes that led to the formation of their current sex chromosome systems. These results demonstrate that different autosomes were involved in translocations with sex chromosomes in closely related lineages of anole lizards and that several sequential microautosome/sex chromosome fusions lead to a remarkable increase in size of Norops sagrei sex chromosomes.

  9. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. IV. Alopoglossidae, Gymnophthalmidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A; Amaral, Silvana

    2017-05-22

    We present distribution data of all Alopoglossidae and Gymnophthalmidae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 54 species-level taxa, belonging to 17 genera and two families. This represents 22 more species-level taxa than previously reported. Data were based on 17,431 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (~80%) are endemic to Amazonia; non-endemic species are mainly associated with open vegetation (savanna) enclaves or open dry (semideciduous) forest in Amazonia, with a few exceptions. As a whole, seven taxa (including one species complex) are widespread in Amazonia, six are restricted to eastern Amazonia, seven to western Amazonia, two to southwestern Amazonia, 11 to southern Amazonia, 11 to northern Amazonia (either in part of it or widespread in the Guiana region), and six to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Besides, four species present unique distributions. Considering this study and the other three catalogues of distribution of lizards already published, the total number of lizard species from Brazilian Amazonia increased from 97 to 142 species-level tava. It represents an increase of 45 species from the region since the last revision.

  10. A revised key to the lizards of Iran (Reptilia: Squamata: Lacertilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabadi, Reza; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Rastegar-Pouyani, Eskandar; Gharzi, Ahmad

    2017-02-03

    During recent years several lizard taxa have been added to the faunal list of Iran. Descriptions and new records are scattered in different publications in the herpetological literature. We here present species accounts for 152 species belonging to 43 genera and 10 families up to July 2016. The most diverse family is Lacertidae with 9 genera, 49 species and 2 subspecies, followed by Gekkonidae with 13 genera and 43 species, Agamidae with 5 genera, 18 species and 4 subspecies, Scincidae with 7 genera, 18 species and 2 subspecies, Phyllodactylidae with 1 genus and 10 species, Sphaerodactylidae with 2 genera and 4 species, Varanidae with 1 genus, 3 species and 2 subspecies, Uromastycidae with 2 genera and 3 species, Eublepharidae with 1 genus and 3 species, and Anguidae with 2 genera and 2 species. The current paper provides a dichotomous key including all of the currently recognized lizards of Iran.

  11. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. III. Anguidae, Scincidae, Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A; Amaral, Silvana

    2016-12-09

    We present distribution data of all Anguidae, Scincidae, and Teiidae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 29 species-level taxa, belonging to 14 genera. This represents 11 more species-level taxa than previously reported for these families in this area. Data were based on literature and 46,806 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (~55%) are endemic to Amazonia. Except for Ameiva ameiva, that is present in several environments and domains, non-endemic species are either associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia, occupying similar environments outside Amazonia, gallery forests within the Cerrado, or present disjunct populations in the Atlantic Forest. As a whole, six taxa are widespread in Amazonia, four are restricted to eastern Amazonia, four to western Amazonia, three to southwestern Amazonia, one to northern Amazonia, and seven to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Besides, two species present apparently more restricted, unique distributions. Only three species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism (AE) recognized for other organisms (birds and primates), of which two occur in AE Guiana and one in AE Inambari.

  12. Three-dimensionally preserved integument reveals hydrodynamic adaptations in the extinct marine lizard Ectenosaurus (Reptilia, Mosasauridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Lindgren

    Full Text Available The physical properties of water and the environment it presents to its inhabitants provide stringent constraints and selection pressures affecting aquatic adaptation and evolution. Mosasaurs (a group of secondarily aquatic reptiles that occupied a broad array of predatory niches in the Cretaceous marine ecosystems about 98-65 million years ago have traditionally been considered as anguilliform locomotors capable only of generating short bursts of speed during brief ambush pursuits. Here we report on an exceptionally preserved, long-snouted mosasaur (Ectenosaurus clidastoides from the Santonian (Upper Cretaceous part of the Smoky Hill Chalk Member of the Niobrara Formation in western Kansas, USA, that contains phosphatized remains of the integument displaying both depth and structure. The small, ovoid neck and/or anterior trunk scales exhibit a longitudinal central keel, and are obliquely arrayed into an alternating pattern where neighboring scales overlap one another. Supportive sculpturing in the form of two parallel, longitudinal ridges on the inner scale surface and a complex system of multiple, superimposed layers of straight, cross-woven helical fiber bundles in the underlying dermis, may have served to minimize surface deformation and frictional drag during locomotion. Additional parallel fiber bundles oriented at acute angles to the long axis of the animal presumably provided stiffness in the lateral plane. These features suggest that the anterior torso of Ectenosaurus was held somewhat rigid during swimming, thereby limiting propulsive movements to the posterior body and tail.

  13. Viviparity and K-selected life history in a Mesozoic marine plesiosaur (Reptilia, Sauropterygia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, F R; Chiappe, L M

    2011-08-12

    Viviparity is known in several clades of Mesozoic aquatic reptiles, but evidence for it is lacking in the Plesiosauria. Here, we report a Late Cretaceous plesiosaur fossil consisting of a fetus preserved within an adult of the same taxon. We interpret this occurrence as a gravid female and unborn young and hence as definitive evidence for plesiosaur viviparity. Quantitative analysis indicates that plesiosaurs gave birth to large, probably single progeny. The combination of viviparity, large offspring size, and small brood number differs markedly from the pattern seen in other marine reptiles but does resemble the K-selected strategy of all extant marine mammals and a few extant lizards. Plesiosaurs may have shared other life history traits with these clades, such as sociality and maternal care.

  14. Spermiogenesis in the imbricate alligator lizard, Barisia imbricata (Reptilia, Squamata, Anguidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Touzinsky, Katherine; Hanover, Jessica; Matchett, Caroline L; Granados-González, Gisela; Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo

    2013-06-01

    Although the events of spermiogenesis are commonly studied in amniotes, the amount of research available for Squamata is lacking. Many studies have described the morphological characteristics of mature spermatozoa in squamates, but few detail the ultrastructural changes that occur during spermiogenesis. This study's purpose is to gain a better understanding of the subcellular events of spermatid development within the Imbricate Alligator Lizard, Barisia imbricata. The morphological data presented here represent the first complete ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis within the family Anguidae. Samples of testes from four specimens collected on the northwest side of the Nevado de Toluca, México, were prepared using standard techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Many of the ultrastructural changes occurring during spermiogenesis within B. imbricata are similar to that of other squamates (i.e., early acrosome formation, chromatin condensation, flagella formation, annulus present, and a prominent manchette). However, there are a few unique characteristics within B. imbricata spermatids that to date have not been described during spermiogenesis in other squamates. For example, penetration of the acrosomal granule into the subacrosomal space to form the basal plate of the perforatorium during round spermatid development, the clover-shaped morphology of the developing nuclear fossa of the flagellum, and the bulbous shape to the perforatorium are all unique to the Imbricate Alligator Lizard. These anatomical character differences may be valuable nontraditional data that along with more traditional matrices (such as DNA sequences and gross morphological data) may help elucidate phylogenetic relationships, which are historically considered controversial within Squamata. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Conquering the Sahara and Arabian deserts: systematics and biogeography of Stenodactylus geckos (Reptilia: Gekkonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metallinou Margarita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary history of the biota of North Africa and Arabia is inextricably tied to the complex geological and climatic evolution that gave rise to the prevalent deserts of these areas. Reptiles constitute an exemplary group in the study of the arid environments with numerous well-adapted members, while recent studies using reptiles as models have unveiled interesting biogeographical and diversification patterns. In this study, we include 207 specimens belonging to all 12 recognized species of the genus Stenodactylus. Molecular phylogenies inferred using two mitochondrial (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA and two nuclear (c-mos and RAG-2 markers are employed to obtain a robust time-calibrated phylogeny, as the base to investigate the inter- and intraspecific relationships and to elucidate the biogeographical history of Stenodactylus, a genus with a large distribution range including the arid and hyper-arid areas of North Africa and Arabia. Results The phylogenetic analyses of molecular data reveal the existence of three major clades within the genus Stenodactylus, which is supported by previous studies based on morphology. Estimated divergence times between clades and sub-clades are shown to correlate with major geological events of the region, the most important of which is the opening of the Red Sea, while climatic instability in the Miocene is hypothesized to have triggered diversification. High genetic variability is observed in some species, suggesting the existence of some undescribed species. The S. petrii - S. stenurus species complex is in need of a thorough taxonomic revision. New data is presented on the distribution of the sister species S. sthenodactylus and S. mauritanicus. Conclusions The phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus Stenodactylus presented in this work permits the reconstruction of the biogeographical history of these common desert dwellers and confirms the importance of the opening of the Red Sea and the climatic oscillations of the Miocene as major factors in the diversification of the biota of North Africa and Arabia. Moreover, this study traces the evolution of this widely distributed and highly specialized group, investigates the patterns of its high intraspecific diversity and elucidates its systematics.

  16. Cytogenetic characterization of the Savannah Sideneck Turtle Podocnemis vogli (Reptilia: Testudinata: Podocnemididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ML. Ortiz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven specimens of Podocnemis vogli were studied; three were collected at Puerto López and Puerto Gaitán in the Meta Department of Colombia, four lacks collecting data. All specimens presented a complement consisting of 28 chromosomes without sexual chromosomes. The first group was composed by four submetacentric pairs and one subtelocentric, the second group by six metacentric pairs and the third group by three acrocentric pairs, differing from the previous description by Rhodin et al. (1978 who found two acrocentric pairs. C, G, NOR and Q band patterns are described for the species. Nucleolar Organizer Regions were localized in the first chromosome pair in an intercalary band inserted in the short arms which could be visualized in interphase as one or two nucleoli. The C band technique allowed heterochromatic regions to be located in chromosomes associated with pericentromeric regions. Some heterochromatic polymorphisms (intercalary bands were identified in chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 7, leading to the supposition that there are chromosome markers which could be associated with different P. vogli populations within their geographic distribution.

  17. Lista y distribución de los ofidios (Reptilia: Serpentes de Santa Fe, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzamendia, Vanesa

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la composición y distribución de las serpientes en la provincia de Santa Fe, Argentina, sobre la base de 1.292 registros obtenidos en muestreos de campo, revisión de las colecciones herpetológicas de Argentina y registros bibliográficos. Se registraron 51 especies y subespecies (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae y 1 Typhlopidae, representando un 39% de los taxones registrados para Argentina. Se realizaron mapas con localidades precisas para determinar la distribución de las serpientes. Una especie y 4 subespecies son registros novedosos para la provincia. Los patrones de distribución son brevemente discutidos en relación con las formaciones fitogeográficas. We studied the composition and distribution of the Santa Fe snakes based on 1,292 examined specimens obtained in field survey, revision of the Argentine herpetological collections and reliable literature records. Maps were built for determinate the distribution of snakes. Fifty one species and subspecies were recorded (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae and 1 Typhlopidae, a 39% of the survey taxa in Argentina. One species and three subspecies were new records in Santa Fe province. The distributional patterns are briefly discussed in relation with phytogeographical subdivisions.

  18. Sexual characteristics and spermatogenesis in males of the parthenogenetic gecko Lepidodactylus lugubris (Reptilia, Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röll, Beate; von Düring, Monika U G

    2008-01-01

    Obligately parthenogenetic lizards usually are all-female populations of hybrids producing diploid oocytes by premeiotic endomitosis and quasi-normal meiosis. In an all-female strain of the gekkonid lizard Lepidodactylus lugubris several phenotypic males arose spontaneously. The sexual characteristics of these males were studied using light and electron microscopy and compared with normal males of the bisexual genus Lygodactylus. Emphasis was layed on morphology of seminiferous tubules, occurrence of spermatogenic stages and ultrastructure of spermatozoa. The phenotypic males possessed preanal pores filled with secretions and a sexual nephric segment which were exactly the same as in normal, reproductively active males. In the testes, density and morphology of non-spermatogenic cell types, the Leydig and Sertoli cells, indicate a normal production of testicular testosterone and a normal function of the blood-testis barrier, respectively. Both in the normal and the phenotypic males, all meiotic cell types of spermatogenesis can be recognised in the seminiferous tubules and are apparently identical, indicating a normal meiosis without impairment in the phenotypic males. In contrast, the differentiation process of spermatids is markedly disturbed in the phenotypic males of L. lugubris. In the normal male, spermiogenesis results in mature spermatids and spermatozoa with small elongated nuclei, an acrosomal complex, and a flagellar tail possessing one axoneme. Spermatozoa fill both the lumen of most seminiferous tubules and the lumina of ductus epididymidis and ductus deferens. In the phenotypic male, spermiogenesis results in seemingly normal spermatids and in spermatozoa with large, non-elongated, deformed nuclei and/or irregular tails possessing more than one axoneme. Both the lumen of most seminiferous tubules and the lumina of the ductus epididymidis and the ductus deferens contain relatively few spermatozoa. We suggest that the phenotypic males inherited the ability for a premeiotic endomitosis from their all-female ancestral lineage. While in females this leads to quasi-normal meiosis and diploid oocytes capable of development, the small nuclei of the spermatozoa are unable to contain a diploid set of chromosomes. Because of the high amount of deformed spermatozoa and possibly uncontrolled loss of genetic material in structurally normal, but aneuploid spermatozoa we conclude that these otherwise perfect males are infertile, thus constituting another example of gametic sterility.

  19. Reptilia, Squamata, Iguanidae, Stenocercus humeralis Gunther, 1859: First country record, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venegas, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work provides the first country record of Stenocercus humeralis in Peru. This new record extends theknown species’ distribution ca. 78.5 km SW from the southernmost record at 12.2 km south of Loja (on road to Vilcabamba,Ecuador

  20. Cenozoic aridization in Central Eurasia shaped diversification of toad-headed agamas (Phrynocephalus; Agamidae, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, Evgeniya N; Lebedev, Vladimir S; Dunayev, Evgeniy A; Nazarov, Roman A; Bannikova, Anna A; Che, Jing; Murphy, Robert W; Poyarkov, Nikolay A

    2018-01-01

    We hypothesize the phylogenetic relationships of the agamid genus Phrynocephalus to assess how past environmental changes shaped the evolutionary and biogeographic history of these lizards and especially the impact of paleogeography and climatic factors. Phrynocephalus is one of the most diverse and taxonomically confusing lizard genera. As a key element of Palearctic deserts, it serves as a promising model for studies of historical biogeography and formation of arid habitats in Eurasia. We used 51 samples representing 33 of 40 recognized species of Phrynocephalus covering all major areas of the genus. Molecular data included four mtDNA ( COI , ND2 , ND4 , Cytb ; 2,703 bp) and four nuDNA protein-coding genes ( RAG1 , BDNF , AKAP9 , NKTR ; 4,188 bp). AU-tests were implemented to test for significant differences between mtDNA- and nuDNA-based topologies. A time-calibrated phylogeny was estimated using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock with nine fossil calibrations. We reconstructed the ancestral area of origin, biogeographic scenarios, body size, and the evolution of habitat preference. Phylogenetic analyses of nuDNA genes recovered a well-resolved and supported topology. Analyses detected significant discordance with the less-supported mtDNA genealogy. The position of Phrynocephalus mystaceus conflicted greatly between the two datasets. MtDNA introgression due to ancient hybridization best explained this result. Monophyletic Phrynocephalus contained three main clades: (I) oviparous species from south-western and Middle Asia; (II) viviparous species of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP); and (III) oviparous species of the Caspian Basin, Middle and Central Asia. Phrynocephalus originated in late Oligocene (26.9 Ma) and modern species diversified during the middle Miocene (14.8-13.5 Ma). The reconstruction of ancestral areas indicated that Phrynocephalus originated in Middle East-southern Middle Asia. Body size miniaturization likely occurred early in the history of Phrynocephalus . The common ancestor of Phrynocephalus probably preferred sandy substrates with the inclusion of clay or gravel. The time of Agaminae radiation and origin of Phrynocephalus in the late Oligocene significantly precedes the landbridge between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia in the Early Miocene. Diversification of Phrynocephalus coincides well with the mid-Miocene climatic transition when a rapid cooling of climate drove progressing aridification and the Paratethys salinity crisis. These factors likely triggered the spreading of desert habitats in Central Eurasia, which Phrynocephalus occupied. The origin of the viviparous Tibetan clade has been associated traditionally with uplifting of the QTP; however, further studies are needed to confirm this. Progressing late Miocene aridification, the decrease of the Paratethys Basin, orogenesis, and Plio-Pleistocene climate oscillations likely promoted further diversification within Phrynocephalus . We discuss Phrynocephalus taxonomy in scope of the new analyses.

  1. Taxonomic reassessment of two Indian shieldtail snakes in the Uropeltis ceylanicus species group (Reptilia: Uropeltidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropeltis is the most speciose of all shieldtail snake (uropeltid genera, particularly in India, and has been bedeviled by a complex and intricate taxonomic history, with several weakly established synonyms and widely disjunct geographic ranges. Our present work on two Indian Uropeltis species revealed greater species diversity than what is currently recognised. We elevate Uropeltis arcticeps madurensis to species level, and revive Silybura shorttii (in the combination Uropeltis shorttii from the subjective synonymy of U. ceylanicus. We provide differential diagnoses, descriptions of examined material and comparisons with similar species based on an examination of voucher specimens as well as fresh, uncollected topotypes documented in the field.

  2. A new species of Liolaemus (Reptilia: Squamata: Tropiduridae from Mendoza province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etheridge, Richard

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Una nueva especie del complejo Liolaemus darwinii es descrita para el centro de la provincia de Mendoza, Argentina. Se parece más a L. olongasta y L. laurenti en que los machos adultos tienen pigmento negro en el pliegue antehumeral y manchas escapulares que no son agrandadas. Difiere de estas especies en tener un cuerpo adulto menor, un número mayor de escamas en la mitad del cuerpo, una cola más corta y un mayor número de poros precloacales en machos, y un patrón ventral distinto en machos adultos. En el norte de su distribución se encuentra L. darwinii en el norte de la provincia de Mendoza y en la provincia de San Luis, y en el sur en el oeste de la provincia de La Pampa, en el noroeste de la provincia de Neuquén y en la provincia de Río Negro, pero se desconoce si estas poblaciones del norte y del sur de L. darwtnii están separadas por la distribución de la nueva especie. Análisis cladísticos basados en comportamiento, morfología y secuencias de DNA muestran filogenias conflictivas, pero concuerdan en que la nueva especie es un miembro del grupo boulengeri, con afinidades más cercanas a L. darwinii, L. olongasta y L. laurenti. A new species,of the Liolaemus darwinii complex is described from central Mendoza Province, Argentina. It most closely resembles L. olongasta and L. laurenti in that adult males have black pigment in the antehumeral fold and scapular spots that are not enlarged. It differs from these species in having a smaller adult body size, a higher number of midbody scales, a shorter tail, more precloacal pores in males, and a different adult male ventral body pattern. Its range is bordered by L. darwinii on the north in northern Mendoza and San Luis provinces, and on the south in western La Pampa and northwestern Neuquén and Río Negro provinces, but it is unknown whether these northern and southern populations of L. darwinii are separated by the range of the new species. Cladistic analyses based on behaviour, morphology, and DNA sequences yield conflicting phylogenies, but agree that the new species is a member of the boulengeri group, with closest affinities to L. darwinii, L. olongasta, and L. laurenti.

  3. Microhabitat ecology of semi-aquatic Varanus flavescens (Reptilia: Varanidae in altered habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur K. M. Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A potential microhabitat is very important for the survival and successful reproduction of any wildlife species. In this study we assessed the microhabitat characteristics of Varanus flavescens in the human altered ecosystems of Chalan beel area, Baraigram, Natore by flowing the Visual Encounter Survey method and by using several important material. A semi-aquatic microhabitat of canal and river was preferred by the species as compared to other identified microhabitats. The slow moving water of the river and canal was fresh and somewhat cloudy in character but stagnant water of the pond and beel (floodplain was semitransparent having lots of phytoplankton and zooplankton. The soil was mostly silty clay. As the study species is cold blooded, the environmental variables like soil, air and water temperatures inside and outside of the microhabitat play major roles for their activity patterns. In order to regulate their body temperature, during a hot sunny day they were more active within the shady area of the microhabitats but at dawn and dusk they were more seen in the sunny areas where temperature was relatively higher. In winter months, the monitor lizards were almost inactive. During that time of the year they live inside the burrow to avoid the extreme cold and foggy weather but during heavy sunshine they come outside of the hole for thermoregulation purpose for a certain time. We noticed that extensive agricultural practice and the excessive use of insecticides may be having a detrimental effect on the microhabitat features important to this semiaquatic lizard. Still the study species is more seen in the human altered ecosystems of Bangladesh. So, to ensure their existence in our close proximity there is an urgent need to create consciousness of the people regarding this beneficial non-venomous species and their respective microhabitat.

  4. Cenozoic aridization in Central Eurasia shaped diversification of toad-headed agamas (Phrynocephalus; Agamidae, Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya N. Solovyeva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize the phylogenetic relationships of the agamid genus Phrynocephalus to assess how past environmental changes shaped the evolutionary and biogeographic history of these lizards and especially the impact of paleogeography and climatic factors. Phrynocephalus is one of the most diverse and taxonomically confusing lizard genera. As a key element of Palearctic deserts, it serves as a promising model for studies of historical biogeography and formation of arid habitats in Eurasia. We used 51 samples representing 33 of 40 recognized species of Phrynocephalus covering all major areas of the genus. Molecular data included four mtDNA (COI, ND2, ND4, Cytb; 2,703 bp and four nuDNA protein-coding genes (RAG1, BDNF, AKAP9, NKTR; 4,188 bp. AU-tests were implemented to test for significant differences between mtDNA- and nuDNA-based topologies. A time-calibrated phylogeny was estimated using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock with nine fossil calibrations. We reconstructed the ancestral area of origin, biogeographic scenarios, body size, and the evolution of habitat preference. Phylogenetic analyses of nuDNA genes recovered a well-resolved and supported topology. Analyses detected significant discordance with the less-supported mtDNA genealogy. The position of Phrynocephalus mystaceus conflicted greatly between the two datasets. MtDNA introgression due to ancient hybridization best explained this result. Monophyletic Phrynocephalus contained three main clades: (I oviparous species from south-western and Middle Asia; (II viviparous species of Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP; and (III oviparous species of the Caspian Basin, Middle and Central Asia. Phrynocephalus originated in late Oligocene (26.9 Ma and modern species diversified during the middle Miocene (14.8–13.5 Ma. The reconstruction of ancestral areas indicated that Phrynocephalus originated in Middle East–southern Middle Asia. Body size miniaturization likely occurred early in the history of Phrynocephalus. The common ancestor of Phrynocephalus probably preferred sandy substrates with the inclusion of clay or gravel. The time of Agaminae radiation and origin of Phrynocephalus in the late Oligocene significantly precedes the landbridge between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia in the Early Miocene. Diversification of Phrynocephalus coincides well with the mid-Miocene climatic transition when a rapid cooling of climate drove progressing aridification and the Paratethys salinity crisis. These factors likely triggered the spreading of desert habitats in Central Eurasia, which Phrynocephalus occupied. The origin of the viviparous Tibetan clade has been associated traditionally with uplifting of the QTP; however, further studies are needed to confirm this. Progressing late Miocene aridification, the decrease of the Paratethys Basin, orogenesis, and Plio–Pleistocene climate oscillations likely promoted further diversification within Phrynocephalus. We discuss Phrynocephalus taxonomy in scope of the new analyses.

  5. Frugivory and seed dispersal by the tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae Reptilia: Teiidae

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Everaldo Rodrigo de; Galetti, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Os lagartos teiús possuem uma dieta generalista, podendo agir como importantes dispersores de sementes em florestas semidecíduas do sudeste do Brasil. Foram estudadas a frugivoria e a dispersão de sementes de lagartos teiús usando animais em cativeiro, através da oferta de frutos de uma floresta semidecídua. Frutos de trinta espécies vegetais foram oferecidos aos lagartos em cativeiro, com diâmetro variando de 0,81 a 10,0 cm. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas na germinação entre a...

  6. A new biogeographically disjunct giant gecko (Gehyra: Gekkonidae: Reptilia) from the East Melanesian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M.; Clegg, Jonathan R.; Fisher, Robert N.; Richards, Stephen J.; Taylor, Peter N.; Jocque, Merlijn M. T.

    2016-01-01

    The East Melanesian Islands have been a focal area for research into island biogeography and community ecology. However, previously undescribed and biogeographically significant new species endemic to this region continue to be discovered. Here we describe a phylogenetically distinct (~20% divergence at the mitochondrial ND2 gene) and biogeographically disjunct new species of gecko in the genus Gehyra, from the Admiralty and St Matthias Islands. Gehyra rohan sp. nov. can be distinguished from all congeners by the combination of its very large size, ring of bright orange scales around the eye, moderate degree of lateral folding on the limbs and body, and aspects of head, body and tail scalation. Molecular data indicate mid to late Miocene divergence of the new species from nearest relatives occurring nearly 2000 kilometres away in Vanuatu and Fiji. Large Gehyra have not been recorded on the intervening large islands of the Bismark Archipelago (New Britain and New Ireland) and the Solomon Islands, suggesting this dispersal pre-dated the current configuration of these islands, extinction in intervening regions, or potentially elements of both. Conversely, low genetic divergence between disjunct samples on Manus and Mussau implies recent overseas dispersal via either natural or anthropogenic means.

  7. A preliminary phylogeny of the Palearctic naked-toed geckos (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) with taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Aaron M; Masroor, Rafaqat; Titus-McQuillan, James; Heinicke, Matthew P; Daza, Juan D; Jackman, Todd R

    2013-01-08

    Palearctic naked-toed geckos are a group of gekkonid geckos that range from North Africa to northern India and western China, with their greatest diversity in Iran and Pakistan. Relationships among the constituent genera remain incompletely resolved and the monophyly of key genera remains unverified. Further, competing classifications are in current use and many species have been allocated to different genera by different authors. We used both mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (RAG1, PDC) to explore relationships among representatives of all but one genus in the group (Rhinogecko), including four genera not previously included in phylogenetic analyses (Asiocolotes, Altigekko, Indogekko, and Siwaligekko). Siwaligekko (and presumably other Tibeto-Himalayan species often referred to Cyrtopodion) are more closely related to tropical Asian Cyrtodactylus than to Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Sampled species of Asiocolotes and Altigekko are sister taxa, but both genera are here considered junior subjective synonyms of Altiphylax. Cyrtopodion sensu lato is non-monophyletic; Mediodactylus and Tenuidactylus, which have variably been considered as subgenera or synonyms of Cyrtopodion are both valid genera. Indogekko is embedded within Cyrtopodion and is here treated as a subgenus. Bunopus and Crossobamon are closely related to one-another, and with Agamura are interdigitated among taxa previously assigned to Cyrtopodion. Our data confirm the previous identification of a Saharo-Arabian Stenodactylus/Tropiocolotes/Pseudoceramodactylus clade and verify that Microgecko and Alsophylax are not members of the main clade of Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Osteological differences between Tropiocolotes and Microgecko, formerly treated as congeneric, are discussed and illustrated. The divergence between Cyrtodactylus and the Palearctic naked-toed clade predates the initial collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates, but deeper divergences within both groups are consistent with mountain building in the Himalayas and adjacent ranges as promoting cladogenic events. Miocene divergences within Tenuidactylus are consistent with vicariant speciation caused by uplift events in the Iranian and Transcaspian regions. Taxonomic implications of our phylogenetic results are discussed and a preliminary allocation of all species of padless Palearctic gekkonids to genus is provided.

  8. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Theropod Dinosaur (Reptilia, Archosauria from the Ipubi Formation, Araripe Basin, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hermínio da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araripe Sedimentary Basin is known by the excellence of its fossils, regarding the preservation, diversity, and quantity. Here, we present a spectroscopic analysis using several experimental techniques (X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis applied in small fragments of bones from the posterior members of a theropod dinosaur. The results agree regarding the different composition of the stone matrix and the fossilized bone, indicating a partial substitution of the material by elements present in the depositional environment. However, differently from what is believed to occur, there is evidence that pyritization is not the only mechanism of fossilization for a specimen of Ipubi formation, but calcification, additionally, plays an important role in the fossil production of this Formation.

  9. Redescription of Tijubina pontei, an Early Cretaceous lizard (Reptilia; Squamata from the Crato Formation of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago R. Simões

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The record of Gondwanan Mesozoic lizards is very poor. Among the few species described for this region there is Tijubina pontei, an Early Cretaceous lizard from the Crato Formation (late Aptian of northeast Brazil. Its description is very brief and lacks most of its diagnostic characters and clear delimitation from other lizard species. Here, a full redescription of the holotype is provided. T. pontei is demonstrated to be a valid species and a new diagnosis is provided with reference to Olindalacerta brasiliensis, a contemporary species of the Crato Formation. It lacks the posteroventral and posterodorsal processes of the dentary; the tibial/fibular length equals the femoral length and its posterior dentary teeth are robust, cylindrically based, unsculptured and bear no cuspids. The systematic position of T. pontei still needs further clarification, but preliminary analyses indicate that it lies in a rather basal position among the Squamata, similarly to O. brasiliensis.O registro de lagartos do Mesozóico de Gondwana é extremamente limitado. Dentre as poucas espécies descritas para esta região está Tijubina pontei, um lagarto do Cretáceo Inferior da Formação Crato (Aptiano superior do nordeste do Brasil. A sua descrição é muito breve e não contém a maioria dos seus caracteres diagnósticos ou uma clara delimitação das outras espécies de lagartos. Neste trabalho, uma redescrição completa do holótipo, é provida. É demonstrado que T. pontei é espécie válida, e uma nova diagnose é provida com referência à Olindalacerta brasiliensis, uma espécie contemporânea da Formação Crato. Ele não possui os processos posteroventral e posterodorsal do dentário; o comprimento tibilar/fibular é relativamente igual ao comprimento do fêmur e os seus dentes posteriores no dentário são robustos, de base cilindrica, sem ornamentações e sem cúspides. Embora a posição sistemática de T. pontei ainda necessite de maiores esclarecimentos, estudos preliminares indicam que este é um lagarto basal dentre os Squamata, de modo similar a O. brasiliensis.

  10. First report of Eutropis innovate (Blanford, 1870 (Reptilia: Scincidae from Nallamalai Hills, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.T. Rao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first record of Eutropis innotata (Blanford, 1870 based on a specimen collected in 2002 from Gundla Brahmeswaram Metta Wildlife Sanctuary, Andhra Pradesh, India. The habitat from where it was collected is relatively undisturbed patch of forest in the Nallamalai Hills of Eastern Ghats. This constitutes the range extension of this species from central India to Nallamalai Hills in Eastern Ghats in peninsular India. We provide details on its diagnosis, habits and habitat, and key to species belonging to the genus Eutropis Fitzinger, 1843.

  11. Standard karyotypes of two populations of the Scincus scincus complex from Tunisia and Morocco (Reptilia: Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Kalboussi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A study on chromosomes of two Scincus populations attributed to S. scincus and S. albifasciatus was carried out by conventional Giemsa staining. Both samples showed the same diploid number of 2N = 32 and identical chromosome morphology. Therefore, these populations seem to be lacking in chromosome changes that could act as barriers to gene flow. However, because speciation in lizards is not always associated with chromosome repatterning, the taxonomic status of “scincus” and “albifasciatus” forms remains unsettled.

  12. Reptilia, Serpentes, Dipsadidae, Gomesophis brasiliensis (Gomes, 1918: Distribution extension in state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortes, V. B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian burrowing snake, Gomesophis brasiliensis, occurs in aquatic habitats such as swamps, from MinasGerais and Distrito Federal until Rio Grande do Sul. In spite of this wide distribution, the species’ geographic range stillremains unclear. This note reports the occurrence of G. brasiliensis in the municipality of Vargem Bonita, state of SantaCatarina, south Brazil, extending the species’ range ca. 80 km to the west in this state.

  13. Tachymenis chilensis Schegel, 1837 (Reptilia: Squamata: Dipsadidae. New record and geographic distribution map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morando, Mariana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the first vouchered record from Chubut provincein Futaleufú Department. Suburbs of Esquel city, along Ruta Nacional 259 to Trevelin on El Pinar, Roberts Farm. This is the southernmost record for the species; to our knowledge the previous southernmost registered specimen was based on collected specimens from Piltriquitrón Mountain in El Bolson, Los Lagos Department, Rio Negro Province.

  14. Rediscovery and redescription of the holotype of Liolaemus lemniscatus Gravenhorst, 1838 (Reptilia, Squamata, Liolaemidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Borczyk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The presumed lost holotype of Liolaemus lemniscatus Gravenhorst 1838 has been found at the Museum of Natural History of the University of Wrocław and identified by the individual pattern of head scales which matches Gravenhorst’s drawing. The first detailed description of this specimen is provided.

  15. Contribution to the knowledge of the herpetofauna of the Sălaj-region, Romania (amphibia, reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katona G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide 79 data of 53 collecting events originating from the Sălaj-region of western Transylvania, Romania between 22. April, 2014 and 10. September, 2015. Geographical, spatial and temporal records are documented for the better knowledge of nine amphibian and seven reptilian species. We remark that the number of roadkilled animals is very high despite the low traffic in the research areas.

  16. Distribution of Lygosoma guentheri (Peter, 1879 (Reptilia: Scincidae in Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.M. Javed

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lygosoma guentheri (Peter, 1879, hitherto a Western Ghats endemic species, has been recently recorded from the central Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh based on a specimen collected in the Nallamalai Hills in 2003. Our herpetological surveys in Andhra Pradesh reveal the presence of Lygosoma guentheri (Peter, 1879 in a few more localities other than the Nallamalai Hills. This paper deals with the distribution and status of Lygosoma guentheri (Peter, 1879 in Andhra Pradesh based on recent sightings and collections.

  17. Checklist of helminths from lizards and amphisbaenians (Reptilia, Squamata of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RW Ávila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive and up to date summary of the literature on the helminth parasites of lizards and amphisbaenians from South America is herein presented. One-hundred eighteen lizard species from twelve countries were reported in the literature harboring a total of 155 helminth species, being none acanthocephalans, 15 cestodes, 20 trematodes and 111 nematodes. Of these, one record was from Chile and French Guiana, three from Colombia, three from Uruguay, eight from Bolivia, nine from Surinam, 13 from Paraguay, 12 from Venezuela, 27 from Ecuador, 17 from Argentina, 39 from Peru and 103 from Brazil. The present list provides host, geographical distribution (with the respective biome, when possible, site of infection and references from the parasites. A systematic parasite-host list is also provided.

  18. Karyology, phylogeny and biogeography of the Namaqua chamaeleon, Chamaeleo namaquensis Smith, 1831 (Chamaeleonidae, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Michael D.

    1979-01-01

    The karyotype of the Namaqua chamaeleon, Chamaeleo namaquensis Smith, 1831, has 24 chromosomes consisting of 12 macro- and 12 microchromosomes. This chromosome pattern is characteristic of the C. chamaeleon (Linnaeus, 1758) species group and indicates that C. namaquensis is a member of that taxon.

  19. Subterranean ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae as prey of fossorial reptiles (Reptilia, Squamata: Amphisbaenidae in Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Araújo Esteves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ant diversity observed in stomach contents of fossorial reptiles was compared to the subterranean ant richness collected using traditional and modern techniques of ant collections. We analyzed the alimentary tract of 64 specimens of amphisbaenians (4 Amphisbaena alba, 10 A. fuliginosa, 25 A. vermicularis, and 25 Leposternon infraorbitale collected during the fauna rescue for the construction of Serra da Mesa hydroelectric dam in the Tocantins River (from 1992 to 1997, in Minaçu County, Goiás, Brazil. We found only five ant species present in the stomach contents, all belonging to the army ants subfamily Ecitoninae. In contrast, the traditional techniques for subterranean ants' collection are far more efficient than the exam of fossorial reptile's stomach contents, collecting a much richer and diverse ant fauna. The exclusive occurrence of army ants in the alimentary tract of these fossorial reptiles suggests that they trace the chemical trails laid by the ants while moving inside and over the soil. Further, the occurrence of the epigaeic army ants Eciton and Labidus in the stomach contents suggests that amphisbaenians may forage on the soil surface as well.A diversidade de formigas no conteúdo estomacal de répteis fossoriais foi comparada à riqueza de formigas subterrâneas coletadas com o uso de técnicas tradicionais e modernas para sua coleta. Analisamos o trato alimentar de 64 espécimes de anfisbenídeos (4 Amphisbaena alba, 10 A. fuliginosa, 25 A. vermicularis e 25 Leposternon infraorbitale coletados durante o resgate da fauna para a construção da represa da Hidroelétrica da Serra da Mesa no Rio Tocantins (de 1992 a 1997, na cidade de Minaçu, Goiás, Brasil. Encontramos apenas cinco espécies de formigas presentes nos conteúdos estomacais aqui examinados, todas pertencentes à subfamília das formigas-de-correição, Ecitoninae. Ao contrário, as técnicas tradicionais de coleta de formigas subterrâneas são muito mais eficientes que o exame dos conteúdos estomacais de répteis fossoriais, coletando uma fauna muito mais rica e diversa de formigas. A ocorrência exclusiva de formigas-de-correição no trato alimentar destes répteis fossoriais sugere que eles seguem trilhas químicas deixadas pelas formigas à medida que se elas movimentam no interior e sobre o solo. Ainda, a ocorrência das formigas-de-correição epigéicas Eciton e Labidus nos conteúdos estomacais analisados sugere que os anfisbenídeos podem também forragear na superfície do solo.

  20. Reptilia, Squamata, Tropiduridae, Stenocercus sinesaccus Torres–Carvajal, 2005: Distribution extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the easternmost known record for the tropidurid lizard Stenocercussinesaccus Torres–Carvajal, 2005, at Floresta Nacional de Silvânia, state of Goiás, Brazil, in a transition areabetween cerrado sensu strictu and gallery forest

  1. VALLESAURUS CENENSIS WILD, 1991, A DREPANOSAURID (REPTILIA DIAPSIDA FROM THE LATE TRIASSIC OF NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIO RENESTO

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Vallesaurus cenensis, a small drepanosaurid reptile from the Norian (Late Triassic beds of the Calcare di Zorzino (Zorzino Limestone is described. The holotype and only known specimen represents the first drepanosaurid in which the skull is preserved articulated with the postcranial skeleton. The study of Vallesaurus anatomy confirms previous data about arboreal adaptation in all known drepanosaurids and permits more firm hypotheses about the phylogenetic relationships of the Drepanosauridae to be proposed.

  2. Osteología comparada de las familias Nothosauridae y Simosauridae (Reptilia. Sauropterygia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz, J. L.

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The alleged homodont condition of Simosaurus is not exact, symphisiary and postsymphisiary pieces can be differenciated, based on morphological and size criteria. The dental morphology of Simosaurus is unique within the Sauropterygia, with teeth whose basal diameter has a great relative developpment. The morphology of vertebral centrum between Nothosauridae and Simosauridae is compared. The first ones have a morphotype called "Kreuzform" (dorsal region of centrum facing that of Simosauridae, here called "Fosetado" (pitted, A typical characteristic of Simosaurus is the occurrence (in the neural arch of additional articulatin,g structures (infrazygapophyses, Huene, 1952. From the consideration of morphometric variationof centrum in N. raabi SCHROEDER, 1914, it can be concluded that the cervical vertebrae of Nothosaurus are relatively longer and deeper than the thoracic ones, The topographic variation of diameter and Ienght of centrum in Simosaurus is more accused than in Nothosaurus, while depth is more constant. Based on morphometric criteria the vertebral centra no pachyostotic of Pachypleurosaurs (generally smaller in size can not be discriminated from those of Nothosauridae. The rib morphology of Simosaurus is similar to that of other Notbosaurs. The coracoid of Simosaurus is stronger and unlike Nothosaurus the glenoid notch has a typically anterior position. Simosaurus has a more slender humerus than the rest of Nothosaurs. The analysis of the different genera proposed as Simosauridae up to date, leads towards the conclusion that it is a monogeneric family. Dentary and postcraneal diagnosis of this taxon is proposed.

    La supuesta condición homodonta de Simosaurus es inexacta, pudiéndose diferenciar piezas sinfisiarias y postsinfisiarias, en base a criterios morfológicos y de tamaño. La morfología dentaria de los Simosaurios es única dentro de los Sauropterigios, con piezas dotadas de un diámetro basal de la corona de un elevado desarrollo relativo. Se compara la morfología del centro vertebral entre Nothosauridae y Simosauridae. Frente al morfotipo en "Kreuzform" (zona dorsal del centro de los primeros, los Simosauridae presentan un morfotipo aquí denominado "Fosetado". Simosaurus se caracteriza igualmente por la aparición de estructuras articulares adicionales en el arco neural (infrazigapófisis, Huene, 1952. Del estudio de la variación morfométrica del, centro vertebral en N. raabi SCHROEDER, 1914, puede concluirse que las vértebras cervicales de Nothosaurus son relativamente más largas y netamente más profundas que las torácicas. En Simosaurus la variación topográfica del diámetro y la longitud del centro es más acusada que en Nothosaurus, mientras la profundidad mantiene una mayor constancia. Los centros vertebrales no paquiostóticos de los Paquipleurosaurios, aunque generalmente de menor tamaño, no son diferenciables morfométricamente de las de los Notosáuridos. La morfología costal de Simosaurus es semejante a la de otros Notosaurios. Su coracoides es más robusto que el de Nothosaurus y, a diferencia de este último género, la incisión glenoidea presenta una típica disposición anterior. El húmero de Simosaurus es más grácil que el del resto de los Notosaurios. El análisis de los diferentes géneros hasta ahora propuestos como Simosáuridos conduce a la conclusión de que Simosauridae es una familia monogenérica. Se propone su diagnosis dentaria y postcraneal.

  3. Osteología craneana de Teius teyou (Daudin, 1802, (Reptilia: Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcel, Eduardo

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available En esta contribución se describe la osteología craneana y del aparato hioideo de Teius teyou procedentes de las provincias de Chaco y Formosa y se los compara con Teius oculatus. Se obtuvieron datos comparativos tanto para las dos especies como entre ambos sexos, de una misma especie. La diferencia interespecífica más remarcable es la separación entre el postfrontal y el postorbital en Teius teyou y la fusión de ambos en Teius oculatus. Esta diferencia se confirmó luego del estudio de 120 ejemplares de cada taxa.

  4. On the identity of Amphisbaena hugoi Vanzolini, 1990 (Reptilia: Squamata: Amphisbaenidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.; Mott, T.

    2003-01-01

    The taxonomic status of Amphisbaena hugoi Vanzolini, 1990, is discussed. It is concluded that it is a new junior synonym of Amphisbaena vanzolinii Gans, 1963. O validade taxonômica de Amphisbaena hugoi é discutida. Conclue-se que A. hugoi Vanzolini, 1990, é um sinônimo júnior de Amphisbaena

  5. Slow worm, Anguis fragilis (Reptilia: Anguidae) as a species complex: Genetic structure reveals deep divergences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav; Jandzik, D.; Lymberakis, P.; Jablonski, D.; Moravec, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2010), s. 460-472 ISSN 1055-7903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Anguis * Phylogeography * NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.889, year: 2010

  6. A new species of Thecadactylus from Sint Maarten, Lesser Antilles (Reptilia, Squamata, Gekkonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Koehler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Thecadactylus from the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten. The new species differs from all other species in the genus bya distinct dorsal pattern of numerous irregular but sharply deliminated black spots and blotches on an otherwise almost patternless background.

  7. Registro nuevo del escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae en Durango, México New report of Mexican scorpion Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae in Durango State, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Muñiz-Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum es una de las 2 especies de lagartijas venenosas que se conocen en el mundo; hay 3 subespecies, todas en una distribución muy localizada, a lo largo de la costa del Pacífico. En la parte suroeste de Durango, en el río Presidio, un grupo de técnicos topógrafos observaron un ejemplar de Heloderma horridum y tomaron fotografías, las cuales aportaron al autor de esta nota, quien por medio de claves determinó la especie. Se trata de una especie que se considera amenazada dentro de la NOM-ECOL-059-2001, razón por la cual no se recolectó. Este registro amplía la distribución de la especie hacia el suroeste de la sierra Madre Occidental y confirma su presencia en el estado de Durango, México.The Beaded Mexican Reptile is one of the 2 species recognized as venomous reptiles in the world. There are known 3 subspecies of Heloderma horridum, all show a very localized distribution, along the Pacific Coast. At the Southwestern part of Durango, this species was seen at the river Presidio. One specimen of Heloderma horridum, was observed and photographed, by a group of topography technical, who donated the pictures. By using taxonomic keys, the specimen was determined as Heloderma horridum. This species is registered in NOM-ECOL-059-2001, and is considered Amazing species, so the specimen was not collected. This is new registration, broads the geographical distribution of this taxon towards the southwestern of the Sierra Madre Occidental and its presence in Durango state, Mexico.

  8. Registro nuevo del escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae) en Durango, México New report of Mexican scorpion Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae) in Durango State, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Muñiz-Martínez; Manuel Antonio Rojas-Pérez

    2009-01-01

    El escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum es una de las 2 especies de lagartijas venenosas que se conocen en el mundo; hay 3 subespecies, todas en una distribución muy localizada, a lo largo de la costa del Pacífico. En la parte suroeste de Durango, en el río Presidio, un grupo de técnicos topógrafos observaron un ejemplar de Heloderma horridum y tomaron fotografías, las cuales aportaron al autor de esta nota, quien por medio de claves determinó la especie. Se trata de una especie que se consi...

  9. Frugivoria e dispersão de sementes pelo lagarto teiú Tupinambis merianae (Reptilia: Teiidae Frugivory and seed dispersal by the tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae Reptilia: Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Rodrigo de Castro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Os lagartos teiús possuem uma dieta generalista, podendo agir como importantes dispersores de sementes em florestas semidecíduas do sudeste do Brasil. Foram estudadas a frugivoria e a dispersão de sementes de lagartos teiús usando animais em cativeiro, através da oferta de frutos de uma floresta semidecídua. Frutos de trinta espécies vegetais foram oferecidos aos lagartos em cativeiro, com diâmetro variando de 0,81 a 10,0 cm. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas na germinação entre as sementes que passaram pelo trato digestivo do lagarto e as controle de Eugenia uniflora (chi²= 0.69, P>0.50, Genipa americana (chi²= 6.4, P>0.975, Cereus peruvianus (chi²= 0.018, P>0.10, e Solanum viarum (chi²= 6.23, P>0.975. O tempo de retenção da semente no tubo digestivo do teiú variou de 22 a 23 h para Solanum lycocarpum e 43 a 44 h para Syagrus romanzoffiana. Nossos resultados indicam que o lagarto teiú tem potencial para agir como um importante dispersor de sementes nos trópicos.Tegu lizards have a generalist diet and may play an important role as seed dispersers in semideciduous forests in south-east Brazil. We studied the frugivory and seed dispersal of tegu lizards using captive animals and offering wild fruits from a semideciduous forest. Thirty fruit species were eaten by the lizards in captivity, ranging from 0.81 to 10.0 cm (fruit diameter. Even large fruit adapted to dispersal by large mammals were swallowed (ex. Syagrus oleracea. There were no statistical differences in seed germination between seeds that passed through the lizard gut and the control in Eugenia uniflora (chi2 = 0.69, P>0.50, Genipa americana (chi2 = 6.4, P>0.975, Cereus peruvianus (chi2 = 0.018, P>0.10, and Solanum viarum (chi2 = 6.23, P>0.975. Seed retention time in the tegu gut ranged from 2224 h (Solanum lycocarpum to 4344 h (for Syagrus romanzoffiana. Our results indicate that tegu lizards have a potential to be an important seed dispersers in the Neotropics.

  10. Comportamento alimentar e dieta de Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron em cativeiro (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae Feeding behavior and diet of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron in captivity (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1985 the biology and behavior of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 at São Paulo Zoo is being studied. Feeding behavior is divided in five phases (foraging, approach, capture, dilaceration and ingestion, but not necessarily all of them happen. During phase 1 the food or prey seems to be visually located. During phase 2 the food itens and stationaty preys are approached and examined by olfaction. Moving preys are pursued and there is no olfactory examination. During phase 3 the food is captured by suction. When food is bigger than turtle mouth it is dilacerated by one or both forefeet used alternately (phase 4. Ingestion is accomplished by gradual suction (phase 5. Intra and inter-specific cleptoparasitism was observed. Success in capture and ingestion of food seems not be dependent on species or size of the turtle. Adults, young, and hatchlings of P. hilarii are primarily carnivorous and vegetables were rarely eaten.

  11. Philodryas chamissonis (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae preys on the arboreal marsupial Dromiciops gliroides (Mammalia: Microbiotheria: Microbiotheriidae Philodryas chamissonis (Reptilia: Squamata: Dipsadidae predando o marsupial arborícola Dromiciops gliroides (Mammalia: Microbiotheria: Microbiotheriidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muñoz-Leal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Philodryas chamissonis, the Chilean long-tailed snake, is a diurnal predator mainly of Liolaemus lizards, but also of amphibians, birds, rodents and juvenile rabbits. Dromiciops gliroides (Colocolo opossum is an arboreal marsupial endemic of temperate rainforest of southern South America. Little information is available about this marsupial's biology and ecology. Here we report the predation of one Colocolo opossum by an adult female P. chamissonis in a mixed Nothofagus forest, composed mainly by N. dombeyi, N. glauca and N. alpina trees, in the "Huemules de Niblinto" National Reserve, Nevados de Chillán, Chile. Since these two species have different activity and habitat use patterns, we discuss how this encounter may have occurred. Although it could just have been an opportunistic event, this finding provides insights into the different components of food chains in forest ecosystems of Chile.Philodryas chamissonis, cobra de cauda comprida ("Culebra de cola larga", é uma cobra diurna, predadora principalmente de lagartos do gênero Liolaemus, mas também de anfíbios, aves, roedores e coelhos jovens. Dromiciops gliroides (colocolo é um marsupial arborícola endêmico das florestas temperadas do sul da América do Sul. Há pouca informação disponível sobre a biologia e a ecologia deste marsulpial. É reportada, neste estudo, a predação de um colocolo por uma fêmea adulta de P. chamissonis, em uma floresta mista de Nothofagus, composta principalmente por árvores N. dombeyi, N. glauca e N. alpina, na Reserva Nacional de Huemules de Niblinto, Nevados de Chillán, Chile. Uma vez que estas duas espécies possuem diferentes padrões de atividade e de uso de habitat, discute-se como este evento poder ter ocorrido. Embora este possa ter sido apenas um evento oportunístico, o achado fornece novas informações sobre os diferentes componentes da cadeia alimentar nos ecossistemas florestais do Chile.

  12. A new species of Mathevotaenia (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae parasitizing Tropidurus spinulosus (Reptilia, Squamata from northeastern Argentina Una especie nueva de Mathevotaenia (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae parásita de Tropidurus spinulosus (Reptilia, Squamata del noreste de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lía Inés Lunaschi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mathevotaenia chaquensis n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae, Linstowiinae from a Spiny Lava Lizard, Tropidurus spinulosus, collected in Chaco Province, Argentina, is described. This is the second species of Mathevotaenia described from Neotropical reptiles. The new species is mainly characterized by having a relatively small strobila, 24 mm in total length, with about 100 craspedote proglottids, and 19-24 testes per proglottid. Among the South American species of Mathevotaenia, M. argentinensis is most similar to the new species by having similar body length and number of testes, but the major differences between both species include the size of suckers, neck, proglottids, testes and egg capsules, and the shape of the genital atrium and ovary (with 10-13 lobules on each side in M. argentinensis,, and 4-7 lobules in M. chaquensis n. sp.. A key to the species of the South American members of the Mathevotaenia Akumyan, 1946 is presented.Mathevotaenia chaquensis n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae, Linstowiinae es descrita parasitando al lagarto de los quebrachales, Tropidurus spinulosus, procedente de la Provincia del Chaco, Argentina. Esta es la segunda especie de Mathevotaenia descrita parasitando reptiles Neotropicales. La nueva especie está caracterizada principalmente por tener un estróbilo relativamente pequeño, 24 mm de largo, con aproximadamente 100 proglótides craspedotas y 19-24 testículos por proglótide. Entre las especies sudamericanas de Mathevotaenia, M. argentinensis es la más semejante a la nueva especie por presentar similar longitud del cuerpo y número de testículos, pero difieren en el tamaño de las ventosas, cuello, proglótides, testículos y huevos. Además difieren en la forma del atrio genital y del ovario (10-13 lóbulos a cada lado enM. argentinensis vs. 4-7 lóbulos en M. chaquensis n. sp.. Se presenta una clave para la determinación de las especies sudamericanas de Mathevotaenia Akumyan, 1946.

  13. Actividad reproductiva en tres especies simpátricas del género Liolaemus (Reptilia: Sauria: Tropiduridae Actividad reproductiva en tres especies simpátricas del género Liolaemus (Reptilia: Sauria: Tropiduridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez Pinilla Martha Patricia

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Sympatric species Liolaemus bibroni (oviparous, Liolaemus elongatus and Liolaemus ruibali (viviparous have partial fall reproductive activity for males and females. Males are reproductively active between fall and spring, females are vitellogenic especially during this season, they are gravid in spring and the oviposition/parturition occur at the end of spring and early summer. Reproductive cycles of males and females have not a long rest phase, and apparently are continuous. The incidence of  environmental and endogenous factors over the partial fall reproductive pattern in Liolaemus species is discussed. Machos y hembras de las especies simpátricas Liolaemus bibroni (ovípara, Liolaemus elongatus y Liolaemus ruibali (vivíparas tienen actividad reproductiva parcial de otoño. Los machos son reproductivos entre otoño y primavera, período en el que las hembras son vitelogénicas; las hembras están grávidas en primavera y el parto/oviposición sucede al final de esta estación y verano temprano. Los ciclos reproductivos de machos y hembras no tienen un período de receso prolongado, y tienden a ser continuos. Se discute la incidencia de factores ambientales y endógenos en el patrón reproductivo parcial de otoño en especies de Liolaemus.

  14. Crescimento alométrico, morfologia e uso do habitat em cinco espécies de Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae Allometric growth, morphology and habitat use in five species of Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Silva Pinto

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas a variação ontogenética da forma do corpo nos lagartos sul-americanos Mabuya agilis, M. bistriata, M. guaporicola, M. macrorhyncha e M. nigropunctata, assim como as diferenças interespecíficas nas proporções do corpo, como resultados de um possível crescimento alométrico. As trajetórias das tendências ontogenéticas foram significativamente diferentes somente entre M. guaporicola e M. nigropunctata; todos os pares de espécies, exceto M. agilis e M. macrorhyncha, M. bistriata e M. nigropunctata, demonstraram diferenças significativas em relação ao intercepto Y. A Análise de Componentes Principais aplicada sobre uma série de caracteres morfométricos demonstrou sinais opostos para as variáveis do corpo e dos membros, corroborando estudos anteriores. Contudo, quando as espécies foram analisadas individualmente, as mãos e dígitos apresentaram alometria negativa, enquanto os demais segmentos apresentaram variação em suas alometrias. Algumas hipóteses levantadas nesse estudo, relacionadas à forma do corpo e ao uso do hábitat nessas espécies, necessitam ser testadas.The ontogenetic variation of body shape in the South American skinks Mabuya agilis Boulenger, 1887, M. bistriata (Spix, 1825, M. guaporicola Dunn, 1936, M. macrorhyncha Hoge, 1946, and M. nigropunctata (Spix, 1825 were analyzed. Interspecific differences in body proportions as a possible result of allometric growth in these species are also examined. Ontogenetic trend lines were significantly different only between M. guaporicola and M. nigropunctata; all other species pairs, except M. agilis and M. macrorhyncha, M. bistriata and M. nigropunctata, showed significantly different Y intercepts. A PCA analysis on a series of morphometric characters showed opposite signals for body and limb variables, corroborating previous studies. However, when the species were analyzed separately, hand and digits were the most likely segments to present negative allometry, while remaining segments were variable. Some hypothesis relating body form and habitat in these species have been raised, which need to be tested.

  15. Notas sobre la ocurrencia de Pelamis platurus (Reptilia: Serpentes: Hydrophiidae en el Pacífico Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez León Ricardo

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Pelamis platurus (Linnaeus in the Colombian Pacific coast, is confirmed based on 35 reports (18 published and 17 unpublished, and 36 individual records in national colections. The pelagic sea snake is commonly found in large yellow and black aggregations along slick and drift lines in the areas of Isla Gorgona-Cabo Marzo. Additionally, the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis is recorded for the first time as a predator of Pelamis platurus in the American Pacific.Se discute la presencia de Pelamis platurus (Linnaeus en el Pacífico colombiano con base en 35 registros (18 publicados y 17 inéditos, y 36 ejemplares en colecciones nacionales. La serpiente marina es común y abundante entre Isla Gorgona y Cabo Marzo, donde forma densas agregaciones amarillas y negras, a lo largo de las costas. Adicionalmente se registra el pelícano marrón Pelecanus occidentalis por primera vez como un depredador de Pelamis platurus en el Pacífico americano.

  16. Cyrtodactylus tahuna sp. nov., a new bent-toed gecko (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Sangihe Island, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, Awal; Arida, Evy; Koch, AndrÉ

    2018-03-21

    Cyrtodactylus tahuna sp. nov. is a new bent-toed gecko we describe herein based on three specimens from Sangihe, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, an island situated in the northern corner of the Wallacea biodiversity hotspot. The new species is a medium sized Cyrtodactylus with a SVL of up to 78.5 mm in adult males and 79.2 mm in females. It is easily distinguished from all but four species (Cyrtodactylus fumosus, C. halmahericus, C. papuensis, and C. tambora) occurring on Sulawesi as well as in the Moluccas and the Lesser Sunda Islands, by possessing precloacal and femoral pores, enlarged precloacal and femoral scales, and lacking transversely enlarged median subcaudal scales. It differs from C. fumosus by the presence of tubercles on the ventrolateral fold, more unkeeled dorsal tubercles (19 versus 4-7) and a pit-like precloacal depression in males (versus groove in males); from C. halmahericus by presence of smaller scales between the enlarged precloacal and femoral scales (versus a continuous series of enlarged precloacofemoral scales) and a continuous series of precloacofemoral pores, as well as the presence of a pit-like precloacal depression in male (versus groove in males), from C. papuensis by possessing a pit-like precloacal depression in males (versus a groove ); and from C. tambora by the presence of tubercles on the dorsal surface of the brachium and the possession of femoral pores. Our contribution, along with several other recent descriptions of bent-toad geckos from Southeast Asia, clearly indicating that the diversity of the genus Cyrtodactylus in Indonesia is still underestimated.

  17. Out of Arabia: a complex biogeographic history of multiple vicariance and dispersal events in the gecko genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, Jiří; Carranza, Salvador; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Moravec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b) and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2) genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7-7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot.

  18. High diversity, low disparity and small body size in plesiosaurs (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B J Benson

    Full Text Available Invasion of the open ocean by tetrapods represents a major evolutionary transition that occurred independently in cetaceans, mosasauroids, chelonioids (sea turtles, ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Plesiosaurian reptiles invaded pelagic ocean environments immediately following the Late Triassic extinctions. This diversification is recorded by three intensively-sampled European fossil faunas, spanning 20 million years (Ma. These provide an unparalleled opportunity to document changes in key macroevolutionary parameters associated with secondary adaptation to pelagic life in tetrapods. A comprehensive assessment focuses on the oldest fauna, from the Blue Lias Formation of Street, and nearby localities, in Somerset, UK (Earliest Jurassic: 200 Ma, identifying three new species representing two small-bodied rhomaleosaurids (Stratesaurus taylori gen et sp. nov.; Avalonnectes arturi gen. et sp. nov and the most basal plesiosauroid, Eoplesiosaurus antiquior gen. et sp. nov. The initial radiation of plesiosaurs was characterised by high, but short-lived, diversity of an archaic clade, Rhomaleosauridae. Representatives of this initial radiation were replaced by derived, neoplesiosaurian plesiosaurs at small-medium body sizes during a more gradual accumulation of morphological disparity. This gradualistic modality suggests that adaptive radiations within tetrapod subclades are not always characterised by the initially high levels of disparity observed in the Paleozoic origins of major metazoan body plans, or in the origin of tetrapods. High rhomaleosaurid diversity immediately following the Triassic-Jurassic boundary supports the gradual model of Late Triassic extinctions, mostly predating the boundary itself. Increase in both maximum and minimum body length early in plesiosaurian history suggests a driven evolutionary trend. However, Maximum-likelihood models suggest only passive expansion into higher body size categories.

  19. Case 3693 Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae): Proposed suppression of Cryptodacus Gundlach, 1862 (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbom, Allen L.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Chen, Xiao-Lin; David, King J.; De Meyer, Marc; Freidberg, Amnon; Han, Ho-Yeon; Steck, Gary J.; Thompson, F. Christian; White, Ian M.; Zucchi, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3, is to conserve current usage of the well-established genus-group name Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 for a genus of Neotropical fruit flies by suppression of the earlier, unused name Crypto- dacus Gundlach, 1862, currently a junior synonym of Arrhyton Günther, 1858, a genus of snakes, under the plenary power of the Commission, in the interest of nomenclatural stability. Cryptodacus Gundlach has not been used as a valid name since 1883, whereas Cryptodacus Hendel has been used in a significant body of literature relating to fruit fly systematics, morphology and phylogeny and is the currently used name in various name and molecular databases. 

  20. Histology, Histochemistry And Ultrastructure Of The Oviducts And Seminal Receptacle Of Tropidurus Itambere (rodrigues, 1987) (reptilia: Tropiduridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira A.; Dolder H.

    2007-01-01

    The present study found new information regarding the histology, histochemistry and ultrastructure of the oviduct of Tropidurus itambere, an inhabitant of the Brazilian Atlantic forest. Three differentiated histological regions constitute the oviduct: the infundibulum, as its main characteristic, has many tubuloalveolar glands; the uterine region is remarkable for many mucous glands, just below the epithelium; the vagina, near to the cloacal opening, is characterized by an epithelium with inf...

  1. Land tortoise types in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie with comments on nomenclature and systematic (Reptilia: Testudines: Testudinidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.; Crumly, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    The holotype of Testudo vosmaeri Fitzinger, 1826 [= Geochelone vosmaeri] is RMNH 6001. The holotype of Testudo forstenii Schlegel & Müller, 1840 [= lndotestudo forstenii] is RMNH 3811. I. forstenii is considered a senior synonym of T. travancorica Boulenger, 1907 because plastral colour pattern,

  2. Eimeria species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae of podocnemis expansa (Schweigger and geochelone denticulata (LINN. from Amazonian Brazil (Reptilia: Chelonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lainson

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Eimeria lagunculata, Eimeria mammiformis and Eimeria podocnemis n. spp., are described from the faeces of the fresh-water turtle Podocnemis expansa, in Pará State, north Brasil. Oocysts of E. lagunculata are ellipsoidal, 19.2 x 12.8 (17.0-20.7 x 11.8-14.1 mum, shape-index (= length/ width 1.5 (1.4-1.7. Oocyst wall about 0.5-0.7 mum thick, with a prominent stopper-like micropyle at one pole. No oocyst residuum and no polar body. Sporocysts elongate ellipsoidal, 11.0 x 5.4 (10.4-11.8 x 5.2-6.0 mum, shape-index 2.0 (1.8-2.1: no Stieda body. A compact, ellipsoidal sporocyst residuum lies between the two sporozoites, which possess a posterior and an anterior refractile body. Oocysts of E. mammiformis broadly ellipsoidal, 30.0 x 19.4 (23.0-37.0 x 16.3-21.5 mum, shape-index 1.5 (1.1-1.9. Oocyst wall about 0.7 mum thick, with a prominent micropyle: no oocyst residuum and rarely a single polar body. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 15.3 x 7.9 (14.8-17.0 x 7.4-9.6 mum, shape-index 2.0 (1.8-2.2, with a tiny Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum bulky, ellipsoidal: sporozoites with two conspicuous refractile bodies. E. podocnemis has broadly ellipsoidal oocysts, 17.0 x 12.8 (14.8-19.2 x 11.8-14.1 mum, shape-index 1.3 (1.1-1.4. Oocyst wall about 0.5-0.7 mum thick, with no micropyle. No oocyst residuum, but always a single polar body. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 9.7 x 5.2 (8.9-10.4 x 4.4-6.0 mum, shape-index 1.9 (1.6-2.0, with no Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum bulky, ellipsoidal: sporocysts with 2 refractile bodies. Eimeria carinii n. sp., is recorded from the tortoise Geochelone denticulata, also from Pará. Oocyst wall about 1.2 mum thicl. No micropyle. Oocyst residuum limited to a number (about 10-20 of scattered granules: no polar body. Sporocysts broadly ellipsoidal, and with no Stieda body: they measure 8,8 x 7.3 (8.0-9.0 x 7.0-7.5 mum, shape-index 1.2 (1.1-1.3. Sporocyst residuum bulky, spherical to ellipsoidal: sporozoites possess both posterior and anterior refractile bodies.

  3. Lungs of the gecko Rhacodactylus leachianus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae): a correlative gross anatomical and light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S F; Bauer, A M; Russell, A P; Alston, J T; Maloney, J E

    1989-01-01

    The lungs of the New Caldeonian gecko Rhacodactylus leachianus were examined by means of gross dissection and light and electron microscopy. This tropical species, which is the largest living gecko, possesses two simple, single-chambered lungs. Right and left lungs are of similar size and shape. The lung volume (27.2 ml.100 g-1) is similar to that of the tokay (Gekko gecko) but differs in that the gas exchange tissue is approximately homogeneously distributed, and the parenchymal units (ediculae) are very large, approximately 2 mm in diameter. The parenchymal depth varies according to the location in the lung, being deepest near the middle of the lung and shallowest caudally. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveal an unusual distribution of ciliated cells in patches on the edicular walls as well as on the trabeculae. Secretory cells are very numerous, particularly in the bronchial epithelium, where they greatly outnumber the ciliated cells. The secretory cells form a morphological continuum characterized by small secretory droplets apically and large vacuoles basally. This continuum includes cells resembling type II pneumocytes but which are devoid of lamellar bodies. Type I pneumocytes similar to those of other reptiles cover the respiratory capillaries, where they form a thin, air-blood barrier together with the capillary endothelial cells and the fused basement laminae. The innervation, musculature, and vascular distribution in R. leachianus are also characterized. Apparent simplification of the lungs in this taxon may be related to features of its sluggish habits, whereas peculiarities of cell and tissue composition may reflect demands of its mesic habitat.

  4. Human-crocodile conflict and conservation implications of Saltwater Crocodiles Crocodylus porosus (Reptilia: Crocodylia: Crocodylidae in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Thasun Amarasinghe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human-wildlife conflict occurs when human requirements encroach on those of wildlife populations, with potential costs to both humans and wild animals.  As top predators in most inland waters, crocodilians are involved in human-wildlife conflicts in many countries.  Here we present findings of a 5-year survey on human-crocodile conflict on the island of Sri Lanka and relate the results to improving management practices. We aimed to quantify and understand the causes of human-crocodile conflict in Sri Lanka, and propose solutions to mitigate it.  Visual encounter surveys were carried out to estimate the population size of Saltwater Crocodiles. We recorded 778 sightings of Saltwater Crocodiles at 262 of 400 locations surveyed, and estimate the total population to comprise more than 2000 non-hatchlings and to have increased at an average rate of 5% p.a. since 1978. We propose four crocodile vigilance zones within the wet zone and one crocodile vigilance zone within the dry zone of the country. Specific threats to Saltwater Crocodiles identified in crocodile vigilance zones were: habitat destruction and loss; illegal killing and harvesting (17 killings out of fear, ~200 incidents of killing for meat and skins, ~800 eggs annually for consumption; unplanned translocations; and, interaction with urbanization (10 incidents of crocodiles being run over by trains/vehicles and electrocution. Additionally, 33 cases of crocodile attacks on humans were recorded [8 fatal, 25 non-fatal (minor to grievous injuries] and more than 50 incidents of attacks on farm and pet animals. 

  5. Reptilia, Squamata, Scincidae, Brachymeles elerae (Taylor, 1917: Rediscovery in Old Balbalan, Cordillera Mountain Range, Luzon Island, Philippines, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siler, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachymeles elerae (Taylor 1917 is one of 18 recognized lizard species of Brachymeles, and is one of only twospecies known to possess four digits on the fore- and hind limbs. This unique species was originally described on thebasis of two specimens, both lacking locality data, and has long been presumed to occur in the Nueva Vizcaya Provincein the north central region of Luzon Island in the Philippines. In 1920, two additional specimens were collected from theMunicipality of Balbalan of Luzon by E. H. Taylor. All subsequent reviews of the genus have been based on this material. Ireport on the first records of Brachymeles elerae in over ninety years and present the first photograph and new data onmorphology and habitat.

  6. Potential distribution of Podocnemis lewyana (Reptilia: Podocnemididae) and its possible fluctuation under different global climate change scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Yusty, Carlos; Restrepo, Adriana; Paez, Vivian P

    2014-01-01

    We implemented a species distribution modelling approach to establish the potential distribution of Podocnemis lewyana, to explore the climatic factors that may influence the species' distribution and to evaluate possible changes in distribution under future climate scenarios. The distribution models predicted a continuous distribution from south to north along the Magdalena River, from Rivera and Palermo in the Department of Huila to the departments of Atlantico and Magdalena in the north. Temperature was the variable most influential in the distribution of P. lewyana; this species tends to be present in warm regions with low temperature variability. The distribution model predicted an increase in the geographic range of P. lewyana under climate change scenarios. However, taking into account the habitat preferences of this species and its strong association with water, this result should be treated with caution since the model considered only terrestrial climatic variables. Given the life history characteristics of this species (temperature dependent sex determination, high pivotal temperature and a very narrow transition range) and the negative effect of changes in hydrological regimes on embryo survival, expansion of the potential distribution of P. lewyana in the future does not mean that the species will not be affected by global climate change.

  7. Contribución al conocimiento de la reproducción de Podocnemis Lewyana Dumeril (Reptilia: Quelonia: Pelomedusidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño Mora Olga Victoria

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia se encuentran 5 especies del Género Podocnemis : P. expansa, P. lewyana, P. sextuberculata , P. unifilis y P. vogli. De estas P. lewyana es la única que se encuentra en la zona Norte de nuestro país y es endémica para la región que abarca las hoyas del Magdalena y del Sinú.La presion human a la que esta sometida Podocnemis lewyana es muy fuerte, esto sumado a su endemismo, hace que su esperanza de supervivencia se reduzca aceleradamente ; los pescadores de la zona son unánimes en manifestar que su número disminuye notablemente, año tras año

  8. A gigantic nothosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Middle Triassic of SW China and its implication for the Triassic biotic recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Hu, Shi-Xue; Rieppel, Olivier; Jiang, Da-Yong; Benton, Michael J.; Kelley, Neil P.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Zhou, Chang-Yong; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-Yuan; Xie, Tao; Lv, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The presence of gigantic apex predators in the eastern Panthalassic and western Tethyan oceans suggests that complex ecosystems in the sea had become re-established in these regions at least by the early Middle Triassic, after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). However, it is not clear whether oceanic ecosystem recovery from the PTME was globally synchronous because of the apparent lack of such predators in the eastern Tethyan/western Panthalassic region prior to the Late Triassic. Here we report a gigantic nothosaur from the lower Middle Triassic of Luoping in southwest China (eastern Tethyan ocean), which possesses the largest known lower jaw among Triassic sauropterygians. Phylogenetic analysis suggests parallel evolution of gigantism in Triassic sauropterygians. Discovery of this gigantic apex predator, together with associated diverse marine reptiles and the complex food web, indicates global recovery of shallow marine ecosystems from PTME by the early Middle Triassic.

  9. Nuevos registros de squamata (reptilia para el pleistoceno superior del norte de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Agnolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo son reportados ejemplares de diversos taxones de reptiles escamados fósiles procedentes de la base de la Formación Luján (Pleistoceno Superior, en la localidad fosilífera de Merlo, provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Entre los ejemplares registrados se reconoce el primer registro fósil para el género y especie Anops kingii (Amphisbaenidae; asimismo se reporta la presencia de especies indeterminadas de los géneros Homonota (Gekkonidae y Liolaemus (Liolaemidae. La asociación conjunta de estos tres taxones hoy en día no se encuentra representada en el norte de la provincia de Buenos Aires, siendo la región geográficamente más cercana en donde encuentran una superposición en su distribución el Partido de Balcarce, ubicado en el extremo Sureste de la provincia y alejado unos 600 kilómetros al sur de la localidad fosilífera de Merlo. La presencia conjunta de estos tres reptiles se encuentra de acuerdo con la posible existencia de un pulso árido y frío, tal como ha sido propuesto con anterioridad para porción más inferior del Pleistoceno Superior en la provincia de Buenos Aires.

  10. Body and skull morphometric variations between two shovel-headed species of Amphisbaenia (Reptilia: Squamata with morphofunctional inferences on burrowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro dos Santos Lima Hohl

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Morphological descriptions comparing Leposternon microcephalum and L. scutigerum have been made previously. However, these taxa lack a formal quantitative morphological characterization, and comparative studies suggest that morphology and burrowing performance are be related. The excavatory movements of L. microcephalum have been described in detail. However, there is a lack of studies comparing locomotor patterns and/or performance among different amphisbaenids sharing the same skull shape. This paper presents the first study of comparative morphometric variations between two closely related amphisbaenid species, L. microcephalum and L. scutigerum, with functional inferences on fossorial locomotion efficiency. Methods Inter-specific morphometric variations were verified through statistical analyses of body and cranial measures of L. microcephalum and L. scutigerum specimens. Their burrowing activity was assessed through X-ray videofluoroscopy and then compared. The influence of morphological variation on the speed of digging was tested among Leposternon individuals. Results Leposternon microcephalum and L. scutigerum are morphometrically distinct species. The first is shorter and robust with a wider head while the other is more elongated and slim with a narrower head. They share the same excavatory movements. The animals analyzed reached relatively high speeds, but individuals with narrower skulls dug faster. A negative correlation between the speed and the width of skull was determined, but not with total length or diameter of the body. Discussion The morphometric differences between L. microcephalum and L. scutigerum are in accord with morphological variations previously described. Since these species performed the same excavation pattern, we may infer that closely related amphisbaenids with the same skull type would exhibit the same excavatory pattern. The negative correlation between head width and excavation speed is also observed in others fossorial squamates. The robustness of the skull is also related to compression force in L. microcephalum. Individuals with wider heads are stronger. Thus, we suggest trade-offs between excavation speed and compression force during burrowing in this species.

  11. Frugivoria e dispersão de sementes pelo lagarto teiú Tupinambis merianae (Reptilia: Teiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Castro,Everaldo Rodrigo de; Galetti,Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Os lagartos teiús possuem uma dieta generalista, podendo agir como importantes dispersores de sementes em florestas semidecíduas do sudeste do Brasil. Foram estudadas a frugivoria e a dispersão de sementes de lagartos teiús usando animais em cativeiro, através da oferta de frutos de uma floresta semidecídua. Frutos de trinta espécies vegetais foram oferecidos aos lagartos em cativeiro, com diâmetro variando de 0,81 a 10,0 cm. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas na germinação entre a...

  12. Life-history and ecological distribution of chameleons (Reptilia, Chamaeleonidae from the rain forests of Nigeria: conservation implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akani, G. C.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Five species of chameleons were observed in the continuous forest zone of southern Nigeria: Chamaeleo gracilis gracilis Hallowell, 1842, Chamaeleo owenii Gray, 1831, Chamaeleo cristatus Stutchbury, 1837, Chamaeleo wiedersheimi Nieden, 1910, and Rhampholeon spectrum (Bucholz 1874. Many original locality records are presented for each species. One species is apparently rare and confined to montane habitats (C. wiedersheimi, another species is relatively common and its habitat is generalist (C. gracilis, and the other three species are vulnerable and limited to specific micro-habitats. Female R. spectrum had clutch sizes of two eggs each and exhibited a prolonged reproductive season with oviposition likely occurring during the late phase of the dry season. Females of both C. cristatus (clutch sizes: 11-14 eggs and C. owenii (clutch sizes: 15-19 eggs have a shorter reproductive season with oviposition occurring most probably at the interphase between the end of the wet season and the onset of the dry season, and female C. gracilis (clutch sizes: 14-23 eggs appeared to exhibit two distinct oviposition periods (one at the interphase between the end of the wet season and the onset of the dry season, and one at the peak phase of the dry season. Diets of four sympatric species of chameleons consisted almost exclusively of arthropods. There were significant inter-group differences at either intra-specific level (with the females of the two best studied species, i.e. R. spectrum and C. gracilis, having a wider food niche breadth than males or inter-specific level (with a continuum of dietary specialization from the less generalist (C. cristatus to the more generalist (C. gracilis. However, ‘thread-trailing’ experiments indicated that activity patterns of Nigerian chameleons were relatively similar among species. The overall abundance of chameleons (as estimated from the number of specimens observed in the time unit of field effort was relatively similar in three contrasted habitat types, but lizards were more abundant in the mature secondary forest. When greatly altered by massive logging activity, the overall abundance of chameleons in the mature secondary forest habitat declined only slightly, whereas the species diversity declined drastically. This was an effect of (i the simultaneous extinction of three of the four species originally present in the forest plot, and of (ii the rapid increase in abundance of a single species (C. gracilis as a response to habitat alteration. The conservation implications of all these data are also discussed.

  13. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. I. Dactyloidae, Hoplocercidae, Iguanidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae, Tropiduridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A

    2015-07-08

    I present distribution data of all Dactyloidae, Hoplocercidae, Iguanidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae and Tropiduridae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 40 species-level taxa, belonging to 11 genera. This represents four more species-level taxa than previously reported for these families. Data were based on the direct examination of 41,243 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian musea, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (62.5%) are endemic to the Amazonia; non-endemic species are mainly associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia, with a few exceptions. As a whole, seven taxa are widespread in Amazonia, one is restricted to eastern Amazonia, three to western Amazonia, five to northern Amazonia (either in part of it or widespread in the Guiana region), two to northwestern Amazonia, one to southern Amazonia, nine to southwestern Amazonia, and seven to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Five species have unique distributions and five species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism (AE) recognized for other organisms (birds and primates). The first herpetological gazetteer for the Brazilian Amazonia with about 3,600 georeferenced localities was also produced.

  14. Reptilia, Gymnophthalmidae, Micrablepharus maximiliani (Reinhardt and Lutken, 1861: Distribution extension, new state record and geographic distribution map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide records for Micrablepharus maximiliani from state of Minas Gerais and present a map representingits distribution. The record of M. maximiliani from municipality of Resplendor, Minas Gerais, represents a distributionextension of 1,050 km southern from the type locality at the municipality of Maruim, Sergipe. Others 57 new recordsare presented based on specimens housed in several Brazilian and Paraguayan herpetological collections, improving theknowledge on geographic distribution of M. maximiliani in South America.

  15. The snakes of the genus Atractus Wagler (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae) from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, M.; Oliveira, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Taxonomic and natural history data are presented on eight species of Atractus from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil, namely: A. alphonsehogei, A. latifrons, A, major, A. poeppigi, A. schach, A. snethlageae, A. torquatus, and A. trilineatus. Four of these species are recorded for the first

  16. Biology and impacts of Pacific island invasive species. 2. Boiga irregularis, the Brown Tree Snake (Reptilia: Colubridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Gordon H.; Savidge, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    The Brown Tree Snake, Boiga irregularis (Merrem, 1802), was accidentally transported to the island of Guam shortly after World War II. Over the following two decades it spread throughout the island with little public or professional recognition of its extent or impacts. This secretive nocturnal arboreal snake occurs in all habitats on Guam, from grasslands to forests. Under the right conditions, it is capable of high rates of reproduction and population growth. The Brown Tree Snake caused the extirpation of 13 of Guam's 22 native breeding birds and contributed to the extirpation of several species of native bats and lizards. Guam's 12 forest birds were especially impacted, with 10 species eliminated and the other two severely reduced. In addition, the snake continues to substantially impact domestic poultry, pets, the island's electrical power infrastructure, and human health. To protect other vulnerable Pacific islands, the U.S. government annually spends several million dollars inspecting cargo outbound from Guam to exclude Brown Tree Snakes. Cargo destinations most at risk are in Micronesia, especially the Northern Mariana Islands, but Guam also has direct air transportation links to Hawai'i that will soon be supplemented with direct ship traffic. Ultimately, all Pacific islands are at risk but especially those obtaining cargo through Guam. ?? 2007 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma esterases in the tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae (Reptilia, Teiidae): impact of developmental stage, sex, and organophosphorus in vitro exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Agustín; Attademo, Andrés M; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Peltzer, Paola M; Junges, Celina; Cabagna, Mariana C; Fiorenza, Gabriela S; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we determined normal serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities in Tupinambis merianae in order to obtain reference values for organophosphorus pesticide monitoring. Forty-two T. merianae individuals were grouped by sex and size to identify potential differences in their enzyme levels to allow for proper representation of normal values for females, males, juveniles, and hatchlings. Mean CbE was determined using two model substrates: alpha-naphtylacetate (α-NA) and p-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV). BChE and CbE sensitivity to malaoxon (Mx) was also evaluated as well as the possibility of BChE reactivation with pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM). Mean adult females' BChE was significantly higher than adult males, juveniles, and hatchlings. No significant differences were found between groups regarding CbE. CbE (4-NPV) activity showed slightly negative correlation with lizard snout-vent length, while BChE and CbE (α-NA) showed no correlation with body size. Apparent IC(50) values for BChE and CbE (α-NA) suggested different sensitivities among groups. CbE (4-NPV) could not be inhibited. All Mx-inhibited groups treated with 2-PAM in a final concentration of 2.8 mM showed clear signs of reactivation. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that (1) plasma esterase activity did not vary with age and sex, except for BChE activity, and (2) because biological and environmental variables could be confounding factors in the response of plasma cholinesterases, complementary biomarkers like CbE inhibition and oxime-induced reactivation of esterases are strongly recommended.

  18. Structure of the posthepatic septum and its influence on visceral topology in the tegu lizard, Tupinambis merianae (Teiidae: Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Wilfried; Abe, Augusto S; Andrade, Denis V; Perry, Steven F

    2003-11-01

    The posthepatic septum (PHS) divides the body cavity of Tupinambis merianae into two parts: the cranial one containing the lungs and liver and the caudal one containing the remaining viscera. The PHS is composed of layers of collagenous fibers and bundles of smooth muscle, neither of which show systematic orientation, as well as isolated blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and nerves. Striated muscle of the abdominal wall does not invade the PHS. The contractions of the smooth muscles may stabilize the pleurohepatic cavity under conditions of elevated aerobic needs rather than supporting breathing on a breath-by-breath basis. Surgical removal of the PHS changes the anatomical arrangement of the viscera significantly, with stomach and intestine invading the former pleurohepatic cavity and reducing the space for the lungs. Thus, the PHS is essential to maintain the visceral topography in Tupinambis. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. An investigation into the Swan Island Honduras collecting event of Tiaporus fuliginosus Cope (Reptilia: Teiidae) and its systematic status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranie, James R.; Gotte, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Confusion exists in the literature concerning the collecting event of the teiid lizard Tiaporus fuliginosus. We investigated the literature and documents stored at the Smithsonian Institution Archives involving the collector of those specimens in an effort to resolve that confusion. We conclude that the type series was collected on the Swan Islands of Honduras by Charles H. Townsend during 1887. We also provide a redescription of that nominal form and show that it is a valid species that should be called Ameiva fuliginosa. We also examined the type series of A. panchlora from Old Providence, Colombia and confirm that its 1950 placement as a junior synonym of A. fuliginosa is correct.

  20. First record of cannibalism in the Lima leaf-toed gecko, Phyllodactylus sentosus (Reptilia, Phyl-lodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Valdez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cannibalism for the Lima leaf-toed gecko, Phyllodactylus sentosus, in which an adult male devoured a juvenile. No reported cases were found in other species of the same genus, so we consider that this is the first report of cannibalism in Phyllodactylus.

  1. Effects of climate change on niche shifts of Pseudotrapelus dhofarensis and Pseudotrapelus jensvindumi (Reptilia: Agamidae) in Western Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, Iman; Hosseinian Yousefkhani, Seyyed Saeed

    2018-01-01

    Genus Pseudotrapelus has a wide distribution in North Africa and in the Middle East. In the present study, we modeled the habitat suitability of two Omani species of the genus (Pseudotrapelus dhofarensis and Pseudotrapelus jensvindumi) to evaluate the potential effects of climate change on their distribution. Mean diurnal range and precipitation of wettest quarter are the most highly contributed variables for P. jensvindumi and P. dhofarensis, respectively. The potential distribution for P. dhofarensis in the current time covers the southern coastal regions of Oman, Yemen, the Horn of Africa, and Socotra Island, but the suitable regions were reduced in the future prediction and limited to Yemen, Socotra Island, and Oman. There have not been any records of the species outside of Oman. Analysis of habitat suitability for P. jensvindumi indicated that the species is restricted to the Al Hajar Mountain of Oman and the southeast coastal region of Iran, but there are no records of the species from Iran. Because mean diurnal range will not be influenced by climate change in future, the potential distribution of the species is not expected to be changed in 2050. All predicted models were performed with the highest AUC (more than 0.97) using the Maxent method. Investigation to find unknown populations of these two species in Iran, Yemen, and Socotra Island is essential for developing conservation programs in the future.

  2. Life-history and ecological distribution of chameleons (Reptilia, Chamaeleonidae) from the rain forests of Nigeria: conservation implications

    OpenAIRE

    Akani, G. C.; Ogbalu, O. K.; Luiselli, L.

    2001-01-01

    Five species of chameleons were observed in the continuous forest zone of southern Nigeria: Chamaeleo gracilis gracilis Hallowell, 1842, Chamaeleo owenii Gray, 1831, Chamaeleo cristatus Stutchbury, 1837, Chamaeleo wiedersheimi Nieden, 1910, and Rhampholeon spectrum (Bucholz 1874). Many original locality records are presented for each species. One species is apparently rare and confined to montane habitats (C. wiedersheimi), another species is relatively common and its habitat is generalist (C...

  3. First record of Mesoclemmys tuberculata (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae in the Cerrado area of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Lima Silveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoclemmys tuberculata is a turtle species that is distributed in northeastern Brazil, recorded mainly in the Caatinga and at some localities in the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. In this paper we report the first species record in an area of Cerrado of Minas Gerais state, and it is the only known state record in a specific location. During field sampling, a specimen of M. tuberculata was collected in the municipality of João Pinheiro, northwest state, in a Cerrado nuclear area in the São Francisco river basin. The locality of this record is the southern and western limits of M. tuberculata’s known distribution, as well as the most inland locality of species record in the Cerrado biome.

  4. The skull of Chamaeleo nasutus adds more information to the relationship of Chamaeleo with Rhampholeon and Brookesia (Chamaeleonidae, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillenius, D.

    1988-01-01

    The form of the skull of Chamaeleo nasutus, especially the broad, trigonal parietal, is strikingly similar to the skull of Rhampholeon. This supports the hypothesis (Hillenius, 1986) that of all chameleons the group of species around Ch. nasutus is the most closely related to Rhampholeon.

  5. Speciation on the rocks: integrated systematics of the Heteronotia spelea species complex (Gekkota; Reptilia from Western and Central Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitzy Pepper

    Full Text Available The isolated uplands of the Australian arid zone are known to provide mesic refuges in an otherwise xeric landscape, and divergent lineages of largely arid zone taxa have persisted in these regions following the onset of Miocene aridification. Geckos of the genus Heteronotia are one such group, and have been the subject of many genetic studies, including H. spelea, a strongly banded form that occurs in the uplands of the Pilbara and Central Ranges regions of the Australian arid zone. Here we assess the systematics of these geckos based on detailed examination of morphological and genetic variation. The H. spelea species complex is a monophyletic lineage to the exclusion of the H. binoei and H. planiceps species complexes. Within the H. spelea complex, our previous studies based on mtDNA and nine nDNA loci found populations from the Central Ranges to be genetically divergent from Pilbara populations. Here we supplement our published molecular data with additional data gathered from central Australian samples. In the spirit of integrative species delimitation, we combine multi-locus, coalescent-based lineage delimitation with extensive morphological analyses to test species boundaries, and we describe the central populations as a new species, H. fasciolatus sp. nov. In addition, within the Pilbara there is strong genetic evidence for three lineages corresponding to northeastern (type, southern, and a large-bodied melanic population isolated in the northwest. Due to its genetic distinctiveness and extreme morphological divergence from all other Heteronotia, we describe the melanic form as a new species, H. atra sp. nov. The northeastern and southern Pilbara populations are morphologically indistinguishable with the exception of a morpho-type in the southeast that has a banding pattern resembling H. planiceps from the northern monsoonal tropics. Pending more extensive analyses, we therefore treat Pilbara H. spelea as a single species with phylogenetic structure and morphological heterogeneity.

  6. Endogenous development of Hemolivia mauritanica (Apicomplexa: Adeleina: Haemogregarinidae) in the marginated tortoise Testudo marginata (Reptilia: Testudinidae): evidence from experimental infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Kamler, M.; Frye, F. L.; Fictum, P.; Modrý, David

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2007), s. 13-18 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Grant - others:Univerzita veterinárních a farmaceutických věd, Brno(CZ) IGA VFU 2/2004 FVHE; GA ČR(CZ) GP524/03/D104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Apicomplexa * Hemolivia mauritanica * Testudo * merogony * cystogony * tick-born disease * life cycle Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2007

  7. Morphologic caracteristics of cells on the erytrocytic series of the Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802; Reptilia, crocodilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Kindlein Penno

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa objetivou estudar as características anatômicas do pulmão da cutia, particularmente os aspectos relativos a lobação, distribuição dos ramos da artéria pulmonar e sua relação com os brônquios.Para tal utilizaram-se dez conjuntos coração-pulmão, dos quais oito tiveram a artéria pulmonar injetada com látex neoprene corado. Os conjuntos foram fixados em solução de formol a 10% e os ramos arteriais no parênquima pulmonar foram dissecados. Em dois pulmões injetou-se "vinil" corado nas artérias e estes foram submetidos à corrosão no ácido clorídrico a 30%. O pulmão da cutia é dividido externamente por fissuras bastante pronunciadas, separando os lobos pulmonares, tanto à direita quanto à esquerda. O pulmão direito apresenta quatro lobos: cranial, médio, caudal e acessório, e o esquerdo dois lobos: cranial e caudal, sendo o lobo cranial dividido em segmentos cranial e caudal. Do brônquio principal direito derivam os brônquios lobares cranial direito, médio, caudal direito e acessório. O brônquio principal esquerdo origina um pequeno tronco, que emite o brônquio lobar cranial, o qual se bifurca, fornecendo ramos para as porções cranial e caudal do lobo cranial esquerdo, e segue como brônquio lobar caudal esquerdo. A artéria pulmonar direita origina, respectivamente, ramos para os lobos cranial, médio, acessório e caudal, e a esquerda fornece, isoladamente, os ramos ascendente e descendente para os segmentos cranial e caudal do lobo cranial esquerdo, prosseguindo para o lobo caudal. Conclui-se que, no pulmão da cutia, as artérias pulmonares seguem as ramificações bronquiais, caracterizando a segmentação anátomo-cirúrgica broncoarterial.

  8. Historical colonization and dispersal limitation supplement climate and topography in shaping species richness of African lizards (Reptilia: Agaminae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissling, W.D.; Blach-Overgaard, A.; Zwaan, R.E.; Wagner, P.

    2016-01-01

    To what extent deep-time dispersal limitation shapes present-day biodiversity at broad spatial scales remains elusive. Here, we compiled a continental dataset on the distributions of African lizard species in the reptile subfamily Agaminae (a relatively young, Neogene radiation of agamid lizards

  9. Reptilia, Squamata, Amphisbaenia, Amphisbaena cuiabana (Strussmann and Carvalho, 2001: Range extension in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphisbaena cuiabana (Strüssmann and Carvalho, 2001 is reported from three localities in Mato Grosso,Brazil. These new records extend its known distribution on 275 km northwest, 230 km west, 67 km east of its type-locality.We redefine the diagnosis of the species based on these additional specimens.

  10. Out of Arabia: a complex biogeographic history of multiple vicariance and dispersal events in the gecko genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Smíd

    Full Text Available The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2 genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7-7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot.

  11. Abundancia y estructura poblacional de Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae en la laguna Palmasola, Oaxaca, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús García-Grajales

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available La abundancia y estructura poblacional son pará-metros importantes para evaluar y comparar el estatus de conservación de una población a través del tiempo en un área determinada. Este estudio describe la abundancia y estructura poblacional de Crocodylus acutus en la laguna Palmasola, Oaxaca. El trabajo consistió en recorridos nocturnos, entre las 21 y 24h, durante la fase de luna nueva para contabilizar el número de individuos y obtener estimaciones poblacionales. El tamaño poblacional estimado fluctuó de 32.7 a 93 individuos según el modelo utilizado. Las tasas de encuentro registradas fluctuaron de 32 a 109.3 ind/km lineal durante los 40 recorridos efectuados con un tiempo promedio de navegación de 18 minutos. Existió una marcada dominancia de la clase III (subadultos, seguido por la clase II y en menor proporción las clases IV y V, así como aquellos individuos en los que no se pudo determinar el tamaño corporal, en ambas épocas del año. Mientras tanto, los individuos juveniles (Clase II se observaron en mayor proporción asociados al manglar que cubre las orillas del cuerpo de agua (26.1%, los individuos subadultos (Clase III a menudo se observaron sobre el espejo de agua sin vegetación flotante (22.7% y entre el manglar que cubre las orillas del cuerpo de agua (15.7%, mientras que los ejemplares adultos se observaron con mayor frecuencia sobre el espejo de agua sin vegetación flotante (9.7%. Con la presente información se contribuye al conocimiento de la ecología poblacional de C. acutus en la laguna Palmasola donde el tamaño poblacional estimado parece mostrar valores altos con respecto a lo reportado en otros estados de la República Mexicana.

  12. On the generic names Gonydactylus Kuhl & van Hasselt, 1822, Goniodactylus Schlegel, 1826, and Gonyodactylus Wagler, 1830 (Reptilia: Sauria: Gekkonidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Instead of straightening it out, Kluge (1985) has added some twists to the tortuous history of the name Gonydactylus Kuhl & van Hasselt. In this paper, an attempt is made to present the case more clearly. Contrary to Kluge's conclusion, the name does not affect current nomenclature.

  13. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae) in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillaume, Barbara; Valette, Victorien; Lepais, Olivier; Grandjean, Frédéric; Breuil, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana) in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact of interspecific hybridization on the decline of I. delicatissima. 59 I. delicatissima (5 localities), 47 I. iguana (12 localities) and 27 hybrids (5 localities), who were all identified based on morphological characters, have been genotyped at 15 microsatellites markers. We also sequenced hybrids using ND4 mitochondrial loci to further investigate mitochondrial introgression. The genetic clustering of species and hybrid genetic assignment were performed using a comparative approach, through the implementation of a Discriminant Analysis of Principal Component (DAPC) based on statistics, as well as genetic clustering approaches based on the genetic models of several populations (Structure, NewHybrids and HIest), in order to get full characterization of hybridization patterns and introgression dynamics across the islands. The iguanas identified as hybrids in the wild, thanks to morphological analysis, were all genetically F1, F2, or backcrosses. A high proportion of individuals were also the result of a longer-term admixture. The absence of reproductive barriers between species leads to hybridization when species are in contact. Yet morphological and behavioral differences between species could explain why males I. iguana may dominate I. delicatissima, thus resulting in short-term species displacement and extinction by hybridization and recurrent introgression from I. iguana toward I. delicatissima. As a consequence, I. delicatissima gets eliminated through introgression, as observed in recent population history over several islands. These results have profound implications for species management of the endangered I. delicatissima and practical conservation recommendations are being discussed in the light of these findings.

  14. Genetic evidence of hybridization between the endangered native species Iguana delicatissima and the invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae) in the Lesser Antilles: management Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Vuillaume, Barbara; Valette, Victorien; Lepais, Olivier; Grandjean, Frederic; Breuil, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana) in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact ...

  15. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae) in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillaume, Barbara; Valette, Victorien; Lepais, Olivier; Grandjean, Frédéric; Breuil, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana) in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact of interspecific hybridization on the decline of I. delicatissima. 59 I. delicatissima (5 localities), 47 I. iguana (12 localities) and 27 hybrids (5 localities), who were all identified based on morphological characters, have been genotyped at 15 microsatellites markers. We also sequenced hybrids using ND4 mitochondrial loci to further investigate mitochondrial introgression. The genetic clustering of species and hybrid genetic assignment were performed using a comparative approach, through the implementation of a Discriminant Analysis of Principal Component (DAPC) based on statistics, as well as genetic clustering approaches based on the genetic models of several populations (Structure, NewHybrids and HIest), in order to get full characterization of hybridization patterns and introgression dynamics across the islands. The iguanas identified as hybrids in the wild, thanks to morphological analysis, were all genetically F1, F2, or backcrosses. A high proportion of individuals were also the result of a longer-term admixture. The absence of reproductive barriers between species leads to hybridization when species are in contact. Yet morphological and behavioral differences between species could explain why males I. iguana may dominate I. delicatissima, thus resulting in short-term species displacement and extinction by hybridization and recurrent introgression from I. iguana toward I. delicatissima. As a consequence, I. delicatissima gets eliminated through introgression, as observed in recent population history over several islands. These results have profound implications for species management of the endangered I. delicatissima and practical conservation recommendations are being discussed in the light of these findings. PMID:26046351

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of the red-spotted tokay gecko (Gekko gecko, Reptilia: Gekkonidae): comparison of red- and black-spotted tokay geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin-Min; Qian, Fang; Zeng, De-Long; Liu, Xiao-Can; Li, Hui-Min

    2011-10-01

    Here, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the red-spotted tokay gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae). The genome is 16,590 bp in size. Its gene arrangement pattern was identical with that of black-spotted tokay gecko. We compared the mitochondrial genome of red-spotted tokay gecko with that of the black-spotted tokay gecko. Nucleotide sequence of the two whole mitochondrial genomes was 97.99% similar, and the relatively high similarity seems to indicate that they may be separated at the subspecies level. The information of mitochondrial genome comparison of the two morphological types of tokay gecko is discussed in detail.

  17. Proterodiplostome Parasites (Digenea, Proterodiplostomidae of the Caiman, Caiman crocodilus yacare (Reptilia, Crocodylia in the Pantanal mato-Grossense, Brazil, with the description of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B. Catto

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species are described from the caiman. Caiman crocodilus yacare. Proterodiplostomum breve n. sp. differs from all other species in the genus by the following chacacteristics: (1 the paraprostate gland is shorter and club-shaped; (2 the genital cone is, in average, eight times longer than that of P. medusae; (3 the genital atrium is larger and without pseudosuckers; (4 the oral sucker and pharynx are longer; and (5 there are larger numbers of papillae surrounding the tribocytic organ (40 against 20 in P. longum, 16 in p. tumidilum, 8 in P. ophidum, and 16-18 in P. medusae. Proterodiplostomum globulare n. sp. differs from all the other species in the fenus by the following characteristics: (1 from P. tumidilum, P. lomgum, P. medusae, and P. breve n. sp. for the absense of pseudosuckers or muscular bunches in the inferior wall of the genital atrium; (2 the shape of the paraprostate gland, which is globular and not cylindrical as in P. longum, P. tumidilum, P. medusae, and P. ophidum; (3 the size of the tribocytic organ 201-407 long, 183-495 wide, while is 138-270 long, 102-292 wide in P. medusae, and 138-270 long, 255 wide in P. ophidum; (4 the number of papillae in the tribocytic organ (18-20 in P. globulare and 16-18 in P. medusae, and 8 in P. ophidum. Specimens belonging to six other species of proterodiplostomes are recorded for the first time infecting the caiman, C. c. yacare in the Pantanal Mato-grossense, Brazil, namely: Proterodiplostomum medusae, P. tumidilum, Cystodiplostomum hollyi, Prolecithodiplostomum constrictum, Paradiplostomum abbreviatum, and Herpetodiplostomum caimancola.

  18. Establishing a New Species Encephalitozoon pogonae for the Microsporidian Parasite of Inland Bearded Dragon Pogona vitticeps Ahl 1927 (Reptilia, Squamata, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Yuliya Y; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Paulsen, Daniel B

    2016-07-01

    The microsporidium parasitizing Inland Bearded Dragons Pogona vitticeps, and developing primarily in macrophages within foci of granulomatous inflammation of different organs, is described as a new species Encephalitozoon pogonae. Establishing the new species was based on sequencing the ITS-SSUrDNA region of the ribosomal gene and consequent SSUrDNA-inferred phylogenetic analyses, as well as on comparison of pathogenesis, host specificity, and ultrastructure among Encephalitozoon species and isolates. The new species is closely related to E. lacertae and E. cuniculi. Analysis of the literature suggests that this microsporidium has been reported previously as an unidentified microsporidian species or isolate of E. cuniculi and may represent a common infection in bearded dragons. All stages of E. pogonae develop in parasitophorous vacuoles. Uninucleate spores on methanol-fixed smears measured 2.1 × 1.1 μm, range 1.7-2.6 × 0.9-1.7 μm; on ultrathin sections spores measured 0.8-1.1 × 1.8-2.2 μm. Ultrastructural study revealed 3-6 polar filament coils, a mushroom-shaped polar disk, and a polar sac embracing half of the volume occupied by the lamellar polaroplast. In activated spores, polar filament everted eccentrically. The overall morphology and intracellular development of E. pogonae were similar to other Encepahalitozoon spp. We also review the existing data on microsporidia infecting reptiles. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  19. Road kills of the endemic snake Perrotet’s Shieldtail Plectrurus perrotetii, Dumeril, 1851 (Reptilia: Squamata: Uropeltidae in Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Santhoshkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven road killed specimens of Plectrurus perrotetii were recorded in Emerald and its surrounding areas in the Nilgiris. Among the road kills, fourteen of them were females, seven were males and six are juveniles. Among the road kill female specimens of this species, it was observed that seven were gravid with fully developed young. Three to six developing young ones were observed

  20. Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.

  1. DISTRIBUCIÓN POTENCIAL DE Podocnemis lewyana (REPTILIA:PODOCNEMIDIDAE Y SU POSIBLE FLUCTUACIÓN BAJO ESCENARIOS DE CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO GLOBAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ortiz-Yusty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se implementó el modelaje de distribución de especies para establecer el rango de distribución potencial de Podocnemis lewyana, explorar los componentes del clima que pueden influenciar dicha distribución y evaluar posibles fluctuaciones de su distribución bajo escenarios de clima futuro. Los modelos obtenidos predicen una distribución continua de sur a norte por todo el río Magdalena, desde los municipios de Rivera y Palermo en el departamento de Huila, hasta los departamentos de Atlántico y Magdalena en el norte. La temperatura fue el elemento del clima que más influyó en la distribución de P. lewyana; esta especie tiende a estar presente en climas cálidos y con poca variabilidad en la temperatura. El modelo de distribución transferido a los escenarios de clima futuro predicen un aumento en el rango geográfico de P. lewyana. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta las preferencias de hábitat de esta especie y su fuerte asociación con los cuerpos de agua, este resultado debe tomarse con cautela, dado que el modelo solo tuvo en cuenta variables climáticas terrestres. Dadas las características de historia de vida de esta especie (presencia de determinación sexual dependiente de la temperatura, alta temperatura pivotal y un rango de transición de temperatura muy estrecho, y el efecto negativo de los cambios en los regímenes hidrológicos en la mortalidad embrionaria, la expansión del área potencial de P. lewyana en el futuro no significa que esta especie no vaya a verse afectada por el cambio climático global.

  2. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vuillaume

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact of interspecific hybridization on the decline of I. delicatissima. 59 I. delicatissima (5 localities, 47 I. iguana (12 localities and 27 hybrids (5 localities, who were all identified based on morphological characters, have been genotyped at 15 microsatellites markers. We also sequenced hybrids using ND4 mitochondrial loci to further investigate mitochondrial introgression. The genetic clustering of species and hybrid genetic assignment were performed using a comparative approach, through the implementation of a Discriminant Analysis of Principal Component (DAPC based on statistics, as well as genetic clustering approaches based on the genetic models of several populations (Structure, NewHybrids and HIest, in order to get full characterization of hybridization patterns and introgression dynamics across the islands. The iguanas identified as hybrids in the wild, thanks to morphological analysis, were all genetically F1, F2, or backcrosses. A high proportion of individuals were also the result of a longer-term admixture. The absence of reproductive barriers between species leads to hybridization when species are in contact. Yet morphological and behavioral differences between species could explain why males I. iguana may dominate I. delicatissima, thus resulting in short-term species displacement and extinction by hybridization and recurrent introgression from I. iguana toward I. delicatissima. As a consequence, I. delicatissima gets eliminated through introgression, as observed in recent population history over several islands. These results have profound implications for species management of the endangered I. delicatissima and practical conservation recommendations are being discussed in the light of these findings.

  3. Anatomy of the Enigmatic Reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Germany and Its Relevance for the Origin of Sauria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Gabriela; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Müller, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The holotype and only known specimen of the enigmatic small reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 from the Upper Triassic (Norian) Arnstadt Formation of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) is redescribed using μCT scans of the material. This re-examination revealed new information on the morphology of this taxon, including previously unknown parts of the skeleton such as the palate, braincase, and shoulder girdle. Elachistosuchus is diagnosed especially by the presence of the posterolateral process of the frontal, the extension of the maxillary tooth row to the posterior margin of the orbit, the free posterior process of the jugal, and the notched anterior margin of the interclavicle. Phylogenetic analyses using two recently published character-taxon matrices recovered conflicting results for the phylogenetic position of Elachistosuchus-either as an archosauromorph, as a lepidosauromorph or as a more basal, non-saurian diapsid. These different placements highlight the need of a thorough revision of critical taxa and new character sets used for inferring neodiapsid relationships.

  4. The ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the lizard Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Squamata, Iguanidae) and the variability of sperm morphology among iguanian lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Gustavo H C; Colli, Guarino R; Báo, Sônia N

    2004-01-01

    The spermatozoon of Iguana iguana is filiform and resembles that of other iguanian lizards, being most similar to Tropidurus. All sperm synapomorphies of Tetrapoda, Amniota and Squamata are present in the sperm of Iguana iguana. By reconstructing the evolution of 30 sperm characters we identified a novel synapomorphy of Iguania: the presence of a well-developed acrosomal ridge at the level of the epinuclear lucent zone. Because of the poor topological resolution among iguanian clades we could not discount the possibility of convergence or neutral selection as determinant of the variability in characteristics of the sperm cell. In agreement with previous studies, we identified heterogeneous rates of evolution among the three main regions of the sperm cell, namely the head, midpiece and tail. PMID:15198687

  5. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of ethnoecological tools to evaluate possible damage and loss of biodiversity related to the populations of species under some degree of threat may represent a first step towards integrating the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen’s ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch in Ilhéus, Southern Bahia, Brazil. Methods Fishermen experts semi-structured interviews were performed using snowball sampling method. The interviews consisted of a series of questions relating to the fishermen’s profile, structure and work equipment, the local ecological knowledge of fishermen about sea turtles and bycatch, a projective test, attitudes towards turtle conservation and beliefs and taboos regarding turtles. Indicators for quantitative comparisons of respondents in terms of their broad knowledge and attitudes towards turtle conservation were created. Correlation analyses were made between indicators of knowledge and attitude as well as the relationship between education level and knowledge and attitudes. Results Thirty experts were interviewed for the study. The local ecological knowledge and attitudes of fishermen towards the conservation of sea turtles were respectively medium (0.43) and moderate (0.69) according to experts (based on Likert scale and Cronbach’s Alpha). Potential areas of spawning were reported from Barra Grande to Una covering the entire coast of Ilhéus. Methods for identifying the animal, behavior, and popular names were described by fishermen. The most recent captures of turtles were attributed to fishing line, but according to the respondents, lobster nets and shrimp traps are more likely to capture turtles. Knowledge and attitudes were weakly inversely correlated (r = −0.38, p = 0.04), and the education level of the respondent showed a positive correlation with positive attitudes towards turtle conservation (H = 8.33; p = 0.04). Life history, habitat, specific and exogenous taboos, beliefs and the use of hawksbill turtle to make glasses and other handcrafts are also reported in the study. Conclusions Monitoring of spawning areas, preservation of traditional practices, strategies to moderate the use of fishery resources and the local ecological knowledge/attitudes can provide data to improve the conservation practices and management of sea turtles. PMID:23448503

  6. Molecular and morphological differentiation of Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus, with the description of a new subspecies from Iran (Reptilia, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, Evgeniya N; Dunayev, Evgeniy N; Nazarov, Roman A; Mehdi Radjabizadeh; Poyarkov, Nikolay A

    2018-01-01

    The morphological and genetic variation of a wide-ranging Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus that inhabits sand deserts of south-eastern Europe, Middle East, Middle Asia, and western China is reviewed. Based on the morphological differences and high divergence in COI (mtDNA) gene sequences a new subspecies of Ph. mystaceus is described from Khorasan Razavi Province in Iran. Partial sequences of COI mtDNA gene of 31 specimens of Ph. mystaceus from 17 localities from all major parts of species range were analyzed. Genetic distances show a deep divergence between Ph. mystaceus khorasanus ssp. n. from Khorasan Razavi Province and all other populations of Ph. mystaceus . The new subspecies can be distinguished from other populations of Ph. mystaceus by a combination of several morphological features. Molecular and morphological analyses do not support the validity of other Ph. mystaceus subspecies described from Middle Asia and Caspian basin. Geographic variations in the Ph. mystaceus species complex and the status of previously described subspecies were discussed.

  7. Redescription of Cyrtodactylus fumosus (Müller, 1895 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae, with a revised identification key to the bent-toed geckos of Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Mecke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The binominal Cyrtodactylus fumosus has frequently been used for populations of bent-toed geckos occurring on some Indonesian islands, including Java, Bali, Sulawesi, and Halmahera. Unfortunately, incorrect usage of this name for different geographic lineages has resulted in confusion about the true identity of C. fumosus. Examination of the type specimen and additional specimens from Rurukan and Mount Masarang, North Sulawesi Province, Indonesia, revealed that this population is distinct from other forms heretofore called ‘fumosus’ by a combination of unique morphological characters. In order to stabilize the taxonomy of C. fumosus sensu stricto, and to prevent further confusion, we provide a comprehensive redescription of this species, whose distribution we herein restrict to North Sulawesi. Cyrtodactylus fumosus is one of the most distinctive species among the six bent-toed geckos recorded from Sulawesi, and it differs from Sulawesi congeners by the presence of (1 precloacofemoral scales, including three pore-bearing scales on each thigh, separated from 10 or 11 pore-bearing scales in the precloacal region by 9-11 interscales in males, (2 a precloacal groove in adult males, (3 flat dorsal tubercles in 4-7 irregularly arranged longitudinal rows at midbody, and (4 a distinct lateral fold lacking tubercles. We also provide a revised identification key to the bent-toed gecko species of Sulawesi.

  8. Molecular and morphological differentiation of Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus, with the description of a new subspecies from Iran (Reptilia, Agamidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya N. Solovyeva

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The morphological and genetic variation of a wide-ranging Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus that inhabits sand deserts of south-eastern Europe, Middle East, Middle Asia, and western China is reviewed. Based on the morphological differences and high divergence in COI (mtDNA gene sequences a new subspecies of Ph. mystaceus is described from Khorasan Razavi Province in Iran. Partial sequences of COI mtDNA gene of 31 specimens of Ph. mystaceus from 17 localities from all major parts of species range were analyzed. Genetic distances show a deep divergence between Ph. mystaceus khorasanus ssp. n. from Khorasan Razavi Province and all other populations of Ph. mystaceus. The new subspecies can be distinguished from other populations of Ph. mystaceus by a combination of several morphological features. Molecular and morphological analyses do not support the validity of other Ph. mystaceus subspecies described from Middle Asia and Caspian basin. Geographic variations in the Ph. mystaceus species complex and the status of previously described subspecies were discussed.

  9. Molecular and morphological differentiation of Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus, with the description of a new subspecies from Iran (Reptilia, Agamidae)

    OpenAIRE

    N. Solovyeva, Evgeniya; N. Dunayev, Evgeniy; A. Nazarov, Roman; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Poyarkov Jr., Nikolay A.

    2018-01-01

    The morphological and genetic variation of a wide-ranging Secret Toad-headed agama, Phrynocephalus mystaceus that inhabits sand deserts of south-eastern Europe, Middle East, Middle Asia, and western China is reviewed. Based on the morphological differences and high divergence in COI (mtDNA) gene sequences a new subspecies of Ph. mystaceus is described from Khorasan Razavi Province in Iran. Partial sequences of COI mtDNA gene of 31 specimens of Ph. mystaceus from 17 localities from all major p...

  10. Description and phylogenetic relationships of a new genus and two new species of lizards from Brazilian Amazonia, with nomenclatural comments on the taxonomy of Gymnophthalmidae (Reptilia: Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Guarino R; Hoogmoed, Marinus S; Cannatella, David C; Cassimiro, José; Gomes, Jerriane Oliveira; Ghellere, José Mário; Gomes, Jerriane Oliveira; Ghellere, José Mário; Nunes, Pedro M Sales; Pellegrino, Kátia C M; Salerno, Patricia; Souza, Sergio Marques De; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut

    2015-08-18

    We describe a new genus and two new species of gymnophthalmid lizards based on specimens collected from Brazilian Amazonia, mostly in the "arc of deforestation". The new genus is easily distinguished from other Gymnophthalmidae by having very wide, smooth, and imbricate nuchals, arranged in two longitudinal and 6-10 transverse rows from nape to brachium level, followed by much narrower, strongly keeled, lanceolate, and mucronate scales. It also differs from all other Gymnophthalmidae, except Iphisa, by the presence of two longitudinal rows of ventrals. The new genus differs from Iphisa by having two pairs of enlarged chinshields (one in Iphisa); posterior dorsal scales lanceolate, strongly keeled and not arranged in longitudinal rows (dorsals broad, smooth and forming two longitudinal rows), and lateral scales keeled (smooth). Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses based on morphological and molecular data indicate the new species form a clade that is most closely related to Iphisa. We also address several nomenclatural issues and present a revised classification of Gymnophthalmidae.

  11. Microanatomical and histological features in the long bones of Mosasaurine mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata)--implications for aquatic adaptation and growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Lindgren, Johan; Pellegrini, Rodrigo; Lee, Andrew H; Germain, Damien; Polcyn, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy) and tissue types and characteristics (histology) of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone) and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine skeletal elements supports the evolutionary convergence between this lineage of secondarily aquatically adapted squamates and cetaceans in the ecological transition from a coastal to a pelagic lifestyle.

  12. FOSSIL VERTEBRATES (MAMMALIA AND REPTILIA FROM CAPO MANNU (LATE PLIOCENE, WESTERN SARDINIA, ITALY, WITH DESCRIPTION OF A NEWTESTUDO (CHELONII, TESTUDINIDAE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAURA ABBAZZI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the North-West Sinis Peninsula (Western Sardinia a stratigraphic sequence, the Capo Mannu Fm., that evolves from marine-littoral to continental-dunar, is present. A vertebrate fauna is reported within the middle part of this coastal dune complex. These new remains, here referred to as the Capo Mannu D4 Local Fauna, are slightly younger in the sedimentary succession than the Local Fauna known in the literature as Mandriola and here re-named the Capo Mannu D1 Local Fauna.Vertebrates from Capo Mannu D4 include reptiles (Chelonii and mammals (Bovidae and Suidae. The tortoise fossils show peculiarities of shape that require the naming of a new species. The suid material includes a fragmentary palate and a partial mandible, referable to the endemic species Sus sondaari. Bovids are well represented in the assemblage, although quite fragmentary. They have been identified as belonging to at least two forms. One of these is comparable in morphology to Nesogoral, one of the most characteristic taxa of the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene Sardinian endemic fauna (the so called "Nesogoral complex". On the whole, the Capo Mannu D4 assemblages open a new window on the Plio-Pleistocene terrestrial faunas of the Sardinian Island. 

  13. Microanatomical and histological features in the long bones of Mosasaurine mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata--implications for aquatic adaptation and growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Houssaye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy and tissue types and characteristics (histology of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine skeletal elements supports the evolutionary convergence between this lineage of secondarily aquatically adapted squamates and cetaceans in the ecological transition from a coastal to a pelagic lifestyle.

  14. NEW FOSSIL VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM SAN GIOVANNI DI SINIS (LATE PLEISTOCENE, SARDINIA: THE LAST MAUREMYS (REPTILIA, TESTUDINES IN THE CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCESCO CHESI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available New fossil vertebrates from the most representative Upper Pleistocene section (Tyrrhenian, MIS 5e of the outcrop of San Giovanni di Sinis (Oristano, Sardinia are here reported and described. The fossils, although scarce and fragmentary, document the occurrence of a terrapin (Mauremys sp. and the endemic Sardinian deer (Praemegaceros cazioti. Significant is the occurrence of the terrapin because it is the youngest representative of the genus in the central Mediterranean area where it is extinct at present. The Late Pleistocene extinction of Mauremys in Italy follows the same pattern of other Mediterranean reptiles, in being in some cases delayed on the islands. A comparison of the modern range of Mauremys and that of the pond turtle, Emys, as well as of their past ranges as evidenced by the fossil record, might suggest that some sort of thermophily (at least during pre-hatching stages characterized the former taxon and is responsible for its past and present distribution. SHORT NOTE

  15. On two new species of Pseudogonatodes Ruthven, 1915 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae), with remarks on the distribution of some other sphaerodactyl lizards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila-Pires, T.C.S.; Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Two new species of Pseudogonatodes Ruthven, 1915, are described, one from the Rio Juruá Basin, in the state of Acre, Brazil (Amazonian rainforest), the other from Rancho Grande, in the state Aragua, Venezuela (cloud forest). Both have granular dorsals and relatively numerous fourth toe lamellae, of

  16. Cryptic diversity in Ptyodactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae from the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates uncovered by an integrative taxonomic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Simó-Riudalbas

    Full Text Available The Hajar Mountains of south-eastern Arabia form an isolated massif surrounded by the sea to the east and by a large desert to the west. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals. With 19 species restricted to the Hajar Mountains, reptiles are the vertebrate group with the highest level of endemicity, becoming an excellent model for understanding the patterns and processes that generate and shape diversity in this arid mountain range. The geckos of the Ptyodactylus hasselquistii species complex are the largest geckos in Arabia and are found widely distributed across the Arabian Mountains, constituting a very important component of the reptile mountain fauna. Preliminary analyses suggested that their diversity in the Hajar Mountains may be higher than expected and that their systematics should be revised. In order to tackle these questions, we inferred a nearly complete calibrated phylogeny of the genus Ptyodactylus to identify the origin of the Hajar Mountains lineages using information from two mitochondrial and four nuclear genes. Genetic variability within the Hajar Mountains was further investigated using 68 specimens of Ptyodactylus from 46 localities distributed across the entire mountain range and sequenced for the same genes as above. The molecular phylogenies and morphological analyses as well as niche comparisons indicate the presence of two very old sister cryptic species living in allopatry: one restricted to the extreme northern Hajar Mountains and described as a new species herein; the other distributed across the rest of the Hajar Mountains that can be confidently assigned to the species P. orlovi. Similar to recent findings in the geckos of the genus Asaccus, the results of the present study uncover more hidden diversity in the northern Hajar Mountains and stress once again the importance of this unique mountain range as a hot spot of biodiversity and a priority focal point for reptile conservation in Arabia.

  17. Tangled skeins: a first report of non-captive mating behavior in the Southeast Asian Paradise Flying Snake (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae: Chrysopelea paradisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich Kaiser

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the courtship behavior of the Paradise Flying Snake, Chrysopelea paradisi, from a series of images taken near Sandakan, eastern Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia. During the episode observed, four males moved together with a female in various states of entanglement, traveling at ground level and into a series of bushes.  The observations took place over the course of a 30-min period until the snakes were lost to view.  Our report is the first direct observation of mating behavior in C. paradisi in the wild and provides another rare glimpse of the multi-male courtship in Southeast Asian colubrids. 

  18. Anatomy of the Enigmatic Reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 (Reptilia: Diapsida from the Upper Triassic of Germany and Its Relevance for the Origin of Sauria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Sobral

    Full Text Available The holotype and only known specimen of the enigmatic small reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 from the Upper Triassic (Norian Arnstadt Formation of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany is redescribed using μCT scans of the material. This re-examination revealed new information on the morphology of this taxon, including previously unknown parts of the skeleton such as the palate, braincase, and shoulder girdle. Elachistosuchus is diagnosed especially by the presence of the posterolateral process of the frontal, the extension of the maxillary tooth row to the posterior margin of the orbit, the free posterior process of the jugal, and the notched anterior margin of the interclavicle. Phylogenetic analyses using two recently published character-taxon matrices recovered conflicting results for the phylogenetic position of Elachistosuchus-either as an archosauromorph, as a lepidosauromorph or as a more basal, non-saurian diapsid. These different placements highlight the need of a thorough revision of critical taxa and new character sets used for inferring neodiapsid relationships.

  19. Parallel gigantism and complex colonization patterns in the Cape Verde scincid lizards Mabuya and Macroscincus (Reptilia: Scincidae) revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N; Mateo, J A; López-Jurado, L F

    2001-08-07

    The scincid lizards of the Cape Verde islands comprise the extinct endemic giant Macroscincus coctei and at least five species of Mabuya, one of which, Mabuya vaillanti, also had populations with large body size. Phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase I and 12S rRNA genes (711, 498 and 378 base pairs (bp), respectively) corroborates morphological evidence that these species constitute a clade and that Macroscincus is unrelated to very large skinks in other areas. The relationships are ((M. vaillanti and Mabuya delalandii) (Mabuya spinalis and Macroscincus coctei (Mabuya fogoensis nicolauensis (Mabuya fogoensis antaoensis and Mabuya stangeri)))). The Cape Verde archipelago was colonized from West Africa, probably in the Late Miocene or Early Pliocene period. The north-eastern islands were probably occupied first, after which the ancestor of M. vaillanti and M. delalandii may have originated on Boavista, the ancestor of the latter species arriving on Santiago or Fogo later. The M. fogoensis--M. stangeri clade colonized the islands of Branco, Razo, Santa Luzia and São Vicente from São Nicolau and reached Santo Antão after this. Colonization of these northeastern islands was slow, perhaps because the recipient islands had not developed earlier or because colonization cut across the path of the Canary Current and the Northeast Trade Winds, the main dispersing agents in the region. Rapid extension of range into the southwestern islands occurred later in M. spinalis and then in M. vaillanti and M. delalandii. The long apparent delay between the origin of these species and their southwestern dispersal may have been because there were earlier colonizations of the southern islands which excluded later ones until the earlier inhabitants were exterminated by volcanic or climatic events. The evolution of large size in Macroscincus occurred in the northwestern islands and was paralleled in the eastern and southern islands by populations of M. vaillanti. Both cases of size increase in Cape Verde skinks were accompanied by the development of herbivory.

  20. Skull osteology of the Eocene amphisbaenian Spathorhynchus fossorium (Reptilia, Squamata) suggests convergent evolution and reversals of fossorial adaptations in worm lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Johannes; Hipsley, Christy A; Maisano, Jessica A

    2016-11-01

    The fossorial amphisbaenians, or worm lizards, are characterized by a suite of specialized characters in the skull and postcranium, however fossil evidence suggests that at least some of these shared derived traits evolved convergently. Unfortunately the lack of detailed knowledge of many fossil taxa has rendered a more precise interpretation difficult. Here we describe the cranial anatomy of the oldest-known well-preserved amphisbaenian, Spathorhynchus fossorium, from the Eocene Green River Formation, Wyoming, USA, using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT). This taxon possesses one of the most strongly reinforced crania known among amphisbaenians, with many dermal bones overlapping each other internally. In contrast to modern taxa, S. fossorium has a paired orbitosphenoid, lacks a true compound bone in the mandible, and possesses a fully enclosed orbital rim. The last feature represents a highly derived structure in that the jugal establishes contact with the frontal internally, reinforcing the posterior orbital margin. S. fossorium also possesses a strongly modified Vidian canal with a previously unknown connection to the ventral surface of the parabasisphenoid. Comparison with the closely related fossil taxon Dyticonastis rensbergeri reveals that these derived traits are also shared by the latter species and potentially represent synapopmorphies of an extinct Paleogene clade of amphisbaenians. The presence of a reinforced orbital rim suggests selection against the loss of a functional eye and indicates an ecology potentially different from modern taxa. Given the currently accepted phylogenetic position of Spathorhynchus and Dyticonastis, we predict that supposedly 'unique' cranial traits traditionally linked to fossoriality such as a fused orbitosphenoid and the reduction of the eye show a more complex character history than previously assumed, including both parallel evolution and reversals to superficially primitive conditions. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  1. Aspectos morfológicos e citoquímicos dos glóbulos sangüíneos de Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802 (Reptilia, Crocodilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Leal de Moura

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 10 jacarés Caiman crocodilus yacare, colhendo-se 5 ml do sangue periférico de cada animal. A análise morfológica foi realizada após coloração por Leishman. Para estudo citoquímico, empregaram-se os métodos do PAS, do Sudan black B, da o-toluidina e do azul de bromofenol. Foram identificados 7 tipos celulares: eritrócitos, trombócitos, heterófilos, eosinófilos, basófilos, linfócitos e monócitos azurófilos. Os eritrócitos nucleados apresentam formato elíptico com atividade mitótica e positividade citoplasmática para o azul de bromofenol. Os trombócitos são de formato elíptico, com citoplasma abundante nos pólos, contendo grânulos de glicogênio e núcleo com sulcos profundos. Heterófilos, grosseiramente esféricos, mostram núcleo esférico excêntrico e citoplasma repleto de grânulos corados em salmão, de formato fusiforme, em baqueta, oval ou esférico. A citoquímica nestas células revelou a presença de glicogênio, grânulos citoplasmáticos positivos para azul de bromofenol e parcialmente sudanófilos e positivos para mieloperoxidase. Eosinófilos mostram-se esféricos com núcleo lenticular excêntrico e citoplasma com grânulos esféricos ou ovais róseos positivos para Sudan e mieloperoxidase, porém fracamente para o azul de bromofenol. Basófilos apresentam formato esférico, de tamanho menor em relação aos demais granulócitos, núcleo esférico central e citoplasma com poucos grânulos fortemente basófilos. Linfócitos mostram-se polimórficos com núcleo de formato irregular, citoplasma escasso com projeções e grânulos azurófilos. Monócito azurófilo, de formato esférico, núcleo excêntrico e citoplasma basófilo contendo grânulos azurófilos abundantes.

  2. A study on the Gut contents of six Leathery Turtles Dermochelys Coriacea (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Testudines: Dermochelyidae) from British waters and from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den J.C.; Nierop, van M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopical investigations of the gut contents of six individuals of Dermochelys coriacea from southern England and the North Sea revealed the presence in all of these of numerous nematocysts, mainly scyphozoan. Only six species of Scyphozoa occur in British shallow waters and in the North Sea,

  3. Nematode assemblages of some insular and continental lizard hosts of the genus Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae along the eastern Brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frederico D. Rocha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nematode assemblages associated to three species of lizards of the genus Mabuya Fitzinger, 1826 [M. agilis (Raddi, 1823, M. caissara Rebouças-spieker, 1974 and M. macrorhyncha Hoge, 1946] from three mainland sites and three island sites along the eastern Brazilian coast were analyzed. A total of six nematode species were recorded, with total nematode richness varying from one to four and overall nematode prevalences varying from 6.7% to 90.5% among host populations. Number of nematode species per host individual (including all hosts, infected and uninfected varied among host populations from 0.07 to 1.05, but most infected lizards in all six host populations harbored a single nematode species. Both insular and continental populations of Mabuya spp. exhibited generally poor nematode assemblages, and no clear tendency for insular host populations to have more depauperate nematode faunas and/or lower infection rates compared to mainland ones (or vice versa was evident on the basis of the present data.

  4. Long-term occurrence of Hemolivia cf. mauretanica (Apicomplexa: Adeleina: Haemogregarinidae) in captive Testudo marginata (Reptilia: Testudinidae): evidence for cyclic merogony?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Kamler, M.; Modrý, David

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 6 (2004), s. 1391-1393 ISSN 0022-3395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Apicomplexa * Adeleina * Haemogregarinidae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.439, year: 2004

  5. Reptilia, Squamata, Iguanidae, Anolis heterodermus Duméril, 1851: Distribution extension, first record for Ecuador and notes on color variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Carvajal, O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first record of A. heterodermus for Ecuador based on four specimens from Chilmá Bajo, province ofCarchi, ca. 120 km NE from the nearest record (departamento Putumayo, municipio de Santiago, Colombia reported in theliterature. Two additional records for Ecuador are listed in the Herpnet database, from specimens deposited at the CarnegieMuseum of Natural History and collected 18 km SE from Maldonado (ca. 8 km NW from Chilmá Bajo. We also presentinformation about color variation in the recently collected specimens.

  6. A replacement name for Sphenomorphus keiensis (Kopstein, 1926) from the southeastern Moluccas, Indonesia (Reptilia: Squamata: Scincidae) with a redescription of the species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shea, G.M.; Michels, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Lygosoma keiensis Kopstein, 1926 is demonstrated to be a junior primary homonym of Lygosoma cyanogaster keiensis Sternfeld, 1918. The junior homonym, now placed in Sphenomorphus, is given the replacement name S. capitolythos, and redescribed from the holotype, the only known specimen.

  7. Homonota fasciata Duméril y Bibron, 1839 (Reptilia, Squamata, Phyllodactylidae. Primer registro para la provincia de Corrientes (República Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcione, Camila

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Homonota fasciata Duméril & Bibron, 1839. República Argentina, Provincia de Corrientes, Departamento Bella Vista, Cuarta Sección, Colonia Progreso, Loma Sur, Toropí (28°35'55" S; 59°03'38" W (Figura 1. Colectores: Eduardo Etchepare, María del Rosario Ingaramo, Camila Falcione y Roberto Aguirre. 05 de abril de 2011. Se colectaron 4 ejemplares adultos (2 machos y 2 hembras y 1 juvenil, depositados en la Colección Herpetológica de la Universidad Nacional del Nordeste (UNNEC-11212, UNNEC-11213, UNNEC- 11214, UNNEC-11215 y UNNEC-11216.

  8. Does diet in lacertid lizards reflect prey availability? Evidence for selective predation in the Aeolian wall lizard, Podarcis raffonei (Mertens, 1952 (Reptilia, Lacertidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Lo Cascio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the invertebrate fauna occurring on Scoglio Faraglione, a tiny Aeolian island (AeolianArchipelago, NE Sicily inhabited by a population of the critically endangered lacertid lizard Podarcis raffonei(Mertens, 1952, was censused at different seasons and the resulting data were then compared with dataobtained analysing prey composition and prey abundance in the diet of the lizards occurring on the same islet.The diet of Podarcis raffonei was mainly based on insects and other arthropods. The results indicate that dietcomposition is not directly influenced by prey availability and temporal prey abundance, and that there isstrong evidence indicating selective predation. Lizards prey upon a number of arthropod categories fewer thanthat recorded in field. Some invertebrate taxa (e.g. Diptera and Gastropoda are really less attractive for lizardsand are rarely preyed or not preyed at all despite their spatial and/or temporal abundance. This suggests thatPodarcis raffonei is able to operate a hierarchical choice within the range of prey items constituting its preyspectrum, probably through the ability to discriminate between prey chemicals or visually oriented predation.

  9. Two new species of Pseudotelorchis (Digenea, Telorchiidae, parasites of the Caiman, Caiman crocodilus yacare (Reptilia, Crocodylia from the Pantanal Mato-Grossense, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joäo B. Catto

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudotelorchis caimanis n. sp. and P. yacarei n. sp. are described based on specimens collected from Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin in the Pantanal Mato-grossense, Brazil. This is the first record of any species of Telorchiidae Stunkard, 1924, parasitizing crocodilians. Pseudotelorchis caimanis n. sp. differs from P. comapactus, the only species described in the genus with seminal receptacle, testes in tandem, and genital pore lateral to acetabulum. Pseudotelorchis yacarei n. sp. differs from the two other species for its body shape, for infecting the intestine instead of the uterus, by having regularly disposed instead of irregulary disposed uterine loops, and by having the vitelline glands disposed in longitudinal lateral lines instead of in lateral bunches.

  10. Extreme feeding behaviours in the Italian wall lizard, Podarcis siculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Capula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the occurrence of cannibalism, unusual predation on small reptiles [Hemidactylus turcicus (Reptilia, Gekkonidae], and foraging on small mammal carrion [Suncus etruscus (Mammalia, Soricidae] by P. siculus is reported.

  11. Studies on African Agama IX. New insights into Agama finchi Bohme et al., 2005 (Sauria: Agamidae), with the description of a new subspecies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, P.; Freund, W.; Modrý, David; Schmitz, A.; Böhme, W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2011), s. 25-34 ISSN 2190-7307 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Reptilia * Sauria * Agamidae * Agama finchi * Agama finchi ssp. n. * Africa * Kenya * Uganda * DR Congo * Ethiopia Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  12. Possibilities of RCH-microscopy in the reptilian research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2002), s. 249-252 ISSN 0139-7893 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : reptilia * integument * replica Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.234, year: 2002

  13. Egg retention and intrauterine embryonic development in Sceloporus aeneus (Reptilia: Phrynosomatidae: implications for the evolution of viviparity Retención de huevos y avance embrionario intrauterino en Sceloporus aeneus (Reptilia: Phrynosomatidae: implicaciones para la evolución de la viviparidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo García-Collazo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Egg retention (ER and intrauterine embryonic development (IED have been considered intermediate steps in the evolution from oviparity to viviparity. Sceloporus aeneus is an oviparous lizard that is closely related to the viviparous species (Sceloporus bicanthalis. The present study addresses the following 2 questions: 1 Are intermediate stages of egg retention (ER and IED present in populations of Sceloporus aeneus? and 2 Are ER and/or IED explained by elevation, precipitation or phylogenetic effects? Results indicate that in S. aeneus, ER differs among populations. ER was negatively related to altitude and pluvial precipitation, whereas average environmental temperature had no effect on ER or IER. In contrast to previous observations of oviparous species related to viviparous species, populations of S. aeneus with advanced IED are associated with environmental factors such as low elevation and aridity instead of high elevation and cold climate, whereas the comparative analysis shows that there are no significative evolutionary changes throughout the phylogeny, which means that the altitude has no effect on the transition to the evolution of viviparity in S. aeneus-S bicanthalis.La retención de huevos (ER y el desarrollo embrionario intrauterino (IED han sido considerados pasos intermedios hacia la viviparidad. Sceloporus aeneus es un lacertilio ovíparo estrechamente relacionado a una especie vivípara (Sceloporus bicanthalis. El presente estudio derivó de las preguntas: ¿El ER y el IED presentes en las poblaciones de S. aeneus son estadios intermedios a la viviparidad? ¿ER y/o IED son explicados por la temperatura, altitud, precipitación pluvial o son un efecto filogenético? En S. aeneus, el ER y el IED fueron diferentes entre poblaciones. Los resultados indicaron que la ER se relacionó negativamente con la altitud y la precipitación pluvial, mientras que no se encontró efecto con la temperatura ambiental. En contraste con observaciones previas en especies emparentadas con las especies vivíparas, los resultados de la presente investigación indican que en las poblaciones de S. aeneus estudiadas, el mayor avance en el IED lo presentaron los organismos que habitan en baja elevación y áreas secas en lugar de alta elevación y climas fríos. Por otro lado, el análisis comparativo mostró que no existen cambios evolutivos significativos en los valores a lo largo de la filogenia, lo que significa que la altitud no tiene un efecto significativo en la transición hacia la viviparidad en Sceloporus aeneus-S. bicanthalis.

  14. Incubação artificial dos ovos e processo de eclosão em Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae Artificial egg incubation and hatching proccess in Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudimes, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial incubation of 558 eggs from 70 clutches of Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 were performed at São Paulo Zoo during 1992 and 1993. Hatching occurred when eggs were incubated between 25 and 31.5oC. Incubation time varied from 54 (at 31.5oC to 120 days (at 25oC, similarly to Trachemys scripla sspp. Hatchling used the caruncle to made small incisions in the egg shell, latter enlarged by movements of the head and forefeet. Hatching usually lasted from one to two days. Newborn's carapace and plastron showed their natural form few hours after the emergence from the egg shell. During the third or fourth week, caruncle usually disappeared, and yolk sac was completely absorbed. Average (x±sd measures of newborn were 3.55±0.18cm of carapace length, 3.35±0.17cm of plastron length, and 10.73±1.36g of weight.

  15. Identificação sexual através do estudo anatômico do sistema urogenital em recém-eclodidos e jovens de Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae Sexual identification using anatomical study of urogenital system in hatchlings and juveniles of tracHemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Malvasio

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals of Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 less than 12 months old are examined for sexual identification through anatomical study of urogenital system. Histological analysis is used to confirm sexual identification. It is concluded that accurate sexual identification is possible in hatchlings using gonadal morphology. Differences between testes and ovaries are clear so histological analysis is necessary for this species only in case of doubts.

  16. A new species of bent-toed gecko, genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae), from Jawa Timur Province, Java, Indonesia, with taxonomic remarks on C. fumosus (Müller, 1895).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lukas; Mecke, Sven; Kieckbusch, Max; Mader, Felix; Kaiser, Hinrich

    2016-01-26

    A new species of the gekkonid lizard genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 is described from Klakah, Lumajang Regency, Jawa Timur Province, Java, Indonesia. Cyrtodactylus klakahensis sp. nov. can be distinguished from all other congeners by the presence of (1) a deep precloacal groove in males, (2) three rows of enlarged precloacofemoral scales, of which the third row bears 37-38 pores in males, (3) three or four rows of enlarged scales between the precloacofemoral scale rows and the cloaca, forming distinct chevrons, (4) raised and strongly keeled dorsal tubercles in 15-19 rows at midbody, (5) an indistinct lateral fold, (6) 17-20 subdigital lamellae under the 4th toe, and (7) subcaudal scales which are not transversely enlarged. Cyrtodactylus klakahensis sp. nov. is only the third bent-toed gecko species described from Java, indicating that the diversity of this genus on this island has been neglected in the past. Furthermore, we confirm that C. fumosus (Müller, 1895) is a species that possesses a precloacal groove in males and is most likely restricted to northern Sulawesi. That species is defined by a single female holotype (NMB-REPT 2662). Specimens in museum collections catalogued as C. fumosus from localities elsewhere are misidentified and likely represent undescribed species.

  17. An inconspicuous, conspicuous new species of Asian pipesnake, genus Cylindrophis (Reptilia: Squamata: Cylindrophiidae), from the south coast of Jawa Tengah, Java, Indonesia, and an overview of the tangled taxonomic history of C. ruffus (Laurenti, 1768).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieckbusch, Max; Mecke, Sven; Hartmann, Lukas; Ehrmantraut, Lisa; O'shea, Mark; Kaiser, Hinrich

    2016-03-20

    We describe a new species of Cylindrophis currently known only from Grabag, Purworejo Regency, Jawa Tengah Pro-vince (Central Java), Java, Indonesia. Cylindrophis subocularis sp. nov. can be distinguished from all congeners by the presence of a single, eponymous subocular scale between the 3rd and 4th or 4th and 5th supralabial, preventing contact between the 4th or 5th supralabial and the orbit, and by having the prefrontal in narrow contact with or separated from the orbit. We preface our description with a detailed account of the tangled taxonomic history of the similar and putatively wide-ranging species C. ruffus, which leads us to (1) remove the name Scytale scheuchzeri from the synonymy of C. ruffus, (2) list the taxon C. rufa var. javanica as species inquirenda, and (3) synonymize C. mirzae with C. ruffus. We provide additional evidence to confirm that the type locality of C. ruffus is Java. Cylindrophis subocularis sp. nov. is the second species of Asian pipesnake from Java.

  18. An annotated type catalogue of the anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the Department of Herpetology, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (Reptilia: Sauria: Anguidae, Dibamidae, Scincidae and Varanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanov, Andrei; Milto, Konstantin

    2017-03-17

    A complete catalogue is provided for the type specimens of anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the herpetological collection of the Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (ZISP), as of January 2017. The collection contains a total of 170 type specimens, representing 50 taxa in the four lizard families under consideration. Thirty-one of these taxa are regarded currently as valid. The types of four taxa (one holotype, one lectotype and two paralectotypes) could not be located in the ZISP collections in January 2017. A majority of the types are skinks (43 taxa, 155 types), many of which were described by the late Ilya Darevsky (1924-2009).

  19. Taxonomic analysis of Paraguayan samples of Homonota fasciata Duméril & Bibron (1836 with the revalidation of Homonota horrida Burmeister (1861 (Reptilia: Squamata: Phyllodactylidae and the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Cacciali

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Homonota is a Neotropical genus of nocturnal lizards characterized by the following combination of characters: absence of femoral pores, infradigital lamellae not dilated, claws without sheath, inferior lamellae laterally not denticulate, and presence of a ceratobranchial groove. Currently the genus is composed of 10 species assembled in three groups: two groups with four species, and the fasciata group with only two species. Here, we analyzed genetic and morphologic data of samples of Homonota fasciata from Paraguay; according to Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses, the Paraguay population represents an undescribed species. Additionally, morphological analysis of the holotype of H. fasciata (MNHN 6756 shows that it is morphologically different from the banded, large-scaled Homonota commonly referred to as “H. fasciata”. Given the inconsistency between morphological characters of the name-bearing type of H. fasciata and the species commonly referred to as H. fasciata, we consider them as different taxa. Thus, H. fasciata is a species inquirenda which needs further studies, and we resurrect the name H. horrida for the banded, large-scaled Homonota. The undescribed species from Paraguay is similar to H. horrida, but can be differentiated by the high position of the auditory meatus relative to the mouth commissure (vs. low position in H. horrida; and less developed tubercles on the sides of the head, including a narrow area between the orbit and the auditory meatus covered with small granular scales with or without few tubercles (vs. several big tubercles on the sides of the head even in the area between the orbit and the auditory meatus. The new species is distributed in the Dry Chaco in South America. With the formal description of this species, the actual diversity of the genus Homonota is increased to 12 species. Furthermore, we infer phylogenetic relationships for 11 of the 12 described species of the genus, based on 11 molecular markers (two mitochondrial and nine nuclear genes, with concatenated and species tree approaches.

  20. [Artículo Retractado/Retracted Article]:BYCATCH OF HELICOPS ANGULATUS (LINNAEUS 1758 (REPTILIA: SQUAMATA: COLUBRIDAE IN HOOP-TRAPS USED TO CAPTURE FRESH WATER TURTLES ON THE COAST OF PARÁ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil José Hernández Ruz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Between September, 2007, and August, 2009, six field excursions were conducted on the northern Brazilian coast (Romana and Maiandeua islands, state of Pará for the collection of specimens of freshwater turtles (Rhinoclemmys punctularia and Kinosternon scorpioides in natural ponds. Hoop-nets were used and 35 specimens of brown-banded water snakes, Helicops angulatus, were captured as bycatch in the traps. Thus, in addition to turtles, the procedure may be useful for the sampling populations of aquatic snakes. RESUMEN Entre septiembre de 2007 y agosto de 2009, seis excursiones de campo se llevaron a cabo en la costa norte de Brasil (islas Romana y Maiandeua, estado de Pará para la recolección de especímenes de tortugas de agua dulce (Rhinoclemmys punctularia y Kinosternon scorpioides en posos naturales. Utilizamos trampas en embudo. 35 ejemplares de la serpiente acuática Helicops angulatus, fueron capturados como pesca incidental en las trampas. Por lo tanto, además de las tortugas, el procedimiento puede ser útil para la toma de muestras de las poblaciones de serpientes acuáticas.

  1. All that glitters is not gold: A projected distribution of the endemic Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae indicates a major range shrinkage due to future climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Srinivasulu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has a perceived threat on biodiversity due to its effect on species range.  Species with narrow ranges and highly specific climatic and habitat requirements are at higher risk.  To understand the influence of climate change on the Indian endemic gekkonid, the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870 we model the present and future predicted distribution (2050 and 2070 under the CMIP5 RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios using MaxEnt under the HadGEM3-ES Model.  Our analysis revealed the negative impact of climate change on the Indian Golden Gecko with a decrease in the amount of climatically suitable areas in the future, and an almost total range shrinkage by 2070.  Despite its wide distribution in the eastern Deccan Peninsula, according to our predictions, the species is threatened by a shrinkage in the future range due to climate change. 

  2. Food Composition of the Snake-Eyed Lizard, Ophisops elegans Ménétriés, 1832 (Reptilia: Sauria: Lacertidae from Gökçeada (Imbros, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Varol Tok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents data on the food composition of the snake-eyed lizard (Ophisops elegans, from Gökçeada (Imbros, Çanakkale, Turkey. A total of 94 preys were determined in thedigestive systems of 20 individuals (10 males, 10 females examined in the study. Insects (67%constitute most of its food composition. Major prey groups in the food composition are included inAranea (13%, Lepidoptera (13%, Coleoptera (19%, and Homoptera (20% in numeric proportion.No significant difference was observed between sexes considering food composition.

  3. ESPÉCIES VEGETAIS UTILIZADAS NA ALIMENTAÇÃO DE Podocnemis unifilis, Troschel 1948 (REPTILIA, TESTUDINAE, PELOMEDUSIDAE NA REGIÃO DO PRACUÚBA -AMAPÁ-BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda Soares de Lucena Bataus

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram obtidas, junto às comunidades que vivem às margens dos rios e lagos da região do Pracuúba, Estado do Amapá, informações sobre 35 espécies vegetais que fazem parte da alimentação natural de Podocnemis unifilis (tracajá. Após a identificação dos vegetais, procedeu-se à coleta de suas partes comestíveis, para posteriores classificação taxonômica e análise química. Foram encontrados vegetais de 21 famílias botânicas, sendo que as famílias Leguminosae e Graminae ocorreram em 22,81% e 8,57% do total. A caracterização físico-química mostrou a composição centesimal quanto aos níveis de proteína, lipídios, cálcio, fósforo, potássio e magnésio, fibra bruta e de resíduo mineral fixo. Dentre os vegetais analisados, 12 espécies mostraram teores de proteína superiores a 10%. Dentre estas, oito espécies apresentaram boa possibilidade de servirem como ingredientes de uma ração regional, em função de suas propriedades nutricionais e de sua disponibilidade na natureza. São elas: Commelina longicaulis (maria-mole (20,78%, Polyganum acuminatum (pimenteira brava (20,19%; Aschymene sensitiva (corticeira (19,93%; Macrolobium acaiae folium (jandaruá (17,06%; Oryza glandiglumes (canarana grande (15,00%; Thalia geniculata (14,14%; Nymphaeae rudgeana (11,55% e Hymenachine amplexicaulis (10,11%. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Podocnemis unifilis, tracajá, alimentação de quelônios na natureza.

  4. Regional summary, textbook, handbook and scientific monograph. Review to the book V. L. Bulakhov, V. Y. Gasso, A. Y. Pakhomov «Biological Diversity of Ukraine. The Dnipropetrovsk region. Amphibians and Reptiles (Amphibia et Reptilia / A. Y. Pakhomov (ed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Shabanov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The review on the monograph of specialists of the Dnipropetrovs’k National University describes main scientific and methodical achievements of the authors and initiates discussion on some moot points, which are presented in the monograph.

  5. Heterochronical patterns of evolution in the transitional stages of vertebrate classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, W

    1993-12-01

    Transitional forms of the recent classes of vertebrates are only known in paleontology. The well described examples are: Eusthenopteron foordi (Crossopterygii), Ichthyostega and Acanthostega (Labyrinthodontia) between Osteichthyes and Amphibia, Seymouria baylorensis (Amphibiosaria) between Amphibia and Reptilia, Archaeopteryx lithographica (Archaeornithes) between Reptilia and Aves, and the mammal-like reptiles Pelycosauria, Therapsida and Cynodontia between Reptilia and Aves, and the description of their phylogenetical heterochronies in terms of peramorphosis and paedomorphosis shows the progressive role of the motorial, especially the locomotorial organ systems and their functions in comparison with the retarded evolution of the axial system, especially the skull and central nervous system. The evolution of the Hominidae shows the same rule. The evaluation of these transitional forms in their fossil context reveals them as inhabitants of biotopes situated in the border areas of coastal and shore landscapes of marine, brackish or fresh water. These biotopes have obviously favoured the innovations on the high taxonimic level of macro-evolutionary characteristics.

  6. A new species of Australotaenia (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea) from a snake in Cambodia: host switching or postcyclic parasitism in a distant region?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Chambrier, A.; Scholz, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2012), s. 279-286 ISSN 0015-5683 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : taxonomy * zoogeography * tapeworms * helminths * Reptilia * South East Asia * Indomalayan Region Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.515, year: 2012 http://folia.paru.cas.cz/detail.php?id=22092

  7. Initiation and patterning of the snake dentition are dependent on Sonic Hedgehog signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, Marcela; Handrigan, G. R.; Tucker, A. S.; Lozanoff, S.; Town, L.; Fu, K.; Diewert, V. M.; Wicking, C.; Richman, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 319, č. 1 (2008), s. 132-145 ISSN 0012-1606 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : reptilia * amniotes * enamel organ Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 4.416, year: 2008

  8. Equus burchelli antiquorum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lowed up. This extends the range of Ptenopus into the Great and Little Karroo. Previously the southernmost record as given by Haacke (1975) is from Nuwerust on the west coast. REFERENCES. HAACKE, W. D. 1975. The burrowing geckos of southern Africa, 1 (Reptilia: Gekkonidae). Ann. Transvaal Mus. 29: 197-243. R ep.

  9. THE HERPETOLOGICAL COLLECTION OF ZOOLOGY MUSEUM, ISTANBUL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgün Kaya; Oya Özuluğ

    2017-01-01

    Amphibia and Reptilia collections at the Zoological Museum, University of Istanbul (ZMUI) were studied and revised. The samples were collected from 1921 until today. The localities of most species are found in the diffrent regions of Turkey. The collection have 74 species of which 20 species are amphibia and 54 species are reptiles.

  10. Radiography atlas of domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebel, G.A.; Isenbuegel, E.; Wolvekamp, P.; Gabrisch, K.; Grimm, F.; Koblik, P.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Oschwald, C.P.; Schildger, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The 370 radiographs presented in the atlas together with notes and explanations give information on normal roentgenographic findings, physiological variations, and important pathological findings observed in small mammals, birds, reptilia and amphibia. Introductory notes to each chapter explain the principles of exposure techniques and the handling of the animals. (VHE) [de

  11. New and already known acanthocephalans from amphibians and reptiles in Vietnam, with keys to species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1956 (Echinorhynchidae) and Sphaerechinorhynchus Johnston and Deland, 1929 (Plagiorhynchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Omar M; Ha, Ngyuen Van; Heckmann, Richard A

    2008-02-01

    Adults of 2 new species in 2 orders of acanthocephalans obtained from the intestines of terrestrial amphibians and reptiles collected between 1998 and 2004 in Vietnam are described here. Pseudoacanthocephalus nguyenthileae n. sp. (Palaeacnthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) was collected from 5 species of terrestrial amphibians: (1) the common Sunda toad Bufo melanostictus Schneider (Bufonidae); (2) Paa verucospinosa (Bourret); (3) Gunther's Amoy frog Rana guentheri Boulenger; (4) Taipei frog R. taipehensis Denburgh (Ranidae), and (5) the Burmese whipping frog Polypedates mutus (Smith) (Racophoridae); as well as from the Chinese cobra Naja atra Cantor (Reptilia: Elapidae) and house gecko Hemidactylus frenatus Dumeril and Bibron (Reptilia: Gekkonidae). Sphaerechinorhynchus maximesospinus n. sp. (Plagiorhynchidae: Sphaerechinorhynchinae) was isolated from a king cobra Ophiophagus hannah (cantor) (Reptilia: Elapidae). Cystacanths of Porrorchis houdemeri (Joyeux and Baer, 1935) Schmidt and Kuntz, 1967 (Plagiorhynchidae: Porrorchinae) obtained from the mesenteries of banded krait Bungarus fasciatus (Schneider) (Reptilia: Elapidae), a paratenic host, are reported for the first time. Keys to the species of Pseudoacanthocephalus and Sphaerechinorhynchus are included. Characteristic features distinguishing the new species from related taxa include: P. nguyenthileae has 15-19 (usually 16-18) proboscis hook rows, each with 5-6 hooks that progressively increase in length and size posteriorly. The largest, intermediate, and smallest proboscis hooks of S. maximesospinus are the middle, anterior, and posterior hooks, respectively; the proboscis and neck are enclosed in a membrane. Morphometric characteristics of P. nguyenthileae show host-related variability.

  12. Two new species of Oswaldocruzia (Nematoda, Molineidae) parasitising lizards in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitin, Roman

    2017-05-09

    Two new species, Oswaldocruzia lisnykiensis sp. n. and Oswaldocruzia lacertica sp. n., are described from Anguis fragilis L. (Reptilia: Anquidae) and Lacerta agilis L. (Reptilia: Lacertidae) respectively. Both species belong to the Palaearctic group of species which have spicules divided in three main branches (blade, fork and shoe) with fork division above its distal third. The new species differs from all previously known Palaearctic species by several morphological characters: type of caudal bursa (type III in O. lisnykiensis and type I in O. lacertica), shape of spicules (blade distally divided into four tips and specific shape of shoe) and synlophe structure (narrow cervical alae consist of three crests in both species). Illustrated descriptions of O. lisnykiensis and O. lacertica based on 63 and 38 specimens respectively are presented. Host specificity and geographical distribution of the species are discussed. O. dispar is considered as a species inquirenda.

  13. Comment on Spracklandus Hoser, 2009 (Reptilia, Serpentes, ELAPIDAE): request for confirmation of availability of the generic name and for the nomenclatural validation of the journal in which it was published (Case 3601; BZN 70:234–237; 71:30–38; 133-135,181-182 ,252-253)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, Anders G.J.; Kaiser, Hinrich; van Dijk, Peter Paul; Wüster, Wolfgang; O’Shea, Mark; Archer, Michael; Auliya, Mark; Boitani, Luigi; Bour, Roger; Clausnitzer, Viola; Contreras-MacBeath, Topiltzin; Crother, Brian I.; Daza, Juan M.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Frazier, Jack; Fritz, Uwe; Gardner, Alfred L.; Gascon, Claude; Georges, Arthur; Glaw, Frank; Grazziotin, Felipe G.; Groves, Colin P.; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Havaš, Peter; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Hoogmoed, Marinus S.; Horne, Brian D.; Iverson, John B.; Jäch, Manfred; Jenkins, Christopher L.; Jenkins, Richard K.B.; Kiester, A. Ross; Keogh, J. Scott; Lacher, Thomas E.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Luiselli, Luca; Mahler, D. Luke; Mallon, David P.; Mast, Roderic; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Measey, John; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Molur, Sanjay; Mosbrugger, Volker; Murphy, Robert W.; Naish, Darren; Niekisch, Manfred; Ota, Hidetoshi; Parham, James F.; Parr, Michael J.; Pilcher, Nicolas J.; Pine, Ronald H.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Sanderson, James G.; Savage, Jay M.; Schleip, Wulf; Scrocchi, Gustavo J.; Shaffer, H. Bradley; Smith, Eric N.; Sprackland, Robert; Stuart, Simon N.; Vetter, Holger; Vitt, Laurie J.; Waller, Tomás; Webb, Grahame; Wilson, Edward O.; Zaher, Hussam; Thomson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In Case 3601 Raymond Hoser has asked the Commission to validate for the purposes of nomenclature the name Spracklandus Hoser, 2009, and ‘the journal in which it was published,’ issue 7 of the Australasian Journal of Herpetology (AJH). We note that the entire run of AJH has been written, edited, and published solely by Hoser. Although his requests to the Commission were presented as narrow and, in his words, ‘routine matters,’ we are convinced that they represent an important tipping-point with broad implications of major concern for zoological taxonomy and nomenclature as a whole and, by extension, the greater scientific community. Since Hoser’s actions and works have failed to follow scientific best practices (e.g. Turtle Taxonomy Working Group, 2007, 2014; Kaiser et al., 2013; Kaiser, 2014) and both the Commission’s general Recommendations and Code of Ethics in Appendix A, the global herpetological community has widely rejected his taxonomic decisions and resultant nomenclature. This has unfortunately caused a confusing dual nomenclature to develop in the herpetological community, with most boycotting or ignoring Hoser’s 700+ new names coined in the AJH, while he and a few personal followers actively promote their usage. We believe that suppression of the name Spracklandus, and all issues of AJH, is the only effective way to bring this contentious and confusing issue to resolution. The plenary power available under Article 81.1 of the Code exist specifically to allow the Commission to make rulings in individual cases that disturb stability and cause confusion, whether the works are Code-compliant or not. We maintain that it is in the interest of nomenclatural stability, not only for herpetology, but for all of zoological taxonomy, that the plenary power be invoked to declare the works in AJH unavailable, regardless of any narrow interpretation of their technical Code-compliance. We present our arguments for rejection of the validity of AJH in the following commentary. In view of the wide-reaching implications of this case for all of zoology, and reflecting the deep and broad-based community concern over these issues, our contributing authors include 70 global scientific leaders and accomplished amateurs from a wide variety of zoological disciplines.

  14. Factors underlying the natural resistance of animals against snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moussatché

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of mammals and reptilia with a natural resistance to snake venoms is known since a long time. This fact has been subjected to the study by several research workers. Our experiments showed us that in the marsupial Didelphis marsupialis, a mammal highly resistant to the venom of Bothrops jararaca, and other Bothrops venoms, has a genetically origin protein, a alpha-1, acid glycoprotein, now highly purified, with protective action in mice against the jararaca snake venom.

  15. Terrestrial Origin of Viviparity in Mesozoic Marine Reptiles Indicated by Early Triassic Embryonic Fossils

    OpenAIRE

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-yong; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier; Chen, Guan-bao

    2014-01-01

    Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic). This exc...

  16. Harry S. Truman Dam and REservoir, Missouri, Mitigation of the Adverse Effects upon the Local Paleontological Resources. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    scripta elegans , occuring from Ohio and Iowa to New Mexico, prefers quiet water with muddy bottoms and much vegetation. Today Chrysemys scripta ...Chrysemys ( Trachemys ) scripta Pond slider ABUNDANCE. One individual. A single specimen, the medial portion of the first left pleural bone, ISM 490,014 (Moodie...75,000 years ago. *" Systematic Discussion of Trolinger Spring I Fauna Class REPTILIA Order CHELONIA Family TESTUDINIDAE Chrysemys ( Trachemys

  17. Universal Dimensions of Meaning Derived from Semantic Relations among Words and Senses: Mereological Completeness vs. Ontological Generality (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Octopus 3.99 Reptilia −2.82 linolenic_acid 3.97 Dilleniidae −2.82 horseshoe_crab 3.94 Asteridae −2.78 Asian_horseshoe_crab 3.88 Eutheria −2.71...corresponds to a movement toward a definite meaning (e.g., more positive, or more exciting, or more abstract), but pairs of unrelated concepts can be found

  18. Esparganose em alguns vertebrados do Brasil: dificuldades na identificaçao das espécies de Luheella (Spirometra Sparganum in some brazilian vertebrates: problems in the identification of species of Luheella (Spirometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arandas Rego

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species of Amphibia and Reptilia are listed as new hosts of spargana, from material deposited in the Helminthological Collection of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. It is discussed the difficulties in identifying the larvae (Sparganum and also the identification of adults of Luheella species from South America. The histopathology induced by spargana in the liver of a species of Amphibia is briefly described.

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Ratsnake [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese Ratsnake Elaphe climacophora Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Elaphe_climacophora_L.png Elaphe_clim...acophora_NL.png Elaphe_climacophora_S.png Elaphe_climacophora_NS.png http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=3 ...

  20. FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey. Report on the environmental effect survey (No. A-4 Kunbetsu-dake area); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Kankyo eikyo chosa hokokusho (No.A-4 Kunbetsudake chiiki)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-30

    Of the FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey, the primary environmental effect survey in the Kunbetsu-dake area was conducted, and the results were arranged. In the well drilling survey, etc., the survey was made aiming at extracting areas to be preserved from an environmental aspect. The results of the survey were summarized as follows: As to the mammalia, 12 families 46 species were confirmed in the area surveyed and the periphery by literature survey. Out of them, the noticeable species which are considered important from an academic viewpoint are 10 families 19 species. As to the aves, 55 families 340 species were confirmed, of which 29 families 79 species are noticeable species. About the amphibia/reptilia, 3 families 3 species in the amphibia and 4 families 6 species in the reptilia were confirmed by literature and hearing survey. The noticeable species is 1 family 1 species in the amphilia. Concerning the terrestrial insecta, 135 families 873 species were confirmed, and the noticeable species is 11 families 20 species. As to the flora, 115 families 1055 species were confirmed, and the noticeable species is 46 families 126 species. Relating to the living vegetation, the one higher than 9 in nature reserves shows a substantial rate, and the periphery of Kaibetsu-dake is designated as the specified flora colony. (NEDO)

  1. Asociacion faunistica de vertebrados mesozoicos de la localidad de Galve (Teruel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Hemández, B.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Sediments of Tithonian-Barremian of Iberian Basin in the surroundings of Galve (Teniel, Spain have a high content of vertebrate's remains. These ones have been studied since s. XX until today by different scientists. More than ninety taxons have been mentioned in these papers, distributed in Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiforms, Amphibia, Reptilia (Chelonia, Sauria, Crocodylia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia and Marnmalia.Los sedimentos del Tithónico-Barremiense de la Cuenca Ibérica aflorantes en los alrededores de la localidad de Galve (Teniel, son particularmente ricos en restos de vertebrados mesozoicos. Estos han sido estudiados por diferentes autores, desde principios del siglo xx hasta la actualidad. El objetivo del presente artículo es recopilar los distintos taxones que han sido citados para esta área, a lo largo del tiempo, recogiéndose más de noventa taxones distribuidos entre Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiformes, Amphibia, Reptilia (Testudines, Sauria, Crocodilia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia y Mammalia.

  2. A single origin of extreme matrotrophy in African mabuyine skinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinou, Margarita; Karin, Benjamin R.; Conradie, Werner; Wagner, Philipp; Schmitz, Andreas; Jackman, Todd R.; Bauer, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Most mammals and approximately 20% of squamates (lizards and snakes) are viviparous, whereas all crocodilians, birds and turtles are oviparous. Viviparity evolved greater than 100 times in squamates, including multiple times in Mabuyinae (Reptilia: Scincidae), making this group ideal for studying the evolution of nutritional patterns associated with viviparity. Previous studies suggest that extreme matrotrophy, the support of virtually all of embryonic development by maternal nutrients, evolved as many as three times in Mabuyinae: in Neotropical Mabuyinae (63 species), Eumecia (2 species; Africa) and Trachylepis ivensii (Africa). However, no explicit phylogenetic hypotheses exist for understanding the evolution of extreme matrotrophy. Using multilocus DNA data, we inferred a species tree for Mabuyinae that implies that T. ivensii (here assigned to the resurrected genus Lubuya) is sister to Eumecia, suggesting that extreme matrotrophy evolved only once in African mabuyine skinks. PMID:27555650

  3. The Evolution and Fossil History of Sensory Perception in Amniote Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Johannes; Bickelmann, Constanze; Sobral, Gabriela

    2018-05-01

    Sensory perception is of crucial importance for animals to interact with their biotic and abiotic environment. In amniotes, the clade including modern mammals (Synapsida), modern reptiles (Reptilia), and their fossil relatives, the evolution of sensory perception took place in a stepwise manner after amniotes appeared in the Carboniferous. Fossil evidence suggests that Paleozoic taxa had only a limited amount of sensory capacities relative to later forms, with the majority of more sophisticated types of sensing evolving during the Triassic and Jurassic. Alongside the evolution of improved sensory capacities, various types of social communication evolved across different groups. At present there is no definitive evidence for a relationship between sensory evolution and species diversification. It cannot be excluded, however, that selection for improved sensing was partially triggered by biotic interactions, e.g., in the context of niche competition, whereas ecospace expansion, especially during the Mesozoic, might also have played an important role.

  4. Sound Localization Strategies in Three Predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    . Despite the similar organization of their auditory systems, archosaurs and lizards use different strategies for encoding the ITDs that underlie localization of sound in azimuth. Barn owls encode ITD information using a place map, which is composed of neurons serving as labeled lines tuned for preferred......In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosaurs...... spatial locations, while geckos may use a meter strategy or population code composed of broadly sensitive neurons that represent ITD via changes in the firing rate....

  5. Evolution of viviparous reproduction in Paleozoic and Mesozoic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Sidor, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Although viviparity (live-bearing reproduction) is widely distributed among lizards and snakes, it is entirely absent from other extant Reptilia and many extinct forms. However, paleontological evidence reveals that viviparity was present in at least nine nominal groups of pre-Cenozoic reptiles, representing a minimum of six separate evolutionary origins of this reproductive mode. Two viviparous clades (sauropterygians and ichthyopterygians) lasted more than 155 million years, a figure that rivals the duration of mammalian viviparity. Circumstantial evidence indicates that extinct viviparous reptiles had internal fertilization, amniotic fetal membranes, and placentas that sustained developing embryos via provision of respiratory gases, water, calcium, and possibly organic nutrients. Production of offspring via viviparity facilitated the invasion of marine habitats in at least five reptilian lineages. Thus, this pattern of embryonic development and reproduction was central to the ecology and evolution of these ancient animals, much as it is to numerous extant species of vertebrates.

  6. Liolaemus lizards (Squamata: Liolaemidae) as hosts for the nymph of Amblyomma parvitarsum (Acari: Ixodidae), with notes on Rickettsia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Leal, Sebastián; Tarragona, Evelina L; Martins, Thiago F; Martín, Claudia M; Burgos-Gallardo, Freddy; Nava, Santiago; Labruna, Marcelo B; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Adults of Amblyomma parvitarsum are common ectoparasites of South American camelids of the genera Lama and Vicugna, occuring in highlands of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Peru and also in Argentinean Patagonia. Whereas larval stages of this tick are known to feed on small lizards, host records for the nymphal instar have remained unreported. Supported by morphological and molecular analyses, herein we report A. parvitarsum nymphs parasitizing two Liolaemus species (Reptilia: Squamata) in the Andean Plateau of Argentina and Chile. Additionally, by a PCR screening targetting gltA and ompA genes, DNA of Rickettsia was detected in one of the collected nymphs. Obtained sequences of this agent were identical to a recent Rickettsia sp. described infecting adults of this tick species in Chile and Argentina.

  7. Taxonomy of Platypterygius campylodon and the diversity of the last ichthyosaurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Fischer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A complex and confusing taxonomy has concealed the diversity dynamics of Cretaceous ichthyosaurs (Reptilia for decades. The near totality of Albian-Cenomanian remains from Eurasia has been assigned, by default, to the loosely defined entity Platypterygius campylodon, whose holotype was supposed to be lost. By thoroughly examining the Cenomanian ichthyosaur collections from the UK, I redescribe the syntypic series of Platypterygius campylodon. This material, along with a handful of other coeval remains, is diagnostic and seemingly differs from the vast majority of Cretaceous remains previously assigned to this taxon. A lectotype for Platypterygius campylodon is designated and I reassign this species to Pervushovisaurus campylodon nov. comb. The feeding ecology of this species is assessed and conforms to the scenario of an early Cenomanian diversity drop prior to the latest Cenomanian final extinction.

  8. A new squamate lizard from the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Nava

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The record of non-mosasaur squamates (Reptilia, Squamata is sparse in the Cretaceus fossil record of Brazil and include six putative reports, three from the Aptian-Albian of the Araripe Basin (Tijubina pontei Bonfim-Júnior and Marques, Olindalacerta brasiliensis Evans and Yabumoto, and a lizard indet. and three from the Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Group (Pristiguana brasiliensis Estes and Price, Anilioidae gen. et sp. indet., and Squamata gen. et sp. indet.. In this contribution, a new genus and species of lizard, Brasiliguana prudentis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on an isolated left maxilla with teeth. The material was discovered in an outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group located in the proximity of Presidente Prudente Municipality, São Paulo State, Brazil. The new taxon is considered a basal non-Priscagamidae+Acrodonta iguanian based on the presence of a weakly inclined anterior margin of the maxillary nasal process and maxillary tooth shape and tooth implantation similar to that of iguanians rather than of other lizard groups (e.g. teiids. This finding significantly increases the squamate lizard diversity of South America, which is still poorly understood and sparsely represented in the fossil record.Os achados de escamados (Reptilia, Squamata são escassos no Cretáceo do Brasil, incluindo cinco registros pontuais, dois do Aptiano-Albiano da Bacia do Araripe (Tijubina pontei Bonfim-Júnior e Marques e Olindalacerta brasiliensis Evans e Yabumoto, e três do Cretáceo Superior do Grupo Bauru (Pristiguana brasiliensis Estes and Price, Anilioidae gen. et sp. indet., Squamata gen. et sp. indet.. Nesta contribuição apresentamos um novo gênero e espécie de lagarto, Brasiliguana prudentis, baseado numa maxila esquerda com dentição. O material provém de depósitos da Formação Adamantina aflorantes próximos a cidade de Presidente Prudente, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. O novo táxon é considerado um

  9. New insight into the anatomy of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis and implications for reconstructing feeding in extinct archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiheng; Clarke, Julia A

    2015-07-01

    Anatomical studies of the cranium of crocodilians motivated by an interest in its function in feeding largely focused on bite force, the jaw apparatus and associated muscles innervated by the trigeminal nerve. However, the ossified and cartilaginous elements of the hyoid and the associated hyolingual muscles, innervated by the facial, hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves, received much less attention. Crocodilians are known to retain what are ancestrally the 'Rhythmic Hyobranchial Behaviors' such as buccal oscillation, but show diminished freedom and movement for the hyobranchial apparatus and the tongue in food transport and manipulation. Feeding among crocodilians, generally on larger prey items than other reptilian outgroups, involves passive transport of the food within the mouth. The tongue in extant crocodilians is firmly attached to the buccal floor and shows little movement during feeding. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the myology of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis, utilizing contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography and dissection. We construct the first three-dimensional (3D) description of hyolingual myology in Alligator mississippiensis and discuss the detailed implications of these data for our understanding of hyolingual muscle homology across Reptilia. These anatomical data and an evaluation of the fossil record of hyoid structures also shed light on the evolution of feeding in Reptilia. Simplification of the hyoid occurs early in the evolution of archosaurs. A hyoid with only one pair of ceratobranchials and a weakly ossified or cartilaginous midline basihyal is ancestral to Archosauriformes. The comparison with non-archosaurian reptilian outgroup demonstrates that loss of the second set of ceratobranchials as well as reduced ossification in basihyal occurred prior to the origin of crown-clade archosaurs, crocodilians and birds. Early modification in feeding ecology appears to characterize the

  10. THE GARGANO TERRE ROSSE INSULAR FAUNAS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FEDERICO MASINI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available After forty years from its discovery, the history of the field surveys and of the researches on the fossiliferous deposits on Gargano is briefly reported. The Gargano fauna belongs to the Abruzzo-Apulian Palaeobioprovince (including also Scontrone and Palena, Abruzzo. The fossil assemblage comprehends all the classes of terrestrial vertebrates: Reptilia, Amphibia, Aves and Mammalia. The faunal composition is unbalanced and presents the features of a typical insular endemic fauna. The bulk of the assemblage is composed of small mammals and birds. Based on literature, we report the most characteristic features, phylogenetic relationships, and evolutionary remarks on a list of mammals, focusing particularly on the adaptations of the most endemic taxa. Moreover, a biochronological scheme of the major faunal events is proposed and illustrated. Although still imperfect, the scheme is the first synopsis of all the biochronological and taxonomical information on mammals so far available. Eventually, the hypotheses on the origin and modes of colonisation are summarized and shortly discussed. From this overview the Gargano fauna is indeed of great interest for studies of evolution and biogeography. Nonetheless, there are persistent uncertainties on its age and origin, as well as on the age of infilling of the karstic fissure system of this unique fossiliferous locality. 

  11. Descrição macroscópica da musculatura dos membros do Tupinambis merianae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barbosa Casals

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2012v25n1p103 O lagarto teiú (Tupinambis merianae pertence à família Teiidae. Distribui-se ao longo das Américas, com numerosas espécies, inclusive no Brasil. São do gênero Tupinambis, os maiores representantes da família Teiidae. Para este estudo foram utilizados três animais (atropelados provenientes de doação. Os lagartos dissecados foram fixados em formol 10%, e a análise macroscópica foi realizada de forma detalhada e fotodocumentada, guardando as estruturas selecionadas “in situ”. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo contribuir com a descrição macroscópica da miologia peitoral e dos membros torácico e pélvico do lagarto T. merianae. Os resultados obtidos nesta pesquisa foram comparados com autores que estudaram animais da mesma classe Reptilia. Com isso, concluímos que nossos resultados macroscópicos assemelham-se aos já descritos pelos pesquisadores Hildebrand (1995, Moro e Abdala, (2004 e Abdala e Diogo (2010. Devemos ressaltar que o conhecimento da anatomia tem importâncias e aplicações em diversas áreas dentro da Biologia, contribuindo de maneira substancial para as áreas da saúde humana e da tecnologia.

  12. Evidence for self-cleaning in gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W. R.; Autumn, K.

    2005-01-01

    A tokay gecko can cling to virtually any surface and support its body mass with a single toe by using the millions of keratinous setae on its toe pads. Each seta branches into hundreds of 200-nm spatulae that make intimate contact with a variety of surface profiles. We showed previously that the combined surface area of billions of spatulae maximizes van der Waals interactions to generate large adhesive and shear forces. Geckos are not known to groom their feet yet retain their stickiness for months between molts. How geckos manage to keep their feet clean while walking about with sticky toes has remained a puzzle until now. Although self-cleaning by water droplets occurs in plant and animal surfaces, no adhesive has been shown to self-clean. In the present study, we demonstrate that gecko setae are a self-cleaning adhesive. Geckos with dirty feet recovered their ability to cling to vertical surfaces after only a few steps. Self-cleaning occurred in arrays of setae isolated from the gecko. Contact mechanical models suggest that self-cleaning occurs by an energetic disequilibrium between the adhesive forces attracting a dirt particle to the substrate and those attracting the same particle to one or more spatulae. We propose that the property of self-cleaning is intrinsic to the setal nanostructure and therefore should be replicable in synthetic adhesive materials in the future. adhesion | contact mechanics | locomotion | reptilia | nanotechnology

  13. FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey. Report on the environmental effect survey (animals/plants, No. B-7 Kuwanosawa area); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Kankyo eikyo chosa hokokusho (doshokubutsu, No.B-7 Kuwanosawa chiiki)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This survey was conducted to estimate effects of drilling of geothermal exploration well on the environment, aiming at grasping the present state of environmental elements before the survey/development. As a result of the literature survey, the following distribution were confirmed in the fauna: 5 orders 10 families 19 species in the mammalia, 10 orders 25 families 73 species in the aves, 1 order 3 families 6 species in the reptilia, 2 orders 6 families 9 species in the amphibia, and 17 orders 179 families 719 species in the insecta. In the flora, a distribution of 132 families 670 species was confirmed. The results of studying the above indicated that in the fauna, there were 10 species such as antelope as valuable animal in the area surveyed and that it is necessary to pay much attention to the environmental preservation of the habitat for those animals in the well drilling associated with geothermal survey. In the flora, the 13 valuable animals selected as animal having a fear of extinction in the 'plant-version red list' were confirmed in the area surveyed and the periphery. Further, as to the plant colony, there are no important colonies in terms of preservation. In well drilling, important things are efforts exerted to restore to the original state of the area altered, prevention of the washed-away of mud water, etc., and efforts exerted to preserve the environment of vegetation. (NEDO)

  14. Lateralization of visually guided detour behaviour in the common chameleon, Chamaeleo chameleon, a reptile with highly independent eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Avichai; Ketter-Katz, Hadas; Katzir, Gadi

    2013-11-01

    Chameleons (Chamaeleonidae, reptilia), in common with most ectotherms, show full optic nerve decussation and sparse inter-hemispheric commissures. Chameleons are unique in their capacity for highly independent, large-amplitude eye movements. We address the question: Do common chameleons, Chamaeleo chameleon, during detour, show patterns of lateralization of motion and of eye use that differ from those shown by other ectotherms? To reach a target (prey) in passing an obstacle in a Y-maze, chameleons were required to make a left or a right detour. We analyzed the direction of detours and eye use and found that: (i) individuals differed in their preferred detour direction, (ii) eye use was lateralized at the group level, with significantly longer durations of viewing the target with the right eye, compared with the left eye, (iii) during left side, but not during right side, detours the durations of viewing the target with the right eye were significantly longer than the durations with the left eye. Thus, despite the uniqueness of chameleons' visual system, they display patterns of lateralization of motion and of eye use, typical of other ectotherms. These findings are discussed in relation to hemispheric functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Material tipo de la Colección de Herpetología del Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro, Daiana Paola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El Museo de la Plata (Buenos Aires, República Argentina se fundó en 1889, y la colección herpetológica comenzó a funcionar poco tiempo después, bajo la responsabilidad deJulio G. Koslowsky. En esta contribución se listan los ejemplares tipo de Anfibios y Reptiles depositados en la colección herpetológica del Museo de La Plata. El material tipo depositado corresponde a 32 especies descriptas desde 1895 hasta la actualidad, incluyendo: 14 holotipos, 115 paratipos, 4 lectotipos, 22 paralectotipos, 1 neotipo y 12 sintipos (sin incluir los ejemplares extraviados. Se proporciona, para cada taxón, la información completa referida a estatus de cada ejemplar tipo, sexo, datos de recolección y modificaciones taxonómicas posteriores. The La Plata Museum (Buenos Aires, República Argentina was founded on 1889, and after a little time, the herpetological collection started under the responsibility of Julio G. Koslowsky. In this paper the type specimens of Amphibia and Reptilia housed in the collection of the Herpetology Section at the La Plata Museum are listed. These type materials correspondto 32 species described since 1895 until nowadays, and include: 14 holotypes, 115 paratypes, 4 lectotypes, 22 paralectotypes, 1 neotype and 12 sintypes (this list does not include lost specimens. Complete data about taxonomic status, sex, collection data, and subsequent taxonomic changes are given for each taxon.

  16. Entomologic perception by teachers and students in the municipality of Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Maia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to identify and interpret the entomologic perception of students and teachers living in the Santa Cruz do Xingu, Médio Araguaia region. Semistructured interviews were carried out in December 2006 with students and teachers of the basic and intermediate levels, as well as in Youth and Adult Education, in the municipality of Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso. Of the living beings perceived as “insects” by all the interviewees, 82.75% belonged to the Insecta Class, but the rest belonged either to the Fungi Kingdom or to Classes of Animalia (Amphibia, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Gastropoda, Mammalia and Reptilia. The “insects” were defined by the interviewees as small bugs, which were disgusting and dangerous. When in contact with the “insects”, 76% of the interviewees admitted that they killed them, and the greatest reason given for this was the psychological damage caused by the presence of these animals (65%. To 78% of those interviewed, the “insects” were beings without positive importance. Due to the scarce knowledge about their positive aspects, the perception of the “insects” by the students and teachers living in the Santa Cruz do Xingu region is mainly related to their belief in the negative qualities of these animals, causing aggressive reactions against them as soon as they are perceived in the environment.

  17. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have novel asymmetrical antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Schneemann, Anette; Sung, Joyce; Hew, Brian; Balazs, George H.; Berestecky, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Igs in vertebrates comprise equally sized H and L chains, with exceptions such as H chain–only Abs in camels or natural Ag receptors in sharks. In Reptilia, Igs are known as IgYs. Using immunoassays with isotype-specific mAbs, in this study we show that green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have a 5.7S 120-kDa IgY comprising two equally sized H/L chains with truncated Fc and a 7S 200-kDa IgY comprised of two differently sized H chains bound to L chains and apparently often noncovalently associated with an antigenically related 90-kDa moiety. Both the 200- and 90-kDa 7S molecules are made in response to specific Ag, although the 90-kDa molecule appears more prominent after chronic Ag stimulation. Despite no molecular evidence of a hinge, electron microscopy reveals marked flexibility of Fab arms of 7S and 5.7S IgY. Both IgY can be captured with protein G or melon gel, but less so with protein A. Thus, turtle IgY share some characteristics with mammalian IgG. However, the asymmetrical structure of some turtle Ig and the discovery of an Ig class indicative of chronic antigenic stimulation represent striking advances in our understanding of immunology.

  18. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-01-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term ‘ansulate bone’ is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia. PMID:24102560

  19. Terrestrial origin of viviparity in mesozoic marine reptiles indicated by early triassic embryonic fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-yong; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier; Chen, Guan-bao

    2014-01-01

    Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic). This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction.

  20. Review of the effusus group of the Lanternfly genus Pyrops Spinola, 1839, with one new species and notes on trophobiosis (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Fulgoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Constant

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The species group effusus of the genus Pyrops Spinola, 1839 is reviewed and the nomenclatural history of the genus Pyrops is briefly summarized. One new species from eastern Borneo, Pyrops synavei sp. nov., is described. P. gunjii (Satô & Nagai, 1994 stat. nov. is proposed as a valid species instead of a subspecies of P. whiteheadi (Distant, 1889. P. maquilinganus (Baker, 1925 is removed from the effusus group and placed back into the candelaria group. P. cyanirostris (Guérin-Méneville, 1845 is removed from the group and not attributed to any of the currently defined species groups. An illustrated key to the species of the group with the addition of P. intricatus (Walker, 1857 and a distribution map are given. The effusus group is restricted to Borneo and adjacent Laut Island and presently contains 4 species: P. effusus (Distant, 1891, P. gunjii (Satô & Nagai, 1994 stat.nov., P. synavei sp. nov. and P. whiteheadi (Distant, 1889. Trophobiosis observations with the gecko Gehyra mutilata (Wiegmann, 1835 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae and two species of cockroaches (Insecta: Blattodea, one Dorylaea sp. and an unidentified species of Pseudophyllodromiinae, are reported and illustrated for P. whiteheadi; observation with a cockroach, Dorylaea sp., is reported for P. intricatus.

  1. Terrestrial origin of viviparity in mesozoic marine reptiles indicated by early triassic embryonic fossils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Motani

    Full Text Available Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia, which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic. This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction.

  2. A bird-like skull in a Triassic diapsid reptile increases heterogeneity of the morphological and phylogenetic radiation of Diapsida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Adam C.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.

    2017-10-01

    The Triassic Period saw the first appearance of numerous amniote lineages (e.g. Lepidosauria, Archosauria, Mammalia) that defined Mesozoic ecosystems following the end Permian Mass Extinction, as well as the first major morphological diversification of crown-group reptiles. Unfortunately, much of our understanding of this event comes from the record of large-bodied reptiles (total body length > 1 m). Here we present a new species of drepanosaurid (small-bodied, chameleon-like diapsids) from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of New Mexico. Using reconstructions of micro-computed tomography data, we reveal the three-dimensional skull osteology of this clade for the first time. The skull presents many archaic anatomical traits unknown in Triassic crown-group reptiles (e.g. absence of bony support for the external ear), whereas other traits (e.g. toothless rostrum, anteriorly directed orbits, inflated endocranium) resemble derived avian theropods. A phylogenetic analysis of Permo-Triassic diapsids supports the hypothesis that drepanosaurs are an archaic lineage that originated in the Permian, far removed from crown-group Reptilia. The phylogenetic position of drepanosaurids indicates the presence of archaic Permian clades among Triassic small reptile assemblages and that morphological convergence produced a remarkably bird-like skull nearly 100 Myr before one is known to have emerged in Theropoda.

  3. Invasion of Ancestral Mammals into Dim-light Environments Inferred from Adaptive Evolution of the Phototransduction Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Haifeng; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-20

    Nocturnality is a key evolutionary innovation of mammals that enables mammals to occupy relatively empty nocturnal niches. Invasion of ancestral mammals into nocturnality has long been inferred from the phylogenetic relationships of crown Mammalia, which is primarily nocturnal, and crown Reptilia, which is primarily diurnal, although molecular evidence for this is lacking. Here we used phylogenetic analyses of the vision genes involved in the phototransduction pathway to predict the diel activity patterns of ancestral mammals and reptiles. Our results demonstrated that the common ancestor of the extant Mammalia was dominated by positive selection for dim-light vision, supporting the predominate nocturnality of the ancestral mammals. Further analyses showed that the nocturnality of the ancestral mammals was probably derived from the predominate diurnality of the ancestral amniotes, which featured strong positive selection for bright-light vision. Like the ancestral amniotes, the common ancestor of the extant reptiles and various taxa in Squamata, one of the main competitors of the temporal niches of the ancestral mammals, were found to be predominate diurnality as well. Despite this relatively apparent temporal niche partitioning between ancestral mammals and the relevant reptiles, our results suggested partial overlap of their temporal niches during crepuscular periods.

  4. Macroscopic description of the limb muscles of Tupinambis merianae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barbosa Casals

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae belongs to the Teiidae family. It is distributed throughout the Americas, with many species, including Brazilian ones. They are from the Tupinambis genus, the largest representatives of the Teiidae family. For this study three animals (run over coming from donation were used. The dissected lizards were fixed in 10%, formaldehyde, and the macroscopic analysis was carried out in a detailed and photo documented way, keeping the selected structures “in situ”. This paper had as its main aim contributing to the macroscopic description of the chest myology, as well as the thoracic and pelvic limbs of the lizard T. merianae. The results obtained from this research were compared to authors who have studied animals from the same Reptilia class. Thus, we conclude that our macroscopic results are similar to those already described by the researchers Hildebrand (1995, Moro and Abdala (2004 and Abdala and Diogo (2010. We should highlight that the knowledge on anatomy has importance and applications to various areas within Biology, contributing in a substantial way to the areas of human health and technology.

  5. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole.

  6. RELIEF JENIS-JENIS FAUNA DAN SETTING LINGKUNGANNYA PADA PAHATAN DINDING CANDI BOROBUDUR (Fauna and Environmental Setting Reliefs on Sculptured Wall of the Borobudur Temple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Agus Suripto

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Dalam perkembangan kebudayaannya, manusia selalu akrab dengan fauna yang hidup di sekitar lingkungannya. Pada dinding gua yang pernah dihuni oleh manusia, bangunan candi, piramid, sphinx dsb. dijumpai gambaran tentang fauna. Pada dinding Candi Borobudur banyak dijumpai relief berbagai kelompok fauna tetapi belum diketahui apakah fauna itu semuanya berasal dari India atau terdapat pula kelompok yang ada atau pernah ada di Pulau Jawa. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui relief jenis-jenis fauna yang dipahat pada dinding candi Borobudur, dan mengetahui asal-usul jenis yang tergarnbar pada relief itu dari Pulau Jawa atau dari India. Informasi itu diharapkan dapat diungkapkan ada tidaknya gambaran setting lingkungan Pulau Jawa tercermin pada pahatan di dinding Candi itu. Relief fauna pada pahatan dinding langkan, dinding utama bagian atas-bawah di tingkatan Rupadhatu dipotret dan nama kelompok fauna diindentifikasi dengan buku-buku kunci identifikasi bergambar, kemudian penyebaran alami masing-masing kelompok fauna diketahui melalui kajian pustaka. Data yang diperoleh dianalisis secara deskriptif untuk mengungkap ada atau tidaknya gambaran setting lingkungan Pulau Jawa yang tercermin pada pahatan di dinding Candi Borsbudur. Pada dinding Candi Borobudur terdapat relief paling sedikit 25 jenis anggota Osteichthyes, Reptilia, Aves dan Mammalia yang dipahat secara natural, dan terdapat paling sedikit 5 jenis hewan yang dipahat secara setilir. Semua jenis fauna itu terdapat di Asia Selatan, dan beberapa di anlaranya secara alami tidak pernah hidup di Pulau Jawa, misalnya singa Pantera leo. Setting lingkungan India Abad VII tervisualisasi dengan baik pada relief pahatan dinding Candi Borobudur, tetapi setting lingkungan Pulau Jawa sampai sebelum masa penjajahan Belanda tidak tergambar dengan baik.   ABSTRACT In the cource of culture development, human was always close to fauna in their surrounding areas. Pictures of fauna are found in

  7. Methodological limitations of counting total leukocytes and thrombocytes in reptiles (Amazon turtle, Podocnemis expansa: an analysis and discussion Limitações metodológicas de contagens de leucócitos e trombócitos totais em répteis (tartaruga da Amazônia, Podocnemis expansa: uma análise e discussão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tavares-Dias

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare three different methods for counting white blood cells [WBC] (Natt and Herrick method, estimation with 1,000 and 2,000 erythrocytes and three methods for counting total thrombocytes [TT] (Wojtaszek method, estimation with 1,000 and 2,000 erythrocytes in a South American freshwater turtle species, Podocnemis expansa, Schweigger 1812 (Reptilia, Pelomedusidae. Direct WBC counts using the Natt and Herrick method showed limitations, which are discussed here. The WBC and TT counts using 1,000 erythrocytes from blood smears are not recommended for Amazon turtles nor other reptilian species, since wide variation in counts can be observed. Estimation methods for determining WBC and TT based on 2,000 erythrocytes of blood smears were most acceptable because they allow a differentiation between leukocytes and thrombocytes and also had a smaller variation. The methods investigated here for the Amazon turtle, which have been widely used in other reptile species, provided evidence that the most acceptable method is not that of using diluted stains and a hemocytometer.O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar três diferentes métodos para contar leucócitos totais [LT] (método de Natt & Herrick, de estimação em 1000 e 2000 eritrócitos e três métodos para contar trombócitos totais [TT] ( método de Wojtaszek, de estimação em 1000 e 2000 eritrócitos em uma espécie de tartaruga de água doce da América do Sul, Podocnemis expansa, Schweigger 1812 (Reptilia, Pelomedusidae. As contagens diretas de LT usando o método de Natt & Herrick mostraram limitações que são aqui discutidas. As contagens de LT e TT usando estimativa em 1000 eritrócitos na extensão sanguínea não são recomendadas para tartaruga-da-Amazônia nem para outras espécies de répteis, pois houve ampla variação nestas contagens. Os métodos para determinar LT e TT baseados em 2000 eritrócitos nas extensões sanguíneas foram mais aceitáveis porque

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of the MHC: the evolution of class I duplication blocks, diversity and complexity from shark to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shiina, Takashi; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kohara, Sakae; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region is composed of a group of linked genes involved functionally with the adaptive and innate immune systems. The class I and class II genes are intrinsic features of the MHC and have been found in all the jawed vertebrates studied so far. The MHC genomic regions of the human and the chicken (B locus) have been fully sequenced and mapped, and the mouse MHC sequence is almost finished. Information on the MHC genomic structures (size, complexity, genic and intergenic composition and organization, gene order and number) of other vertebrates is largely limited or nonexistent. Therefore, we are mapping, sequencing and analyzing the MHC genomic regions of different human haplotypes and at least eight nonhuman species. Here, we review our progress with these sequences and compare the human MHC structure with that of the nonhuman primates (chimpanzee and rhesus macaque), other mammals (pigs, mice and rats) and nonmammalian vertebrates such as birds (chicken and quail), bony fish (medaka, pufferfish and zebrafish) and cartilaginous fish (nurse shark). This comparison reveals a complex MHC structure for mammals and a relatively simpler design for nonmammalian animals with a hypothetical prototypic structure for the shark. In the mammalian MHC, there are two to five different class I duplication blocks embedded within a framework of conserved nonclass I and/or nonclass II genes. With a few exceptions, the class I framework genes are absent from the MHC of birds, bony fish and sharks. Comparative genomics of the MHC reveal a highly plastic region with major structural differences between the mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Additional genomic data are needed on animals of the reptilia, crocodilia and marsupial classes to find the origins of the class I framework genes and examples of structures that may be intermediate between the simple and complex MHC organizations of birds and mammals, respectively.

  9. The enigmatic marine reptile nanchangosaurus from the lower triassic of Hubei, China and the phylogenetic affinities of Hupehsuchia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-hong; Motani, Ryosuke; Cheng, Long; Jiang, Da-yong; Rieppel, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The study of the holotype and of a new specimen of Nanchangosaurus suni (Reptilia; Diapsida; Hupehsuchia) revealed a suite of hitherto unrecognized characters. For example, Nanchangosaurus has bipartite neural spines and its vertebral count is nearly identical to that of Hupehsuchus. It differs from the latter in having poorly developed forelimbs despite the advanced ossification in the rest of the skeleton. Other differences all pertain to hupehsuchian plesiomorphies retained in Nanchangosaurus, such as low neural spines. The relationship of Hupehsuchia within Diapsida was analyzed based on a data matrix containing 41 taxa coded for 213 characters, of which 18 were identified as aquatic adaptations from functional inferences. These aquatic adaptations may be vulnerable to the argumentation of character homology because expectation for homoplasy is high. There is an apparent incongruence between phylogenetic signals from aquatic adaptations and the rest of the data, with aquatic adaptations favoring all marine reptiles but Helveticosaurus to form a super-clade. However, this super-clade does not obtain when aquatic adaptations were deleted, whereas individual marine reptile clades are all derived without them. We examined all possible combinations of the 18 aquatic adaptations (n = 262143) and found that four lineages of marine reptiles are recognized almost regardless of which of these features were included in the analysis: Hupehsuchia-Ichthyopterygia clade, Sauropterygia-Saurosphargidae clade, Thalattosauria, and Helveticosaurus. The interrelationships among these four depended on the combination of aquatic adaptations to be included, i.e., assumed to be homologous a priori by bypassing character argumentation. Hupehsuchia always appeared as the sister taxon of Ichthyopterygia.

  10. Percepção entomológica por docentes e discentes do município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Frida Hatsue Modro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2009v22n2p153 Este trabalho objetivou identificar e interpretar a percepção entomológica de alunos e professores residentes em Santa Cruz do Xingu, região do Médio Araguaia. Entrevistas semi-estruturadas foram realizadas em dezembro de 2006 com alunos e professores dos ensinos fundamental, médio e Educação de Jovens e Adultos em dezembro de 2006, no Município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso. Dos seres vivos percebidos como “insetos” por todos os entrevistados, 82,75% pertenceram à Classe Insecta, as demais citações foram pertencentes ao Reino Fungi e a outras Classes do Reino Animalia (Amphibia, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Gastropoda, Mammalia e Reptilia. Os “insetos” foram definidos, como bichos pequenos, nojentos ou perigosos. Em contato com os “insetos”, 76% dos entrevistados admitiram matá-los e a maior razão para tal reação foi o dano psicológico causado pela presença destes animais (65%. Para 78% dos entrevistados, os “insetos” foram seres sem importância positiva. Devido ao pouco conhecimento sobre os seus aspectos positivos, a percepção dos “insetos” por alunos e professores residentes da região de Santa Cruz do Xingu está relacionada, principalmente, à atribuição de qualidades negativas a estes animais, provocando reações de agressividade contra os “insetos” assim que percebidos no ambiente.

  11. The enigmatic marine reptile nanchangosaurus from the lower triassic of Hubei, China and the phylogenetic affinities of Hupehsuchia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hong Chen

    Full Text Available The study of the holotype and of a new specimen of Nanchangosaurus suni (Reptilia; Diapsida; Hupehsuchia revealed a suite of hitherto unrecognized characters. For example, Nanchangosaurus has bipartite neural spines and its vertebral count is nearly identical to that of Hupehsuchus. It differs from the latter in having poorly developed forelimbs despite the advanced ossification in the rest of the skeleton. Other differences all pertain to hupehsuchian plesiomorphies retained in Nanchangosaurus, such as low neural spines. The relationship of Hupehsuchia within Diapsida was analyzed based on a data matrix containing 41 taxa coded for 213 characters, of which 18 were identified as aquatic adaptations from functional inferences. These aquatic adaptations may be vulnerable to the argumentation of character homology because expectation for homoplasy is high. There is an apparent incongruence between phylogenetic signals from aquatic adaptations and the rest of the data, with aquatic adaptations favoring all marine reptiles but Helveticosaurus to form a super-clade. However, this super-clade does not obtain when aquatic adaptations were deleted, whereas individual marine reptile clades are all derived without them. We examined all possible combinations of the 18 aquatic adaptations (n = 262143 and found that four lineages of marine reptiles are recognized almost regardless of which of these features were included in the analysis: Hupehsuchia-Ichthyopterygia clade, Sauropterygia-Saurosphargidae clade, Thalattosauria, and Helveticosaurus. The interrelationships among these four depended on the combination of aquatic adaptations to be included, i.e., assumed to be homologous a priori by bypassing character argumentation. Hupehsuchia always appeared as the sister taxon of Ichthyopterygia.

  12. Is response to fire influenced by dietary specialization and mobility? A comparative study with multiple animal assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Santos

    Full Text Available Fire is a major agent involved in landscape transformation and an indirect cause of changes in species composition. Responses to fire may vary greatly depending on life histories and functional traits of species. We have examined the taxonomic and functional responses to fire of eight taxonomic animal groups displaying a gradient of dietary and mobility patterns: Gastropoda, Heteroptera, Formicidae, Coleoptera, Araneae, Orthoptera, Reptilia and Aves. The fieldwork was conducted in a Mediterranean protected area on 3 sites (one unburnt and two burnt with different postfire management practices with five replicates per site. We collected information from 4606 specimens from 274 animal species. Similarity in species composition and abundance between areas was measured by the Bray-Curtis index and ANOSIM, and comparisons between animal and plant responses by Mantel tests. We analyze whether groups with the highest percentage of omnivorous species, these species being more generalist in their dietary habits, show weak responses to fire (i.e. more similarity between burnt and unburnt areas, and independent responses to changes in vegetation. We also explore how mobility, i.e. dispersal ability, influences responses to fire. Our results demonstrate that differences in species composition and abundance between burnt and unburnt areas differed among groups. We found a tendency towards presenting lower differences between areas for groups with higher percentages of omnivorous species. Moreover, taxa with a higher percentage of omnivorous species had significantly more independent responses of changes in vegetation. High- (e.g. Aves and low-mobility (e.g. Gastropoda groups had the strongest responses to fire (higher R scores of the ANOSIM; however, we failed to find a significant general pattern with all the groups according to their mobility. Our results partially support the idea that functional traits underlie the response of organisms to environmental

  13. Is response to fire influenced by dietary specialization and mobility? A comparative study with multiple animal assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Xavier; Mateos, Eduardo; Bros, Vicenç; Brotons, Lluís; De Mas, Eva; Herraiz, Joan A; Herrando, Sergi; Miño, Àngel; Olmo-Vidal, Josep M; Quesada, Javier; Ribes, Jordi; Sabaté, Santiago; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Serra, Antoni; Vallejo, V Ramón; Viñolas, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Fire is a major agent involved in landscape transformation and an indirect cause of changes in species composition. Responses to fire may vary greatly depending on life histories and functional traits of species. We have examined the taxonomic and functional responses to fire of eight taxonomic animal groups displaying a gradient of dietary and mobility patterns: Gastropoda, Heteroptera, Formicidae, Coleoptera, Araneae, Orthoptera, Reptilia and Aves. The fieldwork was conducted in a Mediterranean protected area on 3 sites (one unburnt and two burnt with different postfire management practices) with five replicates per site. We collected information from 4606 specimens from 274 animal species. Similarity in species composition and abundance between areas was measured by the Bray-Curtis index and ANOSIM, and comparisons between animal and plant responses by Mantel tests. We analyze whether groups with the highest percentage of omnivorous species, these species being more generalist in their dietary habits, show weak responses to fire (i.e. more similarity between burnt and unburnt areas), and independent responses to changes in vegetation. We also explore how mobility, i.e. dispersal ability, influences responses to fire. Our results demonstrate that differences in species composition and abundance between burnt and unburnt areas differed among groups. We found a tendency towards presenting lower differences between areas for groups with higher percentages of omnivorous species. Moreover, taxa with a higher percentage of omnivorous species had significantly more independent responses of changes in vegetation. High- (e.g. Aves) and low-mobility (e.g. Gastropoda) groups had the strongest responses to fire (higher R scores of the ANOSIM); however, we failed to find a significant general pattern with all the groups according to their mobility. Our results partially support the idea that functional traits underlie the response of organisms to environmental changes caused

  14. No evidence of the effect of extreme weather events on annual occurrence of four groups of ectothermic species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka H Malinowska

    Full Text Available Weather extremes may have strong effects on biodiversity, as known from theoretical and modelling studies. Predicted negative effects of increased weather variation are found only for a few species, mostly plants and birds in empirical studies. Therefore, we investigated correlations between weather variability and patterns in occupancy, local colonisations and local extinctions (metapopulation metrics across four groups of ectotherms: Odonata, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Reptilia. We analysed data of 134 species on a 1×1 km-grid base, collected in the last 20 years from the Netherlands, combining standardised data and opportunistic data. We applied dynamic site-occupancy models and used the results as input for analyses of (i trends in distribution patterns, (ii the effect of temperature on colonisation and persistence probability, and (iii the effect of years with extreme weather on all the three metapopulation metrics. All groups, except butterflies, showed more positive than negative trends in metapopulation metrics. We did not find evidence that the probability of colonisation or persistence increases with temperature nor that extreme weather events are reflected in higher extinction risks. We could not prove that weather extremes have visible and consistent negative effects on ectothermic species in temperate northern hemisphere. These findings do not confirm the general prediction that increased weather variability imperils biodiversity. We conclude that weather extremes might not be ecologically relevant for the majority of species. Populations might be buffered against weather variation (e.g. by habitat heterogeneity, or other factors might be masking the effects (e.g. availability and quality of habitat. Consequently, we postulate that weather extremes have less, or different, impact in real world metapopulations than theory and models suggest.

  15. Trichospirura aethiopica n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae from Malacomys longipes (Rodentia: Muridae in Gabon, first record of the genus in the Ethiopian Realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain Odile

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichospirura aethiopica n. sp. is described from unidentified tubular structures (pancreatic ducts? near the stomach of the murid Malacomys longipes Milne-Edwards, 1877 in Gabon. The extremely long and narrow buccal capsule, posterior position of the vulva, unequal spicules and absence of caudal alae readily identified the specimens as belonging to Trichospirura Smith & Chitwood, 1967, but a combination of several characters distinguished them from the described species in this genus. Males of the new species are characterized by the absence of precloacal papillae, the presence of four pairs of postcloacal papillae and a left spicule length of 165–200 μm. With only five nominal and one unnamed species, the host range of Trichospirura extends into the Neotropical, Indo-Malayan and Ethiopian Realms and comprises three classes of vertebrates, Amphibia, Reptilia and Mammalia, suggesting a larger species diversity than that currently recorded. Detection is difficult as predilection sites are often outside the gut lumen. It was noted that, irrespective of their geographic origin, species from mammals share certain characters (shorter left spicule and absence of precloacal papillae that oppose them to those from amphibians and reptiles. A hypothesis for the origin of Trichospirura in mammals through a remote host-switching event in tupaiids in southern Asia, likely facilitated by the intermediate hosts, and for their subsequent migration to the Ethiopian and finally Neotropical Realm is proposed. Regarding the two species from anurans and saurians in the Antilles, one or two host-switching events are considered equally possible, based on morphological characters.

  16. A genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance Stacey L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome elucidation is now in high gear for many organisms, and whilst genetic maps have been developed for a broad array of species, surprisingly, no such maps exist for a crocodilian, or indeed any other non-avian member of the Class Reptilia. Genetic linkage maps are essential tools for the mapping and dissection of complex quantitative trait loci (QTL, and in order to permit systematic genome scans for the identification of genes affecting economically important traits in farmed crocodilians, a comprehensive genetic linage map will be necessary. Results A first-generation genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus was constructed using 203 microsatellite markers amplified across a two-generation pedigree comprising ten full-sib families from a commercial population at Darwin Crocodile Farm, Northern Territory, Australia. Linkage analyses identified fourteen linkage groups comprising a total of 180 loci, with 23 loci remaining unlinked. Markers were ordered within linkage groups employing a heuristic approach using CRIMAP v3.0 software. The estimated female and male recombination map lengths were 1824.1 and 319.0 centimorgans (cM respectively, revealing an uncommonly large disparity in recombination map lengths between sexes (ratio of 5.7:1. Conclusion We have generated the first genetic linkage map for a crocodilian, or indeed any other non-avian reptile. The uncommonly large disparity in recombination map lengths confirms previous preliminary evidence of major differences in sex-specific recombination rates in a species that exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD. However, at this point the reason for this disparity in saltwater crocodiles remains unclear. This map will be a valuable resource for crocodilian researchers, facilitating the systematic genome scans necessary for identifying genes affecting complex traits of economic importance in the crocodile industry. In addition

  17. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Strongyluris calotis (Nematoda: Ascaridida: Heterakidae) in South East and East Asian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Binh Thi; Ong, An Vinh; Luc, Pham Van; Sato, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Strongyluris calotis is a heterakid nematode in the large intestine of agamid lizards (Reptilia: Sauria: Agamidae) from the Oriental Region. The standard light microscopic definition of the species counts the "caudal papillae" as 10 pairs on male worms. However, previous work from our group using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the heterakid from agamid lizards in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore revealed that this counting contained a pair of phasmids and that two pairs of postcloacal papillae were completely fused to form a pair of united papillae, thus resulting in "10 pairs." In the present study, we examined S. calotis specimens from the Emma Gray's forest lizard, Calotes emma (Agamidae), living in the plain forest at low altitude, and the Vietnam false bloodsucker, Pseudocalotes brevipes (Agamidae), living in the mountainous forest at high altitude in the northern part of Vietnam. Using SEM, the arrangement of caudal papillae in male worms from an Emma Gray's forest lizard was found to be comparable to classical S. calotis specimens from agamid lizards collected in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore. However, male worms from Vietnam false bloodsuckers did not have a pair of united papillae but had 10 pairs of independent caudal papillae with a pair of phasmids. Molecular genetic analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of worms of the classical S. calotis morphotype from Japan and Singapore and two S. calotis morphotypes from Vietnam demonstrated absolutely identical nucleotide sequences of partial 18S rDNA (at least 1764 base pairs (bp)) and 5.8S rDNA (158 bp). However, intraspecific differences were detected in other regions of the rDNA, related to the geographical distribution of hosts regardless of morphotype: 97.8-98.5 % identity (443-446 bp/453 bp) in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region, 96.6-98.0 % identity (425-431 bp/440 bp) in the ITS-2 region, and 99.6-99.7 % identity (1149-1151 bp/1154 bp) in the 28S rDNA. Thus, in the future, taxonomic

  18. Recent and subrecent diet of the barn owl (Tyto alba in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obuch Ján

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We completed data on the diet of the barn owl (Tyto alba predominately from pellets for the period of the last 50 years from Slovakia. We analyzed material from 251 locations and 16 territorial units. The aggregate represents 119,231 pieces of prey from 47 species of mammals (Mammalia, 95.7% and 58 species of birds (Aves, 3.9%, with a small representation of amphibians, reptiles (Amphibia and Reptilia, 0.2% and invertebrates (Invertebrata, 0.2%. The obtaining of food among the owls is limited to synanthropic environments and the surrounding agricultural landscape, and the centre of its distribution in the recent period (i.e. the past 50 years: 1965-201 5 has been concentrated mainly on the southern parts of Slovakia. In this environment the common vole (Microtus arvalis, 59.6% is the primary prey. Additional prey are rodents of the family Muridae: Mus musculus (5.6%, Micromys minutus (2.2%, Apodemus microps (2.2%, A. flavicollis (2.0%, A. sylvaticus (1 .6% and A. agrarius (1 .5%; insectivores of the family Soricidae: Sorex araneus (6.2%, S. minutus (2.4%, Crocidura leucodon (4.8% and C. suaveolens (2.8%; and the house sparrow Passer domesticus (2.9%. In the higher situated Turcianska kotlina Basin the species M. arvalis (74.3% has higher domination, and instead of the white-toothed shrews the water shrews Neomys anomalus (2.8% and N. fodiens (1 .3% are more abundantly represented. In 3 localities owls focused on hunting bats; for example, in the church in Ratková the order Chiroptera made up 35.2% of prey. From the subrecent period (i.e. from before more than 50 years ago we evaluate 4 samples from the territory of Slovakia with 15,601 pieces of prey ofT. alba. Before more than 50 years ago owls were also more abundantly represented at higher elevations in Slovakia, evidence of which is Weisz’s collection of pellets from 1 6 localities in the Ondavská vrchovina Upland in the years 1945 to 1963, but also a registry of data from the 19th and

  19. Genetics and evolution of colour patterns in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Ballen, Cissy

    2013-01-01

    The study of coloration in the polyphyletic reptilians has flourished in the last two decades, in particular with respect to the underlying genetics of colour traits, the function of colours in social interactions, and ongoing selection on these traits in the wild. The taxonomic bias, however, is profound: at this level of resolution almost all available information is for diurnal lizards. Therefore, we focus on case studies, for which there are as complete causal sequences of colour evolution as possible, from phenotypic expression of variation in colour, to ongoing selection in the wild. For work prior to 1992 and for a broader coverage of reptilian coloration we refer the readers to Cooper and Greenburg's (Biology of the Reptilia, 1992) review. There are seven major conclusions we would like to emphasise: (a) visual systems in diurnal lizards are broadly conserved but among the wider range of reptiles in general, there is functionally important variation in the number and type of photoreceptors, spectral tuning of photopigments and optical properties of the eye; (b) coloration in reptiles is a function of complex interactions between structural and pigmentary components, with implications for both proximate control and condition dependence of colour expression; (c) studies of colour-variable species have enabled estimates of heritability of colour and colour patterns, which often show a simple Mendelian pattern of inheritance; (d) colour-polymorphic lizard species sometimes, but not always, show striking differences in genetically encoded reproductive tactics and provide useful models for studying the evolution and maintenance of polymorphism; (e) both male and female colours are sometimes, but not always, a significant component of socio-sexual signalling, often based on multiple traits; (f) evidence for effects of hormones and condition on colour expression, and trade-offs with immunocompetence and parasite load, is variable; (g) lizards show fading of colours

  20. Integration of morphological data sets for phylogenetic analysis of Amniota: the importance of integumentary characters and increased taxonomic sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert V

    2005-08-01

    data set compiled from published sources and data original to this study supports monophyly of Amniota, Synapsida, Reptilia, Parareptilia, Eureptilia, Eosuchia, Diapsida, Neodiapsida, Sauria, Lepidosauria, and Archosauriformes, as well as several more highly nested divisions within the latter two clades. Turtles are here resolved as the sister taxon to a monophyletic Lepidosauria (squamates + Sphenodon), a novel phylogenetic position that nevertheless is consistent with recent molecular and morphological studies that have hypothesized diapsid affinities for this clade.

  1. Dieta del Pirincho (Guira guira en el nordeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E Soave

    2008-12-01

    only on animals. The trophic spectrum was determined on the basis of the identification of 92 items, all of animal origin, principally insecta (98 %, Annelida, Mollusca, Arachnida, Crustacea, Amphibia, Reptilia and Aves. in conclusion, G. guira is a opportunistic species that consumes animal preys exclusively. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (4: 1883-1892. Epub 2008 December 12.

  2. The development of the Middle Triassic tectonical controlled Germanic Basin of Central Europe and the palaeoenvironmental related distribution of marine and terrestrial reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    -Italy). Bolletino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 41 (1), 37-40. Bachmann, G.H. and Aref, M.A.M., 2005. A seismite in Triassic gypsum deposits (Grabfeld Formation, Ladinian), Southwest Germany. Sedimentary Geology 180, 75-89. De Zanche, V. and Farabegoli, E. 1988. Anisian paleogeographic evolution in the Central-Western Southern Alps. Memoirs Scientifique Geologique 40, 399-411. Demathieu, G.R. 1985. Trace fossil assemblages in Middle Triassic marginal marine deposits, eastern border of the Massif Central, France. Societe Economie Paléontologie et Mineralogie, Special Publications, 35, 53-66. Diedrich, C. 2005. Actuopalaeontological trackway experiments with Iguana on intertidal flat carbonates of the Arabian Gulf - a comparison to fossil Rhynchosauroides tracks of Triassic carbonate tidal flat megatracksites in the European Germanic Basin. Senckenbergiana maritime, 35 (2), 203-220. Diedrich, C. 2008a. Millions of reptile tracks - Early to Middle Triassic carbonate tidal flat migration bridges of Central Europe. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 259, 410-423. Diedrich, C. 2008b. Palaeogeographic evolution of the marine Middle Triassic marine Germanic Basin changements - with emphasis on the carbonate tidal flat and shallow marine habitats of reptiles in Central Pangaea. Global and Planetary Change, 65 (2009), 27-55. Diedrich, C. 2009a. The vertebrates of the Anisian/Ladinian boundary (Middle Triassic) from Bissendorf (NW Germany) and their contribution to the anatomy, palaeoecology, and palaeobiogeography of the Germanic Basin reptiles. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 273 (2009), 1-16. Diedrich, C. 2009b. Die Saurierspuren-Grabung im basalen Mittleren Muschelkalk (Anis, Mitteltrias) von Bernburg (Sachsen-Anhalt). Archäologie in Sachsen-Anhalt, Sonderband 2009, 1-62. Diedrich, 2010a. Palaeoecology of Placodus gigas (Reptilia) and other placodontids - macroalgae feeder of the Middle Triassic in the Germanic Basin of Central Europe and