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Sample records for molecule inhibitor targeting

  1. Novel targets and derived small molecule inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Recent research advances have defined a key role of the bone marrow (BM) in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis thereby leading to new treatment paradigms, which aim to target both the tumor cell as well as its BM microenvironment. The incorporation of thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide into conventional cytotoxic and transplantation regimens in relapsed and refractory, but also in newly diagnosed MM has changed treatment options during the last decade. However, MM remains still incurable. Ongoing translational research aims to identify additional therapeutic targets and to design derived agents, predominantly small molecule inhibitors, with higher potency and less toxicity to further improve MM patient outcome and to overcome drug resistance.

  2. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

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    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  3. Small molecule inhibitors target the tissue transglutaminase and fibronectin interaction.

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    Bakhtiyor Yakubov

    Full Text Available Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 mediates protein crosslinking through generation of ε-(γ-glutamyl lysine isopeptide bonds and promotes cell adhesion through interaction with fibronectin (FN and integrins. Cell adhesion to the peritoneal matrix regulated by TG2 facilitates ovarian cancer dissemination. Therefore, disruption of the TG2-FN complex by small molecules may inhibit cell adhesion and metastasis. A novel high throughput screening (HTS assay based on AlphaLISA™ technology was developed to measure the formation of a complex between His-TG2 and the biotinylated FN fragment that binds TG2 and to discover small molecules that inhibit this protein-protein interaction. Several hits were identified from 10,000 compounds screened. The top candidates selected based on >70% inhibition of the TG2/FN complex formation were confirmed by using ELISA and bioassays measuring cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and proliferation. In conclusion, the AlphaLISA bead format assay measuring the TG2-FN interaction is robust and suitable for HTS of small molecules. One compound identified from the screen (TG53 potently inhibited ovarian cancer cell adhesion to FN, cell migration, and invasion and could be further developed as a potential inhibitor for ovarian cancer dissemination.

  4. A novel small molecule inhibitor targeted at Bcl-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; LiJi; ZHANG; ZhiChao; WANG; YuanYuan; WEI; MeiJiao; XU; Qin

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the heterocyclic compound 8-oxo-3-thiomorpholino-8H-acenaphtho[1,2-b]pyrrole-9-carbonitrile (S1) was synthesized and shown to induce apoptosis in both (H22) hematoma and (MCF-7) adenocarcinoma cells. The IC50 values of S1 against the two cell lines were 0.17 and 0.09 μmol/L, respectively. Furthermore, the apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound was highlighted both in vivo and in vitro. Subsequent experiments identified Bcl-2 as the primary target of S1, as a significant reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels was observed in H22 cells following a two-hour treatment with 10 μmol/L S1. While rapid depolarization of mitochondrial membranes led immediately to caspase 9 activation, no changes were identified in either caspase 8 levels or levels in Bcl-2 mRNA. These data were consistent with the results of circular dichroism (CD) spectra analysis, revealing that S1 inactivated the Bcl-2 protein by destroying its critical alpha helices. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of S1 in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

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    Mohammad Hojjat-Farsangi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1 the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2 the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3 emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs.

  6. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

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    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  7. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-12-18

    Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, was found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppress SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibit SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity.

  8. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

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    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  9. Small-molecule auxin inhibitors that target YUCCA are powerful tools for studying auxin function.

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    Kakei, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Ayako; Sato, Akiko; Ishida, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Rie; Higashi, Shouichi; Kokudo, Yumiko; Ishii, Takahiro; Soeno, Kazuo; Shimada, Yukihisa

    2015-11-01

    Auxin is essential for plant growth and development, this makes it difficult to study the biological function of auxin using auxin-deficient mutants. Chemical genetics have the potential to overcome this difficulty by temporally reducing the auxin function using inhibitors. Recently, the indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) pathway was suggested to be a major biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana L. for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most common member of the auxin family. In this pathway, YUCCA, a flavin-containing monooxygenase (YUC), catalyzes the last step of conversion from IPyA to IAA. In this study, we screened effective inhibitors, 4-biphenylboronic acid (BBo) and 4-phenoxyphenylboronic acid (PPBo), which target YUC. These compounds inhibited the activity of recombinant YUC in vitro, reduced endogenous IAA content, and inhibited primary root elongation and lateral root formation in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings. Co-treatment with IAA reduced the inhibitory effects. Kinetic studies of BBo and PPBo showed that they are competitive inhibitors of the substrate IPyA. Inhibition constants (Ki ) of BBo and PPBo were 67 and 56 nm, respectively. In addition, PPBo did not interfere with the auxin response of auxin-marker genes when it was co-treated with IAA, suggesting that PPBo is not an inhibitor of auxin sensing or signaling. We propose that these compounds are a class of auxin biosynthesis inhibitors that target YUC. These small molecules are powerful tools for the chemical genetic analysis of auxin function.

  10. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

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    Marion Peyressatre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported.

  11. Targeting of the MYCN protein with small molecule c-MYC inhibitors.

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    Inga Müller

    Full Text Available Members of the MYC family are the most frequently deregulated oncogenes in human cancer and are often correlated with aggressive disease and/or poorly differentiated tumors. Since patients with MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma have a poor prognosis, targeting MYCN using small molecule inhibitors could represent a promising therapeutic approach. We have previously demonstrated that the small molecule 10058-F4, known to bind to the c-MYC bHLHZip dimerization domain and inhibiting the c-MYC/MAX interaction, also interferes with the MYCN/MAX dimerization in vitro and imparts anti-tumorigenic effects in neuroblastoma tumor models with MYCN overexpression. Our previous work also revealed that MYCN-inhibition leads to mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in accumulation of lipid droplets in neuroblastoma cells. To expand our understanding of how small molecules interfere with MYCN, we have now analyzed the direct binding of 10058-F4, as well as three of its analogs; #474, #764 and 10058-F4(7RH, one metabolite C-m/z 232, and a structurally unrelated c-MYC inhibitor 10074-G5, to the bHLHZip domain of MYCN. We also assessed their ability to induce apoptosis, neurite outgrowth and lipid accumulation in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, all c-MYC binding molecules tested also bind MYCN as assayed by surface plasmon resonance. Using a proximity ligation assay, we found reduced interaction between MYCN and MAX after treatment with all molecules except for the 10058-F4 metabolite C-m/z 232 and the non-binder 10058-F4(7RH. Importantly, 10074-G5 and 10058-F4 were the most efficient in inducing neuronal differentiation and lipid accumulation in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells. Together our data demonstrate MYCN-binding properties for a selection of small molecules, and provide functional information that could be of importance for future development of targeted therapies against MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma.

  12. Computer-assisted identification of novel small molecule inhibitors targeting GLUT1

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    Wan, Zhining; Li, Xin; Sun, Rong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Xinru; Rong, Li; Shi, Zheng; Bao, Jinku

    2015-12-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) are the main carriers of glucose that facilitate the diffusion of glucose in mammalian cells, especially GLUT1. Notably, GLUT1 is a rate-limiting transporter for glucose uptake, and its overexpression is a common characteristic in most cancers. Thus, the inhibition of GLUT1 by novel small compounds to lower glucose levels for cancer cells has become an emerging strategy. Herein, we employed high-throughput screening approaches to identify potential inhibitors against the sugar-binding site of GLUT1. Firstly, molecular docking screening was launched against the specs products, and three molecules (ZINC19909927, ZINC19908826, and ZINC19815451) were selected as candidate GLUT1 inhibitors for further analysis. Then, taking the initial ligand β-NG as a reference, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were applied to evaluate the binding stability and affinity of the three candidates towards GLUT1. Finally, we found that ZINC19909927 might have the highest affinity to occupy the binding site of GLUT1. Meanwhile, energy decomposition analysis identified several residues located in substrate-binding site that might provide clues for future inhibitor discovery towards GLUT1. Taken together, these results in our study may provide valuable information for identifying new inhibitors targeting GLUT1-mediated glucose transport and metabolism for cancer therapeutics.

  13. Targeting JAK/STAT signalling in inflammatory skin diseases with small molecule inhibitors.

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    Welsch, Katharina; Holstein, Julia; Laurence, Arian; Ghoreschi, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    For most inflammatory skin diseases topical glucocorticosteroids and traditional oral immunosuppressive drugs remain the principle treatment choices, but this has started to change. A deeper understanding in individual disease pathogenesis, basic immune mechanisms and molecular signalling pathways, together with advances in pharmaceutical drug development, allow us to interfere more precisely with disease-related factors. Some examples of inflammation-controlling interventions include antibodies neutralizing disease-associated cytokines, and small molecules targeting intracellular pathways relevant to cytokine production or cytokine signalling. So far, this is best established for psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease dominated by Th17 cytokines. In this review, we focus on chronic inflammatory skin diseases where cytokines using type I/II cytokine receptors play a dominant role in disease pathogenesis and where novel treatments with inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway are already under clinical investigation. To better understand the rationale of using JAK/STAT inhibitors in the discussed skin diseases, we give an overview of important genetic and immunological associations with the JAK/STAT pathway and summarize the stage of clinical development of small molecular inhibitors. JAK/STAT inhibitors will presumably find wide application in dermatology, since they can be applied not only systematically but also topically for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes.

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    Issaenko, Olga A; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27(Kip1) and p16(Ink4A). These changes are associated with arrest in S-G 2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors.

  15. Targeting DDX3 with a small molecule inhibitor for lung cancer therapy.

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    Bol, Guus M; Vesuna, Farhad; Xie, Min; Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Gandhi, Nishant; Levine, Anne; Irving, Ashley; Korz, Dorian; Tantravedi, Saritha; Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Bordt, Evan A; Polster, Brian M; Cope, Leslie; van der Groep, Petra; Kondaskar, Atul; Rudek, Michelle A; Hosmane, Ramachandra S; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Tran, Phuoc T; Raman, Venu

    2015-03-27

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and is a focus for developing targeted therapies due to its refractory nature to current treatment. We identified a RNA helicase, DDX3, which is overexpressed in many cancer types including lung cancer and is associated with lower survival in lung cancer patients. We designed a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor, RK-33, which binds to DDX3 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 caused G1 cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and promoted radiation sensitization in DDX3-overexpressing cells. Importantly, RK-33 in combination with radiation induced tumor regression in multiple mouse models of lung cancer. Mechanistically, loss of DDX3 function either by shRNA or by RK-33 impaired Wnt signaling through disruption of the DDX3-β-catenin axis and inhibited non-homologous end joining-the major DNA repair pathway in mammalian somatic cells. Overall, inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 promotes tumor regression, thus providing a compelling argument to develop DDX3 inhibitors for lung cancer therapy.

  16. Clinical Development of Gamitrinib, a Novel Mitochondrial-Targeted Small Molecule Hsp90 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    trophoblast, an actively invasive tissue at the interface between fetal and maternal circulation [30], whereas expression of this molecule in the adult...chondrial survivin (3). Furthermore, reconstitution of survivin-depleted PC3 cells with adenovirus ( pAd ) encoding mitochondrial-targeted survivin (3... pAd - mt-SVV) stimulated O2 consumption (Fig. 2G). In contrast, PC3 cells transfected with nontargeting siRNA and reconstituted with pAd -mt-survivin

  17. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase That Target Chemoresistant Glioma Cells.

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    Oliva, Claudia R; Markert, Tahireh; Ross, Larry J; White, E Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Zhang, Wei; Everts, Maaike; Moellering, Douglas R; Bailey, Shannon M; Suto, Mark J; Griguer, Corinne E

    2016-11-11

    The enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) or complex IV (EC 1.9.3.1) is a large transmembrane protein complex that serves as the last enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain of eukaryotic mitochondria. CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) metabolism and has been associated with increased self-renewal characteristics in gliomas. Increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure, and patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme and high tumor CcO activity have worse clinical outcomes than those with low tumor CcO activity. Therefore, CcO is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We report here the characterization of a CcO inhibitor (ADDA 5) that was identified using a high throughput screening paradigm. ADDA 5 demonstrated specificity for CcO, with no inhibition of other mitochondrial complexes or other relevant enzymes, and biochemical characterization showed that this compound is a non-competitive inhibitor of cytochrome c When tested in cellular assays, ADDA 5 dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of chemosensitive and chemoresistant glioma cells but did not display toxicity against non-cancer cells. Furthermore, treatment with ADDA 5 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in flank xenograft mouse models. Importantly, ADDA 5 inhibited CcO activity and blocked cell proliferation and neurosphere formation in cultures of glioma stem cells, the cells implicated in tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy in patients with glioblastoma. In summary, we have identified ADDA 5 as a lead CcO inhibitor for further optimization as a novel approach for the treatment of glioblastoma and related cancers.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting G-protein-coupled Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

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    Shang, Xun; Marchioni, Fillipo; Evelyn, Chris R; Sipes, Nisha; Zhou, Xuan; Seibel, William; Wortman, Matthew; Zheng, Yi

    2013-02-19

    The G-protein-mediated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)-Rho GTPase signaling axis has been implicated in human pathophysiology and is a potential therapeutic target. By virtual screening of chemicals that fit into a surface groove of the DH-PH domain of LARG, a G-protein-regulated Rho GEF involved in RhoA activation, and subsequent validations in biochemical assays, we have identified a class of chemical inhibitors represented by Y16 that are active in specifically inhibiting LARG binding to RhoA. Y16 binds to the junction site of the DH-PH domains of LARG with a ∼80 nM K(d) and suppresses LARG catalyzed RhoA activation dose dependently. It is active in blocking the interaction of LARG and related G-protein-coupled Rho GEFs with RhoA without a detectable effect on other DBL family Rho GEFs, Rho effectors, or a RhoGAP. In cells, Y16 selectively inhibits serum-induced RhoA activity and RhoA-mediated signaling, effects that can be rescued by a constitutively active RhoA or ROCK mutant. By suppressing RhoA activity, Y16 inhibits mammary sphere formation of MCF7 breast cancer cells but does not affect the nontransforming MCF10A cells. Significantly, Y16 works synergistically with Rhosin/G04, a Rho GTPase activation site inhibitor, in inhibiting LARG-RhoA interaction, RhoA activation, and RhoA-mediated signaling functions. Thus, our studies show that Rho GEFs can serve as selective targets of small chemicals and present a strategy of dual inhibition of the enzyme-substrate pair of GEF-RhoA at their binding interface that leads to enhanced efficacy and specificity.

  19. ETV6-NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Hoang Thanh, E-mail: kk086406@mgs.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Ly, Bui Thi Kim [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Kano, Yasuhiko [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Tochigi Cancer Center, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Tojo, Arinobu [Division of Molecular Therapy, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Toshiki [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Sato, Yuko [Musashimurayama Hospital, Musashimurayama, Tokyo 208-0011 (Japan)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETV6-NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC412 could block ETV6-NTRK3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ETV6-NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0-91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  20. In Search of Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting the Flexible CK2 Subunit Interface

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    Benoît Bestgen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2 is a tetrameric holoenzyme composed of two catalytic (α and/or α’ subunits and two regulatory (β subunits. Crystallographic data paired with fluorescence imaging techniques have suggested that the formation of the CK2 holoenzyme complex within cells is a dynamic process. Although the monomeric CK2α subunit is endowed with a constitutive catalytic activity, many of the plethora of CK2 substrates are exclusively phosphorylated by the CK2 holoenzyme. This means that the spatial and high affinity interaction between CK2α and CK2β subunits is critically important and that its disruption may provide a powerful and selective way to block the phosphorylation of substrates requiring the presence of CK2β. In search of compounds inhibiting this critical protein–protein interaction, we previously designed an active cyclic peptide (Pc derived from the CK2β carboxy-terminal domain that can efficiently antagonize the CK2 subunit interaction. To understand the functional significance of this interaction, we generated cell-permeable versions of Pc, exploring its molecular mechanisms of action and the perturbations of the signaling pathways that it induces in intact cells. The identification of small molecules inhibitors of this critical interaction may represent the first-choice approach to manipulate CK2 in an unconventional way.

  1. Accounting for target flexibility and water molecules by docking to ensembles of target structures: the HCV NS5B palm site I inhibitors case study.

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    Barreca, Maria Letizia; Iraci, Nunzio; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Gaetani, Rosy; Guercini, Chiara; Sabatini, Stefano; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2014-02-24

    The introduction of new anti-HCV drugs in therapy is an imperative need and is necessary with a view to develop an interferon-free therapy. Thus, the discovery and development of novel small molecule inhibitors of the viral NS5B polymerase represent an exciting area of research for many pharmaceutical companies and academic groups. This study represents a contribution to this field and relies on the identification of the best NS5B model(s) to be used in structure-based computational approaches aimed at identifying novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of one of the protein allosteric sites, namely, palm site I. First, the NS5B inhibitors at palm site I were classified as water-mediated or nonwater-mediated ligands depending on their ability to interact with or displace a specific water molecule. Then, we took advantage of the available X-ray structures of the NS5B/ligand complexes to build different models of protein/water combinations, which were used to investigate the influence on docking studies of solvent sites as well as of the influence of the protein conformations. As the overall trend, we observed improved performance in the docking results of the water-mediated inhibitors by inclusion of explicit water molecules, with an opposite behavior generally happening for the nonwater-mediated inhibitors. The best performing target structures for the two ligand sets were then used for virtual screening simulations of a library containing the known NS5B inhibitors along with related decoys to assess the best performing targets ensembles on the basis of their ability to discriminate active and inactive compounds as well as to generate the correct binding modes. The parallel use of different protein structures/water sets outperformed the use of a single target structure, with the two-protein 3H98/2W-2FVC/7W and 3HKY/NoW-3SKE/NoW models resulting in the best performing ensembles for water-mediated inhibitors and nonwater-mediated inhibitors, respectively. The information

  2. Phenotypic Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors: Implications for Therapeutic Discovery and Drug Target Development in Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2016-01-01

    The inability of central nervous system (CNS) neurons to regenerate damaged axons and dendrites following traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a substantial obstacle for functional recovery. Apoptotic cell death, deposition of scar tissue, and growth-repressive molecules produced by glia further complicate the problem and make it challenging for re-growing axons to extend across injury sites. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of TBI, accentuating the need for relevant leads. Cell-based and organotypic bioassays can better mimic outcomes within the native CNS microenvironment than target-based screening methods and thus should speed the discovery of therapeutic agents that induce axon or dendrite regeneration. Additionally, when used to screen focused chemical libraries such as small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors, these assays can help elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and regeneration as well as identify novel drug targets. Here, we describe a phenotypic cellular (high content) screening assay that utilizes brain-derived primary neurons for screening small-molecule chemical libraries.

  3. Targeting DDX3 with a small molecule inhibitor for lung cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus M.; Vesuna, Farhad; Xie, Min; Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Gandhi, Nishant; Levine, Anne; Irving, Ashley; Korz, Dorian; Tantravedi, Saritha; Heerma van Voss, Marise R.; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Bordt, Evan A.; Polster, Brian M.; Cope, Leslie; van der Groep, Petra; Kondaskar, Atul; Rudek, Michelle A.; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and is a focus for developing targeted therapies due to its refractory nature to current treatment. We identified a RNA helicase, DDX3, which is overexpressed in many cancer types including lung cancer and is associated with lower survival in lung

  4. Traffic jam at the bacterial sec translocase: targeting the SecA nanomotor by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Kenneth; Anné, Jozef

    2011-06-24

    The rapid rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the most serious unmet medical needs facing the world. Despite this increasing problem of antibiotic resistance, the number of different antibiotics available for the treatment of serious infections is dwindling. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial drugs, preferably with novel modes of action to potentially avoid cross-resistance with existing antibacterial agents. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to bacterial protein secretion as a potential antibacterial target. Among the different protein secretion pathways that are present in bacterial pathogens, the general protein secretory (Sec) pathway is widely considered as an attractive target for antibacterial therapy. One of the key components of the Sec pathway is the peripheral membrane ATPase SecA, which provides the energy for the translocation of preproteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. In this review, we will provide an overview of research efforts on the discovery and development of small-molecule SecA inhibitors. Furthermore, recent advances on the structure and function of SecA and their potential impact on antibacterial drug discovery will be discussed.

  5. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  6. Design and synthesis of a cell-permeable, drug-like small molecule inhibitor targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganipisetti Srinivasrao

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1 plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and the inhibition of Plk1 has been considered as a potential target for specific inhibitory drugs in anti-cancer therapy. Several research groups have identified peptide-based inhibitors that target the polo-box domain (PBD of Plk1 and bind to the protein with high affinity in in vitro assays. However, inadequate proteolytic resistance and cell permeability of the peptides hinder the development of these peptide-based inhibitors into novel therapeutic compounds.In order to overcome the shortcomings of peptide-based inhibitors, we designed and synthesized small molecule inhibitors. Among these molecules, bg-34 exhibited a high binding affinity for Plk1-PBD and it could cross the cell membrane in its unmodified form. Furthermore, bg-34-dependent inhibition of Plk1-PBD was sufficient for inducing apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, modeling studies performed on Plk1-PBD in complex with bg-34 revealed that bg-34 can interact effectively with Plk1-PBD.We demonstrated that the molecule bg-34 is a potential drug candidate that exhibits anti-Plk1-PBD activity and possesses the favorable characteristics of high cell permeability and stability. We also determined that bg-34 induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting Plk1-PBD in HeLa cells at the same concentration as PEGylated 4j peptide, which can inhibit Plk1-PBD activity 1000 times more effectively than bg-34 can in in vitro assays. This study may help to design and develop drug-like small molecule as Plk1-PBD inhibitor for better therapeutic activity.

  7. The small-molecule VEGF receptor inhibitor pazopanib (GW786034B) targets both tumor and endothelial cells in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Tonon, Giovanni; Sattler, Martin; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Legouill, Steven; Yasui, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kumar, Shaji; Kumar, Rakesh; Pandite, Lini N; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2006-12-19

    A critical role for vascular endothelial factor (VEGF) has been demonstrated in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule VEGF receptor inhibitor pazopanib on MM cells in the bone marrow milieu. Pazopanib inhibits VEGF-triggered signaling pathways in both tumor and endothelial cells, thereby blocking in vitro MM cell growth, survival, and migration, and inhibits VEGF-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules on both endothelial and tumor cells, thereby abrogating endothelial cell-MM cell binding and associated cell proliferation. We show that pazopanib is the first-in-class VEGF receptor inhibitor to inhibit in vivo tumor cell growth associated with increased MM cell apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis, and prolonged survival in a mouse xenograft model of human MM. Low-dose pazopanib demonstrates synergistic cytotoxicity with conventional (melphalan) and novel (bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs) therapies. Finally, gene expression and signaling network analysis show transcriptional changes of several cancer-related genes, in particular c-Myc. Using siRNA, we confirm the role of c-Myc in VEGF production and secretion, as well as angiogenesis. These preclinical studies provide the rationale for clinical evaluation of pazopanib, alone and in combination with conventional and novel therapies, to increase efficacy, overcome drug resistance, reduce toxicity, and improve patient outcome in MM.

  8. Targeting of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase by small molecule inhibitors leads to MET accumulation by impairing the receptor downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Dominic; Pochon, Benoît; Blank-Liss, Wieslawa; Francica, Paola; Glück, Astrid A; Aebersold, Daniel M; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Medová, Michaela

    2014-03-03

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase is deregulated primarily via overexpression or point mutations in various human cancers and different strategies for MET inhibition are currently evaluated in clinical trials. We observed by Western blot analysis and by Flow cytometry that MET inhibition by different MET small molecule inhibitors surprisingly increases in a dose-dependent manner total MET levels in treated cells. Mechanistically, this inhibition-related MET accumulation was associated with reduced Tyr1003 phosphorylation and MET physical association with the CBL ubiquitin ligase with concomitant decrease in MET ubiquitination. These data may suggest careful consideration for design of anti-MET clinical protocols. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual-Targeting Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus FMN Riboswitch Disrupt Riboflavin Homeostasis in an Infectious Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Mann, Paul A; Xiao, Li; Gill, Charles; Galgoci, Andrew M; Howe, John A; Villafania, Artjohn; Barbieri, Christopher M; Malinverni, Juliana C; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; McCurry, Megan D; Murgolo, Nicholas; Flattery, Amy; Mack, Matthias; Roemer, Terry

    2017-05-18

    Riboswitches are bacterial-specific, broadly conserved, non-coding RNA structural elements that control gene expression of numerous metabolic pathways and transport functions essential for cell growth. As such, riboswitch inhibitors represent a new class of potential antibacterial agents. Recently, we identified ribocil-C, a highly selective inhibitor of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch that controls expression of de novo riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. Here, we provide a mechanistic characterization of the antibacterial effects of ribocil-C as well as of roseoflavin (RoF), an antimetabolite analog of RF, among medically significant Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis. We provide genetic, biophysical, computational, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence that ribocil-C and RoF specifically inhibit dual FMN riboswitches, separately controlling RF biosynthesis and uptake processes essential for MRSA growth and pathogenesis. Such a dual-targeting mechanism is specifically required to develop broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial agents targeting RF metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  11. Discovering Bisdemethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome as a potent small molecule inhibitor of human pancreatic α-amylase, a target for type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Rajamohanan, P R; Ravikumar, Ameeta

    2012-12-15

    Curcuma longa rhizome is used extensively in culinary preparations in Far East and South-East Asia. Health benefits of curcuminoids from C. longa as antioxidants, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory molecules have been well documented. We report here for the first time that Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) from C. longa, acts as an inhibitor to inactivate human pancreatic α-amylase, a therapeutic target for oral hypoglycemic agents in type-2 diabetes. Bioactivity guided isolation of rhizome isopropanol extract led to the identification by HPLC and NMR of BDMC as a lead small molecule inhibitor of porcine and human pancreatic α-amylase with an IC(50) value of 0.026 and 0.025 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, HPA exhibited an uncompetitive mode of inhibition with an apparent K(i) of 3.0 μM. The study gains importance as BDMC could be a good drug candidate in development of new inhibitors of HPA and of functional foods for controlling starch digestion in order to reduce post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  12. Discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor of human DDX3 specifically designed to target the RNA binding site: towards the next generation HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marco; Falchi, Federico; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Bernardo, Vincenzo; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; Schenone, Silvia; Manetti, Fabrizio; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Efficacy of currently approved anti-HIV drugs is hampered by mutations of the viral enzymes, leading invariably to drug resistance and chemotherapy failure. Recent data suggest that cellular co-factors also represent useful targets for anti-HIV therapy. Here we describe the identification of the first small molecules specifically designed to inhibit the HIV-1 replication by targeting the RNA binding site of the human DEAD-Box RNA helicase DDX3. Optimization of a easily synthetically accessible hit (1) identified by application of a high-throughput docking approach afforded the promising compounds 6 and 8 which proved to inhibit both the helicase and ATPase activity of DDX3 and to reduce the viral load of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV-1.

  13. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Brum Ortigoza

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  14. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    -molecule allosteric inhibitor trametinib in 2013, the progress of more than 10 other allosteric inhibitors in clinical trials, and the emergence of a pipeline of highly selective and potent preclinical molecules, have been reported in the past decade. In this article, we present the current knowledge on allosteric...... inhibition in terms of conception, classification, potential advantages, and summarized debatable topics in the field. Recent progress and allosteric inhibitors that were identified in the past three years are highlighted in this paper....

  15. Targeting Hsp90 with small molecule inhibitors induces the over-expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule, survivin, in human A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Kevin W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual functioning protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cancer cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Since the molecular chaperone Hsp90 binds and stabilizes survivin, it is widely believed that down-regulation of survivin is one of the important therapeutic functions of Hsp90 inhibitors such as the phase III clinically trialed compound 17-AAG. However, Hsp90 interferes with a number of molecules that up-regulate the intracellular level of survivin, raising the question that clinical use of Hsp90 inhibitors may indirectly induce survivin expression and subsequently enhance cancer anti-drug responses. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting Hsp90 can alter survivin expression differently in different cancer cell lines and to explore possible mechanisms that cause the alteration in survivin expression. Results Here, we demonstrated that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, induced the over-expression of survivin in three different human cancer cell lines as shown by Western blotting. Increased survivin mRNA transcripts were observed in 17-AAG and geldanamycin-treated HT-29 and HONE-1 cancer cells. Interestingly, real-time PCR and translation inhibition studies revealed that survivin was over-expressed partially through the up-regulation of protein translation instead of gene transcription in A549 cancer cells. In addition, 17-AAG-treated A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cells showed reduced proteasomal activity while inhibition of 26S proteasome activity further increased the amount of survivin protein in cells. At the functional level, down-regulation of survivin by siRNA further increased the drug sensitivity to 17-AAG in the tested cancer cell lines. Conclusions We showed for the first time that down-regulation of survivin is not a definite therapeutic function of Hsp90 inhibitors. Instead, targeting Hsp90 with small

  16. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    current barriers of kinase inhibitors, including poor selectivity and emergence of drug resistance. In spite of the small number of identified allosteric inhibitors in comparison with that of inhibitors targeting the ATP pocket, encouraging results, such as the FDA-approval of the first small...

  17. In vitro and in vivo activity of novel small-molecule inhibitors targeting the pleckstrin homology domain of protein kinase B/AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Sylvestor A; Ali, M Ahad; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhou, Li Li; Lemos, Robert; Ihle, Nathan; Skillman, A Geoffrey; Zhang, Shuxing; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J

    2009-06-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in activating survival and antiapoptotic pathways within cancer cells. Several studies have shown that this pathway is constitutively activated in many different cancer types. The goal of this study was to discover novel compounds that bind to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT, thereby inhibiting AKT activation. Using proprietary docking software, 22 potential PH domain inhibitors were identified. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the binding of the compounds to the expressed PH domain of AKT followed by an in vitro activity screen in Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We identified a novel chemical scaffold in several of the compounds that binds selectively to the PH domain of AKT, inducing a decrease in AKT activation and causing apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. Structural modifications of the scaffold led to compounds with enhanced inhibitory activity in cells. One compound, 4-dodecyl-N-(1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide, inhibited AKT and its downstream targets in cells as well as in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice; it also exhibited good antitumor activity. In summary, a pharmacophore for PH domain inhibitors targeting AKT function was developed. Computer-aided modeling, synthesis, and testing produced novel AKT PH domain inhibitors that exhibit promising preclinical properties.

  18. Targeting PKC in multiple myeloma: in vitro and in vivo effects of the novel, orally available small-molecule inhibitor enzastaurin (LY317615.HCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Raab, Marc S; Zhang, Jing; McMillin, Douglas; Breitkreutz, Iris; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Boris K; Munshi, Nikhil; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-02-15

    In multiple myeloma (MM) protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways have been implicated in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Here we investigated the novel, orally available PKC-inhibitor enzastaurin for its anti-MM activity. Enzastaurin specifically inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of PKC isoforms, as well as phosphorylation of downstream signaling molecules MARCKS and PKCmu. Importantly, it also inhibits PKC activation triggered by growth factors and cytokines secreted by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), costimulation with fibronectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as MM patient serum. Consequently, enzastaurin inhibits proliferation, survival, and migration of MM cell lines and MM cells isolated from multidrug-resistant patients and overcomes MM-cell growth triggered by binding to BMSCs and endothelial cells. Importantly, strong synergistic cytotoxicity is observed when enzastaurin is combined with bortezomib and moderate synergistic or additive effects when combined with melphalan or lenalidomide. Finally, tumor growth, survival, and angiogenesis are abrogated by enzastaurin in an in vivo xenograft model of human MM. Our results therefore demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the orally available PKC inhibitor enzastaurin in MM and strongly support its clinical evaluation, alone or in combination therapies, to improve outcome in patients with MM.

  19. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Type III Secretion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Gu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant pathogens have presented increasing challenges to the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents. The type III secretion system (T3SS, existing in bacterial chromosomes or plasmids, is one of the most complicated protein secretion systems. T3SSs of animal and plant pathogens possess many highly conserved main structural components comprised of about 20 proteins. Many Gram-negative bacteria carry T3SS as a major virulence determinant, and using the T3SS, the bacteria secrete and inject effector proteins into target host cells, triggering disease symptoms. Therefore, T3SS has emerged as an attractive target for antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, many T3SS-targeting small-molecule inhibitors have been discovered; these inhibitors prevent the bacteria from injecting effector proteins and from causing pathophysiology in host cells. Targeting the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens, rather than their survival, is an innovative and promising approach that may greatly reduce selection pressures on pathogens to develop drug-resistant mutations. This article summarizes recent progress in the search for promising small-molecule T3SS inhibitors that target the secretion and translocation of bacterial effector proteins.

  20. Multivalent Small-Molecule Pan-RAS Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Matthew E; Kaplan, Anna; Chambers, Jennifer M; Stokes, Michael E; Bos, Pieter H; Zask, Arie; Zhang, Yan; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Badgley, Michael A; Huang, Christine S; Tran, Timothy H; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Brown, Lewis M; Nandakumar, Renu; Cremers, Serge; Yang, Wan Seok; Tong, Liang; Olive, Kenneth P; Ferrando, Adolfo; Stockwell, Brent R

    2017-02-23

    Design of small molecules that disrupt protein-protein interactions, including the interaction of RAS proteins and their effectors, may provide chemical probes and therapeutic agents. We describe here the synthesis and testing of potential small-molecule pan-RAS ligands, which were designed to interact with adjacent sites on the surface of oncogenic KRAS. One compound, termed 3144, was found to bind to RAS proteins using microscale thermophoresis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry and to exhibit lethality in cells partially dependent on expression of RAS proteins. This compound was metabolically stable in liver microsomes and displayed anti-tumor activity in xenograft mouse cancer models. These findings suggest that pan-RAS inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy for some cancers and that structure-based design of small molecules targeting multiple adjacent sites to create multivalent inhibitors may be effective for some proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis.

  2. Urea transporter proteins as targets for small-molecule diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional diuretics such as furosemide and thiazides target salt transporters in kidney tubules, but urea transporters (UTs) have emerged as alternative targets. UTs are a family of transmembrane channels expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, in particular the kidney. UT knockout mice and humans with UT mutations exhibit reduced maximal urinary osmolality, demonstrating that UTs are necessary for the concentration of urine. Small-molecule screening has identified potent and selective inhibitors of UT-A, the UT protein expressed in renal tubule epithelial cells, and UT-B, the UT protein expressed in vasa recta endothelial cells. Data from UT knockout mice and from rodents administered UT inhibitors support the diuretic action of UT inhibition. The kidney-specific expression of UT-A1, together with high selectivity of the small-molecule inhibitors, means that off-target effects of such small-molecule drugs should be minimal. This Review summarizes the structure, expression and function of UTs, and looks at the evidence supporting the validity of UTs as targets for the development of salt-sparing diuretics with a unique mechanism of action. UT-targeted inhibitors may be useful alone or in combination with conventional diuretics for therapy of various oedemas and hyponatraemias, potentially including those refractory to treatment with current diuretics. PMID:25488859

  3. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  4. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  5. Evolution toward small molecule inhibitor resistance affects native enzyme function and stability, generating acarbose-insensitive cyclodextrin glucanotransferase variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, Ronan M.; Leemhuis, Hans; Gatjen, Linda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Gätjen, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors play an essential role in the selective inhibition of enzymes associated with human infection and metabolic disorders. Targeted enzymes may evolve toward inhibitor resistance through selective incorporation of mutations. Acquisition of insensitivity may, however, result in

  6. Evolution toward small molecule inhibitor resistance affects native enzyme function and stability, generating acarbose-insensitive cyclodextrin glucanotransferase variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, Ronan M.; Leemhuis, Hans; Gatjen, Linda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Gätjen, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors play an essential role in the selective inhibition of enzymes associated with human infection and metabolic disorders. Targeted enzymes may evolve toward inhibitor resistance through selective incorporation of mutations. Acquisition of insensitivity may, however, result in

  7. Chitin synthesis inhibitors: old molecules and new developments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hans Merzendorfer

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is the most abundant natural aminopolysaccharide and serves as a structural component of extracellular matrices.It is found in fungal septa,spores,and cell walls,and in arthropod cuticles and peritrophic matrices,squid pens,mollusk shells,nematode egg shells,and some protozoan cyst walls.As prokaryotes,plants and vertebrates including humans do not produce chitin,its synthesis is considered as an attractive target site for fungicides,insecticides,and acaricides.Although no chitin synthesis inhibitor has been developed into a therapeutic drug to treat fungal infections in humans,a larger number of compounds have been successfully launched worldwide to combat arthropod pests in agriculture and forestry.This review summarizes the latest advances on the mode of action of chitin synthesis inhibitors with a special focus on those molecules that act on a postcatalytic step of chitin synthesis.

  8. Small-molecule kinase inhibitors: an analysis of FDA-approved drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), 28 of which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), have been actively pursued as promising targeted therapeutics. Here, we assess the key structural and physicochemical properties, target selectivity and mechanism of function, and ther...... to be unreliable. Although previous SMKI research was concentrated on tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cancer treatment, recent progress indicates diversification of SMKI research in terms of new targets, mechanistic types, and therapeutic indications....

  9. Enhancement of Radiation Sensitivity in Lung Cancer Cells by a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor That Targets the β-Catenin/Tcf4 Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghao; Gao, Mei; Luo, Guifen; Han, Xiaofeng; Bao, Wenjing; Cheng, Yanyan; Tian, Wang; Yan, Maocai; Yang, Guanlin; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment choice for unresectable advanced human lung cancers, and a critical adjuvant treatment for surgery. However, radiation as a lung cancer treatment remains far from satisfactory due to problems associated with radiation resistance in cancer cells and severe cytotoxicity to non-cancer cells, which arise at doses typically administered to patients. We have recently identified a promising novel inhibitor of β-catenin/Tcf4 interaction, named BC-23 (C21H14ClN3O4S), which acts as a potent cell death enhancer when used in combination with radiation. Sequential exposure of human p53-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1299 cells to low doses of x-ray radiation, followed 1 hour later by administration of minimally cytotoxic concentrations of BC-23, resulted in a highly synergistic induction of clonogenic cell death (combination index radiation effectiveness mediated by BC-23. BC-23 therefore represents a promising new class of radiation enhancer.

  10. A new class of small molecule inhibitor of BMP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E Sanvitale

    Full Text Available Growth factor signaling pathways are tightly regulated by phosphorylation and include many important kinase targets of interest for drug discovery. Small molecule inhibitors of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP receptor kinase ALK2 (ACVR1 are needed urgently to treat the progressively debilitating musculoskeletal disease fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP. Dorsomorphin analogues, first identified in zebrafish, remain the only BMP inhibitor chemotype reported to date. By screening an assay panel of 250 recombinant human kinases we identified a highly selective 2-aminopyridine-based inhibitor K02288 with in vitro activity against ALK2 at low nanomolar concentrations similar to the current lead compound LDN-193189. K02288 specifically inhibited the BMP-induced Smad pathway without affecting TGF-β signaling and induced dorsalization of zebrafish embryos. Comparison of the crystal structures of ALK2 with K02288 and LDN-193189 revealed additional contacts in the K02288 complex affording improved shape complementarity and identified the exposed phenol group for further optimization of pharmacokinetics. The discovery of a new chemical series provides an independent pharmacological tool to investigate BMP signaling and offers multiple opportunities for pre-clinical development.

  11. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  12. Renal targeting of kinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, M. E. M.; Fretz, M. M.; Segers, Gj. W.; Lacombe, M.; Prakash, J.; Storm, G.; Hennink, W. E.; Kok, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of proximal tubular cells by fibrotic and inflammatory mediators is an important hallmark of chronic kidney disease. We have developed a novel strategy to intervene in renal fibrosis, by means of locally delivered kinase inhibitors. Such compounds will display enhanced activity within tub

  13. Renal targeting of kinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, M. E. M.; Fretz, M. M.; Segers, Gj. W.; Lacombe, M.; Prakash, J.; Storm, G.; Hennink, W. E.; Kok, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of proximal tubular cells by fibrotic and inflammatory mediators is an important hallmark of chronic kidney disease. We have developed a novel strategy to intervene in renal fibrosis, by means of locally delivered kinase inhibitors. Such compounds will display enhanced activity within

  14. Methodologies for Studying B. subtilis Biofilms as a Model for Characterizing Small Molecule Biofilm Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2016-10-09

    This work assesses different methodologies to study the impact of small molecule biofilm inhibitors, such as D-amino acids, on the development and resilience of Bacillus subtilis biofilms. First, methods are presented that select for small molecule inhibitors with biofilm-specific targets in order to separate the effect of the small molecule inhibitors on planktonic growth from their effect on biofilm formation. Next, we focus on how inoculation conditions affect the sensitivity of multicellular, floating B. subtilis cultures to small molecule inhibitors. The results suggest that discrepancies in the reported effects of such inhibitors such as D-amino acids are due to inconsistent pre-culture conditions. Furthermore, a recently developed protocol is described for evaluating the contribution of small molecule treatments towards biofilm resistance to antibacterial substances. Lastly, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques are presented to analyze the three-dimensional spatial arrangement of cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix in a B. subtilis biofilm. SEM facilitates insight into the three-dimensional biofilm architecture and the matrix texture. A combination of the methods described here can greatly assist the study of biofilm development in the presence and absence of biofilm inhibitors, and shed light on the mechanism of action of these inhibitors.

  15. Nox Inhibitors & Therapies: Rational Design of Peptidic and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Pagano, M. Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N.; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related diseases underlie many if not all of the major leading causes of death in United States and the Western World. Thus, enormous interest from both academia and pharmaceutical industry has been placed on the development of agents which attenuate oxidative stress. With that in mind, great efforts have been placed in the development of inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the major enzymatic source of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in many cells and tissue. The regulation of a catalytically active Nox enzyme involves numerous protein-protein interactions which, in turn, afford numerous targets for inhibition of its activity. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of the available Nox inhibitors, both peptidic and small molecules, and discuss the body of data related to their possible mechanisms of action and specificity towards each of the various isoforms of Nox. Indeed, there have been some very notable successes. However, despite great commitment by many in the field, the need for efficacious and well-characterized, isoform-specific Nox inhibitors, essential for the treatment of major diseases as well as for delineating the contribution of a given Nox in physiological redox signalling, continues to grow. PMID:26510437

  16. Saururus cernuus Lignans - Potent Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Baerson, Scott R; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important tumor-selective therapeutic target for solid tumors. In search of novel small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors, 5400 natural product-rich extracts from plants, marine organisms, and microbes were examined for HIF-1 inhibitory activities using a cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation, followed by structure elucidation, yielded three potent natural product-derived HIF-1 inhibitors and two structurally related in...

  17. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abetov, Danysh; Mustapova, Zhanar; Saliev, Timur; Bulanin, Denis; Batyrbekov, Kanat; Gilman, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of oncologists worldwide is to understand and then intervene in the primary tumor initiation and propagation mechanisms. This is essential to allow targeted elimination of cancer cells without altering normal mitotic cells. Currently, there are two main rival theories describing the process of tumorigenesis. According to the Stochastic Model, potentially any cell, once defunct, is capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Alternatively the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Model posits that only a small fraction of undifferentiated tumor cells are capable of triggering carcinogenesis. Like healthy stem cells, CSCs are also characterized by a capacity for self-renewal and the ability to generate differentiated progeny, possibly mediating treatment resistance, thus leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Moreover, molecular signaling profiles are similar between CSCs and normal stem cells, including Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways. Therefore, development of novel chemotherapeutic agents and proteins (e.g., enzymes and antibodies) specifically targeting CSCs are attractive pharmaceutical candidates. This article describes small molecule inhibitors of stem cell pathways Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, and their recent chemotherapy clinical trials.

  18. Potent antimicrobial small molecules screened as inhibitors of tyrosine recombinases and Holliday junction-resolving enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Marc C; Boldt, Jeffrey L; Vahi-Ferguson, Gabriel; Salamon, Peter; Nefzi, Adel; Ostresh, John M; Giulianotti, Marc; Pinilla, Clemencia; Segall, Anca M

    2011-11-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are critical intermediates in many recombination-dependent DNA repair pathways. Our lab has previously identified several hexameric peptides that target HJ intermediates formed in DNA recombination reactions. One of the most potent peptides, WRWYCR, is active as a homodimer and has shown bactericidal activity partly because of its ability to interfere with DNA repair proteins that act upon HJs. To increase the possibility of developing a therapeutic targeting DNA repair, we searched for small molecule inhibitors that were functional surrogates of the peptides. Initial screens of heterocyclic small molecule libraries resulted in the identification of several N-methyl aminocyclic thiourea inhibitors. Like the peptides, these inhibitors trapped HJs formed during recombination reactions in vitro, but were less potent than the peptides in biochemical assays and had little antibacterial activity. In this study, we describe the screening of a second set of libraries containing somewhat larger and more symmetrical scaffolds in an effort to mimic the symmetry of a WRWYCR homodimer and its target. From this screen, we identified several pyrrolidine bis-cyclic guanidine inhibitors that also interfere with processing of HJs in vitro and are potent inhibitors of Gram-negative and especially Gram-positive bacterial growth. These molecules are proof-of-principle of a class of compounds with novel activities, which may in the future be developed into a new class of antibiotics that will expand the available choices for therapy against drug-resistant bacteria.

  19. SGLT inhibitors: a novel target for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Abhinav; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Inhibiting sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT1/SGLT2), which have a key role in the absorption of glucose in the kidney and/or GI tract has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes. Thus, screening and patenting of chemical compounds for SGLT1/SGLT2 gets more importance in the development of new drugs in diabetes. Several companies are developing SGLT inhibitors, some of which are now in various stages of clinical development. Some molecules in the pipeline, including dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, ASP1941, BI10773, LX4211, RG7201 and TS071, are at various stages of drug development. This patent review presents the overall progress carried out in the development of SGLT inhibitors over the last decade with the active participation of various pharmaceutical companies. This class of drug is anticipated to have a large impact on diabetes field and predicting to attain a blockbuster status.

  20. Small molecule screen for candidate antimalarials targeting Plasmodium Kinesin-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqiong; Richard, Jessica; Kim, Sunyoung; Wojcik, Edward J

    2014-06-06

    Plasmodium falciparum and vivax are responsible for the majority of malaria infections worldwide, resulting in over a million deaths annually. Malaria parasites now show measured resistance to all currently utilized drugs. Novel antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. The Plasmodium Kinesin-5 mechanoenzyme is a suitable "next generation" target. Discovered via small molecule screen experiments, the human Kinesin-5 has multiple allosteric sites that are "druggable." One site in particular, unique in its sequence divergence across all homologs in the superfamily and even within the same family, exhibits exquisite drug specificity. We propose that Plasmodium Kinesin-5 shares this allosteric site and likewise can be targeted to uncover inhibitors with high specificity. To test this idea, we performed a screen for inhibitors selective for Plasmodium Kinesin-5 ATPase activity in parallel with human Kinesin-5. Our screen of nearly 2000 compounds successfully identified compounds that selectively inhibit both P. vivax and falciparum Kinesin-5 motor domains but, as anticipated, do not impact human Kinesin-5 activity. Of note is a candidate drug that did not biochemically compete with the ATP substrate for the conserved active site or disrupt the microtubule-binding site. Together, our experiments identified MMV666693 as a selective allosteric inhibitor of Plasmodium Kinesin-5; this is the first identified protein target for the Medicines of Malaria Venture validated collection of parasite proliferation inhibitors. This work demonstrates that chemical screens against human kinesins are adaptable to homologs in disease organisms and, as such, extendable to strategies to combat infectious disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Small Molecule Screen for Candidate Antimalarials Targeting Plasmodium Kinesin-5*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqiong; Richard, Jessica; Kim, Sunyoung; Wojcik, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and vivax are responsible for the majority of malaria infections worldwide, resulting in over a million deaths annually. Malaria parasites now show measured resistance to all currently utilized drugs. Novel antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. The Plasmodium Kinesin-5 mechanoenzyme is a suitable “next generation” target. Discovered via small molecule screen experiments, the human Kinesin-5 has multiple allosteric sites that are “druggable.” One site in particular, unique in its sequence divergence across all homologs in the superfamily and even within the same family, exhibits exquisite drug specificity. We propose that Plasmodium Kinesin-5 shares this allosteric site and likewise can be targeted to uncover inhibitors with high specificity. To test this idea, we performed a screen for inhibitors selective for Plasmodium Kinesin-5 ATPase activity in parallel with human Kinesin-5. Our screen of nearly 2000 compounds successfully identified compounds that selectively inhibit both P. vivax and falciparum Kinesin-5 motor domains but, as anticipated, do not impact human Kinesin-5 activity. Of note is a candidate drug that did not biochemically compete with the ATP substrate for the conserved active site or disrupt the microtubule-binding site. Together, our experiments identified MMV666693 as a selective allosteric inhibitor of Plasmodium Kinesin-5; this is the first identified protein target for the Medicines of Malaria Venture validated collection of parasite proliferation inhibitors. This work demonstrates that chemical screens against human kinesins are adaptable to homologs in disease organisms and, as such, extendable to strategies to combat infectious disease. PMID:24737313

  2. Stopping cancer in its tracks: using small molecular inhibitors to target glioblastoma migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Austin K; Li, Jing; Adamson, David C

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most common aggressive types of primary brain tumors. Despite advances in surgical resection, novel neuroimaging procedures, and the most recent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival after diagnosis is about 12-14 months. Targeting migrating GBM cells is a key research strategy in the fight against this devastating cancer. Though the vast majority of the primary tumor focus can be surgically resected, these migrating cells are responsible for its universal recurrence. Numerous strategies and technologies are being explored to target migrating glioma cells, with small molecular inhibitors as one of the most commonly studied. Small molecule inhibitors, such as protein kinase inhibitors, phosphorylation site inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and antisense oligonucleotides show promise in slowing the progression of this disease. A better understanding of these small molecule inhibitors and how they target various extra- and intracellular signaling pathways may eventually lead to a cure for GBM.

  3. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  4. FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2015-01-01

    Kinases have emerged as one of the most intensivelypursued targets in current pharmacological research,especially for cancer, due to their critical roles in cellularsignaling. To date, the US FDA has approved 28 smallmoleculekinase inhibitors, half of which were approvedin the past 3 years. While...

  5. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  6. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Gupta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sachin Gupta, Bassel F El-RayesDepartment of Hematology/Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, MI, USAAbstract: Pancreatic cancer has proven to be chemo-resistant, with gemcitabine being the only cytotoxic agent approved for advanced pancreatic cancer since 1996. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent a newer generation of chemotherapeutic agents targeting specific tumor pathways associated with carcinogenesis including cell cycle control, signal transduction, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These agents present a more selective way of treating pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib is the prototype of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors with proven efficacy in advanced pancreatic cancer and has been recently approved in that setting. Multiple other tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGFR, PDGFR, and Src kinases are in various phases of clinical trials testing. The preliminary results of these trials have been disappointing. Current challenges in pancreatic cancer clinical trials testing include improving patient selection, identifying effective combinations, improving the predictive value of current preclinical models and better study designs. This review summarizes the present clinical development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in pancreatic cancer and strategies for future drug development.Keywords: pancreatic cancer, erlotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  7. Conversion of calcineurin inhibitors with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors after kidney transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Soleimani, Alireza; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Sarrafnejad, Abdolfattah; Kamkar, Ideh; Einollahi, Behzad

    2013-02-01

    One way to overcome chronic allograft nephropathy induced by calcineurin inhibitors in immunosuppression protocols for organ transplants is to replace such inhibitors with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, which are not clinically nephrotoxic because they have better renal function. If patients tolerate replacement, there could be a clear preference for mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as a maintenance immunosuppressant after renal transplant. This replacement could be sufficient if it were used for a certain time after calcineurin inhibitors. This review considers the conversion effects of calcineurin inhibitors with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors from the view point of kidney function during different periods after a kidney transplant.

  8. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Thomas; Daugaard, Mads; Jaattela, Marja

    2011-01-01

    by the lack of specific small molecule inhibitors. Thus, we screened two small molecule kinase inhibitor libraries for inhibitors of rapamycin-induced autophagic flux. The three most potent inhibitors identified conferred profound inhibition of autophagic flux by inhibiting the formation of autophagosomes...

  9. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  10. Nanostructure sensor of presence and concentration of a target molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system (i) to determine when a selected target molecule is present or absent in a fluid, (2) to estimate concentration of the target molecule in the fluid and (3) estimate possible presence of a second (different) target molecule in the fluid, by analyzing differences in resonant frequencies of vibration of a thin beam suspended in the fluid, after the fluid has moved across the beam.

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masood, Ashiq [Department of Internal Medicine/Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, HWCRC 732, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Azmi, Asfar S. [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, HWCRC 732, Detroit MI 48201 (United States); Mohammad, Ramzi M., E-mail: mohammar@karmanos.org [Department of Internal Medicine/Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, HWCRC 732, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, 4100 John R, HWCRC 732, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2011-03-24

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a complex etiology and displays a wide range of cellular escape pathways that allow it to resist different treatment modalities. Crucial signaling molecules that function downstream of the survival pathways, particularly at points where several of these pathways crosstalk, provide valuable targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-2 family member proteins are anti-apoptotic molecules that are known to be overexpressed in most cancers including PC. The anti-apoptotic machinery has been linked to the observed resistance developed to chemotherapy and radiation and therefore is important from the targeted drug development point of view. Over the past ten years, our group has extensively studied a series of small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 against PC and provide solid preclinical platform for testing such novel drugs in the clinic. This review examines the efficacy, potency, and function of several small molecule inhibitor drugs targeted to the Bcl-2 family of proteins and their preclinical progress against PC. This article further focuses on compounds that have been studied the most and also discusses the anti-cancer potential of newer class of Bcl-2 drugs.

  12. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Stanley G.; Kumar, Sushil; Bansal, Nitu; Singh, Kamalendra; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Comollo, Thomas; Peng, Youyi; Kotenko, Sergei V.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Welsh, William J.; Birge, Raymond B.

    2017-01-01

    TAM receptors (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mertk) are a family of three homologous type I receptor tyrosine kinases that are implicated in several human malignancies. Overexpression of TAMs and their major ligand Growth arrest-specific factor 6 (Gas6) is associated with more aggressive staging of cancers, poorer predicted patient survival, acquired drug resistance and metastasis. Here we describe small molecule inhibitors (RU-301 and RU-302) that target the extracellular domain of Axl at the interface of the Ig-1 ectodomain of Axl and the Lg-1 of Gas6. These inhibitors effectively block Gas6-inducible Axl receptor activation with low micromolar IC50s in cell-based reporter assays, inhibit Gas6-inducible motility in Axl-expressing cell lines, and suppress H1299 lung cancer tumor growth in a mouse xenograft NOD-SCIDγ model. Furthermore, using homology models and biochemical verifications, we show that RU301 and 302 also inhibit Gas6 inducible activation of Mertk and Tyro3 suggesting they can act as pan-TAM inhibitors that block the interface between the TAM Ig1 ectodomain and the Gas6 Lg domain. Together, these observations establish that small molecules that bind to the interface between TAM Ig1 domain and Gas6 Lg1 domain can inhibit TAM activation, and support the further development of small molecule Gas6-TAM interaction inhibitors as a novel class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:28272423

  13. Unique small molecule entry inhibitors of hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew M; Rojek, Jillian M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Gundersen, Anette T; Jin, Wei; Shaginian, Alex; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H; Boger, Dale L; Oldstone, Michael B A; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-07-04

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by the arenaviruses Lassa virus in Africa and Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, and Sabia virus in South America are among the most devastating emerging human diseases with fatality rates of 15-35% and a limited antiviral therapeutic repertoire available. Here we used high throughput screening of synthetic combinatorial small molecule libraries to identify inhibitors of arenavirus infection using pseudotyped virion particles bearing the glycoproteins (GPs) of highly pathogenic arenaviruses. Our screening efforts resulted in the discovery of a series of novel small molecule inhibitors of viral entry that are highly active against both Old World and New World hemorrhagic arenaviruses. We observed potent inhibition of infection of human and primate cells with live hemorrhagic arenaviruses (IC(50)=500-800 nm). Investigations of the mechanism of action revealed that the candidate compounds efficiently block pH-dependent fusion by the arenavirus GPs (IC(50) of 200-350 nm). Although our lead compounds were potent against phylogenetically distant arenaviruses, they did not show activity against other enveloped viruses with class I viral fusion proteins, indicating specificity for arenavirus GP-mediated membrane fusion.

  14. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of the Lin28-mediated blockage of pre-let-7g processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Helen L; Miska, Eric A; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-11-02

    The protein Lin28 and microRNA let-7 play critical roles in mammalian development and human disease. Lin28 inhibits let-7 biogenesis through direct interaction with let-7 precursors (pre-let-7). Accumulating evidence in vitro and in vivo suggests this interaction plays a dominant role in embryonic stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenesis. Thus the Lin28-let-7 interaction might be an attractive drug target, if not for the well-known difficulties in targeting protein-RNA interactions with drugs. The identification and development of suitable probe molecules to further elucidate therapeutic potential, as well as mechanistic details of this pathway will be valuable. We report the development and application of a biophysical high-throughput screening assay for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of the Lin28-pre-let-7 interaction. A library of pharmacologically active small molecules was screened and several small molecule inhibitors were identified and biochemically validated. Of these four validated inhibitors, two compounds successfully restored processing of pre-let-7g in the presence of Lin28, validating the concept. Thus, we have identified examples of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between Lin28 and pre-let-7. This study provides a proof of concept for small molecule inhibitors that antagonise the effects of Lin28 and enhance processing of let-7 miRNA.

  15. Identification of small-molecule scaffolds for p450 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kries, Jens P; Warrier, Thulasi; Podust, Larissa M

    2010-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) attract ongoing interest for their pharmacological development potential, driving direct screening efforts against potential CYP targets with the ultimate goal of developing potent CYP-specific inhibitors and/or molecular probes to address M. tuberculosis biology. The property of CYP enzymes to shift the ferric heme Fe Soret band in response to ligand binding provides the basis for an experimental platform for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries to select chemotypes with high binding affinities to the target. Promising compounds can be evaluated in in vitro assays or in vivo disease models and further characterized by x-ray crystallography, leading to optimization strategies to assist drug design. Protocols are provided for compound library screening, analysis of inhibitory potential, and co-crystallization with the target CYP, as well as expression and purification of soluble CYP enzymes.

  16. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Lin28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Martina; Pradère, Ugo; Ngondo, Richard P; Behera, Alok; Allegrini, Sara; Civenni, Gianluca; Zagalak, Julian A; Marchand, Jean-Rémy; Menzi, Mirjam; Towbin, Harry; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario; Caflisch, Amedeo; Catapano, Carlo V; Ciaudo, Constance; Hall, Jonathan

    2016-10-21

    New discoveries in RNA biology underscore a need for chemical tools to clarify their roles in pathophysiological mechanisms. In certain cancers, synthesis of the let-7 microRNA tumor suppressor is blocked by an RNA binding protein (RBP) Lin28, which docks onto a conserved sequence in let-7 precursor RNA molecules and prevents their maturation. Thus, the Lin28/let-7 interaction might be an attractive drug target, if not for the well-known difficulty in targeting RNA-protein interactions with drugs. Here, we describe a protein/RNA FRET assay using a GFP-Lin28 donor and a black-hole quencher (BHQ)-labeled let-7 acceptor, a fluorescent protein/quencher combination which is rarely used in screening despite favorable spectral properties. We tested 16 000 molecules and identified N-methyl-N-[3-(3-methyl[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazin-6-yl)phenyl]acetamide, which blocked the Lin28/let-7 interaction, rescued let-7 processing and function in Lin28-expressing cancer cells, induced differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells, and reduced tumor-sphere formation by 22Rv1 and Huh7 cells. A biotinylated derivative captured Lin28 from cell lysates consistent with an on-target mechanism in cells, though the compound also showed some activity against bromodomains in selectivity assays. The Lin28/let-7 axis is presently of high interest not only for its role as a bistable switch in stem-cell biology but also because of its prominent roles in numerous diseases. We anticipate that much can be learned from the use of this first reported small molecule antagonist of Lin28, including the potential of the Lin28/let-7 interaction as a new drug target for selected cancers. Furthermore, this approach to assay development may be used to identify antagonists of other RBP/RNA interactions suspected to be operative in pathophysiological mechanisms.

  17. Radiolabeled Small Molecule Protein Kinase Inhibitors for Imaging with PET or SPECT

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    Justin W. Hicks

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Imaging protein kinase expression with radiolabeled small molecule inhibitors has been actively pursued to monitor the clinical potential of targeted therapeutics and treatments as well as to determine kinase receptor density changes related to disease progression. The goal of the present review is to provide an overview of the breadth of radiolabeled small molecules that have been synthesized to target intracellular protein kinases, not only for imaging in oncology, but also for other areas of interest, particularly the central nervous system.  Considerable radiotracer development has focused on imaging receptor tyrosine kinases of growth factors, protein kinases A, B and C, and glycogen synthase kinase–3β. Design considerations, structural attributes and relevant biological results are summarized.

  18. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR.

  19. Small molecule inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta and gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameriks, Michael K; Venable, Jennifer D

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, pharmaceutical companies have increasingly focused on phosphoinositide 3-kinases delta (PI3Kdelta) and gamma (PI3Kgamma) as therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. All class 1 PI3-kinases (alpha/beta/gamma/delta) generate phospholipid second messengers that help govern cellular processes such as migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. PI3K delta/ gamma lipid kinases are mainly restricted to the hematopoetic system whereas PI3K alpha/beta are ubiquitously expressed, thus raising potential toxicity concerns for chronic indications such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, the challenge in developing a small molecule inhibitor of PI3K is to define and attain the appropriate isoform selectivity profile. Significant advances in the design of such compounds have been achieved by utilizing x-ray crystal structures of various inhibitors bound to PI3Kgamma in conjunction with pharmacophore modeling and high-throughput screening. Herein, we review the history and challenges involved with the discovery of small molecule isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors. Recent progress in the design of selective PI3Kdelta, PI3Kgamma, and PI3Kdelta/gamma dual inhibitors will be presented.

  20. Comparison of the cancer gene targeting and biochemical selectivities of all targeted kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use.

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    Joost C M Uitdehaag

    Full Text Available The anti-proliferative activities of all twenty-five targeted kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical use were measured in two large assay panels: (1 a panel of proliferation assays of forty-four human cancer cell lines from diverse tumour tissue origins; and (2 a panel of more than 300 kinase enzyme activity assays. This study provides a head-on comparison of all kinase inhibitor drugs in use (status Nov. 2013, and for six of these drugs, the first kinome profiling data in the public domain. Correlation of drug activities with cancer gene mutations revealed novel drug sensitivity markers, suggesting that cancers dependent on mutant CTNNB1 will respond to trametinib and other MEK inhibitors, and cancers dependent on SMAD4 to small molecule EGFR inhibitor drugs. Comparison of cellular targeting efficacies reveals the most targeted inhibitors for EGFR, ABL1 and BRAF(V600E-driven cell growth, and demonstrates that the best targeted agents combine high biochemical potency with good selectivity. For ABL1 inhibitors, we computationally deduce optimized kinase profiles for use in a next generation of drugs. Our study shows the power of combining biochemical and cellular profiling data in the evaluation of kinase inhibitor drug action.

  1. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  2. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

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    Anthony Arnoldo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibitors that can suppress the toxicity caused by heterologous expression of selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa ORFs. We identified the first small molecule inhibitor of Exoenzyme S (ExoS, a toxin involved in Type III secretion. We show that this inhibitor, exosin, modulates ExoS ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in vitro, suggesting the inhibition is direct. Moreover, exosin and two of its analogues display a significant protective effect against Pseudomonas infection in vivo. Furthermore, because the assay was performed in yeast, we were able to demonstrate that several yeast homologues of the known human ExoS targets are likely ADP-ribosylated by the toxin. For example, using an in vitro enzymatic assay, we demonstrate that yeast Ras2p is directly modified by ExoS. Lastly, by surveying a collection of yeast deletion mutants, we identified Bmh1p, a yeast homologue of the human FAS, as an ExoS cofactor, revealing that portions of the bacterial toxin mode of action are conserved from yeast to human. Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens.

  3. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2015-10-19

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  4. Saururus cernuus lignans--potent small molecule inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Baerson, Scott R; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K; Mohammed, Kaleem A; Agarwal, Ameeta K; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2005-08-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important tumor-selective therapeutic target for solid tumors. In search of novel small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors, 5400 natural product-rich extracts from plants, marine organisms, and microbes were examined for HIF-1 inhibitory activities using a cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation, followed by structure elucidation, yielded three potent natural product-derived HIF-1 inhibitors and two structurally related inactive compounds. In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, manassantin B1, manassantin A, and 4-O-methylsaucerneol inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation with IC50 values of 3, 3, and 20 nM, respectively. All three compounds are relatively hypoxia-specific inhibitors of HIF-1 activation, in comparison to other stimuli. The hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes CDKN1A, VEGF, and GLUT-1 were also inhibited. These compounds inhibit HIF-1 by blocking hypoxia-induced nuclear HIF-1alpha protein accumulation without affecting HIF-1alpha mRNA levels. In addition, preliminary structure-activity studies suggest specific structural requirements for this class of HIF-1 inhibitors.

  5. Saururus cernuus Lignans - Potent Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Baerson, Scott R.; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important tumor-selective therapeutic target for solid tumors. In search of novel small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors, 5400 natural product-rich extracts from plants, marine organisms, and microbes were examined for HIF-1 inhibitory activities using a cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation, followed by structure elucidation, yielded three potent natural product-derived HIF-1 inhibitors and two structurally related inactive compounds. In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, manassantin B1, manassantin A, and 4-O-methylsaucerneol inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation with IC50 values of 3, 3, and 20 nM, respectively. All three compounds are relatively hypoxia-specific inhibitors of HIF-1 activation, in comparison to other stimuli. The hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes CDKN1A, VEGF and GLUT-1 were also inhibited. These compounds inhibit HIF-1 by blocking hypoxia-induced nuclear HIF-1α protein accumulation without affecting HIF-1α mRNA levels. In addition, preliminary structure-activity studies suggest specific structural requirements for this class of HIF-1 inhibitors. PMID:15967416

  6. Small-Molecule XIAP Inhibitors Enhance γ-Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis in Glioblastoma

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    Sri Hari Krishna Vellanki

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Because evasion of apoptosis can cause radioresistance of glioblastoma, there is a need to design rational strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we investigated the potential of targeting the antiapoptotic protein XIAP for the radiosensitization of glioblastoma. Here, we report that small-molecule XIAP inhibitors significantly enhance γ-irradiation-induced loss of viability and apoptosis and cooperate with γ-irradiation to suppress clonogenic survival of glioblastoma cells. Analysis of molecular mechanisms reveals that XIAP inhibitors act in concert with γ-irradiation to cause mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and caspasedependent apoptosis. Importantly, XIAP inhibitors also sensitize primary cultured glioblastoma cells derived from surgical specimens as well as glioblastoma-initiating stemlike cancer stem cells for γ-irradiation. In contrast, they do not increase the toxicity of γ-irradiation on some nonmalignant cells of the central nervous system, including rat neurons or glial cells, pointing to some tumor selectivity. In conclusion, by demonstrating for the first time that smallmolecule XIAP inhibitors increase the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cells while sparing normal cells of the central nervous system, our findings build the rationale for further (preclinical development of XIAP inhibitors in combination with γ-irradiation in glioblastoma.

  7. Novel small molecule EGFR inhibitors as candidate drugs in non-small cell lung cancer

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    Berardi R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rossana Berardi, Matteo Santoni, Francesca Morgese, Zelmira Ballatore, Agnese Savini, Azzurra Onofri, Paola Mazzanti, Mirco Pistelli, Chiara Pierantoni, Mariagrazia De Lisa, Miriam Caramanti, Silvia Pagliaretta, Chiara Pellei, Stefano CascinuMedical Oncology Unit, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I – GM Lancisi – G Salesi, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: In the last decade, better understanding of the role of epidermal growth factor receptor in the pathogenesis and progression of non-small cell lung cancer has led to a revolution in the work-up of these neoplasms. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as erlotinib and gefitinib, have been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, demonstrating an improvement in progression-free and overall survival, particularly in patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Nevertheless, despite initial responses and long-lasting remissions, resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors invariably develops, most commonly due to the emergence of secondary T790M mutations or to the amplification of mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor (c-Met, which inevitably leads to treatment failure. Several clinical studies are ongoing (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combined approaches and to develop novel irreversible or multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mutant-selective inhibitors to overcome such resistance. This review is an overview of ongoing Phase I, II, and III trials of novel small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and combinations in non-small cell lung cancer patients.Keywords: clinical trials, combined targeted therapy, epidermal growth factor receptor, non-small cell lung cancer, novel targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  8. A small molecule inhibitor partitions two distinct pathways for trafficking of tonoplast intrinsic proteins in Arabidopsis.

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    Efrain E Rivera-Serrano

    Full Text Available Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs facilitate the membrane transport of water and other small molecules across the plant vacuolar membrane, and members of this family are expressed in specific developmental stages and tissue types. Delivery of TIP proteins to the tonoplast is thought to occur by vesicle-mediated traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole, and at least two pathways have been proposed, one that is Golgi-dependent and another that is Golgi-independent. However, the mechanisms for trafficking of vacuolar membrane proteins to the tonoplast remain poorly understood. Here we describe a chemical genetic approach to unravel the mechanisms of TIP protein targeting to the vacuole in Arabidopsis seedlings. We show that members of the TIP family are targeted to the vacuole via at least two distinct pathways, and we characterize the bioactivity of a novel inhibitor that can differentiate between them. We demonstrate that, unlike for TIP1;1, trafficking of markers for TIP3;1 and TIP2;1 is insensitive to Brefeldin A in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Using a chemical inhibitor that may target this BFA-insensitive pathway for membrane proteins, we show that inhibition of this pathway results in impaired root hair growth and enhanced vacuolar targeting of the auxin efflux carrier PIN2 in the dark. Our results indicate that the vacuolar targeting of PIN2 and the BFA-insensitive pathway for tonoplast proteins may be mediated in part by common mechanisms.

  9. Diverse inhibitor chemotypes targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

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    Shamila S Gunatilleke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar K(D values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC(50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC(50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5, fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17 and aromatase (CYP19. Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP

  10. Discovery of small-molecule interleukin-2 inhibitors from a DNA-encoded chemical library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbacher, Markus; Zhang, Yixin; Mannocci, Luca; Stravs, Michael; Geppert, Tim; Scheuermann, Jörg; Schneider, Gisbert; Neri, Dario

    2012-06-18

    Libraries of chemical compounds individually coupled to encoding DNA tags (DNA-encoded chemical libraries) hold promise to facilitate exceptionally efficient ligand discovery. We constructed a high-quality DNA-encoded chemical library comprising 30,000 drug-like compounds; this was screened in 170 different affinity capture experiments. High-throughput sequencing allowed the evaluation of 120 million DNA codes for a systematic analysis of selection strategies and statistically robust identification of binding molecules. Selections performed against the tumor-associated antigen carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) and the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) yielded potent inhibitors with exquisite target specificity. The binding mode of the revealed pharmacophore against IL-2 was confirmed by molecular docking. Our findings suggest that DNA-encoded chemical libraries allow the facile identification of drug-like ligands principally to any protein of choice, including molecules capable of disrupting high-affinity protein-protein interactions.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Doets, C.B.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Treister, N.S.; Epstein, J.B.; Arends, A.B.P.; Wiersma, D.R.; Lalla, R.V.; Logan, R.M.; van Erp, N.R.P.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent introduction of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oncology, distinct cutaneous and oral adverse events have been identified. In fact, stomatitis and rash are documented as the most frequent and potentially dose-limiting side effects. Clinically, mTOR inhibitor-ass

  12. Protein homology reveals new targets for bioactive small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, David; Zoete, Vincent

    2015-08-15

    The functional impact of small molecules is increasingly being assessed in different eukaryotic species through large-scale phenotypic screening initiatives. Identifying the targets of these molecules is crucial to mechanistically understand their function and uncover new therapeutically relevant modes of action. However, despite extensive work carried out in model organisms and human, it is still unclear to what extent one can use information obtained in one species to make predictions in other species. Here, for the first time, we explore and validate at a large scale the use of protein homology relationships to predict the targets of small molecules across different species. Our results show that exploiting target homology can significantly improve the predictions, especially for molecules experimentally tested in other species. Interestingly, when considering separately orthology and paralogy relationships, we observe that mapping small molecule interactions among orthologs improves prediction accuracy, while including paralogs does not improve and even sometimes worsens the prediction accuracy. Overall, our results provide a novel approach to integrate chemical screening results across multiple species and highlight the promises and remaining challenges of using protein homology for small molecule target identification. Homology-based predictions can be tested on our website http://www.swisstargetprediction.ch. david.gfeller@unil.ch or vincent.zoete@isb-sib.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors against Meso-2, 6-Diaminopimelate Dehydrogenase from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Victoria N Stone

    Full Text Available Species-specific antimicrobial therapy has the potential to combat the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance and alteration of the human microbiome. We therefore set out to demonstrate the beginning of a pathogen-selective drug discovery method using the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis as a model. Through our knowledge of metabolic networks and essential genes we identified a "druggable" essential target, meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase, which is found in a limited number of species. We adopted a high-throughput virtual screen method on the ZINC chemical library to select a group of potential small-molecule inhibitors. Meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase from P. gingivalis was first expressed and purified in Escherichia coli then characterized for enzymatic inhibitor screening studies. Several inhibitors with similar structural scaffolds containing a sulfonamide core and aromatic substituents showed dose-dependent inhibition. These compounds were further assayed showing reasonable whole-cell activity and the inhibition mechanism was determined. We conclude that the establishment of this target and screening strategy provides a model for the future development of new antimicrobials.

  14. High-Throughput Colorimetric Assay for Identifying PARP-1 Inhibitors Using a Large Small-Molecule Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Elena; Tulin, Alexei V

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) protein became a popular target for treatment of several types of cancer. A number of PARP-1 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. Most of them were designed competitors with NAD for a binding site on PARP-1 molecule. This strategy resulted in a discovery of mainly nucleotide-like PARP-1 inhibitors, which may target not only PARP-1 but also other pathways involving NAD and other nucleotides. Many cancer types demonstrate rapid development of resistance to NAD-like PARP-1 inhibitors. Thus, identification and characterization of new small molecules inhibit PARP-1 with high specificity and efficacy is important for the clinical research. We have proposed a new approach to screen libraries for new PARP-1 inhibitors based on histone H4-dependent PARP-1 activation. Beside identification of NAD competitors in a small molecules collection, this approach allows finding other classes of PARP-1 inhibitors that specifically disrupt H4-based PARP-1 activation or arrest inactive allosteric conformation of PARP-1. Here, we present an adaptation of this approach for a large-scale high-throughput screen.

  15. Tripolin A, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of aurora A kinase, reveals new regulation of HURP's distribution on microtubules.

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    Iliana A Kesisova

    Full Text Available Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs, affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein, a MT-associated protein (MAP and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development.

  16. Tripolin A, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of aurora A kinase, reveals new regulation of HURP's distribution on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisova, Iliana A; Nakos, Konstantinos C; Tsolou, Avgi; Angelis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Joe; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Agianian, Bogos; Giannis, Athanassios; Koffa, Maria D

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs), affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein), a MT-associated protein (MAP) and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development.

  17. Galectin-3 Inhibition by a Small-Molecule Inhibitor Reduces Both Pathological Corneal Neovascularization and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen*, Wei-Sheng; Cao, Zhiyi; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Corneal neovascularization and scarring commonly lead to significant vision loss. This study was designed to determine whether a small-molecule inhibitor of galectin-3 can inhibit both corneal angiogenesis and fibrosis in experimental mouse models. Methods Animal models of silver nitrate cautery and alkaline burn were used to induce mouse corneal angiogenesis and fibrosis, respectively. Corneas were treated with the galectin-3 inhibitor, 33DFTG, or vehicle alone and were processed for whole-mount immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis to quantify the density of blood vessels and markers of fibrosis. In addition, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and primary human corneal fibroblasts were used to analyze the role of galectin-3 in the process of angiogenesis and fibrosis in vitro. Results Robust angiogenesis was observed in silver nitrate–cauterized corneas on day 5 post injury, and markedly increased corneal opacification was demonstrated in alkaline burn–injured corneas on days 7 and 14 post injury. Treatment with the inhibitor substantially reduced corneal angiogenesis and opacification with a concomitant decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and distribution. In vitro studies revealed that 33DFTG inhibited VEGF-A–induced HUVEC migration and sprouting without cytotoxic effects. The addition of exogenous galectin-3 to corneal fibroblasts in culture induced the expression of fibrosis-related proteins, including α-SMA and connective tissue growth factor. Conclusions Our data provide proof of concept that targeting galectin-3 by the novel, small-molecule inhibitor, 33DFTG, ameliorates pathological corneal angiogenesis as well as fibrosis. These findings suggest a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating ocular disorders related to pathological angiogenesis and fibrosis. PMID:28055102

  18. Multimodal effects of small molecule ROCK and LIMK inhibitors on mitosis, and their implication as anti-leukemia agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Oku

    Full Text Available Accurate chromosome segregation is vital for cell viability. Many cancer cells show chromosome instability (CIN due to aberrant expression of the genes involved in chromosome segregation. The induction of massive chromosome segregation errors in such cancer cells by small molecule inhibitors is an emerging strategy to kill these cells selectively. Here we screened and characterized small molecule inhibitors which cause mitotic chromosome segregation errors to target cancer cell growth. We screened about 300 chemicals with known targets, and found that Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK inhibitors bypassed the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which delays anaphase onset until proper kinetochore-microtubule interactions are established. We investigated how ROCK inhibitors affect chromosome segregation, and found that they induced microtubule-dependent centrosome fragmentation. Knockdown of ROCK1 and ROCK2 revealed their additive roles in centrosome integrity. Pharmacological inhibition of LIMK also induced centrosome fragmentation similar to that by ROCK inhibitors. Inhibition of ROCK or LIMK hyper-stabilized mitotic spindles and impaired Aurora-A activation. These results suggested that ROCK and LIMK are directly or indirectly involved in microtubule dynamics and activation of Aurora-A. Furthermore, inhibition of ROCK or LIMK suppressed T cell leukemia growth in vitro, but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells. They induced centrosome fragmentation and apoptosis in T cell leukemia cells. These results suggested that ROCK and LIMK can be a potential target for anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Novel targeted therapeutics: inhibitors of MDM2, ALK and PARP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We reviewed preclinical data and clinical development of MDM2 (murine double minute 2, ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase and PARP (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase inhibitors. MDM2 binds to p53, and promotes degradation of p53 through ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. JNJ-26854165 and RO5045337 are 2 small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2 in clinical development. ALK is a transmembrane protein and a member of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinases. EML4-ALK fusion gene is identified in approximately 3-13% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Early-phase clinical studies with Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, in NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK have demonstrated promising activity with high response rate and prolonged progression-free survival. PARPs are a family of nuclear enzymes that regulates the repair of DNA single-strand breaks through the base excision repair pathway. Randomized phase II study has shown adding PARP-1 inhibitor BSI-201 to cytotoxic chemotherapy improves clinical outcome in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Olaparib, another oral small-molecule PARP inhibitor, demonstrated encouraging single-agent activity in patients with advanced breast or ovarian cancer. There are 5 other PARP inhibitors currently under active clinical investigation.

  20. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  1. Adnectin-targeted inhibitors: rationale and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Esha; Gong, Jun; Rimel, Bobbie; Mita, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Adnectins are a family of binding proteins derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (10Fn3), which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily and normally binds integrin. The 10Fn3 has the potential for broad therapeutic applications given its structural stability, ability to be manipulated, and its abundance in the human body. The most commonly studied adnectin is CT-322, which is an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. A bispecific adnectin, El-Tandem, has also been developed and binds to epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor simultaneously. Pre-clinical studies have shown promising results in relation to reducing tumor growth, decreasing microvessel density, and promoting normalization of tumor architecture. The phase I trial with CT-322 demonstrates relatively low toxicities. However, the phase II study done with CT-322 in recurrent glioblastoma does not reveal as promising results.

  2. New small-molecule inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase inhibit Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Nguyen, Thao; McMichael, Megan; Velu, Sadanandan E; Zou, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Wu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major aetiological agent of dental caries. Formation of biofilms is a key virulence factor of S. mutans. Drugs that inhibit S. mutans biofilms may have therapeutic potential. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a critical role in regulating the metabolism of folate. DHFR inhibitors are thus potent drugs and have been explored as anticancer and antimicrobial agents. In this study, a library of analogues based on a DHFR inhibitor, trimetrexate (TMQ), an FDA-approved drug, was screened and three new analogues that selectively inhibited S. mutans were identified. The most potent inhibitor had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 454.0±10.2nM for the biofilm and 8.7±1.9nM for DHFR of S. mutans. In contrast, the IC50 of this compound for human DHFR was ca. 1000nM, a >100-fold decrease in its potency, demonstrating the high selectivity of the analogue. An analogue that exhibited the least potency for the S. mutans biofilm also had the lowest activity towards inhibiting S. mutans DHFR, further indicating that inhibition of biofilms is related to reduced DHFR activity. These data, along with docking of the most potent analogue to the modelled DHFR structure, suggested that the TMQ analogues indeed selectively inhibited S. mutans through targeting DHFR. These potent and selective small molecules are thus promising lead compounds to develop new effective therapeutics to prevent and treat dental caries.

  3. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs.

  4. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like...... TIMPs and RECK or at the transcriptional and translational levels using, e.g., histone deacetylase inhibitors, synthetic inhibitors like Periostat, microRNA-interfering drugs like AC1MMYR2, and natural compounds like flavonoids, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, anacardic acid, and erythropoietin. Among drugs...... targeting the major ECM receptors, integrins, are the anticancer peptide cilengitide and anti-integrin antibodies, which have a potential for treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, and AD. The latter can be also potentially treated with modulators of CAMs, such as peptide mimetics derived from L1-CAM...

  6. Profiling targets of the irreversible palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Davda, Dahvid; El Azzouny, Mahmoud A.; Tom, Christopher T.M.B.; Hernandez, Jeannie L.; Majmudar, Jaimeen D.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Martin, Brent R.

    2013-01-01

    2-bromohexadecanoic acid, or 2-bromopalmitate, was introduced nearly 50 years ago as a non-selective inhibitor of lipid metabolism. More recently, 2-bromopalmitate re-emerged as a general inhibitor of protein S-palmitoylation. Here, we investigate the cellular targets of 2-bromopalmitate through the synthesis and application of click-enabled analogues. In cells, 2-bromopalmitate is converted to 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA, although less efficiently than free palmitate. Once conjugated to CoA, probe ...

  7. Enzyme kinetics and distinct modulation of the protein kinase N family of kinases by lipid activators and small molecule inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Matthew D.; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Unsal-Kacmaz, Keziban; Klippel, Anke; Grant, Stephan; Brooun, Alexei; Timofeevski, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The PKN (protein kinase N) family of Ser/Thr protein kinases regulates a diverse set of cellular functions, such as cell migration and cytoskeletal organization. Inhibition of tumour PKN activity has been explored as an oncology therapeutic approach, with a PKN3-targeted RNAi (RNA interference)-derived therapeutic agent in Phase I clinical trials. To better understand this important family of kinases, we performed detailed enzymatic characterization, determining the kinetic mechanism and lipid sensitivity of each PKN isoform using full-length enzymes and synthetic peptide substrate. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that PKN1–3 follows a sequential ordered Bi–Bi kinetic mechanism, where peptide substrate binding is preceded by ATP binding. This kinetic mechanism was confirmed by additional kinetic studies for product inhibition and affinity of small molecule inhibitors. The known lipid effector, arachidonic acid, increased the catalytic efficiency of each isoform, mainly through an increase in kcat for PKN1 and PKN2, and a decrease in peptide KM for PKN3. In addition, a number of PKN inhibitors with various degrees of isoform selectivity, including potent (Ki<10 nM) and selective PKN3 inhibitors, were identified by testing commercial libraries of small molecule kinase inhibitors. This study provides a kinetic framework and useful chemical probes for understanding PKN biology and the discovery of isoform-selective PKN-targeted inhibitors. PMID:27919031

  8. Inhibitors of emerging epigenetic targets for cancer therapy: a patent review (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Roberts, Justin M; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James E

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory pathways comprise an emerging and active area of chemical probe discovery and investigational drug development. Emerging insights from cancer genome sequencing and chromatin biology have identified leveraged opportunities for development of chromatin-directed small molecules as cancer therapies. At present, only six agents in two epigenetic target classes have been approved by the US FDA, limited to treatment of hematological malignancies. Recently, new classes of epigenetic inhibitors have appeared in literatures. First-in-class compounds have successfully transitioned to clinical investigation, importantly also in solid tumors and pediatric malignancies. This review considers patent applications for small-molecule inhibitors of selected epigenetic targets from 2010 to 2014. Included are exemplary classes of chromatin-associated epigenomic writers (DOT1L and EZH2), erasers (LSD1) and readers (BRD4).

  9. Rational design of Rho GTPase-targeting inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xun; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases have been implicated in diverse cellular functions and are potential therapeutic targets in inflammation, cancer, and neurologic diseases. Virtual screening of compounds that fit into surface grooves of RhoA known to be critical for guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) interaction produced chemical candidates with minimized docking energy. Subsequent screening for inhibitory activity of RhoA binding to the Rho-GEF, LARG, identified a Rho-specific inhibitor as a lead compound capable of blocking RhoA-LARG interaction and RhoA activation by LARG specifically and dose dependently. A microscale thermophoresis analysis was applied to directly quantify the binding interaction of the lead inhibitor with RhoA target. The lead inhibitor highlights the principle that rational targeting of subfamily members of Rho GTPases is feasible and potentially useful in future drug design effort.

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stoszko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4+ T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  11. Chemical 'Jekyll and Hyde's: small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Tomoyo; Chen, James K

    2011-08-01

    Small molecules that perturb developmental signaling pathways can have devastating effects on embryonic patterning, as evidenced by the chemically induced onset of cyclopic lambs and children with severely shortened limbs during the 1950s. Recent studies, however, have revealed critical roles for these pathways in human disorders and diseases, spurring the re-examination of these compounds as new targeted therapies. In this tutorial review, we describe four case studies of teratogenic compounds, including inhibitors of the Hedgehog (Hh), Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways. We discuss how these teratogens were discovered, their mechanisms of action, their utility as molecular probes, and their potential as therapeutic agents. We also consider current challenges in the field and possible directions for future research. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  12. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-04

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  13. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4(+) T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  14. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper 17 (Th17 cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Crohn’s disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4+ T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  15. Chemistry of the interaction between azole type corrosion inhibitor molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacevic, Natasa [Department of Physical and Organic Chemistry, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kokalj, Anton, E-mail: tone.kokalj@ijs.si [Department of Physical and Organic Chemistry, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    By means of density functional theory calculations, it has been shown how typical organic corrosion inhibitors-molecules that have the ability to remarkably slow down the corrosion of metals and alloys-interact with bare surfaces of various types of metals. As representative model systems, benzimidazole and benzotriazole inhibitors on iron, copper, and aluminum surfaces are considered. It is found that bonding depends sensitively on the type of metal. On transition metals with open d-band the inhibitor molecules can chemisorb strongly either parallel to the surface with a pronounced {pi}-d hybridization or perpendicularly with unsaturated N atom(s) through {sigma}-molecular orbitals, whereas on transition metals with fully occupied d-band and on sp-metals the molecules weakly chemisorb only with the latter mode. In addition to neutral inhibitor molecules also inhibitors in deprotonated (anionic) and protonated (cationic) forms are considered, because many corrosion inhibitors possess acidic hydrogens as well as basic heteroatoms. It is shown that the chemisorptive bonding is far the strongest for deprotonated inhibitors and, moreover, that even protonated inhibitors may chemisorb, although such bonding is characteristic of more reactive metals. However adsorbed protonated inhibitors are likely to deprotonate on all considered metals, whereas further deprotonation from neutral to deprotonated form is more likely on more reactive metals. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bonding of azole corrosion inhibitors onto metal surfaces characterized by DFT calculations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption bonding depends sensitively on the type of metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azoles bond with either {pi}-system or {sigma}-orbitals to transition metals with open d-band. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azoles bond with {sigma}-orbitals to transition metals with fully occupied d-band and to sp-metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Among various molecular forms

  16. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Marialuisa Moccia; Qingsong Liu; Teresa Guida; Giorgia Federico; Annalisa Brescia; Zheng Zhao; Hwan Geun Choi; Xianming Deng; Li Tan; Jinhua Wang; Marc Billaud; Gray, Nathanael S.; Francesca Carlomagno; Massimo Santoro

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-media...

  17. A Novel SERCA Inhibitor Demonstrates Synergy with Classic SERCA Inhibitors and Targets Multidrug-Resistant AML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, Nicholas P.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Thomas, David D.; Xing, Chengguo

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance exists as a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer and drug molecules that retain effectiveness against resistant cancers are a high clinical priority. Ethyl 2-amino-6-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethyl)-4H-chromene-3-carboxylate (CXL017) was recently identified as a promising lead for the treatment of multidrug-resistant leukemia, which elicits its cytotoxic effect, in part, through inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Herein initial experiments with SERCA1a, CXL017 demonstrated no significant effect on calcium affinity, competed with ATP, and induced a dose-dependent decrease in ATPase activity. Among all CXLs tested, (−)-CXL017 exhibited the greatest SERCA inhibition with an IC50 = 13.5 ± 0.5 μM. Inhibitor combination studies were used to assess potential interactions between (−)-CXL017 and well-known SERCA inhibitors: thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, and 2, 5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone. Surprisingly, (−)-CXL017 exhibited marked synergy with each of the known SERCA inhibitors whereas all combinations of the known inhibitors yielded additive effects, indicating that (−)-CXL017 may bind at a unique allosteric site. Treatment of parental (HL60) and multidrug-resistant (HL60/MX2) acute myeloid leukemia cells with the known SERCA inhibitors revealed that all of these inhibitors demonstrate selective cytotoxicity (7.7 to 400 fold) for the resistant cell line. Within the CXL series, a positive correlation exists between SERCA inhibition and cytotoxicity in HL60/MX2 but not HL60. (−)-CXL017 was also shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of thapsigargin in HL60/MX2 cells. Given the elevated SERCA levels and ER calcium content in HL60/MX2, SERCA likely plays a significant role in the collateral sensitivity of this multidrug-resistance cell line to CXL molecules as well as known SERCA inhibitors. PMID:24079514

  18. Approaches for Identification of HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors Targeting gp41 Pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim K. Debnath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon, was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD, it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  19. Rational design and characterization of a Rac GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Dickerson, J Bradley; Guo, Fukun; Zheng, Jie; Zheng, Yi

    2004-05-18

    The signaling pathways mediated by Rho family GTPases have been implicated in many aspects of cell biology. The specificity of the pathways is achieved in part by the selective interaction between Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their Rho GTPase substrates. Here, we report a first-generation small-molecule inhibitor of Rac GTPase targeting Rac activation by GEF. The chemical compound NSC23766 was identified by a structure-based virtual screening of compounds that fit into a surface groove of Rac1 known to be critical for GEF specification. In vitro it could effectively inhibit Rac1 binding and activation by the Rac-specific GEF Trio or Tiam1 in a dose-dependent manner without interfering with the closely related Cdc42 or RhoA binding or activation by their respective GEFs or with Rac1 interaction with BcrGAP or effector PAK1. In cells, it potently blocked serum or platelet-derived growth factor-induced Rac1 activation and lamellipodia formation without affecting the activity of endogenous Cdc42 or RhoA. Moreover, this compound reduced Trio or Tiam1 but not Vav, Lbc, Intersectin, or a constitutively active Rac1 mutant-stimulated cell growth and suppressed Trio, Tiam1, or Ras-induced cell transformation. When applied to human prostate cancer PC-3 cells, it was able to inhibit the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and invasion phenotypes that require the endogenous Rac1 activity. Thus, NSC23766 constitutes a Rac-specific small-molecule inhibitor that could be useful to study the role of Rac in various cellular functions and to reverse tumor cell phenotypes associated with Rac deregulation.

  20. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Charles A. Laughton; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chine...

  1. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poksay, Karen S; Sheffler, Douglas J; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E; Cosford, Nicholas D P; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds - identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP - in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

  2. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poksay, Karen S.; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds – identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP – in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

  3. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura (Pfizer)

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  4. A targeted library screen reveals a new inhibitor scaffold for protein kinase D.

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    Manuj Tandon

    Full Text Available Protein kinase D (PKD has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in multiple pathological conditions, including cancer and heart diseases. Potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of PKD are valuable for dissecting PKD-mediated cellular signaling pathways and for therapeutic application. In this study, we evaluated a targeted library of 235 small organic kinase inhibitors for PKD1 inhibitory activity at a single concentration. Twenty-eight PKD inhibitory chemotypes were identified and six exhibited excellent PKD1 selectivity. Five of the six lead structures share a common scaffold, with compound 139 being the most potent and selective for PKD vs PKC and CAMK. Compound 139 was an ATP-competitive PKD1 inhibitor with a low double-digit nanomolar potency and was also cell-active. Kinase profiling analysis identified this class of small molecules as pan-PKD inhibitors, confirmed their selectivity again PKC and CAMK, and demonstrated an overall favorable selectivity profile that could be further enhanced through structural modification. Furthermore, using a PKD homology model based on similar protein kinase structures, docking modes for compound 139 were explored and compared to literature examples of PKD inhibition. Modeling of these compounds at the ATP-binding site of PKD was used to rationalize its high potency and provide the foundation for future further optimization. Accordingly, using biochemical screening of a small number of privileged scaffolds and computational modeling, we have identified a new core structure for highly potent PKD inhibition with promising selectivity against closely related kinases. These lead structures represent an excellent starting point for the further optimization and the design of selective and therapeutically effective small molecule inhibitors of PKD.

  5. Small Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of ErbB2/HER2/Neu in the Treatment of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Schroeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is a member of the erbB class of tyrosine kinase receptors. These proteins are normally expressed at the surface of healthy cells and play critical roles in the signal transduction cascade in a myriad of biochemical pathways responsible for cell growth and differentiation. However, it is widely known that amplification and subsequent overexpression of the HER2 encoding oncogene results in unregulated cell proliferation in an aggressive form of breast cancer known as HER2-positive breast cancer. Existing therapies such as trastuzumab (Herceptin® and lapatinib (Tyverb/Tykerb®, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor and a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, respectively, are currently used in the treatment of HER2-positive cancers, although issues with high recurrence and acquired resistance still remain. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide attractive therapeutic targets, as they are able to block cell signaling associated with many of the proposed mechanisms for HER2 resistance. In this regard we aim to present a review on the available HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as those currently in development. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as sequential or combinatorial therapeutic strategies with other HER family inhibitors is also discussed.

  6. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

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    Marialuisa Moccia

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  7. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  8. Small molecule kinase inhibitors alleviate different molecular features of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Marzena; Taylor, Katarzyna; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Napierala, Marek; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2014-01-01

    Expandable (CTG)n repeats in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene are a cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which leads to a toxic RNA gain-of-function disease. Mutant RNAs with expanded CUG repeats are retained in the nucleus and aggregate in discrete inclusions. These foci sequester splicing factors of the MBNL family and trigger upregulation of the CUGBP family of proteins resulting in the mis-splicing of their target transcripts. To date, many efforts to develop novel therapeutic strategies have been focused on disrupting the toxic nuclear foci and correcting aberrant alternative splicing via targeting mutant CUG repeats RNA; however, no effective treatment for DM1 is currently available. Herein, we present results of culturing of human DM1 myoblasts and fibroblasts with two small-molecule ATP-binding site-specific kinase inhibitors, C16 and C51, which resulted in the alleviation of the dominant-negative effects of CUG repeat expansion. Reversal of the DM1 molecular phenotype includes a reduction of the size and number of foci containing expanded CUG repeat transcripts, decreased steady-state levels of CUGBP1 protein, and consequent improvement of the aberrant alternative splicing of several pre-mRNAs misregulated in DM1.

  9. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L. (TAM); (Cambridge)

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  10. From polypharmacology to target specificity: the case of PARP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, Paride; Camaioni, Emidio; Carotti, Andrea; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases (PARPs) catalyze a post-transcriptional modification of proteins, consisting in the attachment of mono, oligo or poly ADP-ribose units from NAD+ to specific polar residues of target proteins. The scientific interest in members of this superfamily of enzymes is continuously growing since they have been implicated in a range of diseases including stroke, cardiac ischemia, cancer, inflammation and diabetes. Despite some inhibitors of PARP-1, the founder member of the superfamily, have advanced in clinical trials for cancer therapy, and other members of PARPs have recently been proposed as interesting drug targets, challenges exist in understanding the polypharmacology of current PARP inhibitors as well as developing highly selective chemical tools to unravel specific functions of each member of the superfamily. Beginning with an overview on the molecular aspects that affect polypharmacology, in this article we discuss how these may have an impact on PARP research and drug discovery. Then, we review the most selective PARP inhibitors hitherto reported in literature, giving an update on the molecular aspects at the basis of selective PARP inhibitor design. Finally, some outlooks on current issues and future directions in this field of research are also provided.

  11. Expanding horizons in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma: Ibrutinib a novel BTK-targeting inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Dhingra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and bone marrow with short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival of 4–5 years. Small molecule inhibitors targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, PI3K/PKB/mTOR, JAK/STAT have significantly improved clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Recently Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK, a crucial terminal kinase enzyme in the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling pathway, has emerged as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in human malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Ibrutinib, a novel first-in-human BTK-inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical effectiveness and tolerability in clinical trials, recently been approved by FDA in the treatment of MCL. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 249-254

  12. Defining RNA–Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif–small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure–Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif–small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule–RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  13. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  14. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  15. Targeting DNA Repair in Cancer: Beyond PARP Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica S; O'Carrigan, Brent; Jackson, Stephen P; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-01-01

    Germline aberrations in critical DNA-repair and DNA damage-response (DDR) genes cause cancer predisposition, whereas various tumors harbor somatic mutations causing defective DDR/DNA repair. The concept of synthetic lethality can be exploited in such malignancies, as exemplified by approval of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors for treating BRCA1/2-mutated ovarian cancers. Herein, we detail how cellular DDR processes engage various proteins that sense DNA damage, initiate signaling pathways to promote cell-cycle checkpoint activation, trigger apoptosis, and coordinate DNA repair. We focus on novel therapeutic strategies targeting promising DDR targets and discuss challenges of patient selection and the development of rational drug combinations.

  16. Anti-obesity effects of 3-hydroxychromone derivative, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sooho; Yang, Woo Kyeom; Song, Ji Ho; Ra, Young Min; Jeong, Jin-Hyun; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung-Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2013-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism, and dysregulation of GSK-3 activity is implicated in a variety of metabolic disorders, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Hence, GSK-3 has emerged as an attractive target molecule for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Therefore, this research focused on identification and characterization of a novel small-molecule GSK-3 inhibitor. Compound 1a, a structure based on 3-hydroxychromone bearing isothiazolidine-1,1-dione, was identified from chemical library as a highly potent GSK-3 inhibitor. An in vitro kinase assay utilizing a panel of kinases demonstrated that compound 1a strongly inhibits GSK-3β. The potential effects of compound 1a on the inactivation of GSK-3 were confirmed in human liver HepG2 and human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Stabilization of glycogen synthase and β-catenin, which are direct targets of GSK-3, by compound 1a was assessed in comparison with two other GSK-3 inhibitors: LiCl and SB-415286. In mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, compound 1a markedly blocked adipocyte differentiation. Consistently, intraperitoneal administration of compound 1a to diet-induced obese mice significantly ameliorated their key symptoms such as body weight gain, increased adiposity, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis due to the marked reduction of whole-body lipid level. In vitro and in vivo effects were accompanied by upregulation of β-catenin stability and downregulation of the expression of several critical genes related to lipid metabolism. From these results, it can be concluded that compound 1a, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of GSK-3, has potential as a new class of therapeutic agent for obesity treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of host-targeted small molecules that restrict intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Stanley

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant threat to global health. Macrophages are the host cell for M. tuberculosis infection, and although bacteria are able to replicate intracellularly under certain conditions, it is also clear that macrophages are capable of killing M. tuberculosis if appropriately activated. The outcome of infection is determined at least in part by the host-pathogen interaction within the macrophage; however, we lack a complete understanding of which host pathways are critical for bacterial survival and replication. To add to our understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracellular infection, we performed a chemical screen using a high-content microscopic assay to identify small molecules that restrict mycobacterial growth in macrophages by targeting host functions and pathways. The identified host-targeted inhibitors restrict bacterial growth exclusively in the context of macrophage infection and predominantly fall into five categories: G-protein coupled receptor modulators, ion channel inhibitors, membrane transport proteins, anti-inflammatories, and kinase modulators. We found that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, enhances secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and induces autophagy in infected macrophages, and gefitinib, an inhibitor of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, also activates autophagy and restricts growth. We demonstrate that during infection signaling through EGFR activates a p38 MAPK signaling pathway that prevents macrophages from effectively responding to infection. Inhibition of this pathway using gefitinib during in vivo infection reduces growth of M. tuberculosis in the lungs of infected mice. Our results support the concept that screening for inhibitors using intracellular models results in the identification of tool compounds for probing pathways during in vivo infection and may also result in the identification of new anti

  18. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated protein HU with structure-based inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dixit, Karuna; Ganesan, Varsha; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Dey, Debayan; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoid-associated protein HU plays an important role in maintenance of chromosomal architecture and in global regulation of DNA transactions in bacteria. Although HU is essential for growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there have been no reported attempts to perturb HU function with small molecules. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HU from Mtb. We identify a core region within the HU-DNA interface that can be targeted using stilbene derivatives. These small molecules specifically inhibit HU-DNA binding, disrupt nucleoid architecture and reduce Mtb growth. The stilbene inhibitors induce gene expression changes in Mtb that resemble those induced by HU deficiency. Our results indicate that HU is a potential target for the development of therapies against tuberculosis.

  19. Hedgehog pathway as a drug target: Smoothened inhibitors in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin TL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Lin1, William Matsui21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Division of Hematologic Malignancies, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Emerging laboratory and clinical investigations demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling (Hh represents a novel therapeutic target in various human cancers. This conserved signaling pathway precisely regulates self-renewal and terminal differentiation in embryonic development, but is typically silenced in adult tissues, with reactivation usually only during tissue repair. Aberrant Hh pathway signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis, self-renewal, and chemotherapy resistance of a growing number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Major components of the Hh pathway include the Hh ligands (Sonic, Desert, and Indian, the transmembrane receptor Patched, the signal transducer Smoothened (Smo, and transcription factors Gli1–3 which regulate the transcription of Hh target genes. Mutations in Hh pathway genes, increased Hh signaling in tumor stroma, and Hh overexpression in self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells have been described, and these different modes of Hh signaling have implications for the design of Hh pathway inhibitors and their integration into conventional treatment regimens. Discovery of a naturally-occurring Smo inhibitor, cyclopamine, and the identification of Hh pathway mutations and over expression in cancer cells prompted the development of several cyclopamine derivatives. Encouraging laboratory and in vivo data has resulted in Phase I and II clinical trials of Smo inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of Hh pathway signaling in malignancy and Smo antagonists in development. Recent data with these agents shows that they are well-tolerated and may be effective for subsets of patients. Challenges remain

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors of dengue-virus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron G Schmidt

    Full Text Available Flavivirus envelope protein (E mediates membrane fusion and viral entry from endosomes. A low-pH induced, dimer-to-trimer rearrangement and reconfiguration of the membrane-proximal "stem" of the E ectodomain draw together the viral and cellular membranes. We found stem-derived peptides from dengue virus (DV bind stem-less E trimer and mimic the stem-reconfiguration step in the fusion pathway. We adapted this experiment as a high-throughput screen for small molecules that block peptide binding and thus may inhibit viral entry. A compound identified in this screen, 1662G07, and a number of its analogs reversibly inhibit DV infectivity. They do so by binding the prefusion, dimeric E on the virion surface, before adsorption to a cell. They also block viral fusion with liposomes. Structure-activity relationship studies have led to analogs with submicromolar IC₉₀s against DV2, and certain analogs are active against DV serotypes 1,2, and 4. The compounds do not inhibit the closely related Kunjin virus. We propose that they bind in a previously identified, E-protein pocket, exposed on the virion surface and although this pocket is closed in the postfusion trimer, its mouth is fully accessible. Examination of the E-trimer coordinates (PDB 1OK8 shows that conformational fluctuations around the hinge could open the pocket without dissociating the trimer or otherwise generating molecular collisions. We propose that compounds such as 1662G07 trap the sE trimer in a "pocket-open" state, which has lost affinity for the stem peptide and cannot support the final "zipping up" of the stem.

  1. Radiolabeled prostate-specific membrane antigen small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leon; Sonni, Ida; Kopka, Klaus; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in most PCs and represents an ideal target for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Numerous PSMA tracers have been recently developed. This review aims to provide an overview on the clinical influence of PSMA tracers in primary staging, biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PC and advanced, metastatic PC. Additionally, the use of PSMA tracers in systemic radioligand therapy (RLT) of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), as well as non-prostatic specific uptake of PSMA tracers and the use of PSMA imaging to manage therapy have been described. A computerized search of the literature (PubMed) was conducted in order to find evidence on the role of PSMA tracers in the diagnosis and therapy of PC. PSMA positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) outperforms conventional imaging in the settings of primary PC, BCR and advanced PC. Especially in BCR of PC, PSMA PET/CT shows clinical value with significantly higher detection rates than standard modalities. The use of PSMA PET/CT resulted in a change of the therapeutic management in up to half of the cases. Regarding RLT, smaller studies were able to show positive clinical effects of 177Lu-labeled PSMA tracers without the occurrence of severe side effects. The currently available data clearly shows that PSMA targeting has a clinical impact on the diagnosis of PC, and that RLT using radiolabeled PSMA tracers has high potentiality in the settings of resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches.

  2. A guest molecule-host cavity fitting algorithm to mine PDB for small molecule targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrem, William C; Armstead, Stephen C; Kobayashi, Shunji; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Eckmann, David M

    2006-08-01

    Inhaled anesthetic molecule occupancy of a protein internal cavity depends in part on the volumes of the guest molecule and the host site. Current algorithms to determine volume and surface area of cavities in proteins whose structures have been determined and cataloged make no allowance for shape or small degrees of shape adjustment to accommodate a guest. We developed an algorithm to determine spheroid dimensions matching cavity volume and surface area and applied it to screen the cavities of 6,658 nonredundant structures stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for potential targets of halothane (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane). Our algorithm determined sizes of prolate and oblate spheroids matching dimensions of each cavity found. If those spheroids could accommodate halothane (radius 2.91 A) as a guest, we determined the packing coefficient. 394,766 total cavities were identified. Of 58,681 cavities satisfying the fit criteria for halothane, 11,902 cavities had packing coefficients in the range of 0.46-0.64. This represents 20.3% of cavities large enough to hold halothane, 3.0% of all cavities processed, and found in 2,432 protein structures. Our algorithm incorporates shape dependence to screen guest-host relationships for potential small molecule occupancy of protein cavities. Proteins with large numbers of such cavities are more likely to be functionally altered by halothane.

  3. Structure–activity relationships of a small-molecule inhibitor of the PDZ domain of PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Thorsen, Thor S.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described the first small-molecule inhibitor, (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)acryloylcarbamate (1), of the PDZ domain of protein interacting with Ca-kinase 1 (PICK1), a potential drug target against brain ischemia, pain and cocaine addiction. Herein, we explore structure......, docking studies were used to correlate biological affinities with structural considerations for ligand–protein interactions. The most potent analogue obtained in this study showed an improvement in affinity compared to 1 and is currently a lead in further studies of PICK1 inhibition....

  4. Killer bee molecules: antimicrobial peptides as effector molecules to target sporogonic stages of Plasmodium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Carter

    Full Text Available A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes. Specifically targeting early sporogonic stages, we initially screened AMPs for toxicity against a mosquito cell line and P. berghei ookinetes. Promising candidate AMPs were fed to mosquitoes to monitor adverse fitness effects, and their efficacy in blocking rodent malaria infection in Anopheles stephensi was assessed. This was followed by tests to determine their activity against P. falciparum in An. gambiae, initially using laboratory cultures to infect mosquitoes, then culminating in preliminary assays in the field using gametocytes and mosquitoes collected from the same area in Mali, West Africa. From a range of 33 molecules, six AMPs able to block Plasmodium development were identified: Anoplin, Duramycin, Mastoparan X, Melittin, TP10 and Vida3. With the exception of Anoplin and Mastoparan X, these AMPs were also toxic to an An. gambiae cell line at a concentration of 25 µM. However, when tested in mosquito blood feeds, they did not reduce mosquito longevity or egg production at concentrations of 50 µM. Peptides effective against cultured ookinetes were less effective when tested in vivo and differences in efficacy against P. berghei and P. falciparum were seen. From the range of molecules tested, the majority of effective AMPs were derived from bee/wasp venoms.

  5. The logic and design of analog-sensitive kinases and their small molecule inhibitors.

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    Lopez, Michael S; Kliegman, Joseph I; Shokat, Kevan M

    2014-01-01

    Analog-sensitive AS Kinase technology allows for rapid, reversible, and highly specific inhibition of individual engineered kinases in cells and in mouse models of human diseases. The technique consists of two parts: a kinase containing a space-creating mutation in the ATP-binding pocket and a bulky ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitor that complements the shape of the mutant ATP pocket. This strategy enables dissection of phospho-signaling pathways, elucidation of the physiological function of individual kinases, and characterization of the pharmacology of clinical-kinase inhibitors. Here, we present an overview of AS technology and describe a stepwise approach for generating AS Kinase mutants and identifying appropriate small molecule inhibitors. We also describe commonly encountered technical obstacles and provide strategies to overcome them.

  6. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

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    Jayant S Goda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, RAS (rat sarcoma oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells, it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  7. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  8. The Design and Synthesis of a New Class of RTK/HDAC Dual-Targeted Inhibitors

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    Wei Lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the development of targeted medicines has made significant achievements. As a typical example, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK inhibitors have become important chemotherapy drugs for a variety of cancers. However, the effectiveness of these agents is always hindered by poor response rates and acquired drug resistance. In order to overcome these limitations, several dual-targeted inhibitors with quinazoline core were designed and synthesized. Though these compounds can simultaneously inhibit histone deacetylases (HDAC as well as RTK, the structure-activity relationship (SAR is still not clear enough. To further explore this type of dual-targeted inhibitors, a new class of quinazoline derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their activity evaluations include in vitro inhibitory activity of HDAC, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The SAR study indicated that the introduction of polar group such as hydroxamate on the 4-position of the quinazoline core is more likely to provide a potent HDACi/HER2i hybrid rather than HDACi/EGFRi molecule.

  9. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

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    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  10. Identification of a kinase profile that predicts chromosome damage induced by small molecule kinase inhibitors.

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    Andrew J Olaharski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinases are heavily pursued pharmaceutical targets because of their mechanistic role in many diseases. Small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs are a compound class that includes marketed drugs and compounds in various stages of drug development. While effective, many SMKIs have been associated with toxicity including chromosomal damage. Screening for kinase-mediated toxicity as early as possible is crucial, as is a better understanding of how off-target kinase inhibition may give rise to chromosomal damage. To that end, we employed a competitive binding assay and an analytical method to predict the toxicity of SMKIs. Specifically, we developed a model based on the binding affinity of SMKIs to a panel of kinases to predict whether a compound tests positive for chromosome damage. As training data, we used the binding affinity of 113 SMKIs against a representative subset of all kinases (290 kinases, yielding a 113x290 data matrix. Additionally, these 113 SMKIs were tested for genotoxicity in an in vitro micronucleus test (MNT. Among a variety of models from our analytical toolbox, we selected using cross-validation a combination of feature selection and pattern recognition techniques: Kolmogorov-Smirnov/T-test hybrid as a univariate filter, followed by Random Forests for feature selection and Support Vector Machines (SVM for pattern recognition. Feature selection identified 21 kinases predictive of MNT. Using the corresponding binding affinities, the SVM could accurately predict MNT results with 85% accuracy (68% sensitivity, 91% specificity. This indicates that kinase inhibition profiles are predictive of SMKI genotoxicity. While in vitro testing is required for regulatory review, our analysis identified a fast and cost-efficient method for screening out compounds earlier in drug development. Equally important, by identifying a panel of kinases predictive of genotoxicity, we provide medicinal chemists a set of kinases to avoid when designing

  11. Yeast based small molecule screen for inhibitors of SARS-CoV.

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    Matthew Frieman

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory coronavirus (SARS-CoV emerged in 2002, resulting in roughly 8000 cases worldwide and 10% mortality. The animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV precursors still exist and the likelihood of future outbreaks in the human population is high. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLP is an attractive target for pharmaceutical development because it is essential for virus replication and is conserved among human coronaviruses. A yeast-based assay was established for PLP activity that relies on the ability of PLP to induce a pronounced slow-growth phenotype when expressed in S. cerevisiae. Induction of the slow-growth phenotype was shown to take place over a 60-hour time course, providing the basis for conducting a screen for small molecules that restore growth by inhibiting the function of PLP. Five chemical suppressors of the slow-growth phenotype were identified from the 2000 member NIH Diversity Set library. One of these, NSC158362, potently inhibited SARS-CoV replication in cell culture without toxic effects on cells, and it specifically inhibited SARS-CoV replication but not influenza virus replication. The effect of NSC158362 on PLP protease, deubiquitinase and anti-interferon activities was investigated but the compound did not alter these activities. Another suppressor, NSC158011, demonstrated the ability to inhibit PLP protease activity in a cell-based assay. The identification of these inhibitors demonstrated a strong functional connection between the PLP-based yeast assay, the inhibitory compounds, and SARS-CoV biology. Furthermore the data with NSC158362 suggest a novel mechanism for inhibition of SARS-CoV replication that may involve an unknown activity of PLP, or alternatively a direct effect on a cellular target that modifies or bypasses PLP function in yeast and mammalian cells.

  12. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

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    Jeffrey W Perry

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin (Ub is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs. However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR. WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1 through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  13. Potent new small-molecule inhibitor of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A endopeptidase developed by synthesis-based computer-aided molecular design.

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    Yuan-Ping Pang

    into structural modification of known small-molecule BoNTAe inhibitors. It also demonstrates that SBCAMD is capable of improving potency of an inhibitor lead by nearly one order of magnitude, even for BoNTAe as one of the most challenging protein targets. The results are insightful for developing effective small-molecule inhibitors of protein targets with large active sites.

  14. Amending HIV Drugs: A Novel Small-Molecule Approach To Target Lupus Anti-DNA Antibodies.

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    VanPatten, Sonya; Sun, Shan; He, Mingzhu; Cheng, Kai Fan; Altiti, Ahmad; Papatheodorou, Angelos; Kowal, Czeslawa; Jeganathan, Venkatesh; Crawford, James M; Bloom, Ona; Volpe, Bruce T; Grant, Christian; Meurice, Nathalie; Coleman, Thomas R; Diamond, Betty; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2016-10-13

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that can affect numerous tissues and is characterized by the production of nuclear antigen-directed autoantibodies (e.g., anti-dsDNA). Using a combination of virtual and ELISA-based screens, we made the intriguing discovery that several HIV-protease inhibitors can function as decoy antigens to specifically inhibit the binding of anti-dsDNA antibodies to target antigens such as dsDNA and pentapeptide DWEYS. Computational modeling revealed that HIV-protease inhibitors comprised structural features present in DWEYS and predicted that analogues containing more flexible backbones would possess preferred binding characteristics. To address this, we reduced the internal amide backbone to improve flexibility, producing new small-molecule decoy antigens, which neutralize anti-dsDNA antibodies in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. Pharmacokinetic and SLE model studies demonstrated that peptidomimetic FISLE-412,1 a reduced HIV protease inhibitor analogue, was well-tolerated, altered serum reactivity to DWEYS, reduced glomeruli IgG deposition, preserved kidney histology, and delayed SLE onset in NZB/W F1 mice.

  15. Targeted therapy of ovarian cancer including immune check point inhibitor.

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    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Chi Heum; Song, Hong Suk

    2017-08-22

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women because most patients present with advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis. Although cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy remain the gold standards of treatment, the recurrence rate of ovarian cancer remains high. Attempts to improve this standard two-drug chemotherapy by adding a third cytotoxic drug have failed to affect either progression-free survival or overall survival and have resulted in an increase in toxic side effects. Some anti-angiogenic agents, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown efficacy in early stages of development for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. As demonstrated in recent clinical trials, the use of bevacizumab, cediranib, pazopanib, olaparib, and rucaparib, either alone or in combination with conventional cytotoxic agents, improves progression-free survival. Trials on immune checkpoint inhibitors such as nivolumab have revealed prolonged responses in a small set of ovarian cancer cases but require further exploration. In this review, we discuss the role of targeted therapies against ovarian cancer, including the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  16. Computational Analysis and Predictive Cheminformatics Modeling of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Epigenetic Modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Salma; Arora, Sonam; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic and differential regulation and expression of genes is majorly governed by the complex interactions of a subset of biomolecules in the cell operating at multiple levels starting from genome organisation to protein post-translational regulation. The regulatory layer contributed by the epigenetic layer has been one of the favourite areas of interest recently. This layer of regulation as we know today largely comprises of DNA modifications, histone modifications and noncoding RNA regulation and the interplay between each of these major components. Epigenetic regulation has been recently shown to be central to development of a number of disease processes. The availability of datasets of high-throughput screens for molecules for biological properties offer a new opportunity to develop computational methodologies which would enable in-silico screening of large molecular libraries. In the present study, we have used data from high throughput screens for the inhibitors of epigenetic modifiers. Computational predictive models were constructed based on the molecular descriptors. Machine learning algorithms for supervised training, Naive Bayes and Random Forest, were used to generate predictive models for the small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl-transferases and demethylases. Random forest, with the accuracy of 80%, was identified as the most accurate classifier. Further we complemented the study with substructure search approach filtering out the probable pharmacophores from the active molecules leading to drug molecules. We show that effective use of appropriate computational algorithms could be used to learn molecular and structural correlates of biological activities of small molecules. The computational models developed could be potentially used to screen and identify potential new biological activities of molecules from large molecular libraries and prioritise them for in-depth biological assays. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and

  17. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

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    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  18. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Candida albicans Budded-to-Hyphal Transition Act through Multiple Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midkiff, John; Borochoff-Porte, Nathan; White, Dylan; Johnson, Douglas I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans to interconvert between budded and hyphal growth states, herein termed the budded-to-hyphal transition (BHT), is important for C. albicans development and virulence. The BHT is under the control of multiple cell signaling pathways that respond to external stimuli, including nutrient availability, high temperature, and pH. Previous studies identified 21 small molecules that could inhibit the C. albicans BHT in response to carbon limitation in Spider media. However, the studies herein show that the BHT inhibitors had varying efficacies in other hyphal-inducing media, reflecting their varying abilities to block signaling pathways associated with the different media. Chemical epistasis analyses suggest that most, but not all, of the BHT inhibitors were acting through either the Efg1 or Cph1 signaling pathways. Notably, the BHT inhibitor clozapine, a FDA-approved drug used to treat atypical schizophrenia by inhibiting G-protein-coupled dopamine receptors in the brain, and several of its functional analogs were shown to act at the level of the Gpr1 G-protein-coupled receptor. These studies are the first step in determining the target and mechanism of action of these BHT inhibitors, which may have therapeutic anti-fungal utility in the future. PMID:21966518

  20. Small molecule inhibitors of the Candida albicans budded-to-hyphal transition act through multiple signaling pathways.

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    John Midkiff

    Full Text Available The ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans to interconvert between budded and hyphal growth states, herein termed the budded-to-hyphal transition (BHT, is important for C. albicans development and virulence. The BHT is under the control of multiple cell signaling pathways that respond to external stimuli, including nutrient availability, high temperature, and pH. Previous studies identified 21 small molecules that could inhibit the C. albicans BHT in response to carbon limitation in Spider media. However, the studies herein show that the BHT inhibitors had varying efficacies in other hyphal-inducing media, reflecting their varying abilities to block signaling pathways associated with the different media. Chemical epistasis analyses suggest that most, but not all, of the BHT inhibitors were acting through either the Efg1 or Cph1 signaling pathways. Notably, the BHT inhibitor clozapine, a FDA-approved drug used to treat atypical schizophrenia by inhibiting G-protein-coupled dopamine receptors in the brain, and several of its functional analogs were shown to act at the level of the Gpr1 G-protein-coupled receptor. These studies are the first step in determining the target and mechanism of action of these BHT inhibitors, which may have therapeutic anti-fungal utility in the future.

  1. Profiling targets of the irreversible palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Dahvid; El Azzouny, Mahmoud A; Tom, Christopher T M B; Hernandez, Jeannie L; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Kennedy, Robert T; Martin, Brent R

    2013-09-20

    2-Bromohexadecanoic acid, or 2-bromopalmitate, was introduced nearly 50 years ago as a nonselective inhibitor of lipid metabolism. More recently, 2-bromopalmitate re-emerged as a general inhibitor of protein S-palmitoylation. Here, we investigate the cellular targets of 2-bromopalmitate through the synthesis and application of click-enabled analogues. In cells, 2-bromopalmitate is converted to 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA, although less efficiently than free palmitate. Once conjugated to CoA, probe reactivity is dramatically enhanced. Importantly, both 2-bromopalmitate and 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA label DHHC palmitoyl acyl transferases (PATs), the enzymes that catalyze protein S-palmitoylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of enriched 2-bromopalmitate targets identified PAT enzymes, transporters, and many palmitoylated proteins, with no observed preference for CoA-dependent enzymes. These data question whether 2-bromopalmitate (or 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA) blocks S-palmitoylation by inhibiting protein acyl transferases, or by blocking palmitate incorporation by direct covalent competition. Overall, these findings highlight the promiscuous reactivity of 2BP and validate clickable 2BP analogues as activity-based probes of diverse membrane associated enzymes.

  2. Heterodimeric barnase-barstar vaccine molecules: influence of one versus two targeting units specific for antigen presenting cells.

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    Heidi Cecilie Larsen Spång

    Full Text Available It is known that targeting of antigen to antigen presenting cells (APC increases immune responses. However, it is unclear if more than one APC-specific targeting unit in the antigenic molecule will increase responses. To address this issue, we have here made heterodimeric vaccine molecules that each express four different fusion subunits. The bacterial ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar interact with high affinity, and the barnase-barstar complex was therefore used as a dimerization unit. Barnase and barstar were fused N-terminally with single chain fragment variable (scFvs targeting units specific for either MHC class II molecules on APC or the hapten 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NIP. C-terminal antigenic fusions were either the fluorescent protein mCherry or scFv(315 derived from myeloma protein M315. The heterodimeric vaccine molecules were formed both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the four different fused moieties appeared to fold correctly since they retained their specificity and function. DNA vaccination with MHC class II-targeted vaccine induced higher mCherry-specific IgG1 responses compared to non-targeted control. Since mCherry and MHC class II are in trans in this heterodimer, this suggests that heterodimeric proteins are formed in vivo without prior protein purification. Surprisingly, one targeting moiety was sufficient for the increased IgG1 response, and addition of a second targeting moiety did not increase responses. Similar results were found in in vitro T cell assays; vaccine molecules with one targeting unit were as potent as those with two. In combination with the easy cloning strategy, the heterodimeric barnase-barstar vaccine molecule could provide a flexible platform for development of novel DNA vaccines with increased potency.

  3. Regeneration of human epidermis on acellular dermis is impeded by small-molecule inhibitors of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase.

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    Forsberg, Sofi; Ostman, Arne; Rollman, Ola

    2008-10-01

    The family of human epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR, HER2-4) exerts key functions in normal and malignant epithelial cells. Both EGFR and HER2 are valuable targets for anti-cancer drugs by interfering with ligand binding, receptor dimerization, or tyrosine kinase activity. A similar therapeutic strategy has been advocated for chronic psoriasis since plaque lesions overexpress EGFR and its ligands. Our aim was to characterize EGFR/HER2 protein expression in skin cultures and to evaluate the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on epidermal outgrowth, morphology, and EGFR activation. Human skin explants were established on cell-free dermis and cultured at the air-liquid interface. The impact of small-molecule HER inhibitors on outgrowth was assayed by fluorescence-based image analysis and histometry. Effects of a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, PKI166, on neoepidermis were studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Receptor immunostaining showed in vivo-like distributions with highest EGFR intensity in the proliferative layers whereas HER2 was mainly expressed by suprabasal keratinocytes. Reepithelialization was associated with EGFR autophosphorylation irrespective of exogenous ligand stimulation. PKI166 inhibited neoepidermal EGFR activation, keratinocyte proliferation, and outgrowth from normal and psoriatic skin explants. The rate of epidermalization in presence of other HER inhibitors varied suggesting that drug specificity, potency, and reversibility determine the dynamic outcome. Overall, agents predominantly targeting EGFR kinase were more efficient inhibitors of epidermal regeneration than an HER2-selective drug. The study illustrates the usefulness of a dynamic skin model and emphasizes the potential of HER-directed approaches to control epidermal growth in hyperproliferative skin disorders.

  4. Small-molecule inhibitor leads of ribosome-inactivating proteins developed using the doorstop approach.

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    Yuan-Ping Pang

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2, produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2 from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays.

  5. Small molecules from natural sources, targeting signaling pathways in diabetes.

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    Liu, Qiong; Chen, Lili; Hu, Lihong; Guo, Yuewei; Shen, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease caused by genetic or environmental factors. It has rendered a severe menace to the middle-aged and elderly, while there is still lack of efficient drugs against this disease. The pathogenic mechanism for DM is complex, and the complicated networks related to this disease involve distinct signaling pathways. Currently, discovery of potential modulators targeting these pathways has become a potent approach for anti-diabetic drug lead compound development. Compared with synthetic compounds, natural products provide inherent larger-scale structural diversity and have been the major resource of bioactive agents for new drug discovery. To date, more and more active components from plants or marine organisms have been reported to regulate diabetic pathophysiological signaling pathways and exhibit anti-diabetic activity. This review will summarize the regulation of natural small molecules on some key signaling pathways involved in DM. These pathways include insulin signaling pathway, carbohydrate metabolism pathway, the pathways involving insulin secretion and PPAR regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation related pathways and chromatin modification pathways. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HIV capsid is a tractable target for small molecule therapeutic intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade S Blair

    Full Text Available Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, and inhibit both early and late events in the viral replication cycle. We present mechanistic studies indicating that these early and late activities result from the compound affecting viral uncoating and assembly, respectively. We show that amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA are sufficient to confer resistance to this class of compounds, identifying CA as the target in infected cells. A high-resolution co-crystal structure of the compound bound to HIV-1 CA reveals a novel binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our data demonstrate that broad-spectrum antiviral activity can be achieved by targeting this new binding site and reveal HIV CA as a tractable drug target for HIV therapy.

  7. p53 Small Molecule Inhibitor Enhances Temozolomide Cytotoxic Activity against Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Eduard B.; Lu, Kan V.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Pieper, Russell O.; Prados, Michael D.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated corresponding precursor and active forms of a p53 small molecule inhibitor for effect on temozolomide (TMZ) anti-tumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when GBMs with wild-type p53 were co-treated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased PARP cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, that is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: i.e., TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor co-treatment, of three distinct wild-type p53 GBM xenografts, resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ anti-tumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (p < 0.001 for co-treatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53 null GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhance TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:19074867

  8. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian (Emory-MED); (GSU); (MCW); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2013-02-14

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD{sub a} and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3{zeta} in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer.

  9. FTRIFS biosensor based on double layer porous silicon as a LC detector for target molecule screening from complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yunling; Zhao, Weijie; Xu, Erchao; Tong, Changlun; Wu, Jianmin

    2010-01-15

    Post-column identification of target compounds in complex samples is one of the major tasks in drug screening and discovery. In this work, we demonstrated that double layer porous silicon (PSi) attached with affinity ligand could serve as a sensing element for post-column detection of target molecule by Fourier transformed reflectometric interference spectroscopy (FTRIFS), in which trypsin and its inhibitor were used as the model probe-target system. The double layer porous silicon was prepared by electrical etching with a current density of 500 mA/cm(2), followed by 167 mA/cm(2). Optical measurements indicated that trypsin could infiltrate into the outer porous layer (porosity 83.6%), but was excluded by the bottom layer (porosity 52%). The outer layer, attached with trypsin by standard amino-silane and glutaraldehyde chemistry, could specifically bind with the trypsin inhibitor, acting as a sample channel, while the bottom layer served as a reference signal channel. The binding event between the attached trypsin and trypsin inhibitor samples could be detected by FTRIFS in real-time through monitoring the optical thickness change of the porous silicon layer. The baseline drift caused by sample matrix variation could be effectively eliminated by a signal correction method. Optical signals had a linear relationship with the concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the range of 10-200 ng mL(-1). The FTRIFS biosensor based on double layer porous silicon could be combined with a UV detector for screening the target molecule from complex component mixtures separated by a LC column. Using an LC-UV-FTRIFS system, a fraction containing a trypsin inhibitor could be separated from a soybean extract sample and identified in real-time.

  10. An overview of the binding models of FGFR tyrosine kinases in complex with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiyan; Wang, Mixiang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2017-01-27

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) includes four structurally related members, termed as FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Given its intimate role in the progression of several solid tumors, excessive FGFR signaling provides an opportunity for anticancer therapy. Along with extensive pharmacological studies validating the therapeutic potential of targeting the FGFRs for cancer treatment, co-crystal structures of FGFRs/inhibitors are continuously coming up to study the mechanism of actions and explore new inhibitors. Herein, we review the reported co-crystals of FGFRs in complex with the corresponding inhibitors, main focusing our attention on the binding models and the pharmacological activities of the inhibitors.

  11. Small?molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia?initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF?04449913 (PF?913) is a selective, small?molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof?of?concept and mechanism of action of PF?913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signali...

  12. Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase inhibit expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human melanoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin WANG; Bin ZHOU; Ji LI; Yong-bing CAO; Xin-sheng CHEN; Ming-he CHENG; Ming YIN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in melanoma cells. METHODS: ICAM-1 protein of human melanoma cell a375 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. Level of ICAM-1 mRNA in a375 was evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Adhesion of a375 to endothelial cell EC304 was analyzed by isotopic tracing. RESULTS:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid, AA861 and MK886, could suppress the expression of ICAM-1 protein as well as of its mRNA in a375 cells and reduce the adhesion of a375 to EC304. CONCLUSION:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors can inhibit the expression of ICAM-1 in human melanoma cells and may be valuable for treatment of melanoma metastasis.

  13. Discovery of an inhibitor of a transcription factor using small molecule microarrays and diversity-oriented synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Angela N; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2003-07-16

    Small molecule microarrays were screened to identify a small molecule ligand for Hap3p, a subunit of the yeast Hap2/3/4/5p transcription factor complex. The compound, named haptamide A, was determined to have a KD of 5.03 muM for binding to Hap3p using surface plasmon resonance analysis. Haptamide A also inhibited activation of a GDH1-lacZ reporter gene in a dose-dependent fashion. To explore structure-activity relationships, 11 derivatives of haptamide A were prepared using the same synthetic route that was developed for the original library synthesis. Analysis of dissociation constants and IC50 values for the reporter gene assay revealed a more potent inhibitor, haptamide B, with a KD of 330 nM. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling was used to compare effects of haptamide B with a hap3Delta yeast strain. Treatment with haptamide B, like the deletion mutant, reduced lactate-induced transcription of several genes from wild-type levels. Profiling the genetic "knockout" and the chemical genetic "knockdown" led to the identification of several genes that are regulated by Hap3p under nonfermentative conditions. These results demonstrate that a small molecule discovered using the small molecule microarray binding assay can permeate yeast cells and reach its target transcription factor protein in cells.

  14. Brainstorming: weighted voting prediction of inhibitors for protein targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    The "Brainstorming" approach presented in this paper is a weighted voting method that can improve the quality of predictions generated by several machine learning (ML) methods. First, an ensemble of heterogeneous ML algorithms is trained on available experimental data, then all solutions are gathered and a consensus is built between them. The final prediction is performed using a voting procedure, whereby the vote of each method is weighted according to a quality coefficient calculated using multivariable linear regression (MLR). The MLR optimization procedure is very fast, therefore no additional computational cost is introduced by using this jury approach. Here, brainstorming is applied to selecting actives from large collections of compounds relating to five diverse biological targets of medicinal interest, namely HIV-reverse transcriptase, cyclooxygenase-2, dihydrofolate reductase, estrogen receptor, and thrombin. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) database was used for selecting known inhibitors for these protein targets, and experimental data was then used to train a set of machine learning methods. The benchmark dataset (available at http://bio.icm.edu.pl/∼darman/chemoinfo/benchmark.tar.gz ) can be used for further testing of various clustering and machine learning methods when predicting the biological activity of compounds. Depending on the protein target, the overall recall value is raised by at least 20% in comparison to any single machine learning method (including ensemble methods like random forest) and unweighted simple majority voting procedures.

  15. Identification of verrucarin a as a potent and selective steroid receptor coactivator-3 small molecule inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yan

    Full Text Available Members of the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC family are overexpressed in numerous types of cancers. In particular, steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC-3 has been recognized as a critical coactivator associated with tumor initiation, progression, recurrence, metastasis, and chemoresistance where it interacts with multiple nuclear receptors and other transcription factors to enhance their transcriptional activities and facilitate cross-talk between pathways that stimulate cancer progression. Because of its central role as an integrator of growth signaling pathways, development of small molecule inhibitors (SMIs against SRCs have the potential to simultaneously disrupt multiple signal transduction networks and transcription factors involved in tumor progression. Here, high-throughput screening was performed to identify compounds able to inhibit the intrinsic transcriptional activities of the three members of the SRC family. Verrucarin A was identified as a SMI that can selectively promote the degradation of the SRC-3 protein, while affecting SRC-1 and SRC-2 to a lesser extent and having no impact on CARM-1 and p300 protein levels. Verrucarin A was cytotoxic toward multiple types of cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations, but not toward normal liver cells. Moreover, verrucarin A was able to inhibit expression of the SRC-3 target genes MMP2 and MMP13 and attenuated cancer cell migration. We found that verrucarin A effectively sensitized cancer cells to treatment with other anti-cancer drugs. Binding studies revealed that verrucarin A does not bind directly to SRC-3, suggesting that it inhibits SRC-3 through its interaction with an upstream effector. In conclusion, unlike other SRC SMIs characterized by our laboratory that directly bind to SRCs, verrucarin A is a potent and selective SMI that blocks SRC-3 function through an indirect mechanism.

  16. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  17. N-Aryl-benzimidazolones as novel small molecule HSP90 inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruncko, Milan; Tahir, Stephen K.; Song, Xiaohong; Chen, Jun; Ding, Hong; Huth, Jeffrey R.; Jin, Sha; Judge, Russell A.; Madar, David J.; Park, Chang H.; Park, Cheol-Min; Petros, Andrew M.; Tse, Christin; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Elmore, Steven W. (Abbott)

    2012-03-16

    We describe the development of a novel series of N-aryl-benzimidazolone HSP90 inhibitors (9) targeting the N-terminal ATP-ase site. SAR development was influenced by structure-based design based around X-ray structures of ligand bound HSP90 complexes. Lead compounds exhibited high binding affinities, ATP-ase inhibition and cellular client protein degradation.

  18. Structure of MurF from Streptococcus pneumoniae co-crystallized with a small molecule inhibitor exhibits interdomain closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longenecker, Kenton L.; Stamper, Geoffrey F.; Hajduk, Philip J.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Jakob, Clarissa G.; Harlan, John E.; Edalji, Rohinton; Bartley, Diane M.; Walter, Karl A.; Solomon, Larry R.; Holzman, Thomas F.; Gu, Yu Gui; Lerner, Claude G.; Beutel, Bruce A.; Stoll, Vincent S. (Abbott)

    2010-07-19

    In a broad genomics analysis to find novel protein targets for antibiotic discovery, MurF was identified as an essential gene product for Streptococcus pneumonia that catalyzes a critical reaction in the biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan in the formation of the cell wall. Lacking close relatives in mammalian biology, MurF presents attractive characteristics as a potential drug target. Initial screening of the Abbott small-molecule compound collection identified several compounds for further validation as pharmaceutical leads. Here we report the integrated efforts of NMR and X-ray crystallography, which reveal the multidomain structure of a MurF-inhibitor complex in a compact conformation that differs dramatically from related structures. The lead molecule is bound in the substrate-binding region and induces domain closure, suggestive of the domain arrangement for the as yet unobserved transition state conformation for MurF enzymes. The results form a basis for directed optimization of the compound lead by structure-based design to explore the suitability of MurF as a pharmaceutical target.

  19. Critical off-target effects of the widely used Rac1 inhibitors NSC23766 and EHT1864 in mouse platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dütting, Sebastian; Heidenreich, Julius; Cherpokova, Deya;

    2015-01-01

    analysis of cellular activation and aggregometry. Platelet spreading was analyzed by differential interference contrast microscopy and activation of effector molecules by biochemical approaches. RESULTS: NSC23766 and EHT1864 exhibited strong and distinct Rac1-independent effects at 100 μM in platelet......, these inhibitors directly affected the activation of the Rac1 effectors PAK1/2. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal critical off-target effects of NSC23766 and EHT1864 at 100 μM in mammalian cells, raising questions about their utility as specific Rac1/Rac inhibitors in biochemical studies at these concentrations...

  20. In-depth Profiling of MvfR-Regulated Small Molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Allegretta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium, which causes opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised individuals. Due to its multiple resistances toward antibiotics, the development of new drugs is required. Interfering with Quorum Sensing (QS, a cell-to-cell communication system, has shown to be highly efficient in reducing P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. One of its QS systems employs Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS and 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ as signal molecules. Both activate the transcriptional regulator MvfR (Multiple Virulence Factor Regulator, also called PqsR, driving the production of QS molecules as well as toxins and biofilm formation. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effects of QS inhibitors (QSIs, such as MvfR antagonists and PqsBC inhibitors, on the biosynthesis of the MvfR-regulated small molecules 2′-aminoacetophenone (2-AA, dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ, HHQ, PQS, and 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO. The employed synthetic MvfR antagonist fully inhibited pqs small molecule formation showing expected sigmoidal dose-response curves for 2-AA, HQNO, HHQ and PQS. Surprisingly, DHQ levels were enhanced at lower antagonist concentrations followed by a full suppression at higher QSI amounts. This particular bi-phasic profile hinted at the accumulation of a biosynthetic intermediate resulting in the observed overproduction of the shunt product DHQ. Additionally, investigations on PqsBC inhibitors showed a reduction of MvfR natural ligands, while increased 2-AA, DHQ and HQNO levels compared to the untreated cells were detected. Moreover, PqsBC inhibitors did not show any significant effect in PA14 pqsC mutant demonstrating their target selectivity. As 2-AA is important for antibacterial tolerance, the QSIs were evaluated in their capability to attenuate persistence. Indeed, persister cells were reduced along with 2-AA inhibition resulting from MvfR antagonism, but not from PqsBC inhibition. In conclusion

  1. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  2. Systems-based Discovery of Tomatidine as a Natural Small Molecule Inhibitor of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyle, Michael C.; Ebert, Scott M.; Cook, Daniel P.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  3. Eliciting renal failure in mosquitoes with a small-molecule inhibitor of inward-rectifying potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Raphemot

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever take a large toll on global health. The primary chemical agents used for controlling mosquitoes are insecticides that target the nervous system. However, the emergence of resistance in mosquito populations is reducing the efficacy of available insecticides. The development of new insecticides is therefore urgent. Here we show that VU573, a small-molecule inhibitor of mammalian inward-rectifying potassium (Kir channels, inhibits a Kir channel cloned from the renal (Malpighian tubules of Aedes aegypti (AeKir1. Injection of VU573 into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti disrupts the production and excretion of urine in a manner consistent with channel block of AeKir1 and renders the mosquitoes incapacitated (flightless or dead within 24 hours. Moreover, the toxicity of VU573 in mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti is exacerbated when hemolymph potassium levels are elevated, suggesting that Kir channels are essential for maintenance of whole-animal potassium homeostasis. Our study demonstrates that renal failure is a promising mechanism of action for killing mosquitoes, and motivates the discovery of selective small-molecule inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels for use as insecticides.

  4. The small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 disrupts the chordamesoderm to notochord transition in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó Gábor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Key molecules involved in notochord differentiation and function have been identified through genetic analysis in zebrafish and mice, but MEK1 and 2 have so far not been implicated in this process due to early lethality (Mek1-/- and functional redundancy (Mek2-/- in the knockout animals. Results Here, we reveal a potential role for Mek1/2 during notochord development by using the small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 which blocks phosphorylation of the Mek1/2 target gene Erk1/2 in vivo. Applying the inhibitor from early gastrulation until the 18-somite stage produces a specific and consistent phenotype with lack of dark pigmentation, shorter tail and an abnormal, undulated notochord. Using morphological analysis, in situ hybridization, immunhistochemistry, TUNEL staining and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that in treated embryos the chordamesoderm to notochord transition is disrupted and identify disorganization in the medial layer of the perinotochordal basement mebrane as the probable cause of the undulations and bulges in the notochord. We also examined and excluded FGF as the upstream signal during this process. Conclusion Using the small chemical U0126, we have established a novel link between MAPK-signaling and notochord differentiation. Our phenotypic analysis suggests a potential connection between the MAPK-pathway, the COPI-mediated intracellular transport and/or the copper-dependent posttranslational regulatory processes during notochord differentiation.

  5. A small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 protects against doxorubicin-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asish K; Rai, Rahul; Park, Kitae E; Eren, Mesut; Miyata, Toshio; Wilsbacher, Lisa D; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2016-11-08

    Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic, is a commonly used anticancer drug. In spite of its widespread usage, its therapeutic effect is limited by its cardiotoxicity. On the cellular level, Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity manifests as stress induced premature senescence. Previously, we demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a potent inhibitor of serine proteases, is an important biomarker and regulator of cellular senescence and aging. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of cellular PAI-1 protects against stress- and aging-induced cellular senescence and delineated the molecular basis of protective action of PAI-1 inhibition. Results show that TM5441, a potent small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, effectively prevents Doxorubicin-induced senescence in cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. TM5441 exerts its inhibitory effect on Doxorubicin-induced cellular senescence by decreasing reactive oxygen species generation, induction of antioxidants like catalase and suppression of stress-induced senescence cadre p53, p21, p16, PAI-1 and IGFBP3. Importantly, TM5441 also reduces replicative senescence of fibroblasts. Together these results for the first time demonstrate the efficacy of PAI-1 inhibitor in prevention of Doxorubicin-induced and replicative senescence in normal cells. Thus PAI-1 inhibitor may form an important adjuvant component of chemotherapy regimens, limiting not only Doxorubicin-induced cardiac senescence but also ameliorating the prothrombotic profile.

  6. Small molecule inhibitors of PCNA/PIP-box interaction suppress translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo; Inoue, Akira; Evison, Benjamin; Perry, Scott; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Fujii, Naoaki

    2013-04-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component for DNA replication and DNA damage response. Numerous proteins interact with PCNA through their short sequence called the PIP-box to be promoted to their respective functions. PCNA supports translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) by interacting with TLS polymerases through PIP-box interaction. Previously, we found a novel small molecule inhibitor of the PCNA/PIP-box interaction, T2AA, which inhibits DNA replication in cells. In this study, we created T2AA analogues and characterized them extensively for TLS inhibition. Compounds that inhibited biochemical PCNA/PIP-box interaction at an IC50 <5 μM inhibited cellular DNA replication at 10 μM as measured by BrdU incorporation. In cells lacking nucleotide-excision repair activity, PCNA inhibitors inhibited reactivation of a reporter plasmid that was globally damaged by cisplatin, suggesting that the inhibitors blocked the TLS that allows replication of the plasmid. PCNA inhibitors increased γH2AX induction and cell viability reduction mediated by cisplatin. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitors of PCNA/PIP-box interaction could chemosensitize cells to cisplatin by inhibiting TLS.

  7. A small molecule screen identifies selective inhibitors of urea transporter UT-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2013-10-24

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar half-maximal inhibitory concentration that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a noncompetitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B nonselective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics ("urearetics") with a mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy.

  8. Urearetics: a small molecule screen yields nanomolar potency inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Marc H; de la Fuente, Ricardo; Verkman, A S

    2007-02-01

    Functional studies in knockout mice indicate a critical role for urea transporters (UTs) in the urinary concentrating mechanism and in renal urea clearance. However, potent and specific urea transport blockers have not been available. Here, we used high-throughput screening to discover high-affinity, small molecule inhibitors of the UT-B urea transporter. A collection of 50,000 diverse, drug-like compounds was screened using a human erythrocyte lysis assay based on UT-B-facilitated acetamide transport. Primary screening yielded approximately 30 UT-B inhibitors belonging to the phenylsulfoxyoxazole, benzenesulfonanilide, phthalazinamine, and aminobenzimidazole chemical classes. Screening of approximately 700 structurally similar analogs gave many active compounds, the most potent of which inhibited UT-B urea transport with an EC50 of approximately 10 nM, and approximately 100% inhibition at higher concentrations. Phenylsulfoxyoxazoles and phthalazinamines also blocked rodent UT-B and had good UT-B vs. UT-A specificity. The UT-B inhibitors did not reduce aquaporin-1 (AQP1)-facilitated water transport. In AQP1-null erythrocytes, "chemical UT-B knockout" by UT-B inhibitors reduced by approximately 3-fold UT-B-mediated water transport, supporting an aqueous pore pathway through UT-B. UT-B inhibitors represent a new class of diuretics, "urearetics," which are predicted to increase renal water and solute clearance in water-retaining states.

  9. Structural insight into inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by a small-molecule antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhonghui; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Hong, Zebin

    2013-01-01

    and cancer. Several types of PAI-1 antagonist have been developed, but the structural basis for their action has remained largely unknown. Here we report X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 in complex with a small-molecule antagonist, embelin. We propose a mechanism for embelin-induced rapid conversion...... of PAI-1 into a substrate for its target proteases and the subsequent slow conversion of PAI-1 into an irreversibly inactivated form. Our work provides structural clues to an understanding of PAI-1 inactivation by small-molecule antagonists and an important step toward the design of drugs targeting PAI-1....

  10. Rationally designed small molecules that target both the DNA and RNA causing myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lien; Luu, Long M; Peng, Shaohong; Serrano, Julio F; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2015-11-11

    Single-agent, single-target therapeutic approaches are often limited by a complex disease pathobiology. We report rationally designed, multi-target agents for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1 originates in an abnormal expansion of CTG repeats (CTG(exp)) in the DMPK gene. The resultant expanded CUG transcript (CUG(exp)) identified as a toxic agent sequesters important proteins, such as muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), undergoes repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation, and potentially causes microRNA dysregulation. We report rationally designed small molecules that target the DM1 pathobiology in vitro in three distinct ways by acting simultaneously as transcription inhibitors, by inhibiting aberrant protein binding to the toxic RNA, and by acting as RNase mimics to degrade the toxic RNA. In vitro, the agents are shown to (1) bind CTG(exp) and inhibit formation of the CUG(exp) transcript, (2) bind CUG(exp) and inhibit sequestration of MBNL1, and (3) cleave CUG(exp) in an RNase-like manner. The most potent compounds are capable of reducing the levels of CUG(exp) in DM1 model cells, and one reverses two separate CUG(exp)-induced phenotypes in a DM1 Drosophila model.

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cyclophilin D To Protect Mitochondrial Function as a Potential Treatment for Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Emma R; Awais, Muhammad; Kershaw, Neil M; Gibson, Robert R; Pandalaneni, Sravan; Latawiec, Diane; Wen, Li; Javed, Muhammad A; Criddle, David N; Berry, Neil; O'Neill, Paul M; Lian, Lu-Yun; Sutton, Robert

    2016-03-24

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) causes mitochondrial dysfunction and necrosis in acute pancreatitis (AP), a condition without specific drug treatment. Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a mitochondrial matrix peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that regulates the MPTP and is a drug target for AP. We have synthesized urea-based small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins and tested them against CypD using binding and isomerase activity assays. Thermodynamic profiles of the CypD/inhibitor interactions were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Seven new high-resolution crystal structures of CypD-inhibitor complexes were obtained to guide compound optimization. Compounds 4, 13, 14, and 19 were tested in freshly isolated murine pancreatic acinar cells (PACs) to determine inhibition of toxin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and necrotic cell death pathway activation. Compound 19 was found to have a Kd of 410 nM and a favorable thermodynamic profile, and it showed significant protection of ΔΨm and reduced necrosis of murine as well as human PACs. Compound 19 holds significant promise for future lead optimization.

  12. Small-Molecule Disruption of the Myb/p300 Cooperation Targets Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Piontek, Therese; Dukare, Sandeep; Schomburg, Caroline; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Schmidt, Thomas J; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is essential for the proliferation of hematopoietic cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Pharmacologic inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. By using a Myb reporter cell line, we have identified plumbagin and several naphthoquinones as potent low-molecular weight Myb inhibitors. We demonstrate that these compounds inhibit c-Myb by binding to the c-Myb transactivation domain and disrupting the cooperation of c-Myb with the coactivator p300, a major driver of Myb activity. Naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of c-Myb suppresses Myb target gene expression and induces the differentiation of the myeloid leukemia cell line HL60. We demonstrate that murine and human primary acute myeloid leukemia cells are more sensitive to naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of clonogenic proliferation than normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Overall, our work demonstrates for the first time the potential of naphthoquinones as small-molecule Myb inhibitors that may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of leukemia and other tumors driven by deregulated Myb. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2905-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Targeted Degradation of Proteins Localized in Subcellular Compartments by Hybrid Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Shoda, Takuji; Omura, Risa; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Hattori, Takayuki; Shibata, Norihito; Demizu, Yosuke; Sugihara, Ryo; Ichino, Asato; Kawahara, Haruka; Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Kurihara, Masaaki; Itoh, Susumu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2017-03-01

    Development of novel small molecules that selectively degrade pathogenic proteins would provide an important advance in targeted therapy. Recently, we have devised a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (specific and nongenetic IAP-dependent protein ERaser) that induces the degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. To understand the localization of proteins that can be targeted by this protein knockdown technology, we examined whether SNIPER molecules are able to induce degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) proteins localized in subcellular compartments of cells. CRABP-II is genetically fused with subcellular localization signals, and they are expressed in the cells. SNIPER(CRABP) with different IAP-ligands, SNIPER(CRABP)-4 with bestatin and SNIPER(CRABP)-11 with MV1 compound, induce the proteasomal degradation of wild-type (WT), cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane-localized CRABP-II proteins, whereas only SNIPER(CRABP)-11 displayed degradation activity toward the mitochondrial CRABP-II protein. The small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of cIAP1 expression attenuated the knockdown activity of SNIPER(CRABP) against WT and cytosolic CRABP-II proteins, indicating that cIAP1 is the E3 ligase responsible for degradation of these proteins. Against membrane-localized CRABP-II protein, cIAP1 is also a primary E3 ligase in the cells, but another E3 ligase distinct from cIAP2 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) could also be involved in the SNIPER(CRABP)-11-induced degradation. However, for the degradation of nuclear and mitochondrial CRABP-II proteins, E3 ligases other than cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP play a role in the SNIPER-mediated protein knockdown. These results indicate that SNIPER can target cytosolic, nuclear, membrane-localized, and mitochondrial proteins for degradation, but the responsible E3 ligase is different, depending on the localization of the target protein. Copyright © 2017 by

  14. Small-molecule quinolinol inhibitor identified provides protection against BoNT/A in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Singh

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylaminomethyl-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096 to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC(50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A.

  15. TW-37, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2, Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer: Involvement of Notch-1 Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of Bcl-2 family proteins has been found in a variety of aggressive human carcinomas, including pancreatic cancer, suggesting that specific agents targeting Bcl-2 family proteins would be valuable for pancreatic cancer therapy. We have previously reported that TW-37, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 family proteins, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. However, the precise role and the molecular mechanism of action of TW-37 have not been fully elu...

  16. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Coen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing.

  17. Targeting organic molecules in hydrothermal environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Lindgren, P.; Wilson, R.; Cooper, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrothermal deposits on Mars Hydrothermal systems are proposed as environments that could support organic synthesis, the evolution of life or the maintenance of life [1,2,3]. They have therefore been suggested as primary targets for exploration on Mars [1,2,4,].There is now confidence that hydrothermal deposits occur at the martian surface. This is based on a range of criteria that could point towards hydrothermal activity, including volcanic activity, magmatic-driven tectonism, impact cratering in icy terrains, hydrous alteration of minerals and typical hydrothermal mineralogies [4]. The proposals to search for evidence of life at martian hydrothermal sites have been focussed on seeking morphological evidence of microbial activity [5]. Here we discuss the potential to seek a chemical signature of organic matter in hydrothermal systems. Organics in terrestrial hydrothermal systems Terrestrial hydrothermal systems can have large quantities of organic matter because they intersect organic-rich sedimentary rocks or oil reservoirs. Thus the signatures that they contain reflect some preexisting concentration of fossil organic compounds, rather than life which was active in the hydrothermal system. If any extant life was incorporated in these hydrothermal systems, it is swamped by the fossil molecules. Examples of environments where organic materials may become entrained include subsurface hydrothermal mineral deposits, generation of hydrothermal systems by igneous intrusions, and hot fluid venting at the seafloor. Nevertheless, there is value in studying the interactions of hydrothermal systems with fossil organic matter, for information about the survivability of organic compounds, phase relationships between carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous materials, and where in hydrothermal deposits to find evidence of organic matter. Microbial colonization of hot spring systems is feasible at depth within the systems and at the surface where the hydrothermal waters discharge

  18. The identification of GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394; the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas; Elster, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Søren Møller; Poda, Suresh Babu; Loechel, Frosty; Volbracht, Christiane; Klewe, Ib Vestergaard; David, Laurent; Watson, Stephen P

    2014-11-15

    The identification of the novel and selective GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394, the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function, is described. Structure activity relationships and syntheses based around AF64394 are reported.

  19. A comprehensive review on Aurora kinase: Small molecule inhibitors and clinical trial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisa, Ankit C; Bhatt, Hardik G

    2017-08-24

    Aurora kinase belongs to serine/threonine kinase family which controls cell division. Therapeutic inhibition of Aurora kinase showed great promise as probable anticancer regime because of its important role during cell division. Here, in this review, we have carried out exhaustive study of various synthetic molecules reported as Aurora kinase inhibitors and developed as lead molecule at various stages of clinical trials from its discovery in 1995 to till date. We reported details of small molecules, specifically inhibiting all 3 types of Aurora kinases, which includes extensive literature search in various database like various scientific journals, patents, scifinder and PubMed database, internet resources, books, etc. IC50 values of tumor growth inhibition, in-vitro and in-vivo activity along with clinical trial data. Here, we took efforts to describe essence of Aurora kinase and its inhibition which could be used to develop anti-mitotic drug for the treatment of cancer. In conclusion, we also discuss future perspectives for development of novel inhibitors and their scope in drug development process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. From indole to pyrrole, furan, thiophene and pyridine: Search for novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterial transcription initiation complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Oscar; Mielczarek, Marcin; Ma, Cong; Kutty, Samuel K; Yang, Xiao; Black, David StC; Griffith, Renate; Lewis, Peter J; Kumar, Naresh

    2016-03-15

    The search for small molecules capable of inhibiting transcription initiation in bacteria has resulted in the synthesis of N,N'-disubstituted hydrazines and imine-carbohydrazides comprised of indole, pyridine, pyrrole, furan and thiophene using the respective trichloroacetyl derivatives, carbohydrazides and aldehydes. Replacement of the indole moiety by smaller heterocycles linked by CONHNC linkers afforded a broad variety of compounds efficiently targeting the RNA polymerase-σ(70)/σ(A) interaction as determined by ELISA and exhibiting increased inhibition of the growth of Escherichia coli compared to Bacillus subtilis in culture. The structural features of the synthesized transcription initiation inhibitors needed for antibacterial activity were identified employing molecular modelling and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of A Small Molecule CFTR Chloride Channel Inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cheng-yan; ZHANG Heng-jun; SU Zhong-min; ZHOU Jin-song; YANG Hong; MA Tong-hui

    2004-01-01

    A thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor(CFTRinh-172) was synthesized by a three-step procedure with trifluromethylaniline as the starting material. The synthesized CFTR inhibitor was characterized structurally by means of 1H NMR and functionally in a CFTR-expressing cell line FRT/hCFTR/EYFP-H148Q by both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods. A large amount(100 g) of high-quality small molecule thiazolidinone CFTR chloride channel inhibitor, CFTRinh-172, can be produced with this simple three-step synthetic procedure. The structure of the final product 2-thioxo-3-(3-trifluromethylphenyl)-5-[4-carboxyphenyl-methylene]-4-thiazolidinone was confirmed by 1H NMR. The overall yield was 58% with a purity over 99% as analyzed by HPLC. The synthesized CFTRinh-172 specifically inhibited CFTR chloride channel function in a cell-based fluorescence assay(Kd≈1.5 μmol/L) and in a Ussing chamber-based short-circuit current assay(Kd≈0.2 μmol/L), indicating better quality than that of the commercial combinatorial compound. The synthesized inhibitor is nontoxic to cultured cells at a high concentration and to mouse at a high dose. The synthetic procedure developed here can be used to produce a large amount of the high-quality CFTRinh-172 suitable for antidiarrheal studies and for creation of cystic fibrosis models in large animals. The procedure can be used to synthesize radiolabled CFTRinh-172 for in vivo pharmacokinetics studies.

  2. Discovery of Fungal Denitrification Inhibitors by Targeting Copper Nitrite Reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Masaki; Kumar, Ashutosh; Muddassar, Muhammad; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2017-02-27

    The efficient application of nitrogenous fertilizers is urgently required, as their excessive and inefficient use is causing substantial economic loss and environmental pollution. A significant amount of applied nitrogen in agricultural soils is lost as nitrous oxide (N2O) in the environment due to the microbial denitrification process. The widely distributed fungus Fusarium oxysporum is a major denitrifier in agricultural soils and its denitrification activity could be targeted to reduce nitrogen loss in the form of N2O from agricultural soils. Here, we report the discovery of first small molecule inhibitors of copper nitrite reductase (NirK) from F. oxysporum, which is a key enzyme in the fungal denitrification process. The inhibitors were discovered by a hierarchical in silico screening approach consisting of pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. In vitro evaluation of F. oxysporum NirK activity revealed several pyrimidone and triazinone based compounds with potency in the low micromolar range. Some of these compounds suppressed the fungal denitrification in vivo as well. The compounds reported here could be used as starting points for the development of nitrogenous fertilizer supplements and coatings as a means to prevent nitrogen loss by targeting fungal denitrification.

  3. Clinical candidates of small molecule p38 MAPK inhibitors for inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigger and etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases are not well understood, hindering the development of efficient therapeutic approaches. The observation that abnormal activity of the p38 MAPK is common to all inflammatory diseases raised the expectation that p38 inhibitors would serve as general anti-inflammatory therapeutics. A large number of inhibitors were consequently discovered. Several compounds of different scaffolds, blocking the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, have entered phase II clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pain, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. As I review here, in almost all cases the clinical trials have failed, leading to re-design of compounds and re-evaluation of p38 as a suitable target. I describe how structural features, unique to p38α, have been employed in the inhibitor design and achieved high degree of kinome selectivity. I then focus on some of the drugs that reached human trials and summarize their in vitro/in vivo pharmacological profiles and the related outcomes from clinical investigations. These compounds include VX-745, VX-702, RO-4402257, SCIO- 469, BIRB-796, SD-0006, PH-797804, AMG-548, LY2228820, SB-681323 and GW-856553. Finally, I discuss novel suggested approaches for the use of p38 inhibitors such as combining p38 inhibition with inhibiting other targets that function in parallel inflammatory pathways for achieving efficacy in treating inflammatory diseases.

  4. Identification of potential inhibitors for oncogenic target of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase using in silico approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Choubey, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) plays a major role in the rate limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway and it is pronounced as a novel target for drug development of cancer. The currently available drugs against DHODH are ineffective and bear various side effects. Three-dimensional structure of the targeted protein was constructed using molecular modeling approach followed by 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, High Throughput Virtual Screening (HTVS) was performed using various compound libraries to identify pharmacologically potential molecules. The top four identified lead molecules includes NCI_47074, HitFinder_7630, Binding_66981 and Specs_108872 with high docking score of -9.45, -8.29, -8.04 and -8.03 kcal/mol and the corresponding binding free energy were -16.25, -56.37, -26.93 and -48.04 kcal/mol respectively. Arg122, Arg185, Glu255 and Gly257 are the key residues found to be interacting with the ligands. Molecular dynamics simulations of DHODH-inhibitors complexes were performed to assess the stability of various conformations from complex structures of TtDHODH. Furthermore, stereoelectronic features of the ligands were explored to facilitate charge transfer during the protein-ligand interactions using Density Functional Theoretical approach. Based on in silico analysis, the ligand NCI_47074 ((2Z)-3-({6-[(2Z)-3-carboxylatoprop-2-enamido]pyridin-2-yl}carbamoyl)prop-2-enoate) was found to be the most potent lead molecule which was validated using energetic and electronic parameters and it could serve as a template for designing effective anticancerous drug molecule.

  5. High throughput screens yield small molecule inhibitors of Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 cyclin-dependent kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick G Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania species are parasitic protozoa that have a tightly controlled cell cycle, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. Cdc2-related kinase 3 (CRK3, an essential CDK in Leishmania and functional orthologue of human CDK1, can form an active protein kinase complex with Leishmania cyclins CYCA and CYC6. Here we describe the identification and synthesis of specific small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 using a high throughput screening assay and iterative chemistry. We also describe the biological activity of the molecules against Leishmania parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to obtain an active Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 protein kinase complex, we developed a co-expression and co-purification system for Leishmania CRK3 and CYC6 proteins. This active enzyme was used in a high throughput screening (HTS platform, utilising an IMAP fluorescence polarisation assay. We carried out two chemical library screens and identified specific inhibitors of CRK3:CYC6 that were inactive against the human cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2:CycA. Subsequently, the best inhibitors were tested against 11 other mammalian protein kinases. Twelve of the most potent hits had an azapurine core with structure activity relationship (SAR analysis identifying the functional groups on the 2 and 9 positions as essential for CRK3:CYC6 inhibition and specificity against CDK2:CycA. Iterative chemistry allowed synthesis of a number of azapurine derivatives with one, compound 17, demonstrating anti-parasitic activity against both promastigote and amastigote forms of L. major. Following the second HTS, 11 compounds with a thiazole core (active towards CRK3:CYC6 and inactive against CDK2:CycA were tested. Ten of these hits demonstrated anti-parasitic activity against promastigote L. major. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pharmacophores identified from the high throughput screens, and the derivatives synthesised, selectively

  6. Lifting the mask: identification of new small molecule inhibitors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli group 2 capsule biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Carlos C; Arshad, Mehreen; Noah, James W; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Evans, Carrie W; Nebane, N Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sosa, Melinda; Tower, Nichole A; White, E Lucile; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Porubsky, Patrick; Maki, Brooks E; Rogers, Steven A; Schoenen, Frank; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs), with over 100 million UTIs occurring annually throughout the world. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among UPEC limits ambulatory care options, delays effective treatment, and may increase overall morbidity and mortality from complications such as urosepsis. The polysaccharide capsules of UPEC are an attractive target a therapeutic, based on their importance in defense against the host immune responses; however, the large number of antigenic types has limited their incorporation into vaccine development. The objective of this study was to identify small-molecule inhibitors of UPEC capsule biogenesis. A large-scale screening effort entailing 338,740 compounds was conducted in a cell-based, phenotypic screen for inhibition of capsule biogenesis in UPEC. The primary and concentration-response assays yielded 29 putative inhibitors of capsule biogenesis, of which 6 were selected for further studies. Secondary confirmatory assays identified two highly active agents, named DU003 and DU011, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.0 µM and 0.69 µM, respectively. Confirmatory assays for capsular antigen and biochemical measurement of capsular sugars verified the inhibitory action of both compounds and demonstrated minimal toxicity and off-target effects. Serum sensitivity assays demonstrated that both compounds produced significant bacterial death upon exposure to active human serum. DU011 administration in mice provided near complete protection against a lethal systemic infection with the prototypic UPEC K1 isolate UTI89. This work has provided a conceptually new class of molecules to combat UPEC infection, and future studies will establish the molecular basis for their action along with efficacy in UTI and other UPEC infections.

  7. Lifting the mask: identification of new small molecule inhibitors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli group 2 capsule biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C Goller

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the leading cause of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs, with over 100 million UTIs occurring annually throughout the world. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among UPEC limits ambulatory care options, delays effective treatment, and may increase overall morbidity and mortality from complications such as urosepsis. The polysaccharide capsules of UPEC are an attractive target a therapeutic, based on their importance in defense against the host immune responses; however, the large number of antigenic types has limited their incorporation into vaccine development. The objective of this study was to identify small-molecule inhibitors of UPEC capsule biogenesis. A large-scale screening effort entailing 338,740 compounds was conducted in a cell-based, phenotypic screen for inhibition of capsule biogenesis in UPEC. The primary and concentration-response assays yielded 29 putative inhibitors of capsule biogenesis, of which 6 were selected for further studies. Secondary confirmatory assays identified two highly active agents, named DU003 and DU011, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.0 µM and 0.69 µM, respectively. Confirmatory assays for capsular antigen and biochemical measurement of capsular sugars verified the inhibitory action of both compounds and demonstrated minimal toxicity and off-target effects. Serum sensitivity assays demonstrated that both compounds produced significant bacterial death upon exposure to active human serum. DU011 administration in mice provided near complete protection against a lethal systemic infection with the prototypic UPEC K1 isolate UTI89. This work has provided a conceptually new class of molecules to combat UPEC infection, and future studies will establish the molecular basis for their action along with efficacy in UTI and other UPEC infections.

  8. Systematic Review on Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors as an Alternative to Calcineurin Inhibitors in Renal Transplant: Challenges and Window to Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jayant; Bridson, Julie M; Sharma, Ajay; Halawa, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    This review focuses on the current limited evidence of graft function and graft survival in various immunosuppressive regimens involving mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors with or without calcineurin inhibitors. We evaluated the current literature for describing the role of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as an alternative to calcineurin inhibitors by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Crossref, and Scopus databases using medical subject heading terms. Our detailed analyses of all relevant literature showed use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based de novo regimens, early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal with subsequent introduction of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimens, and late conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimens. Notably, early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal with subsequent introduction of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimen seemed to be a more practical and realistic approach toward immunosuppressive treatment of renal transplant recipients. However, in view of the high rejection rate observed in these studies, it is advisable not to offer these regimens to patients with moderate to high immunologic risk. The present evidences suggest that treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors allows early and substantial calcineurin inhibitor minimization. The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus are preferred due to their complementary mechanisms of action and favorable nephrotoxicity profile, which have opened the way for calcineurin inhibitor reduction/withdrawal in the early posttransplant period.

  9. Escape of HIV-1 from a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor is not associated with a fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo G Anastassopoulou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Fitness is a parameter used to quantify how well an organism adapts to its environment; in the present study, fitness is a measure of how well strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replicate in tissue culture. When HIV-1 develops resistance in vitro or in vivo to antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitors, its fitness is often impaired. Here, we have investigated whether the development of resistance in vitro to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, AD101, has an associated fitness cost. To do this, we developed a growth-competition assay involving dual infections with molecularly cloned viruses that are essentially isogenic outside the env genes under study. Real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR was used to quantify each competing virus individually via probes specific to different, phenotypically silent target sequences engineered within their vif genes. Head-to-head competition assays of env clones derived from the AD101 escape mutant isolate, the inhibitor-sensitive parental virus, and a passage control virus showed that AD101 resistance was not associated with a fitness loss. This observation is consistent with the retention of the resistant phenotype when the escape mutant was cultured for a total of 20 passages in the absence of the selecting compound. Amino acid substitutions in the V3 region of gp120 that confer complete AD101 resistance cause a fitness loss when introduced into an AD101-sensitive, parental clone; however, in the resistant isolate, changes elsewhere in env that occurred prior to the substitutions within V3 appear to compensate for the adverse effect of the V3 changes on replicative capacity. These in vitro studies may have implications for the development and management of resistance to other CCR5 inhibitors that are being evaluated clinically for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Small molecule screening identifies targetable zebrafish pigmentation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colanesi, Sarah; Taylor, Kerrie L; Temperley, Nicholas D

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules complement genetic mutants and can be used to probe pigment cell biology by inhibiting specific proteins or pathways. Here, we present the results of a screen of active compounds for those that affect the processes of melanocyte and iridophore development in zebrafish and investig......Small molecules complement genetic mutants and can be used to probe pigment cell biology by inhibiting specific proteins or pathways. Here, we present the results of a screen of active compounds for those that affect the processes of melanocyte and iridophore development in zebrafish...

  11. Targeting the OB-Folds of Replication Protein A with Small Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Anciano Granadillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication protein A (RPA is the main eukaryotic single-strand (ss DNA-binding protein involved in DNA replication and repair. We have identified and developed two classes of small molecule inhibitors (SMIs that show in vitro inhibition of the RPA-DNA interaction. We present further characterization of these SMIs with respect to their target binding, mechanism of action, and specificity. Both reversible and irreversible modes of inhibition are observed for the different classes of SMIs with one class found to specifically interact with DNA-binding domains A and B (DBD-A/B of RPA. In comparison with other oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold (OB-fold containing ssDNA-binding proteins, one class of SMIs displayed specificity for the RPA protein. Together these data demonstrate that the specific targeting of a protein-DNA interaction can be exploited towards interrogating the cellular activity of RPA as well as increasing the efficacy of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics used in cancer treatment.

  12. Targeting the OB-Folds of Replication Protein A with Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anciano Granadillo, Victor J.; Earley, Jennifer N.; Shuck, Sarah C.; Georgiadis, Millie M.; Fitch, Richard W.; Turchi, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is the main eukaryotic single-strand (ss) DNA-binding protein involved in DNA replication and repair. We have identified and developed two classes of small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) that show in vitro inhibition of the RPA-DNA interaction. We present further characterization of these SMIs with respect to their target binding, mechanism of action, and specificity. Both reversible and irreversible modes of inhibition are observed for the different classes of SMIs with one class found to specifically interact with DNA-binding domains A and B (DBD-A/B) of RPA. In comparison with other oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold (OB-fold) containing ssDNA-binding proteins, one class of SMIs displayed specificity for the RPA protein. Together these data demonstrate that the specific targeting of a protein-DNA interaction can be exploited towards interrogating the cellular activity of RPA as well as increasing the efficacy of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics used in cancer treatment. PMID:21188165

  13. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    post- exposure therapeutics. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we report on five novel small-molecule BoNT/A inhibitors that have been...cellular and tissue-based assays intended to mimic BoNT exposure . These five compounds (at 15 mM) protected N2a cells from BoNT/A-mediated cleavage of SNAP...neurotoxin (rELC; residues 1 to 423) and truncated type A LC ( tALC ; residues 1 to 425) will be described elsewhere. Briefly, rELC with a C-terminal His6

  14. Targeting IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) proteins for therapeutic intervention in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Domagoj

    2008-03-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a cell suicide process with a major role in development and homeostasis in vertebrates and invertebrates. Dysregulation of apoptosis leading to early cell death or the absence of normal cell death contributes to a number of disease conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Inhibition of apoptosis enhances the survival of cancer cells and facilitates their escape from immune surveillance and cytotoxic therapies. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, a family of anti-apoptotic regulators that block cell death in response to diverse stimuli through interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis are among the principal molecules contributing to this phenomenon. IAP proteins are expressed in the majority of human malignancies at elevated levels and play an active role in promoting tumor maintenance through the inhibition of cellular death and participation in signaling pathways associated with malignancies. Herein, the role of IAP proteins in cancer and strategies toward targeting IAP proteins for therapeutic intervention will be discussed.

  15. Discovery and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of the BET family bromodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chun-Wa; Coste, Herve; White, Julia H; Mirguet, Olivier; Wilde, Jonathan; Gosmini, Romain L; Delves, Chris; Magny, Sylvie M; Woodward, Robert; Hughes, Stephen A; Boursier, Eric V; Flynn, Helen; Bouillot, Anne M; Bamborough, Paul; Brusq, Jean-Marie G; Gellibert, Francoise J; Jones, Emma J; Riou, Alizon M; Homes, Paul; Martin, Sandrine L; Uings, Iain J; Toum, Jerome; Clement, Catherine A; Boullay, Anne-Benedicte; Grimley, Rachel L; Blandel, Florence M; Prinjha, Rab K; Lee, Kevin; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Nicodeme, Edwige

    2011-06-09

    Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation have a profound role in normal development and disease processes. An integral part of this mechanism occurs through lysine acetylation of histone tails which are recognized by bromodomains. While the biological and structural characterization of many bromodomain containing proteins has advanced considerably, the therapeutic tractability of this protein family is only now becoming understood. This paper describes the discovery and molecular characterization of potent (nM) small molecule inhibitors that disrupt the function of the BET family of bromodomains (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4). By using a combination of phenotypic screening, chemoproteomics, and biophysical studies, we have discovered that the protein-protein interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones can be antagonized by selective small molecules that bind at the acetylated lysine recognition pocket. X-ray crystal structures of compounds bound into bromodomains of Brd2 and Brd4 elucidate the molecular interactions of binding and explain the precisely defined stereochemistry required for activity.

  16. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan eP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 value of 200 µg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylaminocyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC¬50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 µg/mL and 65 µg/mL respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal

  17. Small molecules and targeted therapies in distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersey, P; Bastholt, L; Chiarion-Sileni, V

    2009-01-01

    , dasatinib, sunitinib) may have a role in treatment of patients with melanoma harbouring c-Kit mutations. Although often studied as single agents with disappointing results, new targeted drugs should be more thoroughly evaluated in combination therapies. The future of rational use of new targeted agents also...

  18. Development of antibody-based c-Met inhibitors for targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dongheon Lee, Eun-Sil Sung, Jin-Hyung Ahn, Sungwon An, Jiwon Huh, Weon-Kyoo You Hanwha Chemical R&D Center, Biologics Business Unit, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Signaling pathways mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and their ligands play important roles in the development and progression of human cancers, which makes RTK-mediated signaling pathways promising therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer. Compared with small-molecule compounds, antibody-based therapeutics can more specifically recognize and bind to ligands and RTKs. Several antibody inhibitors of RTK-mediated signaling pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, have been developed and are widely used to treat cancer patients. However, since the therapeutic options are still limited in terms of therapeutic efficacy and types of cancers that can be treated, efforts are being made to identify and evaluate novel RTK-mediated signaling pathways as targets for more efficacious cancer treatment. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway has come into the spotlight as a promising target for development of potent cancer therapeutic agents. Multiple antibody-based therapeutics targeting hepatocyte growth factor or c-Met are currently in preclinical or clinical development. This review focuses on the development of inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway for cancer treatment, including critical issues in clinical development and future perspectives for antibody-based therapeutics. Keywords: hepatocyte growth factor, ligands, receptor tyrosine kinase, signaling pathway, therapeutic agent

  19. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisan Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H. Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT or higher (R201C and R201H cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  20. Small molecule inhibitor of antigen binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Niannian; Somanaboeina, Animesh; Dixit, Aakanksha; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Hayward, Neil J; Self, Christopher; Olson, Gary L; Forsthuber, Thomas G

    2013-11-15

    The strong association of HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests this molecule as prime target for specific immunotherapy. Inhibition of HLA-DR2b-restricted myelin-specific T cells has the potential to selectively prevent CNS pathology mediated by these MHC molecules without undesired global immunosuppression. In this study, we report development of a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of peptide binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b. PV-267, the candidate molecule used in these studies, inhibited cytokine production and proliferation of myelin-specific HLA-DR2b-restricted T cells. PV-267 had no significant effect on T cell responses mediated by other MHC class II molecules, including HLA-DR1, -DR4, or -DR9. Importantly, PV-267 did not induce nonspecific immune activation of human PBMC. Lastly, PV-267 showed treatment efficacy both in preventing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and in treating established disease. The results suggest that blocking the MS-associated HLA-DR2b allele with small molecule inhibitors may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MS.

  1. Novel multi-targeted ErbB family inhibitor afatinib blocks EGF-induced signaling and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinfang; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Guan, Shan; Woodfield, Sarah E; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Tao, Ling; Pang, Jonathan C; Lu, Jiaxiong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-03

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. The ErbB family of proteins is a group of receptor tyrosine kinases that promote the progression of various malignant cancers including neuroblastoma. Thus, targeting them with small molecule inhibitors is a promising strategy for neuroblastoma therapy. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of members of the ErbB family, on neuroblastoma. We found that afatinib suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability of neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Afatinib also induced apoptosis and blocked EGF-induced activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in all neuroblastoma cell lines tested. In addition, afatinib enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. Finally, afatinib exhibited antitumor efficacy in vivo by inducing apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft neuroblastoma mouse model. Taken together, these results show that afatinib inhibits neuroblastoma growth both in vitro and in vivo by suppressing EGFR-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Our study supports the idea that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. And targeting ErbB family protein kinases with small molecule inhibitors like afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin is a viable option for treating neuroblastoma.

  2. Novel multi-targeted ErbB family inhibitor afatinib blocks EGF-induced signaling and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinfang; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Guan, Shan; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Tao, Ling; Pang, Jonathan C.; Lu, Jiaxiong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. The ErbB family of proteins is a group of receptor tyrosine kinases that promote the progression of various malignant cancers including neuroblastoma. Thus, targeting them with small molecule inhibitors is a promising strategy for neuroblastoma therapy. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of members of the ErbB family, on neuroblastoma. We found that afatinib suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability of neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Afatinib also induced apoptosis and blocked EGF-induced activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in all neuroblastoma cell lines tested. In addition, afatinib enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. Finally, afatinib exhibited antitumor efficacy in vivo by inducing apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft neuroblastoma mouse model. Taken together, these results show that afatinib inhibits neuroblastoma growth both in vitro and in vivo by suppressing EGFR-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Our study supports the idea that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. And targeting ErbB family protein kinases with small molecule inhibitors like afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin is a viable option for treating neuroblastoma. PMID:27902463

  3. Characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Gao-yun; XIE Zhi-qiang; QIAN Ge; CUI Wen-ying; ZHAO Jun-yin; ZHANG Jian-zhong; LIAN Shi

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have shown that reducing the level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) through the use of anti-TNF antibodies or soluble TNF receptor is a safe and efficacious treatment to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, novel approaches to achieve this outcome are desired. The aim of this study was to investigate the characterization of a small molecule inhibitor, Y316, which blocks TNF mRNA upregulation and TNF production by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) stimulated monocytes.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy volunteers were plated in 24-well plates and stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) (100 ng/ml), zymosan (10 μg/ml) and Tsst (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected after 4-hour culture at 37C, and quantitative determination of TNFα, interleukin-1β(IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-2 production in the supernatants was performed by colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Total RNA of PBMC was isolated and cytokine mRNA quantitation was performed by using a RNA level measuring kit (R & D Systems). PBMC were pretreated with Y316 (10 μmol/L, 1 μmol/L, 0.1 μmol/L,0.01 μmol/L and 0.001 μmol/L) or dimethyl sulfoxide at 37C for 10 minutes, and then stimulated with LPS or PMA,protein concentrations of p44.42, IKBα, P38 and Jun NH2-terminal kinase were determined by Western blotting. Cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) of PBMC was measured by enzyme immunoassay kit (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech).Results Y316 blocked TNF production and inhibited the upregulation of TNF mRNA levels in response to LPS, and also prevented the production of IL-1 and IL-6. In contrast, Y316 augmented the production of IL-10 in LPS-stimulated monocytes. Y316 failed to prevent the production of IL-2 and TNF in antigen-stimulated T cells, suggesting that its effects may be cell-type specific. Y316 prevented the phosphorylation and activation of the MAPK, ERK, and

  4. Identification and characterization of potent small molecule inhibitor of hemorrhagic fever New World arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolken, Tove C; Laquerre, Sylvie; Zhang, Yuanming; Bailey, Thomas R; Pevear, Daniel C; Kickner, Shirley S; Sperzel, Lindsey E; Jones, Kevin F; Warren, Travis K; Amanda Lund, S; Kirkwood-Watts, Dana L; King, David S; Shurtleff, Amy C; Guttieri, Mary C; Deng, Yijun; Bleam, Maureen; Hruby, Dennis E

    2006-02-01

    Category A arenaviruses as defined by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are human pathogens that could be weaponized by bioterrorists. Many of these deadly viruses require biosafety level-4 (BSL-4) containment for all laboratory work, which limits traditional laboratory high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of small molecule inhibitors. For those reasons, a related BSL-2 New World arenavirus, Tacaribe virus, 67-78% identical to Junín virus at the amino acid level, was used in a HTS campaign where approximately 400,000 small molecule compounds were screened in a Tacaribe virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. Compounds identified in this screen showed antiviral activity and specificity against not only Tacaribe virus, but also the Category A New World arenaviruses (Junín, Machupo, and Guanarito). Drug resistant variants were isolated, suggesting that these compounds act through inhibition of a viral protein, the viral glycoprotein (GP2), and not through cellular toxicity mechanisms. A lead compound, ST-294, has been chosen for drug development. This potent and selective compound, with good bioavailability, demonstrated protective anti-viral efficacy in a Tacaribe mouse challenge model. This series of compounds represent a new class of inhibitors that may warrant further development for potential inclusion in a strategic stockpile.

  5. Calpains: attractive targets for the development of synthetic inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Markus; Chua, Krystle C H; Abell, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    The physiological roles of calpains are discussed, as are the associated pathological disorders that result from their over-activation. We also present practical information for establishing functional inhibition assays and an overview of X-ray crystal structures of calpain-inhibitor complexes to aid inhibitor design. These structures reveal the expected extended beta-strand conformation for the inhibitor backbone, a geometry that has been engineered into inhibitors with the introduction of either an N-terminal heterocycle or a macrocycle that links the P(1) and P(3) residues. The structure and function of all the main classes of inhibitors are reviewed, with most examples being classified according to the nature of the C-terminal reactive warhead group that reacts with the active site cysteine of calpains. These inhibitor classes include epoxysuccinate derivatives, aldehydes, aldehyde prodrugs (hemiacetals) and alpha-keto carbonyl compounds. Inhibitors derived from the endogenous inhibitor calpastatin and examples lacking a warhead, are now known and these are also discussed.

  6. Novel small molecule inhibitors of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Richard I; Wu, James M; Polokoff, Mark A; Kochanny, Monica J; Dinter, Harald; Zhu, Daguang; Biroc, Sandra L; Alicke, Bruno; Bryant, Judi; Yuan, Shendong; Buckman, Brad O; Lentz, Dao; Ferrer, Mike; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Finster, Silke; Chang, Zheng; Arnaiz, Damian O

    2005-05-20

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1)/Akt signaling pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival, and tumor angiogenesis and represents a promising target for anticancer drugs. Here, we describe three potent PDK1 inhibitors, BX-795, BX-912, and BX-320 (IC(50) = 11-30 nm) and their initial biological characterization. The inhibitors blocked PDK1/Akt signaling in tumor cells and inhibited the anchorage-dependent growth of a variety of tumor cell lines in culture or induced apoptosis. A number of cancer cell lines with elevated Akt activity were >30-fold more sensitive to growth inhibition by PDK1 inhibitors in soft agar than on tissue culture plastic, consistent with the cell survival function of the PDK1/Akt signaling pathway, which is particularly important for unattached cells. BX-320 inhibited the growth of LOX melanoma tumors in the lungs of nude mice after injection of tumor cells into the tail vein. The effect of BX-320 on cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo indicates that PDK1 inhibitors may have clinical utility as anticancer agents.

  7. Isolation of a small molecule inhibitor of DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Smart, Fiona; Shrimpton, Paul; Parsons, Jason L; Gardiner, Laurence; Houlbrook, Sue; Talbot, Denis C; Hammonds, Timothy; Freemont, Paul A; Sternberg, Michael J E; Dianov, Grigory L; Hickson, Ian D

    2005-01-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is essential for the removal of DNA bases damaged by alkylation or oxidation. A key step in BER is the processing of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site intermediate by an AP endonuclease. The major AP endonuclease in human cells (APE1, also termed HAP1 and Ref-1) accounts for >95% of the total AP endonuclease activity, and is essential for the protection of cells against the toxic effects of several classes of DNA damaging agents. Moreover, APE1 overexpression has been linked to radio- and chemo-resistance in human tumors. Using a newly developed high-throughput screen, several chemical inhibitors of APE1 have been isolated. Amongst these, CRT0044876 was identified as a potent and selective APE1 inhibitor. CRT0044876 inhibits the AP endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase activities of APE1 at low micromolar concentrations, and is a specific inhibitor of the exonuclease III family of enzymes to which APE1 belongs. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, CRT0044876 potentiates the cytotoxicity of several DNA base-targeting compounds. This enhancement of cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of unrepaired AP sites. In silico modeling studies suggest that CRT0044876 binds to the active site of APE1. These studies provide both a novel reagent for probing APE1 function in human cells, and a rational basis for the development of APE1-targeting drugs for antitumor therapy.

  8. Potent host-directed small-molecule inhibitors of myxovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A Krumm

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid

  9. Small molecule inhibitors of amyloid β peptide aggregation as a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin NIE; Xiao-guang DU; Mei-yu GENG

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides have long been viewed as a potential target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aggregation of Aβ peptides in the brain tissue is believed to be an exclusively pathological process. Therefore, blocking the initial stages of Aβ peptide aggregation with small molecules could hold considerable promise as the starting point for the development of new therapies for AD. Recent rapid progresses in our understanding of toxic amyloid assembly provide a fresh impetus for this interesting approach. Here, we discuss the problems, challenges and new concepts in targeting Aβ peptides.

  10. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  11. Small molecule ErbB inhibitors decrease proliferative signaling and promote apoptosis in philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Irwin

    Full Text Available The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+ALL is a negative prognostic indicator. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI that target BCR/ABL, such as imatinib, have improved treatment of Ph(+ALL and are generally incorporated into induction regimens. This approach has improved clinical responses, but molecular remissions are seen in less than 50% of patients leaving few treatment options in the event of relapse. Thus, identification of additional targets for therapeutic intervention has potential to improve outcomes for Ph+ALL. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2 is expressed in ~30% of B-ALLs, and numerous small molecule inhibitors are available to prevent its activation. We analyzed a cohort of 129 ALL patient samples using reverse phase protein array (RPPA with ErbB2 and phospho-ErbB2 antibodies and found that activity of ErbB2 was elevated in 56% of Ph(+ALL as compared to just 4.8% of Ph(-ALL. In two human Ph+ALL cell lines, inhibition of ErbB kinase activity with canertinib resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of an ErbB kinase signaling target p70S6-kinase T389 (by 60% in Z119 and 39% in Z181 cells at 3 µM. Downstream, phosphorylation of S6-kinase was also diminished in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner (by 91% in both cell lines at 3 µM. Canertinib treatment increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim by as much as 144% in Z119 cells and 49% in Z181 cells, and further produced caspase-3 activation and consequent apoptotic cell death. Both canertinib and the FDA-approved ErbB1/2-directed TKI lapatinib abrogated proliferation and increased sensitivity to BCR/ABL-directed TKIs at clinically relevant doses. Our results suggest that ErbB signaling is an additional molecular target in Ph(+ALL and encourage the development of clinical strategies combining ErbB and BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors for this subset of ALL patients.

  12. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Taly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted.

  13. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitors as Potential New Mechanism Diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK or Kir1.1) is a putative drug target for a novel class of diuretics that could be used for the treatment of hypertension and edematous states such as heart failure. An internal high-throughput screening campaign identified 1,4-bis(4-nitrophenethyl)piperazine (5) as a potent ROMK inhibitor. It is worth noting that this compound was identified as a minor impurity in a screening hit that was responsible for all of the initially observed ROMK activity. Structure–activity studies resulted in analogues with improved rat pharmacokinetic properties and selectivity over the hERG channel, providing tool compounds that can be used for in vivo pharmacological assessment. The featured ROMK inhibitors were also selective against other members of the inward rectifier family of potassium channels. PMID:24900480

  14. Current and novel therapeutic molecules and targets in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline, i.e., dementia. The disease starts with mild symptoms and gradually becomes severe. AD is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Several different hallmarks of the disease have been reported such as deposits of β-amyloid around neurons, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, oxidative stress, dyshomeostasis of bio-metals, low levels of acetylcholine, etc. AD is not simple to diagnose since there is no single diagnostic test for it. Pharmacotherapy for AD currently provides only symptomatic relief and mostly targets cognitive revival. Computational biology approaches have proved to be reliable tools for the selection of novel targets and therapeutic ligands. Molecular docking is a key tool in computer-assisted drug design and development. Docking has been utilized to perform virtual screening on large libraries of compounds, and propose structural hypotheses of how the ligands bind with the target with lead optimization. Another potential application of docking is optimization stages of the drug-discovery cycle. This review summarizes the known drug targets of AD, in vivo active agents against AD, state-of-the-art docking studies done in AD, and future prospects of the docking with particular emphasis on AD.

  15. Preparation of 232Th Target by Molecule Plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>For the cross section measurement of the 232Th(α, 2n)234U reaction, thorium targets plated on the aluminium foil with 2 and 8 μm thickness are required. It was demanded that the mass thickness of the

  16. A small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tryptophan synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Samantha; Nag, Partha P.; Michalska, Karolina; Johnston, Stephen E; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Kaushik, Virendar K; Clatworthy, Anne E; Siddiqi, Noman; McCarren, Patrick; Bajrami, Besnik; Maltseva, Natalia I.; Combs, Senya; Fisher, Stewart L.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2017-09-01

    New antibiotics with novel targets are greatly needed. Bacteria have numerous essential functions, but only a small fraction of such processes—primarily those involved in macromolecular synthesis—are inhibited by current drugs. Targeting metabolic enzymes has been the focus of recent interest, but effective inhibitors have been difficult to identify. We describe a synthetic azetidine derivative, BRD4592, that kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) through allosteric inhibition of tryptophan synthase (TrpAB), a previously untargeted, highly allosterically regulated enzyme. BRD4592 binds at the TrpAB a–b-subunit interface and affects multiple steps in the enzyme’s overall reaction, resulting in inhibition not easily overcome by changes in metabolic environment. We show that TrpAB is required for the survival of Mtb and Mycobacterium marinum in vivo and that this requirement may be independent of an adaptive immune response. This work highlights the effectiveness of allosteric inhibition for targeting proteins that are naturally highly dynamic and that are essential in vivo, despite their apparent dispensability under in vitro conditions, and suggests a framework for the discovery of a next generation of allosteric inhibitors.

  17. A small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tryptophan synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Samantha; Nag, Partha P.; Michalska, Karolina; Johnston, Stephen E.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Kaushik, Virendar K.; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Siddiqi, Noman; McCarren, Patrick; Bajrami, Besnik; Maltseva, Natalia I.; Combs, Senya; Fisher, Stewart L.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2017-07-03

    New antibiotics with novel targets are greatly needed. Bacteria have numerous essential functions, but only a small fraction of such processes—primarily those involved in macromolecular synthesis—are inhibited by current drugs. Targeting metabolic enzymes has been the focus of recent interest, but effective inhibitors have been difficult to identify. We describe a synthetic azetidine derivative, BRD4592, that kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) through allosteric inhibition of tryptophan synthase (TrpAB), a previously untargeted, highly allosterically regulated enzyme. BRD4592 binds at the TrpAB α–β-subunit interface and affects multiple steps in the enzyme's overall reaction, resulting in inhibition not easily overcome by changes in metabolic environment. We show that TrpAB is required for the survival of Mtb and Mycobacterium marinum in vivo and that this requirement may be independent of an adaptive immune response. This work highlights the effectiveness of allosteric inhibition for targeting proteins that are naturally highly dynamic and that are essential in vivo, despite their apparent dispensability under in vitro conditions, and suggests a framework for the discovery of a next generation of allosteric inhibitors.

  18. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  19. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Small Molecule Inhibitors Induce a Distinct Pancreatic Toxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Rebecca I; Schutt, Leah K; Tarrant, Jacqueline M; McDowell, Michelle; Liu, Lichuan; Johnson, Adam R; Lewin-Koh, Sock-Cheng; Hedehus, Maj; Ross, Jed; Carano, Richard A D; Staflin, Karin; Zhong, Fiona; Crawford, James J; Zhong, Shelly; Reif, Karin; Katewa, Arna; Wong, Harvey; Young, Wendy B; Dambach, Donna M; Misner, Dinah L

    2017-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a member of the Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases involved in B-cell and myeloid cell signaling. Small molecule inhibitors of BTK are being investigated for treatment of several hematologic cancers and autoimmune diseases. GDC-0853 ((S)-2-(3'-(hydroxymethyl)-1-methyl-5-((5-(2-methyl-4-(oxetan-3-yl)piperazin-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl)amino)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-[3,4'-bipyridin]-2'-yl)-7,7-dimethyl-3,4,7,8-tetrahydro-2H-cyclopenta[4,5]pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazin-1(6H)-one) is a selective and reversible oral small-molecule BTK inhibitor in development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, administration of GDC-0853 and other structurally diverse BTK inhibitors for 7 days or longer caused pancreatic lesions consisting of multifocal islet-centered hemorrhage, inflammation, fibrosis, and pigment-laden macrophages with adjacent lobular exocrine acinar cell atrophy, degeneration, and inflammation. Similar findings were not observed in mice or dogs at much higher exposures. Hemorrhage in the peri-islet vasculature emerged between four and seven daily doses of GDC-0853 and was histologically similar to spontaneously occurring changes in aging SD rats. This suggests that GDC-0853 could exacerbate a background finding in younger animals. Glucose homeostasis was dysregulated following a glucose challenge; however, this occurred only after 28 days of administration and was not directly associated with onset or severity of pancreatic lesions. There were no changes in other common serum biomarkers assessing endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function. Additionally, these lesions were not readily detectable via Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Our results indicate that pancreatic lesions in rats are likely a class effect of BTK inhibitors, which may exacerbate an islet-centered pathology that is unlikely to be relevant to humans. Copyright © 2016 by

  20. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-15

    Secondary metastatic cancer remains the single biggest cause of mortality and morbidity across most solid tumors. In breast cancer, 100% of deaths are attributed to metastasis. At present, there are no "cures" for secondary metastatic cancer of any form and there is an urgent unmet clinical need to improve the tools available in our arsenal against this disease, both in terms of treatment, but also prevention. Recently, we showed that hypoxic induction of the extracellular matrix modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic dissemination to the bone in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer and is essential for the formation of premetastatic osteolytic lesions. We showed that in models of breast cancer metastasis, targeting LOX, or its downstream effects, significantly inhibited premetastatic niche formation and the resulting metastatic burden, offering preclinical validation of this enzyme as a therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. Our work is the latest in an emerging body of work supporting the targeting of LOX and calls for greater efforts in developing therapeutics against this extracellular secreted factor in the prevention of cancer progression across multiple solid tumor types.

  1. A novel small-molecule compound targeting CD147 inhibits the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhi-guang; Wang, Li; Cui, Hong-yong; Peng, Jian-long; Wang, Shi-jie; Geng, Jie-jie; Liu, Ji-de; Feng, Fei; Song, Fei; Li, Ling; Zhu, Ping; Jiang, Jian-li; Chen, Zhi-nan

    2016-02-23

    CD147, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed in various cancer types and plays important roles in tumor progression, especially by promoting the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. These crucial roles make CD147 an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in HCC, but no small-molecule inhibitors of CD147 have been developed to date. To identify a candidate inhibitor, we used a pharmacophore model derived from the structure of CD147 to virtually screen over 300,000 compounds. The 100 highest-ranked compounds were subjected to biological assays, and the most potent one, dubbed AC-73 (ID number: AN-465/42834501), was studied further. We confirmed that AC-73 targeted CD147 and further demonstrated it can specifically disrupt CD147 dimerization. Moreover, molecular docking and mutagenesis experiments showed that the possible binding sites of AC-73 on CD147 included Glu64 and Glu73 in the N-terminal IgC2 domain, which two residues are located in the dimer interface of CD147. Functional assays revealed that AC-73 inhibited the motility and invasion of typical HCC cells, but not HCC cells that lacked the CD147 gene, demonstrating on-target action. Further, AC-73 reduced HCC metastasis by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 via down-regulation of the CD147/ERK1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Finally, AC-73 attenuated progression in an orthotopic nude mouse model of liver metastasis, suggesting that AC-73 or its derivatives have potential for use in HCC intervention. We conclude that the novel small-molecule inhibitor AC-73 inhibits HCC mobility and invasion, probably by disrupting CD147 dimerization and thereby mainly suppressing the CD147/ERK1/2/STAT3/MMP-2 pathways, which are crucial for cancer progression.

  2. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chi, Ching-Shiang; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2015-12-25

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM), and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  3. Small-Molecule Compounds Exhibiting Target-Mediated Drug Disposition (TMDD): A Minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guohua

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinearities are commonplace in pharmacokinetics, and 1 special source is the saturable binding of the drug to a high-affinity, low-capacity target, a phenomenon known as target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). Compared with large-molecule compounds undergoing TMDD, which has been well recognized due to its high prevalence, TMDD in small-molecule compounds is more counterintuitive and has not been well appreciated. With more and more potent small-molecule drugs acting on highly specific targets being developed as well as increasingly sensitive analytical techniques becoming available, many small-molecule compounds have recently been reported to have nonlinear pharmacokinetics imparted by TMDD. To expand our current knowledge of TMDD in small-molecule compounds and increase the awareness of this clinically important phenomenon, this minireview provides an overview of the small-molecule compounds that demonstrate nonlinear pharmacokinetics imparted by TMDD. The present review also summarizes the general features of TMDD in small-molecule compounds and highlights the differences between TMDD in small-molecule compounds and large-molecule compounds. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Shutting down the pore: The search for small molecule inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šileikytė, Justina; Forte, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is now recognized as playing a key role in a wide variety of human diseases whose common pathology may be based in mitochondrial dysfunction. Recently, PTP assays have been adapted to high-throughput screening approaches to identify small molecules specifically inhibiting the PTP. Following extensive secondary chemistry, the most potent inhibitors of the PTP described to date have been developed. This review will provide an overview of each of these screening efforts, use of resulting compounds in animal models of PTP-based diseases, and problems that will require further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  5. Small molecule kinase inhibitors block the ZAK-dependent inflammatory effects of doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, John; Smith, Logan B; Magun, Eli A

    2013-01-01

    The adverse side effects of doxorubicin, including cardiotoxicity and cancer treatment-related fatigue, have been associated with inflammatory cytokines, many of which are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). ZAK is an upstream kinase of the MAPK cascade. Using mouse primary...... macrophages cultured from ZAK-deficient mice, we demonstrated that ZAK is required for the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK by doxorubicin. Nilotinib, ponatinib and sorafenib strongly suppressed doxorubicin-mediated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK. In addition, these small molecule kinase inhibitors blocked...... the expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and CXCL1 RNA and the production of these proteins. Co-administration of nilotinib and doxorubicin to mice decreased the expression of IL-1β RNA in the liver and suppressed the level of IL-6 protein in the serum compared with mice that were injected with doxorubicin alone. Therefore...

  6. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  7. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Elizabeth L; Albrow, Victoria E; Leader, Brittany A; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J; Powers, James C; Salvesen, Guy S; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-06-24

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite life cycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extracellular matrix molecules as targets for brown spider venom toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga S.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Loxoscelism, the term used to describe lesions and clinical manifestations induced by brown spider's venom (Loxosceles genus, has attracted much attention over the last years. Brown spider bites have been reported to cause a local and acute inflammatory reaction that may evolve to dermonecrosis (a hallmark of envenomation and hemorrhage at the bite site, besides systemic manifestations such as thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemolysis, and renal failure. The molecular mechanisms by which Loxosceles venoms induce injury are currently under investigation. In this review, we focused on the latest reports describing the biological and physiopathological aspects of loxoscelism, with reference mainly to the proteases recently described as metalloproteases and serine proteases, as well as on the proteolytic effects triggered by L. intermedia venom upon extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, entactin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, besides the disruptive activity of the venom on Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm basement membranes. Degradation of these extracellular matrix molecules and the observed disruption of basement membranes could be related to deleterious activities of the venom such as loss of vessel and glomerular integrity and spreading of the venom toxins to underlying tissues.

  9. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  10. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metastatic cancer remains the single biggest cause of mortality and morbidity across most solid tumors. In breast cancer, 100% of deaths are attributed to metastasis. At present, there are no "cures" for secondary metastatic cancer of any form and there is an urgent unmet clinical need...... to improve the tools available in our arsenal against this disease, both in terms of treatment, but also prevention. Recently, we showed that hypoxic induction of the extracellular matrix modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic dissemination to the bone in estrogen receptor negative...... breast cancer and is essential for the formation of premetastatic osteolytic lesions. We showed that in models of breast cancer metastasis, targeting LOX, or its downstream effects, significantly inhibited premetastatic niche formation and the resulting metastatic burden, offering preclinical validation...

  11. A small molecule inhibitor of Pot1 binding to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Croy, Johnny E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of the regulation of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ∼20 000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with sub-micromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red (CR), was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption.

  12. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  13. Virtual screening of the inhibitors targeting at the viral protein 40 of Ebola virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.Karthick; N.Nagasundaram; C.George Priya Doss; Chiranjib Chakraborty; R.Siva; Aiping Lu; Ge Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Background:The Ebola virus is highly pathogenic and destructive to humans and other primates.The Ebola virus encodes viral protein 40 (VP40),which is highly expressed and regulates the assembly and release of viral particles in the host cell.Because VP40 plays a prominent role in the life cycle of the Ebola virus,it is considered as a key target for antiviral treatment.However,there is currently no FDA-approved drug for treating Ebola virus infection,resulting in an urgent need to develop effective antiviral inhibitors that display good safety profiles in a short duration.Methods:This study aimed to screen the effective lead candidate against Ebola infection.First,the lead molecules were filtered based on the docking score.Second,Lipinski rule of five and the other drug likeliness properties are predicted to assess the safety profile of the lead candidates.Finally,molecular dynamics simulations was performed to validate the lead compound.Results:Our results revealed that emodin-8-beta-D-glucoside from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database (TCMD) represents an active lead candidate that targets the Ebola virus by inhibiting the activity of VP40,and displays good pharmacokinetic properties.Conclusion:This report will considerably assist in the development of the competitive and robust antiviral agents against Ebola infection.

  14. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  15. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 1698221...1 Title Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Author

  16. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors enable freezing of human red blood cells with reduced glycerol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Kurach, Jayme D R; Turner, Tracey R; Mancini, Ross S; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2015-04-08

    In North America, red blood cells (RBCs) are cryopreserved in a clinical setting using high glycerol concentrations (40% w/v) with slow cooling rates (~1°C/min) prior to storage at -80°C, while European protocols use reduced glycerol concentrations with rapid freezing rates. After thawing and prior to transfusion, glycerol must be removed to avoid intravascular hemolysis. This is a time consuming process requiring specialized equipment. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) such as β-PMP-Glc and β-pBrPh-Glc have the ability to prevent ice recrystallization, a process that contributes to cellular injury and decreased cell viability after cryopreservation. Herein, we report that addition of 110 mM β-PMP-Glc or 30 mM β-pBrPh-Glc to a 15% glycerol solution increases post-thaw RBC integrity by 30-50% using slow cooling rates and emphasize the potential of small molecule IRIs for the preservation of cells.

  17. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor that stalls splicing at an early step of spliceosome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidarovich, Anzhalika; Will, Cindy L; Anokhina, Maria M; Ceballos, Javier; Sievers, Sonja; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Samatov, Timur; Bao, Penghui; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Waldmann, Herbert; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of pre-mRNA splicing are important tools for identifying new spliceosome assembly intermediates, allowing a finer dissection of spliceosome dynamics and function. Here, we identified a small molecule that inhibits human pre-mRNA splicing at an intermediate stage during conversion of pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complexes into activated Bact complexes. Characterization of the stalled complexes (designated B028) revealed that U4/U6 snRNP proteins are released during activation before the U6 Lsm and B-specific proteins, and before recruitment and/or stable incorporation of Prp19/CDC5L complex and other Bact complex proteins. The U2/U6 RNA network in B028 complexes differs from that of the Bact complex, consistent with the idea that the catalytic RNA core forms stepwise during the B to Bact transition and is likely stabilized by the Prp19/CDC5L complex and related proteins. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the RNP rearrangements and extensive exchange of proteins that occurs during spliceosome activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23533.001 PMID:28300534

  18. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s. Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS, inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs. Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria.

  19. New approaches of PARP-1 inhibitors in human lung cancer cells and cancer stem-like cells by some selected anthraquinone-derived small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Lee

    Full Text Available Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and telomerase, as well as DNA damage response pathways are targets for anticancer drug development, and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate anticancer activities of anthraquinone-derived tricyclic and tetracyclic small molecules and their structure-activity relationships with PARP-1 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and NSCLC-overexpressing Oct4 and Nanog clone, which show high-expression of PARP-1 and more resistance to anticancer drug. We applied our library selected compounds to NCI's 60 human cancer cell-lines (NCI-60 in order to generate systematic profiling data. Based on our analysis, it is hypothesized that these drugs might be, directly and indirectly, target components to induce mitochondrial permeability transition and the release of pro-apoptotic factors as potential anti-NSCLC or PARP inhibitor candidates. Altogether, the most active NSC747854 showed its cytotoxicity and dose-dependent PARP inhibitory manner, thus it emerges as a promising structure for anti-cancer therapy with no significant negative influence on normal cells. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics. These findings will be of great value to facilitate structure-based design of selective PARP inhibitors, in general, and telomerase inhibitors, in particular. Together, the data presented here expand our insight into the PARP inhibitors and support the resource-demanding lead optimization of structurally related small molecules for human cancer therapy.

  20. Methods to enable the design of bioactive small molecules targeting RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is an immensely important target for small molecule therapeutics or chemical probes of function. However, methods that identify, annotate, and optimize RNA-small molecule interactions that could enable the design of compounds that modulate RNA function are in their infancies. This review describes recent approaches that have been developed to understand and optimize RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (StARTS), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), chemical similarity searching, structure-based design and docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Case studies described include the design of small molecules targeting RNA expansions, the bacterial A-site, viral RNAs, and telomerase RNA. These approaches can be combined to afford a synergistic method to exploit the myriad of RNA targets in the transcriptome. PMID:24357181

  1. Antitumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, in combination with PI3K/mTOR inhibitors or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors in pimasertib-resistant human lung and colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; D'Aiuto, Elena; Morgillo, Floriana; Vitagliano, Donata; Capasso, Anna; Costantino, Sarah; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Merolla, Francesco; Vecchione, Loredana; De Vriendt, Veerle; Tejpar, Sabine; Nappi, Anna; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Berrino, Liberato; De Palma, Raffaele; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2013-11-01

    The RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways are key regulators of proliferation and survival in human cancer cells. Selective inhibitors of different transducer molecules in these pathways have been developed as molecular targeted anti-cancer therapies. The in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, alone or in combination with a PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki), a mTOR inhibitor (everolimus), or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors (sorafenib and regorafenib), that block also BRAF and CRAF, were tested in a panel of eight human lung and colon cancer cell lines. Following pimasertib treatment, cancer cell lines were classified as pimasertib-sensitive (IC50 for cell growth inhibition of 0.001 µM) or pimasertib-resistant. Evaluation of basal gene expression profiles by microarrays identified several genes that were up-regulated in pimasertib-resistant cancer cells and that were involved in both RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Therefore, a series of combination experiments with pimasertib and either PI3Ki, everolimus, sorafenib or regorafenib were conducted, demonstrating a synergistic effect in cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis with sustained blockade in MAPK- and AKT-dependent signaling pathways in pimasertib-resistant human colon carcinoma (HCT15) and lung adenocarcinoma (H1975) cells. Finally, in nude mice bearing established HCT15 and H1975 subcutaneous tumor xenografts, the combined treatment with pimasertib and BEZ235 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) or with sorafenib caused significant tumor growth delays and increase in mice survival as compared to single agent treatment. These results suggest that dual blockade of MAPK and PI3K pathways could overcome intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibition.

  2. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example.

  3. Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Turchi, John J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Zhang, Zhong-Yin, E-mail: zyzhang@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. •SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. •Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

  4. Treatment of platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer using a "predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy" system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-dong; WEI Feng-hua; ZHANG Yi; HE Shu-rong; YANG Li

    2009-01-01

    Background Correct drug selection, the key to successful chemotherapy, is one of the most difficult clinical decisions for the treatment of platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer worldwide. The exact procedures for choosing drugs are undefined, currently relying on clinical trials and personal experience, which often results in disappointing outcomes. Here, we propose a new drug selection method, the "predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy", to choose relatively sensitive routine drugs and avoid relatively resistant routine drugs based on the specific predictive molecule expression of the individual tumor tissue.Methods From January 2004 to June 2008,26 cases of platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer were prospectively recruited. Their routine chemotherapy drug choice was based on the expression of 6 predictive molecules (including p53) as determined by immunohistochemistry (the predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy group). A further 18 cases of platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer were treated by experience and formed the control group. The response rate and the overall survival were compared between the two groups.Results The response rate to second-line chemotherapy was 28% in the control group and 77% in the predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy group (P=0.002). The response rate to third-line chemotherapy was 14% in the control group and 33% in the predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy group (P=0.268). The median overall survival of the predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy group (88 weeks) was significantly longer than the median overall survival of the control group (56 weeks) (P=0.0315).Conclusion The predictive molecule targeted routine chemotherapy is a new effective protocol for choosing drugs when treating platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer.

  5. Small-molecule inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 5A (NS5A): a patent review (2010-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Aladinskiy, Vladimir A; Bushkov, Nikolay A; Ayginin, Andrey A; Majouga, Alexander G; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V

    2017-04-01

    Non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein has achieved a considerable attention as an attractive target for the treatment of hepatitis C (HCV). A number of novel NS5A inhibitors have been reported to date. Several drugs having favorable ADME properties and mild side effects were launched into the pharmaceutical market. For instance, daclatasvir was launched in 2014, elbasvir is currently undergoing registration, ledipasvir was launched in 2014 as a fixed-dose combination with sofosbuvir (NS5B inhibitor). Areas covered: Thomson integrity database and SciFinder database were used as a valuable source to collect the patents on small-molecule NS5A inhibitors. All the structures were ranked by the date of priority. Patent holder and antiviral activity for each scaffold claimed were summarized and presented in a convenient manner. A particular focus was placed on the best-in-class bis-pyrrolidine-containing NS5A inhibitors. Expert opinion: Several first generation NS5A inhibitors have recently progressed into advanced clinical trials and showed superior efficacy in reducing viral load in infected subjects. Therapy schemes of using these agents in combination with other established antiviral drugs with complementary mechanisms of action can address the emergence of resistance and poor therapeutic outcome frequently attributed to antiviral drugs.

  6. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng [Michigan; (HHMI)

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Trafficking Discovered by Phenotypic Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul R.; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Whiteaker, James D.; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A.

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  8. MALT1 small molecule inhibitors specifically suppress ABC-DLBCL in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan, Lorena; Yang, Chenghua; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Volpon, Laurent; Osborne, Michael J; Beltran, Elena; Garcia, Monica; Cerchietti, Leandro; Shaknovich, Rita; Yang, Shao Ning; Fang, Fang; Gascoyne, Randy D; Martinez-Climent, Jose Angel; Glickman, J Fraser; Borden, Katherine; Wu, Hao; Melnick, Ari

    2012-12-11

    MALT1 cleavage activity is linked to the pathogenesis of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL), a chemoresistant form of DLBCL. We developed a MALT1 activity assay and identified chemically diverse MALT1 inhibitors. A selected lead compound, MI-2, featured direct binding to MALT1 and suppression of its protease function. MI-2 concentrated within human ABC-DLBCL cells and irreversibly inhibited cleavage of MALT1 substrates. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression, c-REL nuclear localization inhibition, and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Most notably, MI-2 was nontoxic to mice, and displayed selective activity against ABC-DLBCL cell lines in vitro and xenotransplanted ABC-DLBCL tumors in vivo. The compound was also effective against primary human non-germinal center B cell-like DLBCLs ex vivo.

  9. Ani9, A Novel Potent Small-Molecule ANO1 Inhibitor with Negligible Effect on ANO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Seo

    Full Text Available Anoctamin1 (ANO1/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC, is involved in many physiological functions such as fluid secretion, smooth muscle contraction, nociception and cancer progression. To date, only a few ANO1 inhibitors have been described, and these have low potency and selectivity for ANO1. Here, we performed a high-throughput screening to identify highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of ANO1. Three novel ANO1 inhibitors were discovered from screening of 54,400 synthetic small molecules, and they were found to fully block ANO1 channel activity with an IC50 < 3 μM. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the most potent inhibitor, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy-N-[(2-methoxyphenylmethylideneamino]-acetamide (Ani9, completely inhibited ANO1 chloride current with submicromolar potency. Notably, unlike previous small-molecule ANO1 inhibitors identified to date, Ani9 displayed high selectivity for ANO1 as compared to ANO2, which shares a high amino acid homology to ANO1. In addition, Ani9 did not affect the intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR chloride channel activity. Our results suggest that Ani9 may be a useful pharmacological tool for studying ANO1 and a potential development candidate for drug therapy of cancer, hypertension, pain, diarrhea and asthma.

  10. Small-molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF-04449913 (PF-913) is a selective, small-molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof-of-concept and mechanism of action of PF-913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in AML cells, and evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the Smoothened inhibitor PF-913. In primary AML cells, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway was more pronounced in CD34(+) cells than CD34(-) cells. In vitro treatment with PF-913 induced a decrease in the quiescent cell population accompanied by minimal cell death. In vivo treatment with PF-913 attenuated the leukemia-initiation potential of AML cells in a serial transplantation mouse model, while limiting reduction of tumor burden in a primary xenotransplant system. Comprehensive gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PF-913 modulated self-renewal signatures and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PF-913 sensitized AML cells to cytosine arabinoside, and abrogated resistance to cytosine arabinoside in AML cells cocultured with HS-5 stromal cells. These findings imply that pharmacologic inhibition of Hedgehog signaling attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential, and also enhanced AML therapy by sensitizing dormant leukemia stem cells to chemotherapy and overcoming resistance in the bone marrow microenvironment. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Cytoprotective effect of selective small-molecule caspase inhibitors against staurosporine-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jianghong Wu, Yuren Wang, Shuguang Liang, Haiching Ma Reaction Biology Corp, Malvern, PA, USA Abstract: Caspases are currently known as the central executioners of the apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of apoptosis and promotion of normal cell survival by caspase inhibitors would be a tremendous benefit for reducing the side effects of cancer therapy and for control of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. The objective of this study was to discover small-molecule caspase inhibitors with which to achieve cytoprotective effect. We completed the high-throughput screening of Bionet's 37,500-compound library (Key Organics Limited, Camelford, Cornwall, UK against caspase-1, -3, and -9 and successfully identified 43 initial hit compounds. The 43 hit compounds were further tested for cytoprotective activity against staurosporine-induced cell death in NIH3T3 cells. Nineteen compounds were found to have significant cytoprotective effects in cell viability assays. One of the compounds, RBC1023, was demonstrated to protect NIH3T3 cells from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 cleavage and activation. RBC1023 was also shown to protect against staurosporine-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that staurosporine treatment induced broad global gene expression alterations, and RBC1023 co-treatment significantly restored these changes, especially of the genes that are related to cell growth and survival signaling such as Egr1, Cdc25c, cdkn3, Rhob, Nek2, and Taok1. Collectively, RBC1023 protects NIH3T3 cells against staurosporine-induced apoptosis via inhibiting caspase activity, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, and possibly upregulating some cell survival-related gene expressions and pathways. Keywords: cell death, caspase inhibition, mitochondria, RBC1023

  12. Novel p38α MAP kinase inhibitors identified from yoctoReactor DNA-encoded small molecule library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L. K.; Blakskjær, P.; Chaikuad, A.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific and potent (7 nM cellular IC50) inhibitor of p38α kinase was identified directly from a 12.6 million membered DNA-encoded small molecule library. This was achieved using the high fidelity yoctoReactor technology (yR) for preparing the DNA-encoded library, and a homogeneous scree...

  13. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  14. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton Siklos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  15. Discovery of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Protein-MicroRNA Interaction Using Binding Assay with a Site-Specifically Labeled Lin28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Donghyun; Byun, Wan Gi; Koo, Ja Young; Park, Hankum; Park, Seung Bum

    2016-10-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by targeting protein-coding transcripts that are involved in various cellular processes. Thus, miRNA biogenesis has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target. Especially, the let-7 miRNA family is well-known for its tumor suppressor functions and is downregulated in many cancer cells. Lin28 protein binds to let-7 miRNA precursors to inhibit their maturation. Herein, we developed a FRET-based, high-throughput screening system to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the Lin28-let-7 interaction. We employed unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and bioorthogonal chemistry for the site-specific fluorescent labeling of Lin28, which ensures the robustness and reliability of the FRET-based protein-miRNA binding assay. Using this direct binding assay, we identified an inhibitor of the oncogenic Lin28-let-7 interaction. The inhibitor enhanced the production of let-7 miRNAs in Lin28-expressing cancer cells and reduced the level of let-7 target oncogene products.

  16. Targeting Btk/Etk of prostate cancer cells by a novel dual inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W; Liu, R; Bhardwaj, G; Yang, J C; Changou, C; Ma, A-H; Mazloom, A; Chintapalli, S; Xiao, K; Xiao, W; Kumaresan, P; Sanchez, E; Yeh, C-T; Evans, C P; Patterson, R; Lam, K S; Kung, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Btk and Etk/BMX are Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Btk has previously been reported to be expressed primarily in B cells and has an important role in immune responses and B-cell malignancies. Etk has been shown previously to provide a strong survival and metastasis signal in human prostate cancer cells, and to confer androgen independence and drug resistance. While the role of Etk in prostate carcinogenesis is well established, the functions of Btk in prostate cancer have never been investigated, likely due to the perception that Btk is a hematopoietic, but not epithelial, kinase. Herein, we found that Btk is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. The level of Btk in prostate cancer tissues correlates with cancer grades. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells, but not that of the normal prostate epithelial cells, which express very little Btk. Dual inhibition of Btk and Etk has an additive inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell growth. To explore Btk and Etk as targets for prostate cancer, we developed a small molecule dual inhibitor of Btk and Etk, CTN06. Treatment of PC3 and other prostate cancer cells, but not immortalized prostate epithelial cells with CTN06 resulted in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk/Etk signals. The killing effect of CTN06 is more potent than that of commonly used inhibitors against Src, Raf/VEGFR and EGFR. CTN06 induces apoptosis as well as autophagy in human prostate cancer cells, and is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTN06 also impeded the migration of human prostate cancer cells based on a ‘wound healing' assay. The anti-cancer effect of CTN06 was further validated in vivo in a PC3 xenograft mouse model. PMID:25188519

  17. Structural basis for small molecule targeting of the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zak, Krzysztof M.; Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Katarzyna; Zieba, Bartosz J.; Musielak, Bogdan; Dömling, Alexander; Dubin, Grzegorz; Holak, Tad A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immunologic checkpoint with monoclonal antibodies has provided unprecedented results in cancer treatment in the recent years. Development of chemical inhibitors for this pathway lags the antibody development because of insufficient structural information. The first

  18. Structural basis for small molecule targeting of the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zak, Krzysztof M.; Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Katarzyna; Zieba, Bartosz J.; Musielak, Bogdan; Dömling, Alexander; Dubin, Grzegorz; Holak, Tad A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immunologic checkpoint with monoclonal antibodies has provided unprecedented results in cancer treatment in the recent years. Development of chemical inhibitors for this pathway lags the antibody development because of insufficient structural information. The first nonpeptid

  19. Identification of potential inhibitors based on compound proposal contest: Tyrosine-protein kinase Yes as a target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Ishida, Takashi; Gromiha, M Michael; Taguchi, Y-H; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Hsin, Kun-Yi; Kitano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Sugaya, Nobuyoshi; Kato, Koya; Okuno, Tatsuya; Chikenji, George; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Yasuo, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Ryunosuke; Yanagisawa, Keisuke; Ban, Tomohiro; Teramoto, Reiji; Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Thangakani, A Mary; Velmurugan, D; Prathipati, Philip; Ito, Junichi; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Honma, Teruki; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2015-11-26

    A search of broader range of chemical space is important for drug discovery. Different methods of computer-aided drug discovery (CADD) are known to propose compounds in different chemical spaces as hit molecules for the same target protein. This study aimed at using multiple CADD methods through open innovation to achieve a level of hit molecule diversity that is not achievable with any particular single method. We held a compound proposal contest, in which multiple research groups participated and predicted inhibitors of tyrosine-protein kinase Yes. This showed whether collective knowledge based on individual approaches helped to obtain hit compounds from a broad range of chemical space and whether the contest-based approach was effective.

  20. Design of a bioactive small molecule that targets r(AUUCU) repeats in spinocerebellar ataxia 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wang-Yong; Gao, Rui; Southern, Mark; Sarkar, Partha S; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    RNA is an important target for chemical probes of function and lead therapeutics; however, it is difficult to target with small molecules. One approach to tackle this problem is to identify compounds that target RNA structures and utilize them to multivalently target RNA. Here we show that small molecules can be identified to selectively bind RNA base pairs by probing a library of RNA-focused small molecules. A small molecule that selectively binds AU base pairs informed design of a dimeric compound (2AU-2) that targets the pathogenic RNA, expanded r(AUUCU) repeats, that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) in patient-derived cells. Indeed, 2AU-2 (50 nM) ameliorates various aspects of SCA10 pathology including improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced activation of caspase 3, and reduction of nuclear foci. These studies provide a first-in-class chemical probe to study SCA10 RNA toxicity and potentially define broadly applicable compounds targeting RNA AU base pairs in cells.

  1. Targeted delivery as key for the success of small osteoinductive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmayor, Elizabeth R

    2015-11-01

    Molecules such as growth factors, peptides and small molecules can guide cellular behavior and are thus important for tissue engineering. They are rapidly emerging as promising compounds for the regeneration of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Growth factors have disadvantages such as high cost, short half-life, supraphysiological amounts needed, etc. Therefore, small molecules may be an alternative. These molecules have been discovered using high throughput screening. Small osteoinductive molecules exhibit several advantages over growth factors owing to their small sizes, such as high stability and non-immunogenicity. These molecules may stimulate directly signaling pathways that are important for osteogenesis. However, systemic application doesn't induce osteogenesis in most cases. Therefore, local administration is needed. This may be achieved by using a bone graft material providing additional osteoconductive properties. These graft materials can also act by themselves as a delivery matrix for targeted and local delivery. Furthermore, vascularization is necessary in the process of osteogenesis. Many of the small molecules are also capable of promoting vascularization of the tissue to be regenerated. Thus, in this review, special attention is given to molecules that are capable of inducing both angiogenesis and osteogenesis simultaneously. Finally, more recent preclinical and clinical uses in bone regeneration of those molecules are described, highlighting the needs for the clinical translation of these promising compounds.

  2. Targeted Radiosensitization by the Chk1 Inhibitor SAR-020106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borst, Gerben R., E-mail: g.borst@nki.nl [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); McLaughlin, Martin; Kyula, Joan N.; Neijenhuis, Sari; Khan, Aadil; Good, James; Zaidi, Shane [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Powell, Ned G. [HPV Research Group, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Meier, Pascal; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D. [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Verheij, Marcel [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Harrington, Kevin J. [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To explore the activity of a potent Chk1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) in combination with radiation. Methods and Materials: Colony and mechanistic in vitro assays and a xenograft in vivo model. Results: SAR-020106 suppressed-radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and reduced clonogenic survival only in p53-deficient tumor cells. SAR-020106 promoted mitotic entry following irradiation in all cell lines, but p53-deficient cells were likely to undergo apoptosis or become aneuploid, while p53 wild-type cells underwent a postmitotic G{sub 1} arrest followed by subsequent normal cell cycle re-entry. Following combined treatment with SAR-020106 and radiation, homologous-recombination-mediated DNA damage repair was inhibited in all cell lines. A significant increase in the number of pan-γH2AX-staining apoptotic cells was observed only in p53-deficient cell lines. Efficacy was confirmed in vivo in a clinically relevant human head-and-neck cell carcinoma xenograft model. Conclusion: The Chk1 inhibitor SAR-020106 is a potent radiosensitizer in tumor cell lines defective in p53 signaling.

  3. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  4. A small-molecule inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Rebecca C; Robertson, Avril A B; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S; Monks, Brian G; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E; Butler, Mark S; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L; Mills, Kingston H G; Masters, Seth L; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process, and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocked canonical and noncanonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibited activation of NLRP3 but not the AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 inflammasomes. MCC950 reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuated the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescued neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and was active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease.

  5. Vismodegib, a small-molecule inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway for the treatment of advanced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Gulino, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449) is a small, orally administrable molecule, belonging to the 2-arylpyridine class, which was discovered by Genentech Inc under a collaboration with Curis Inc. Vismodegib inhibits the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which is involved in tumorigenesis, thus providing a strong rationale for its use in the treatment of a variety of cancers. Vismodegib suppresses Hh signaling by binding to and interfering with smoothened, a membrane protein that provides positive signals to the Hh signaling pathway. Preclinical studies demonstrated the antitumor activity of vismodegib in mouse models of medulloblastoma (MB) and in xenograft models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Phase I clinical trials in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and MB highlighted an objective response to vismodegib. Reported side effects were minor, with only one grade 4 adverse event. Vismodegib is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for the treatment of advanced BCC, metastatic colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, MB and other solid tumors. Because of its low toxicity and specificity for the Hh pathway, this drug has potential advantages compared with conventional chemotherapy, and may also be used in combination treatments. Clinical trials with other Hh inhibitors are also ongoing and their therapeutic potential will need to be compared with vismodegib.

  6. Adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix as drug targets for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ishida, Joji; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The formation of tumor vasculature and cell invasion along white matter tracts have pivotal roles in the development and progression of glioma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis and invasion in glioma will aid the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The processes of angiogenesis and invasion cause the production of an array of adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This review focuses on the role of adhesion molecules and the ECM in malignant glioma. The results of clinical trials using drugs targeted against adhesion molecules and the ECM for glioma are also discussed.

  7. Detection of miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and preliminary analysis of its downstream target molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Shen; Jian-Wu Gao; Yan-Yu Li; Peng Teng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the miRNA-21 content in cervical cancer tissue and analyze its downstream target molecules.Methods:Patients with different FIGO stages of cervical cancer and healthy subjects were selected, cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected, and contents of miRNA-21 and apoptotic genes were detected; cervical cancer SiHa cells were cultured, miRNA-21 mimics and inhibitors were transfected, and then apoptotic gene contents were detected.Results:miRNA-21 contents in different stages of cervical cancer tissue were all higher than those in normal cervical tissue, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were lower than those in normal tissue, and mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 were negatively correlated with miRNA-21 contents; after miRNA-21 mimics were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly decreased, and after miRNA-21 inhibitors were transfected, mRNA contents of p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19 significantly increased.Conclusion:miRNA-21 contents in cervical cancer tissue significantly increase; downstream target genes of this miRNA may be apoptotic genes p16ink4a, ASPP1, Fas and GRIM-19.

  8. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieslaw Swietnicki

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  9. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, Andrew R.; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery. PMID:27716809

  10. In Vitro Sensitivity Profiling Of Neuroblastoma Cells Against A Comprehensive Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitor Library To Identify Agents For Future Therapeutic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anjali; Meier-Stephenson, Vanessa; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru

    2016-11-22

    Solid tumors represent one of the most widespread causes of death in children across the world. Neuroblastoma (NB) constitutes about 8% of all childhood tumors, yet accounts for more than 15% of death, with an unacceptable overall survival rate. Despite the current multimodal therapeutic approaches involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with myeloablative therapy and hematopoietic stem cell rescue, there is growing realization of the limitations of conventional agents to improve the outcome in high risk metastatic disease. Hence, efforts have intensified to identify new targets and novel therapeutic approaches to improve cure rates in these children. Among the significant number of new therapeutics that are being evaluated for cancer each year, the agents that have been developed for common adult malignancies have the added advantage of having usable toxicity data already available for consideration. To identify potential therapeutic targets, we screened a small molecule library of 151 small kinase inhibitors against NB cell lines. Based on our initial screening data, we further examined the potential of Bcr-Abl targeting small molecule inhibitors to affect the growth and survival of NB cells. Our findings confirm the diversity in activity among the currently available Bcr-Abl inhibitors, possibly reflecting the molecular heterogeneity and off-target activity in each combination. In depth analyses of ponatinib, an orally bioavailable multi-target kinase inhibitor and an effective agent in the treatment of refractory Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positive leukemia, show growth inhibition at sub-micromolar concentrations. In addition, we also identified the potential of this agent to interfere with insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathways and Src activity. Ponatinib also induced apoptosis, indicated by caspase-9 and PARP cleavage. Furthermore, at sub-lethal conditions ponatinib significantly inhibited the ability of these cells to migrate

  11. Multi-small molecule conjugations as new targeted delivery carriers for tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingling Shan,1 Ming Liu,2 Chao Wu,1 Liang Zhao,1 Siwen Li,3 Lisheng Xu,1 Wengen Cao,1 Guizhen Gao,1 Yueqing Gu3 1Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Biology and Food Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting ability, and harmful side effects, we developed a new tumor-targeted multi-small molecule drug delivery platform. Using paclitaxel (PTX as a model therapeutic, we prepared two prodrugs, ie, folic acid-fluorescein-5(6-isothiocyanate-arginine-paclitaxel (FA-FITC-Arg-PTX and folic acid-5-aminofluorescein-glutamic-paclitaxel (FA-5AF-Glu-PTX, composed of folic acid (FA, target, amino acids (Arg or Glu, linker, and fluorescent dye (fluorescein in vitro or near-infrared fluorescent dye in vivo in order to better understand the mechanism of PTX prodrug targeting. In vitro and acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the prodrug formulations compared with the free drug. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that folate receptor-mediated uptake of PTX-conjugated multi-small molecule carriers induced high antitumor activity. Notably, compared with free PTX and with PTX-loaded macromolecular carriers from our previous study, this multi-small molecule-conjugated strategy improved the water solubility, loading rate, targeting ability, antitumor activity, and toxicity profile of PTX. These results support the use of multi-small molecules as tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. Keywords: multi-small molecules, paclitaxel, prodrugs, targeting, tumor therapy

  12. Identification of small molecule inhibitors for influenza a virus using in silico and in vitro approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makau, Juliann Nzembi; Watanabe, Ken; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Mizuta, Satoshi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses have acquired resistance to approved neuraminidase-targeting drugs, increasing the need for new drug targets for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. Nucleoprotein (NP) is an attractive target since it has an indispensable role in virus replication and its amino acid sequence is well conserved. In this study, we aimed to identify new inhibitors of the NP using a structure-based drug discovery algorithm, named Nagasaki University Docking Engine (NUDE), which has been established especially for the Destination for GPU Intensive Machine (DEGIMA) supercomputer. The hit compounds that showed high binding scores during in silico screening were subsequently evaluated for anti-influenza virus effects using a cell-based assay. A 4-hydroxyquinolinone compound, designated as NUD-1, was found to inhibit the replication of influenza virus in cultured cells. Analysis of binding between NUD-1 and NP using surface plasmon resonance assay and fragment molecular orbital calculations confirmed that NUD-1 binds to NP and could interfere with NP-NP interactions essential for virus replication. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the compound inhibited the mid-stage of infection, corresponding to assembly of the NP and other viral proteins. Moreover, NUD-1 was also effective against various types of influenza A viruses including a clinical isolate of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 1.8–2.1 μM. Our data demonstrate that the combined use of NUDE system followed by the cell-based assay is useful to obtain lead compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. PMID:28273150

  13. Nanoencapsulated anti-CK2 small molecule drug or siRNA specifically targets malignant cancer but not benign cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembley, Janeen H; Unger, Gretchen M; Korman, Vicci L; Tobolt, Diane K; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Kren, Betsy T; Ahmed, Khalil

    2012-02-01

    CK2, a pleiotropic Ser/Thr kinase, is an important target for cancer therapy. We tested our novel tenfibgen-based nanocapsule for delivery of the inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) and an siRNA directed against both CK2α and α' catalytic subunits to prostate cancer cells. We present data on the TBG nanocapsule itself and on CK2 inhibition or downregulation in treated cells, including effects on Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65. By direct comparison of two CK2-directed cargos, our data provide proof that the TBG encapsulation design for delivery of drugs specifically to cancer cells has strong potential for small molecule- and nucleic acid-based cancer therapy.

  14. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  15. Reversing hypoxic cell chemoresistance in vitro using genetic and small molecule approaches targeting hypoxia inducible factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louisa M; Cowen, Rachel L; Debray, Camille; Eustace, Amanda; Erler, Janine T; Sheppard, Freda C D; Parker, Catriona A; Stratford, Ian J; Williams, Kaye J

    2006-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to conventional chemotherapy is well documented. Using both adenovirus-mediated gene delivery and small molecules targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), we evaluated the impact of HIF-1 inhibition on the sensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells to etoposide. The genetic therapy exploited a truncated HIF-1alpha protein that acts as a dominant-negative HIF-1alpha (HIF-1alpha-no-TAD). Its functionality was validated in six human tumor cell lines using HIF-1 reporter assays. An EGFP-fused protein demonstrated that the dominant-negative HIF-1alpha was nucleus-localized and constitutively expressed irrespective of oxygen tension. The small molecules studied were quinocarmycin monocitrate (KW2152), its analog 7-cyanoquinocarcinol (DX-52-1), and topotecan. DX-52-1 and topotecan have been previously established as HIF-1 inhibitors. HT1080 and HCT116 cells were treated with either AdHIF-1alpha-no-TAD or nontoxic concentrations (0.1 microM; TAD (multiplicity of infection 50) ablated the anoxic resistance in both cell lines (IC(50) values: HT1080, 0.7 +/- 0.04 microM; HCT116, 3 +/- 1 microM). HIF-1alpha-no-TAD expression inhibited HIF-1-mediated down-regulation of the proapoptotic protein Bid under anoxia. These data support the potential development of HIF-1 targeted approaches in combination with chemotherapy, where hypoxic cell resistance contributes to treatment failure.

  16. Identification and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of death-associated protein kinase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbek, Theis S; Skovgaard, Tine; Sorrell, Fiona J

    2015-01-01

    A novel imidazo-pyramidazine inhibitor of DAPK1 that undergoes class-specific interactions and extends into the substrate recognition site has been identified. This inhibitor is a good starting point for the development of selective and potent inhibitors of DAPK1, with potential use against stroke...

  17. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Seop Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a genetic multisystem disorder that results from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, and is associated with hamartomas in several organs, including subependymal giant cell tumors. The neurological manifestations of TSC are particularly challenging and include infantile spasms, intractable epilepsy, cognitive disabilities, and autism. The TSC1- and TSC2-encoded proteins modulate cell function via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling cascade, and are key factors in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. The mTOR pathway provides an intersection for an intricate network of protein cascades that respond to cellular nutrition, energy levels, and growth factor stimulation. In the brain, TSC1 and TSC2 have been implicated in cell body size, dendritic arborization, axonal outgrowth and targeting, neuronal migration, cortical lamination, and spine formation. The mTOR pathway represents a logical candidate for drug targeting, because mTOR regulates multiple cellular functions that may contribute to epileptogenesis, including protein synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, and synaptic plasticity. Antagonism of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin and related compounds may provide new therapeutic options for TSC patients.

  18. Significant blockade of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases by MGCD516 (Sitravatinib), a novel small molecule inhibitor, shows potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models of sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Parag P; Ivy, Kathryn S; Musi, Elgilda; de Stanchina, Elisa; Schwartz, Gary K

    2016-01-26

    Sarcomas are rare but highly aggressive mesenchymal tumors with a median survival of 10-18 months for metastatic disease. Mutation and/or overexpression of many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including c-Met, PDGFR, c-Kit and IGF1-R drive defective signaling pathways in sarcomas. MGCD516 (Sitravatinib) is a novel small molecule inhibitor targeting multiple RTKs involved in driving sarcoma cell growth. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of MGCD516 both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models in vivo. MGCD516 treatment resulted in significant blockade of phosphorylation of potential driver RTKs and induced potent anti-proliferative effects in vitro. Furthermore, MGCD516 treatment of tumor xenografts in vivo resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth. Efficacy of MGCD516 was superior to imatinib and crizotinib, two other well-studied multi-kinase inhibitors with overlapping target specificities, both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report describing MGCD516 as a potent multi-kinase inhibitor in different models of sarcoma, superior to imatinib and crizotinib. Results from this study showing blockade of multiple driver signaling pathways provides a rationale for further clinical development of MGCD516 for the treatment of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma.

  19. Therapeutic potential of mTOR inhibitors for targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is aberrantly activated in many cancer types. As the intricate network of regulatory mechanisms controlling mTOR activity is uncovered, more refined drugs are designed and tested in clinical trials. While first generation mTOR inhibitors have failed to show clinical efficacy due partly to the feedback relief of oncogenetic circuits, newly developed inhibitors show greater promise as anti-cancer agents. An effective drug must defeat the cancer stem cells (CSCs) while sparing the normal stem cells. Due to its opposing role on normal and malignant stem cells, mTOR lends itself very well as a therapeutic target. Indeed, a preferential inhibitory effect on CSCs has already been shown for some mTOR inhibitors. These results provide a compelling rationale for the clinical development of mTOR-targeted therapies.

  20. Suppression of Autoimmune Arthritis by Small Molecule Inhibitors of the JAK/STAT Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Malemud

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A skewed ratio of pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokines, elevated growth factor synthesis and T- and B-lymphocyte activation are 3 hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathology. Interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-7, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 and growth factors, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, IL-3, and erythropoietin activate the Janus Kinase/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (JAK/STAT pathway. Evidence showed that STAT protein phosphorylation (p-STAT by activated JAKs is permissive for p-STAT to act as transcription factors by binding to STAT-responsive gene promoter sequences. This event is critical for perpetuating RA, in part, by up-regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Activation of JAK/STAT by cytokines and growth factors can induce ‘cross-talk’ with other signaling pathways by which Stress-Activated Protein/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (SAP/MAPK and Phosphatidylinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K-mediated signaling are also activated. JAK-specific small molecule inhibitors (SMIs were developed to test whether JAK/STAT pathway blockade would regulate autoimmune-mediated inflammation. JAK-specific SMI blockade inhibited p-STAT induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Systemically administered JAK-specific SMI blockade also ameliorated biomarkers of inflammation in well-validated arthritis animal models. A few JAK-specific SMIs have made their way into RA clinical trials. In fact, the JAK3-specific SMI, CP-690,500 is the first JAK/STAT SMI to be assessed for clinical efficacy in a Phase III RA trial.

  1. Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the Shigella flexneri Master Virulence Regulator VirF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Osaka, Ichie; Skredenske, Jeff M.; Kettle, Bria; Hefty, P. Scott; Li, Jiaqin

    2013-01-01

    VirF is an AraC family transcriptional activator that is required for the expression of virulence genes associated with invasion and cell-to-cell spread by Shigella flexneri, including multiple components of the type three secretion system (T3SS) machinery and effectors. We tested a small-molecule compound, SE-1 (formerly designated OSSL_051168), which we had identified as an effective inhibitor of the AraC family proteins RhaS and RhaR, for its ability to inhibit VirF. Cell-based reporter gene assays with Escherichia coli and Shigella, as well as in vitro DNA binding assays with purified VirF, demonstrated that SE-1 inhibited DNA binding and transcription activation (likely by blocking DNA binding) by VirF. Analysis of mRNA levels using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) further demonstrated that SE-1 reduced the expression of the VirF-dependent virulence genes icsA, virB, icsB, and ipaB in Shigella. We also performed eukaryotic cell invasion assays and found that SE-1 reduced invasion by Shigella. The effect of SE-1 on invasion required preincubation of Shigella with SE-1, in agreement with the hypothesis that SE-1 inhibited the expression of VirF-activated genes required for the formation of the T3SS apparatus and invasion. We found that the same concentrations of SE-1 had no detectable effects on the growth or metabolism of the bacterial cells or the eukaryotic host cells, respectively, indicating that the inhibition of invasion was not due to general toxicity. Overall, SE-1 appears to inhibit transcription activation by VirF, exhibits selectivity toward AraC family proteins, and has the potential to be developed into a novel antibacterial agent. PMID:24002059

  2. Targeting epigenetic reader and eraser: Rational design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of dimethylisoxazoles derivatives as BRD4/HDAC dual inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Hou, Shaohua; Chen, Hongli; Ran, Ting; Jiang, Fei; Bian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Dewei; Zhi, Yanle; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Yanmin; Tang, Weifang; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-06-15

    The bromodomain protein module and histone deacetylase (HDAC), which recognize and remove acetylated lysine, respectively, have emerged as important epigenetic therapeutic targets in cancer treatments. Herein we presented a novel design approach for cancer drug development by combination of bromodomain and HDAC inhibitory activity in one molecule. The designed compounds were synthesized which showed inhibitory activity against bromodomain 4 and HDAC1. The representative dual bromodomain/HDAC inhibitors, compound 11 and 12, showed potent antiproliferative activities against human leukaemia cell line K562 and MV4-11 in cellular assays. This work may lay the foundation for developing dual bromodomain/HDAC inhibitors as potential anticancer therapeutics.

  3. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  4. Chemical Genetics Approach to Engineer Kinesins with Sensitivity towards a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Eg5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckel, Martin M; Hund, Corinna; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-11-03

    Due to their fast and often reversible mode of action, small molecules are ideally suited to dissect biological processes. Yet, the validity of small-molecule studies is intimately tied to the specificity of the applied compounds, thus imposing a great challenge to screens for novel inhibitors. Here, we applied a chemical-genetics approach to render kinesin motor proteins sensitive to inhibition by the well-characterized small molecule S-Trityl-l-cysteine (STLC). STLC specifically inhibits the kinesin Eg5 through binding to a known allosteric site within the motor domain. Transfer of this allosteric binding site into the motor domain of the human kinesins Kif3A and Kif4A sensitizes them towards STLC. Single-molecule microscopy analyses confirmed that STLC inhibits the movement of chimeric but not wild-type Kif4A along microtubules. Thus, our proof-of-concept study revealed that this chemical-genetic approach provides a powerful strategy to specifically inhibit kinesins in vitro for which small-molecule inhibitors are not yet available. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Computer-aided lead optimization: improved small-molecule inhibitor of the zinc endopeptidase of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available Optimization of a serotype-selective, small-molecule inhibitor of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNTA endopeptidase is a formidable challenge because the enzyme-substrate interface is unusually large and the endopeptidase itself is a large, zinc-binding protein with a complex fold that is difficult to simulate computationally. We conducted multiple molecular dynamics simulations of the endopeptidase in complex with a previously described inhibitor (K(i (app of 7+/-2.4 microM using the cationic dummy atom approach. Based on our computational results, we hypothesized that introducing a hydroxyl group to the inhibitor could improve its potency. Synthesis and testing of the hydroxyl-containing analog as a BoNTA endopeptidase inhibitor showed a twofold improvement in inhibitory potency (K(i (app of 3.8+/-0.8 microM with a relatively small increase in molecular weight (16 Da. The results offer an improved template for further optimization of BoNTA endopeptidase inhibitors and demonstrate the effectiveness of the cationic dummy atom approach in the design and optimization of zinc protease inhibitors.

  6. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2014-09-01

    Urea transport (UT) proteins of the UT-A class are expressed in epithelial cells in kidney tubules, where they are required for the formation of a concentrated urine by countercurrent multiplication. Here, using a recently developed high-throughput assay to identify UT-A inhibitors, a screen of 50,000 synthetic small molecules identified UT-A inhibitors of aryl-thiazole, γ-sultambenzosulfonamide, aminocarbonitrile butene, and 4-isoxazolamide chemical classes. Structure-activity analysis identified compounds that inhibited UT-A selectively by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 down to ∼1 μM. Molecular modeling identified putative inhibitor binding sites on rat UT-A. To test compound efficacy in rats, formulations and administration procedures were established to give therapeutic inhibitor concentrations in blood and urine. We found that intravenous administration of an indole thiazole or a γ-sultambenzosulfonamide at 20 mg/kg increased urine output by 3-5-fold and reduced urine osmolality by ∼2-fold compared to vehicle control rats, even under conditions of maximum antidiuresis produced by 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). The diuresis was reversible and showed urea > salt excretion. The results provide proof of concept for the diuretic action of UT-A-selective inhibitors. UT-A inhibitors are first in their class salt-sparing diuretics with potential clinical indications in volume-overload edemas and high-vasopressin-associated hyponatremias.

  7. The specificity of targeted vaccines for APC surface molecules influences the immune response phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig Grødeland

    Full Text Available Different diseases require different immune responses for efficient protection. Thus, prophylactic vaccines should prime the immune system for the particular type of response needed for protection against a given infectious agent. We have here tested fusion DNA vaccines which encode proteins that bivalently target influenza hemagglutinins (HA to different surface molecules on antigen presenting cells (APC. We demonstrate that targeting to MHC class II molecules predominantly induced an antibody/Th2 response, whereas targeting to CCR1/3/5 predominantly induced a CD8(+/Th1 T cell response. With respect to antibodies, the polarizing effect was even more pronounced upon intramuscular (i.m delivery as compared to intradermal (i.d. vaccination. Despite these differences in induced immune responses, both vaccines protected against a viral challenge with influenza H1N1. Substitution of HA with ovalbumin (OVA demonstrated that polarization of immune responses, as a consequence of APC targeting specificity, could be extended to other antigens. Taken together, the results demonstrate that vaccination can be tailor-made to induce a particular phenotype of adaptive immune responses by specifically targeting different surface molecules on APCs.

  8. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  9. Structure-based DNA-targeting strategies with small molecule ligands for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics.

  10. Identification of ligand-target pairs from combined libraries of small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Lynn M; Jain, Tara; Liu, David R

    2014-02-26

    We describe the development and validation of interaction determination using unpurified proteins (IDUP), a method that selectively amplifies DNA sequences identifying ligand+target pairs from a mixture of DNA-linked small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates. By operating in cell lysates, IDUP preserves native post-translational modifications and interactions with endogenous binding partners, thereby enabling the study of difficult-to-purify targets and increasing the potential biological relevance of detected interactions compared with methods that require purified proteins. In IDUP, target proteins are associated with DNA oligonucleotide tags either non-covalently using a DNA-linked antibody or covalently using a SNAP-tag. Ligand-target binding promotes hybridization of a self-priming hairpin that is extended by a DNA polymerase to create a DNA strand that contains sequences identifying both the target and its ligand. These sequences encoding ligand+target pairs are selectively amplified by PCR and revealed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. IDUP can respond to the effect of affinity-modulating adaptor proteins in cell lysates that would be absent in ligand screening or selection methods using a purified protein target. This capability was exemplified by the 100-fold amplification of DNA sequences encoding FRB+rapamycin or FKBP+rapamycin in samples overexpressing both FRB and FKBP (FRB·rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 100 fM; FKBP·rapamycin+FRB, Kd = 12 nM). In contrast, these sequences were amplified 10-fold less efficiently in samples overexpressing either FRB or FKBP alone (rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 0.2 nM; rapamcyin+FRB, Kd = 26 μM). Finally, IDUP was used to process a model library of DNA-linked small molecules and a model library of cell lysates expressing SNAP-target fusions combined in a single sample. In this library×library experiment, IDUP resulted in enrichment of sequences corresponding to five known ligand+target pairs ranging in binding

  11. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95...... of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG...

  12. A fluorescence polarization based screening assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of the PICK1 PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thor S; Madsen, Kenneth L; Dyhring, Tino

    2011-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology) domains represent putative targets in several diseases including cancer, stroke, addiction and neuropathic pain. Here we describe the application of a simple and fast screening assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) to identify inhibitors of the PDZ...

  13. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets.

  14. Approach for targeting Ras with small molecules that activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Sun, Qi; Daniels, R Nathan; Camper, DeMarco; Kennedy, J Phillip; Phan, Jason; Olejniczak, Edward T; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2014-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the small GTPase Ras by oncogenic mutation or constitutively active upstream receptor tyrosine kinases results in the deregulation of cellular signals governing growth and survival in ∼30% of all human cancers. However, the discovery of potent inhibitors of Ras has been difficult to achieve. Here, we report the identification of small molecules that bind to a unique pocket on the Ras:Son of Sevenless (SOS):Ras complex, increase the rate of SOS-catalyzed nucleotide exchange in vitro, and modulate Ras signaling pathways in cells. X-ray crystallography of Ras:SOS:Ras in complex with these molecules reveals that the compounds bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the CDC25 domain of SOS adjacent to the Switch II region of Ras. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of multiple X-ray cocrystal structures. Mutational analyses confirmed the functional relevance of this binding site and showed it to be essential for compound activity. These molecules increase Ras-GTP levels and disrupt MAPK and PI3K signaling in cells at low micromolar concentrations. These small molecules represent tools to study the acute activation of Ras and highlight a pocket on SOS that may be exploited to modulate Ras signaling.

  15. Discovery of a Chemical Tool Inhibitor Targeting the Bromodomains of TRIM24 and BRPF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James; Fedorov, Oleg; Tallant, Cynthia; Monteiro, Octovia; Meier, Julia; Gamble, Vicky; Savitsky, Pavel; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; Haendler, Bernard; Rogers, Catherine; Brennan, Paul E; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-02-25

    TRIM24 is a transcriptional regulator as well as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It is overexpressed in diverse tumors, and high expression levels have been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. TRIM24 contains a PHD/bromodomain offering the opportunity to develop protein interaction inhibitors that target this protein interaction module. Here we identified potent acetyl-lysine mimetic benzimidazolones TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitors. The best compound of this series is a selective BRPF1B/TRIM24 dual inhibitor that bound with a KD of 137 and 222 nM, respectively, but exerted good selectivity over other bromodomains. Cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated using FRAP assays as well as cell viability data.

  16. Exploiting the repertoire of CK2 inhibitors to target DYRK and PIM kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Giorgio; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Girardi, Cristina; Orzeszko, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Di Paolo, Maria Luisa; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2013-07-01

    Advantage has been taken of the relative promiscuity of commonly used inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 to develop compounds that can be exploited for the selective inhibition of druggable kinases other than CK2 itself. Here we summarize data obtained by altering the scaffold of CK2 inhibitors to give rise to novel selective inhibitors of DYRK1A and to a powerful cell permeable dual inhibitor of PIM1 and CK2. In the former case one of the new compounds, C624 (naphto [1,2-b]benzofuran-5,9-diol) displays a potency comparable to that of the first-in-class DYRK1A inhibitor, harmine, lacking however the drawback of drastically inhibiting monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) as harmine does. On the other hand the promiscuous CK2 inhibitor 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (TBI,TBBz) has been derivatized with a sugar moiety to generate a 1-(β-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (TDB) compound which inhibits PIM1 and CK2 with comparably high efficacy (IC50 valuescancer cells consistent with concomitant inhibition of both its onco-kinase targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases (2012).

  17. Discovery of Multi-target Anticancer Agents Based on HDAC Inhibitor MS-275 and 5-FU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuqi; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Xiaoyang; Hou, Jinning; Ding, Yongzheng; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors have multiple effects targeting the cancer cells and have become one of the promising cancer therapeutics with possibly broad applicability. Combination of HDAC inhibitors with the cytotoxic fluorouracil (5-FU) showed additive and synergistic effects both in vitro and in vivo. To explore the possibility in cancer therapy of a bivalent agent that combines two bioactive groups within a single molecular architecture, we designed and synthesized new dual-acting compounds by combining the bioactive fragment of MS-275, a clinical HDACs inhibitor, with cytotoxic agent 5-FU. The target compounds 9a and 9b showed comparable HDACs inhibition with MS-275 and moderate antiproliferative acitivities against six cancer cells lines.

  18. Targeting KIT on innate immune cells to enhance the antitumor activity of checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Maximilian; Gedrich, Richard; Peck, Ronald; LaVallee, Theresa; Eder, Joseph Paul

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune cells such as mast cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key components of the tumor microenvironment. Recent evidence indicates that levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma patients are associated with poor survival to checkpoint inhibitors. This suggests that targeting both the innate and adaptive suppressive components of the immune system will maximize clinical benefit and elicit more durable responses in cancer patients. Preclinical data suggest that targeting signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, particularly on mast cells, may modulate innate immune cell numbers and activity in tumors. Here, we review data highlighting the importance of the KIT signaling in regulating antitumor immune responses and the potential benefit of combining selective KIT inhibitors with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  19. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. When Teaching Gets Tough--Professional Community Inhibitors of Teacher-Targeted Bullying and Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Bullying in school has become an international concern in recent decades. Yet, we know surprisingly little about inhibitors of teacher-targeted bullying. The study focused on exploring the interrelation between the teacher-working environment fit, bullying, experienced exhaustion and turnover intentions. Altogether 2310 comprehensive school…

  1. When Teaching Gets Tough--Professional Community Inhibitors of Teacher-Targeted Bullying and Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Bullying in school has become an international concern in recent decades. Yet, we know surprisingly little about inhibitors of teacher-targeted bullying. The study focused on exploring the interrelation between the teacher-working environment fit, bullying, experienced exhaustion and turnover intentions. Altogether 2310 comprehensive school…

  2. Electrostatic similarities between protein and small molecule ligands facilitate the design of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnout Voet

    Full Text Available One of the underlying principles in drug discovery is that a biologically active compound is complimentary in shape and molecular recognition features to its receptor. This principle infers that molecules binding to the same receptor may share some common features. Here, we have investigated whether the electrostatic similarity can be used for the discovery of small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors (SMPPIIs. We have developed a method that can be used to evaluate the similarity of electrostatic potentials between small molecules and known protein ligands. This method was implemented in a software called EleKit. Analyses of all available (at the time of research SMPPII structures indicate that SMPPIIs bear some similarities of electrostatic potential with the ligand proteins of the same receptor. This is especially true for the more polar SMPPIIs. Retrospective analysis of several successful SMPPIIs has shown the applicability of EleKit in the design of new SMPPIIs.

  3. Diverse small molecule inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 identified from a screen of a large public collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorjbal Dorjsuren

    Full Text Available The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR, as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment.

  4. Discovery of highly potent and selective small molecule ADAMTS-5 inhibitors that inhibit human cartilage degradation via encoded library technology (ELT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongfeng; O'Keefe, Heather; Davie, Christopher P; Lind, Kenneth E; Acharya, Raksha A; Franklin, G Joseph; Larkin, Jonathan; Matico, Rosalie; Neeb, Michael; Thompson, Monique M; Lohr, Thomas; Gross, Jeffrey W; Centrella, Paolo A; O'Donovan, Gary K; Bedard, Katie L Sargent; van Vloten, Kurt; Mataruse, Sibongile; Skinner, Steven R; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Carpenter, Tiffany Y; Shearer, Todd W; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Morgan, Barry A

    2012-08-23

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS-5 is considered a potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. To identify selective inhibitors of ADAMTS-5, we employed encoded library technology (ELT), which enables affinity selection of small molecule binders from complex mixtures by DNA tagging. Selection of ADAMTS-5 against a four-billion member ELT library led to a novel inhibitor scaffold not containing a classical zinc-binding functionality. One exemplar, (R)-N-((1-(4-(but-3-en-1-ylamino)-6-(((2-(thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-4-propylbenzenesulfonamide (8), inhibited ADAMTS-5 with IC(50) = 30 nM, showing >50-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-4 and >1000-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-13, MMP-13, and TACE. Extensive SAR studies showed that potency and physicochemical properties of the scaffold could be further improved. Furthermore, in a human osteoarthritis cartilage explant study, compounds 8 and 15f inhibited aggrecanase-mediated (374)ARGS neoepitope release from aggrecan and glycosaminoglycan in response to IL-1β/OSM stimulation. This study provides the first small molecule evidence for the critical role of ADAMTS-5 in human cartilage degradation.

  5. Diverse small molecule inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 identified from a screen of a large public collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N; Maloney, David J; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment.

  6. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  7. Design and generation of DVD-Ig™ molecules for dual-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiammarino, Enrico; Ghayur, Tariq; Liu, Junjian

    2012-01-01

    The dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™) protein is a new type of dual-specific IgG. As a novel therapeutic class, the great potential of the DVD-Ig protein is to simultaneously target two mediators of disease by a single pharmaceutical entity. The molecule contains an Fc region and constant regions in a configuration similar to a conventional IgG; however, the DVD-Ig protein is unique in that each arm of the molecule contains two variable domains (VDs). The VDs within an arm are linked in tandem and can possess different binding specificities. Here, we discuss critical design features of the DVD-Ig protein and describe a methodology for cloning, expressing, and purifying the molecules.

  8. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Roelofs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs, and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis. In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis. The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota.

  9. Electron-Molecule Cross Sections for Plasma Applications: the Role of Internal Energy of the Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, M.; Celiberto, R.

    The role of internal excitation in affecting electron-molecule cross sections is analyzed for H2, N2 and O2 systems. Particula emphasis is given to the role of vibrational energy in affecting both resonant and non-resonant electron molecule cross sections. In general for resonant transitions the cross sections dramatically depends on the initial vibrational quantum number of the target, while a minor effect if found for direct (non-resonant) transitions. Cross sections in this last case reflect the form of Franck-Condon factors and Franck-Condon densities linking the relevant boun-bound or bound-continuum transitions. A similar behaviour is presented when the target is electronically excited. In this case, however, the enhancement of cross section is much higher.

  10. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  11. Targeting the mitotic checkpoint for cancer therapy with NMS-P715, an inhibitor of MPS1 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Riccardo; Caldarelli, Marina; Mennecozzi, Milena; Giorgini, Maria Laura; Sola, Francesco; Cappella, Paolo; Perrera, Claudia; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Rusconi, Luisa; Cucchi, Ulisse; Avanzi, Nilla; Bertrand, Jay Aaron; Bossi, Roberto Tiberio; Pesenti, Enrico; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Colotta, Francesco; Donati, Daniele; Moll, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    MPS1 kinase is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. It has been found aberrantly overexpressed in a wide range of human tumors and is necessary for tumoral cell proliferation. Here we report the identification and characterization of NMS-P715, a selective and orally bioavailable MPS1 small-molecule inhibitor, which selectively reduces cancer cell proliferation, leaving normal cells almost unaffected. NMS-P715 accelerates mitosis and affects kinetochore components localization causing massive aneuploidy and cell death in a variety of tumoral cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in preclinical cancer models. Inhibiting the SAC could represent a promising new approach to selectively target cancer cells.

  12. Rational Design of Small Molecules Targeting Oncogenic Noncoding RNAs from Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Angelbello, Alicia J

    2016-12-20

    The discovery of RNA catalysis in the 1980s and the dissemination of the human genome sequence at the start of this century inspired investigations of the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs in biology. In fact, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has shown that only 1-2% of the human genome encodes protein, yet 75% is transcribed into RNA. Functional studies both preceding and following the ENCODE project have shown that these noncoding RNAs have important roles in regulating gene expression, developmental timing, and other critical functions. RNA's diverse roles are often a consequence of the various folds that it adopts. The single-stranded nature of the biopolymer enables it to adopt intramolecular folds with noncanonical pairings to lower its free energy. These folds can be scaffolds to bind proteins or to form frameworks to interact with other RNAs. Not surprisingly, dysregulation of certain noncoding RNAs has been shown to be causative of disease. Given this as the background, it is easy to see why it would be useful to develop methods that target RNA and manipulate its biology in rational and predictable ways. The antisense approach has afforded strategies to target RNAs via Watson-Crick base pairing and has typically focused on targeting partially unstructured regions of RNA. Small molecule strategies to target RNA would be desirable not only because compounds could be lead optimized via medicinal chemistry but also because structured regions within an RNA of interest could be targeted to directly interfere with RNA folds that contribute to disease. Additionally, small molecules have historically been the most successful drug candidates. Until recently, the ability to design small molecules that target non-ribosomal RNAs has been elusive, creating the perception that they are "undruggable". In this Account, approaches to demystify targeting RNA with small molecules are described. Rather than bulk screening for compounds that bind to singular

  13. Structural and biochemical basis for development of influenza virus inhibitors targeting the PA endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M DuBois

    Full Text Available Emerging influenza viruses are a serious threat to human health because of their pandemic potential. A promising target for the development of novel anti-influenza therapeutics is the PA protein, whose endonuclease activity is essential for viral replication. Translation of viral mRNAs by the host ribosome requires mRNA capping for recognition and binding, and the necessary mRNA caps are cleaved or "snatched" from host pre-mRNAs by the PA endonuclease. The structure-based development of inhibitors that target PA endonuclease is now possible with the recent crystal structure of the PA catalytic domain. In this study, we sought to understand the molecular mechanism of inhibition by several compounds that are known or predicted to block endonuclease-dependent polymerase activity. Using an in vitro endonuclease activity assay, we show that these compounds block the enzymatic activity of the isolated PA endonuclease domain. Using X-ray crystallography, we show how these inhibitors coordinate the two-metal endonuclease active site and engage the active site residues. Two structures also reveal an induced-fit mode of inhibitor binding. The structures allow a molecular understanding of the structure-activity relationship of several known influenza inhibitors and the mechanism of drug resistance by a PA mutation. Taken together, our data reveal new strategies for structure-based design and optimization of PA endonuclease inhibitors.

  14. Designing of Anti Dengue Drug Molecule against Insilico Modeled Target DC-Sign (CD-209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashantha C.N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209 plays a major role in receptor on human dendritic cells, it binds to several glycoproteins of viruses that facilitate disease progression. In dengue fever, the disease targets of arbovirus infection, show dendritic and reticuloendothelial cells that may affect immune system. The phytochemical extracts of Bosenbergia rotunda (BR have been effectively used as potential small molecular inhibitors to inhibit DC-SIGN (CD209 function. Using rational drug designing the training sets include Panduratin-A and 4-hydroxypanduratin is designed from BR derivatives could be an effective inhibitor of a DC-SIGN (CD209 binding towards the drug discovery/ therapy against dengue fever.

  15. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Yi; Wang, Don-Hong; Wang, Xiaobing; Dixon, Seth M; Meng, Liping; Ahadi, Sara; Enter, Daniel H; Chen, Chao-Yu; Kato, Jason; Leon, Leonardo J; Ramirez, Laura M; Maeda, Yoshiko; Reis, Carolina F; Ribeiro, Brianna; Weems, Brittany; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Lam, Kit S

    2016-06-13

    Identifying "druggable" targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 10(13) possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the "library-against-library" screening approach and the resulting small molecule-protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development.

  16. Proteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction: an integrated approach for the simultaneous prediction of polypharmacology and binding affinity/potency of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paricharak, Shardul; Cortés-Ciriano, Isidro; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Bender, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    targets and the potency on plasmodial DHFR for the GSK TCAMS dataset, which comprises 13,533 compounds displaying strong anti-malarial activity. 534 of those compounds were identified as DHFR inhibitors by the target prediction algorithm, while the PCM algorithm identified 25 compounds, and 23 compounds (predicted pIC50 > 7) were identified by both methods. Overall, this integrated approach simultaneously provides target and potency/affinity predictions for small molecules. Graphical abstractProteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction.

  17. Different approaches toward an automatic structural alignment of drug molecules: Applications to sterol mimics, thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard; Mietzner, Thomas; Weber, Frank

    1994-12-01

    A relative comparison of the binding properties of different drug molecules requires their mutual superposition with respect to various alignment criteria. In order to validate the results of different alignment methods, the crystallographically observed binding geometries of ligands in the pocket of a common protein receptor have been used. The alignment function in the program SEAL that calculates the mutual superposition of molecules has been optimized with respect to these references. Across the reference data set, alignments could be produced that show mean rms deviations of approximately 1 Å compared to the experimental situation. For structures with obvious skeletal similarities a multiple-flexible fit, linking common pharmacophoric groups by virtual springs, has been incorporated into the molecular mechanics program MOMO. In order to combine conformational searching with comparative alignments, the optimized SEAL approach has been applied to sets of conformers generated by MIMUMBA, a program for conformational analysis. Multiple-flexible fits have been calculated for inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis. Sets of different thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors have been conformationally analyzed and subsequently aligned by a combined MIMUMBA/SEAL approach. Since for these examples crystallographic data on their mutual alignment are available, an objective assessment of the computed results could be performed. Among the generated conformers, one geometry could be selected for the thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors that approached reasonably well the experimentally observed alignment.

  18. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Coyne, Michael J; Gentyala, Rahul R; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-08-23

    We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs), and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s) encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota. We know relatively little about the ecology of the human intestinal microbiota and the combination of factors that dictate which strains and species occupy an individual's gut microbial community

  19. CS2164, a novel multi-target inhibitor against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation with anti-tumor potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Shan, Song; Li, Zhi-Bin; Xin, Li-Jun; Pan, De-Si; Yang, Qian-Jiao; Liu, Ying-Ping; Yue, Xu-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Gao, Ji-Zhou; Zhang, Jin-Wen; Ning, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Xian-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Although inhibitors targeting tumor angiogenic pathway have provided improvement for clinical treatment in patients with various solid tumors, the still very limited anti-cancer efficacy and acquired drug resistance demand new agents that may offer better clinical benefits. In the effort to find a small molecule potentially targeting several key pathways for tumor development, we designed, discovered and evaluated a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, CS2164. CS2164 inhibited the angiogenesis-related kinases (VEGFR2, VEGFR1, VEGFR3, PDGFRα and c-Kit), mitosis-related kinase Aurora B and chronic inflammation-related kinase CSF-1R in a high potency manner with the IC50 at a single-digit nanomolar range. Consequently, CS2164 displayed anti-angiogenic activities through suppression of VEGFR/PDGFR phosphorylation, inhibition of ligand-dependent cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, and prevention of vasculature formation in tumor tissues. CS2164 also showed induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and suppression of cell proliferation in tumor tissues through the inhibition of Aurora B-mediated H3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CS2164 demonstrated the inhibitory effect on CSF-1R phosphorylation that led to the suppression of ligand-stimulated monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and reduced CSF-1R(+) cells in tumor tissues. The in vivo animal efficacy studies revealed that CS2164 induced remarkable regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth at well-tolerated oral doses in several human tumor xenograft models. Collectively, these results indicate that CS2164 is a highly selective multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activities against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation, which may provide the rationale for further clinical assessment of CS2164 as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Small molecule XIAP inhibitors cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells and overcome Bcl-2-mediated resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fakler, Melanie; Loeder, Sandra; Vogler, Meike; Schneider, Katja; Jeremias, Irmela; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2009-01-01

    ...), calling for novel strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that small molecule inhibitors of the antiapoptotic protein XIAP cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells...

  1. Cell-Based Selection Expands the Utility of DNA-Encoded Small-Molecule Library Technology to Cell Surface Drug Targets: Identification of Novel Antagonists of the NK3 Tachykinin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zining; Graybill, Todd L; Zeng, Xin; Platchek, Michael; Zhang, Jean; Bodmer, Vera Q; Wisnoski, David D; Deng, Jianghe; Coppo, Frank T; Yao, Gang; Tamburino, Alex; Scavello, Genaro; Franklin, G Joseph; Mataruse, Sibongile; Bedard, Katie L; Ding, Yun; Chai, Jing; Summerfield, Jennifer; Centrella, Paolo A; Messer, Jeffrey A; Pope, Andrew J; Israel, David I

    2015-12-14

    DNA-encoded small-molecule library technology has recently emerged as a new paradigm for identifying ligands against drug targets. To date, this technology has been used with soluble protein targets that are produced and used in a purified state. Here, we describe a cell-based method for identifying small-molecule ligands from DNA-encoded libraries against integral membrane protein targets. We use this method to identify novel, potent, and specific inhibitors of NK3, a member of the tachykinin family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The method is simple and broadly applicable to other GPCRs and integral membrane proteins. We have extended the application of DNA-encoded library technology to membrane-associated targets and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting DNA-tagged, small-molecule ligands from complex combinatorial libraries against targets in a heterogeneous milieu, such as the surface of a cell.

  2. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  3. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  4. Combining targeted therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of metastatic melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa Kim; Rodabe N Amaria; Christine Spencer; Alexandre Reuben; Zachary A Cooper; Jennifer A Wargo

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and has an incidence that is rising faster than any other solid tumor. Metastatic melanoma treatment has considerably progressed in the past ifve years with the introduction of targeted therapy (BARF and MEK inhibitors) and immune checkpoint blockade (anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1). However, each treatment modality has limitations. Treatment with targeted therapy has been associated with a high response rate, but with short-term responses. Conversely, treatment with immune checkpoint blockade has a lower response rate, but with long-term responses. Targeted therapy affects antitumor immunity, and synergy may exist when targeted therapy is combined with immunotherapy. hTis article presents a brief review of the rationale and evidence for the potential synergy between targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Challenges and directions for future studies are also proposed.

  5. SGLT 2 Inhibitors: A New Therapeutic Target And Its Role In Current Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PV Shiji

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes, one of the major life style diseases, is associated with high morbidity and mortality owing to its microvascular and macrovascular complications. The chance of development of various complications can be effectively prevented by tight glycemic control. We have various groups of drugs like Biguanides, Sulfonyl ureas, Glitazones, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, Incretin based therapy, Insulin and Insulin analogues in the armamentarium to treat diabetes. But still, the number of patients attaining glycemic targets are relatively low and various adverse effect limit the use of some of these drugs, especially in special groups. Hence there is ongoing research to develop newer and newer drugs which provide sustained blood glucose reduction with minimal adverse effects. SGLT-2 inhibitors are a new group of drugs recently approved by FDA to treat Diabetes. In this review we discuss about mechanism of action, various adverse effects and the clinical role of various SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

  6. Deacetylase inhibitors-focus on non-histone targets and effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias; Ocker

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein deacetylases have recently been established as a novel therapeutic principle for several human diseases,including cancer.The original notion of the mechanism of action of these compounds focused on the epigenetic control of transcriptional processes, especially of tumor suppressor genes,by interfering with the acetylation status of nuclear histone proteins,hence the name histone deacetylase inhibitors was coined.Yet,this view could not explain the high specificity for tumor cells and recent evidence now suggests that non-histone proteins represent major targets for protein deacetylase inhibitors and that the post-translational modification of the acetylome is involved in various cellular processes of differentiation,survival and cell death induction.

  7. Small-molecule inhibitors at the PSD-95/nNOS interface protect against glutamate-induced neuronal atrophy in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, M V; O'Toole, E; Connor, T; Harkin, A

    2015-08-20

    Glutamate and nitric oxide (NO) are important regulators of dendrite and axon development in the central nervous system. Excess glutamatergic stimulation is a feature of many pathological conditions and manifests in neuronal atrophy and shrinkage with eventual neurodegeneration and cell death. Here we demonstrate that treatment of cultured primary cortical rat neurons for 24h with glutamate (500μM) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (100-500μM) combined with glycine suppresses neurite outgrowth. A similar reduction of neurite outgrowth was observed with the NO precursor l-arginine and NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (100 and 300μM). The NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R) antagonists ketamine and MK-801 (10nM) counteracted the NMDA/glycine-induced reduction in neurite outgrowth and the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] imidazole (TRIM) (100nM) counteracted both the NMDA/glycine and l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, targeting soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a downstream target of NO, with the sGC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10μM) also protected against l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Since the NMDA-R is functionally coupled to nNOS via the postsynaptic protein 95kDa (PSD-95), inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interaction were tested for their ability to protect against glutamate-induced suppression in neurite outgrowth. Treatment with the small-molecule inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interface 2-((1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-5-ylamino) methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol (IC87201) (10 and 100nM) and 4-(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxy-benzylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (ZL-006) (10 and 100nM) attenuated NMDA/glycine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. These data support the hypothesis that targeting the NMDA-R/PSD-95/nNOS interaction downstream of NMDA-R promotes neurotrophic effects by preventing neurite shrinkage in response to excess glutamatergic stimulation. The PSD-95/n

  8. Exploration of target molecules for molecular imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashikawa, Kei; Akada, Naoki; Yagi, Katsuharu [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Watanabe, Keiko; Kamino, Shinichiro; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto [Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Enomoto, Shuichi, E-mail: senomoto@pharm.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Multiple Molecular Imaging Research Laboratory, RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could discriminate each inflamed area of IBD model mice clearly. {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could not discriminate the difference of pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors expression was different by pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors would be new target molecules for IBD imaging. -- Abstract: Molecular imaging technology is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the efficacy evaluation of various drug therapies for it. However, it is difficult to elucidate directly the relationships between the responsible molecules and IBD using existing probes. Therefore, the development of an alternative probe that is able to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism and provide information on the appropriate guidelines for treatment is earnestly awaited. In this study, we investigated pathognomonic molecules in the intestines of model mice. The accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in the inflamed area of the intestines of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)- or indomethacin (IND)-induced IBD model mice was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and autoradiography to confirm the inflamed area. The results suggested that the inflammation was selectively induced in the colons of mice by the administration of DSS, whereas it was induced mainly in the ilea and the proximal colons of mice by the administration of IND. To explore attractive target molecules for the molecular imaging of IBD, we evaluated the gene expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the inflamed area of the intestines of both model mice. We found that the expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly increased during the progression of IBD, whereas the expression levels were decreased as the mucosa began to heal. In particular, the expression levels of these molecules had already changed before the symptoms of IBD appeared. In

  9. Implication of Crystal Water Molecules in Inhibitor Binding at ALR2 Active Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hymavati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding.

  10. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-08

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells.

  11. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  12. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  13. Targeting B-cell lymphomas with inhibitors of the MALT1 paracaspase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Thome, Margot

    2014-12-01

    The paracaspase MALT1 is an Arg-specific protease that cleaves multiple substrates to promote lymphocyte proliferation and survival. The catalytic activity of MALT1 is normally tightly regulated by antigen receptor triggering, which promotes MALT1 activation by its inducible monoubiquitination-dependent dimerization. Constitutive MALT1 activity is a hallmark of specific subsets of B-cell lymphomas, which are characterized by chromosomal translocations or point mutations that activate MALT1 or its upstream regulators. Recent findings suggest that such lymphomas may be sensitive to treatment with MALT1 inhibitors. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of MALT1 function and regulation, and the development of small molecule MALT1 inhibitors for therapeutic applications.

  14. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Carretero, Julian; Al-shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R.; Poulsen, Hans S.; Aref, Amir R.; Barbie, David A.; Bradner, James E.; George, Rani; Gray, Nathanael S.; Young, Richard A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription factor genes including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors are highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  15. A new anti-angiogenic small molecule, G0811, inhibits angiogenesis via targeting hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •G0811 suppresses HIF-1α expression without cell toxicity. •G0811 exhibits anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. •G0811 provides a new molecular scaffold for the development of therapeutics targeting angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilization, which in turn contributes to adaptation of tumor cells to hypoxia has been highlighted as a promising therapeutic target in angiogenesis-related diseases. We have identified a new small molecule, G0811, as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor that targets HIF-1α signal transduction. G0811 suppressed HIF-1α stability in cancer cells and inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis, as validated by tube formation, chemoinvasion, and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. In addition, G0811 effectively decreased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is one of target genes of HIF-1α. However, G0811 did not exhibit anti-proliferative activities or toxicity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at effective doses. These results demonstrate that G0811 could be a new angiogenesis inhibitor that acts by targeting HIF-1α signal transduction pathway.

  16. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  17. Specific transport of target molecules by motor proteins in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Mehmet C; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Morin, Fabrice O; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-03

    Direct transport powered by motor proteins can alleviate the challenges presented by miniaturization of microfluidic systems. There have been several recent attempts to build motor-protein-driven transport systems based on simple capturing or transport mechanisms. However, to achieve a multifunctional device for practical applications, a more complex sorting/transport system should be realized. Herein, the proof of concept of a sorting device employing selective capture of distinct target molecules and transport of the sorted molecules to different predefined directions is presented. By combining the bottom-up functionality of biological systems with the top-down handling capabilities of micro-electromechanical systems technology, highly selective molecular recognition and motor-protein-based transport is integrated in a microfluidic channel network.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  19. Using Pharmacogenomic Databases for Discovering Patient-Target Genes and Small Molecule Candidates to Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizário, José E.; Sangiuliano, Beatriz A.; Perez-Sosa, Marcela; Neyra, Jennifer M.; Moreira, Dayson F.

    2016-01-01

    With multiple omics strategies being applied to several cancer genomics projects, researchers have the opportunity to develop a rational planning of targeted cancer therapy. The investigation of such numerous and diverse pharmacogenomic datasets is a complex task. It requires biological knowledge and skills on a set of tools to accurately predict signaling network and clinical outcomes. Herein, we describe Web-based in silico approaches user friendly for exploring integrative studies on cancer biology and pharmacogenomics. We briefly explain how to submit a query to cancer genome databases to predict which genes are significantly altered across several types of cancers using CBioPortal. Moreover, we describe how to identify clinically available drugs and potential small molecules for gene targeting using CellMiner. We also show how to generate a gene signature and compare gene expression profiles to investigate the complex biology behind drug response using Connectivity Map. Furthermore, we discuss on-going challenges, limitations and new directions to integrate molecular, biological and epidemiological information from oncogenomics platforms to create hypothesis-driven projects. Finally, we discuss the use of Patient-Derived Xenografts models (PDXs) for drug profiling in vivo assay. These platforms and approaches are a rational way to predict patient-targeted therapy response and to develop clinically relevant small molecules drugs.

  20. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...... to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy....

  1. Discovery of HIV fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 using a comprehensive α-helix mimetic library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Landon R.; Boyle, Kristopher E.; Cai, Lifeng; Yu, Xiaoqian; Gochin, Miriam; Boger, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of a comprehensive α-helix mimetic library for binding the gp41 NHR hydrophobic pocket recognizing an intramolecular CHR α-helix provided a detailed depiction of structural features required for binding and led to the discovery of small molecule inhibitors (Ki 0.6–1.3 µM) that not only match or exceed the potency of those disclosed over the past decade, but that also exhibit effective activity in a cell–cell fusion assay (IC50 5–8 µM). PMID:22424973

  2. Efficacy of HER2-targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Kümler, Iben; Palshof, Jesper Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    Therapies targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 are effective in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review the efficacy of HER2-directed therapies, focussing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting HER2 that have been tested in phase II-III studies...... to those obtained for capecitabine plus lapatinib (48%), continuing trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine (48%), pertuzumab plus trastuzumab (24%), and neratinib (24%). Strategies combining multiple HER2-directed therapies might yield additive or synergistic effects and lead to improved outcome...

  3. CD69 Is the Crucial Regulator of Intestinal Inflammation: A New Target Molecule for IBD Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Radulovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CD69 has been identified as an early activation marker of lymphocytes. However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes. Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature’s most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule. In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation.

  4. In vitro growth inhibitory efficacy of some target specific novel drug molecules against Theileria equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, A; Maji, C; Dahiya, R K; Suthar, A; Kumar, R; Gupta, A K; Dimri, U; Kumar, S

    2016-02-15

    The in vitro growth inhibitory efficacies of five drug molecules against Theileria equi were evaluated in in vitro cultured parasites. A continuous microaerophilic stationary-phase culture (MASP) system was established for propagation of T. equi parasites. This in vitro culture system was used to assess the growth inhibitory effect of harmaline hydrochloride dihydrate (HHD), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTAB), hesparidin methyl chalcone (HMC), andrographolide and imidocarb dipropionate against T. equi. The 50% inhibitory concentration value of HHD, HDTAB, HMC, and imidocarb dipropionate for T. equi growth were 17.42 μM, 14.00 μM, 246.34 μM and 0.279 μM (equivalent to 0.139 μg/ml), respectively (P<0.05). The andrographolide was not effective in inhibiting in vitro growth of T. equi in the present study. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxicity of these five drugs was evaluated on horse PBMC. At 2000 μM concentration of HHD, HDTAB, HMC, andrographolide and imidocarb dipropionate were 8.34, 46.44, 58.53, 31.06, 15.14% cytotoxic on PBMC, respectively. Out of our four tested drug molecules, HHD was having low IC50 value along with least cytotoxicity, as compared to reference drug imidocarb dipropionate. The difference in IC50 value of HDTAB and HHD was significant, but HDTAB was moderately more cytotoxic on PBMC cell lines. HHD and HDTAB are selective inhibitor for heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and choline kinase pathway. It can be concluded that HHD and HDTAB are potential drug molecules against T. equi parasite by acting on Hsp90 and choline kinase pathway.

  5. Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Therapy: Insight into Multitargeted Small-Molecule Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul Roy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, among which nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC comprises about 85%. Taking into account the side effects of surgery, radiation, platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, and the growth self-sufficiency characteristic of cancer cells, drugs have been discovered toward growth factor receptor (GFR to treat NSCLC. As expected, these drugs provide a greater benefit. To increase the efficacy of such growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs, coinhibition of GFR signaling pathways and combination of inhibitors along with radiation or chemotherapy have drew intense insight. Although clinical trials about single-agent RTKIs or their combination strategies suggest their increase potency against cancer, they are not beyond adverse effects, and sometimes the effects are more deadly than chemotherapy. Nevertheless the hope for RTKIs may be proved true by further researches and digging deep into cancer therapeutics.

  6. Discovery of novel small-molecule inhibitors of BRD4 using structure-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidler, Lewis R; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fedorov, Oleg; Picaud, Sarah; Martin, Sarah; Tomsett, Michael; Woodward, Hannah; Brown, Nathan; Knapp, Stefan; Hoelder, Swen

    2013-10-24

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are epigenetic readers that recognize acetylated-lysine (KAc) on proteins and are implicated in a number of diseases. We describe a virtual screening approach to identify BRD inhibitors. Key elements of this approach are the extensive design and use of substructure queries to compile a set of commercially available compounds featuring novel putative KAc mimetics and docking this set for final compound selection. We describe the validation of this approach by applying it to the first BRD of BRD4. The selection and testing of 143 compounds lead to the discovery of six novel hits, including four unprecedented KAc mimetics. We solved the crystal structure of four hits, determined their binding mode, and improved their potency through synthesis and the purchase of derivatives. This work provides a validated virtual screening approach that is applicable to other BRDs and describes novel KAc mimetics that can be further explored to design more potent inhibitors.

  7. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  8. Structure-Bioactivity Relationship for Benzimidazole Thiophene Inhibitors of Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1, a Potential Drug Target in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavy Long

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma flatworm parasites cause schistosomiasis, a chronic and debilitating disease of poverty in developing countries. Praziquantel is employed for treatment and disease control. However, its efficacy spectrum is incomplete (less active or inactive against immature stages of the parasite and there is a concern of drug resistance. Thus, there is a need to identify new drugs and drug targets.We show that RNA interference (RNAi of the Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of human polo-like kinase (huPLK1 elicits a deleterious phenotypic alteration in post-infective larvae (schistosomula or somules. Phenotypic screening and analysis of schistosomula and adult S. mansoni with small molecule inhibitors of huPLK1 identified a number of potent anti-schistosomals. Among these was a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK benzimidazole thiophene inhibitor that has completed Phase I clinical trials for treatment of solid tumor malignancies. We then obtained GSKs Published Kinase Inhibitor Sets (PKIS 1 and 2, and phenotypically screened an expanded series of 38 benzimidazole thiophene PLK1 inhibitors. Computational analysis of controls and PLK1 inhibitor-treated populations of somules demonstrated a distinctive phenotype distribution. Using principal component analysis (PCA, the phenotypes exhibited by these populations were mapped, visualized and analyzed through projection to a low-dimensional space. The phenotype distribution was found to have a distinct shape and topology, which could be elicited using cluster analysis. A structure-activity relationship (SAR was identified for the benzimidazole thiophenes that held for both somules and adult parasites. The most potent inhibitors produced marked phenotypic alterations at 1-2 μM within 1 h. Among these were compounds previously characterized as potent inhibitors of huPLK1 in cell assays.The reverse genetic and chemical SAR data support a continued investigation of SmPLK1 as a possible drug target and/or the prosecution of

  9. A cell-based small molecule screening method for identifying inhibitors of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian-Ngiap Chua

    Full Text Available Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is a crucial mechanism for carcinoma progression, as it provides routes for in situ carcinoma cells to dissociate and become motile, leading to localized invasion and metastatic spread. Targeting EMT therefore represents an important therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. The discovery of oncogene addiction in sustaining tumor growth has led to the rapid development of targeted therapeutics. Whilst initially optimized as anti-proliferative agents, it is likely that some of these compounds may inhibit EMT initiation or sustenance, since EMT is also modulated by similar signaling pathways that these compounds were designed to target. We have developed a novel screening assay that can lead to the identification of compounds that can inhibit EMT initiated by growth factor signaling. This assay is designed as a high-content screening assay where both cell growth and cell migration can be analyzed simultaneously via time-course imaging in multi-well plates. Using this assay, we have validated several compounds as viable EMT inhibitors. In particular, we have identified compounds targeting ALK5, MEK, and SRC as potent inhibitors that can interfere with EGF, HGF, and IGF-1 induced EMT signaling. Overall, this EMT screening method provides a foundation for improving the therapeutic value of recently developed compounds in advanced stage carcinoma.

  10. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus B Nissen

    Full Text Available PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  11. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  12. Management of Psoriatic Arthritis: Traditional Disease-Modifying Rheumatic Agents and Targeted Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Enrique R

    2015-11-01

    Traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) remain the first-line treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), despite lack of randomized controlled trials, and with evidence based on observational studies. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents remain a top choice for biologic treatment, complemented with new biologics with different targets (IL12-23 and IL17). Unmet needs have been identified for patients who do not respond to treatment. Among targeted small molecules Apremilast is approved for the treatment of PsA and Tofactitinib is under investigation. The drugs discussed herein have the potential to address unmet needs; however, additional research is required to identify more effective therapies for PsA.

  13. Lessons Learned: Dose Selection of Small Molecule-Targeted Oncology Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Julie M; Rahman, Atiqur; Liu, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of dose plays a critical role in a successful oncology development program. Typically for oncology agents, the first-in-man phase I dose-escalation trials are conducted to determine a maximum tolerated dose (MTD). This MTD is taken forward into subsequent trials to establish the safety and efficacy of the drug product. Although this approach was appropriate historically for cytotoxics, the application of MTD as the recommend phase II dose has been problematic for the newer small molecule-targeted oncology agents. Promising alternative approaches using dose and exposure exploration, including lessons learned from recent targeted oncology agent development and approvals, are summarized and discussed. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2630-8. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "NEW APPROACHES FOR OPTIMIZING DOSING OF ANTICANCER AGENTS".

  14. Pre-clinical evaluation of small molecule LOXL2 inhibitors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Lucas, Morghan C; Leonte, Lidia Elena

    2017-01-01

    Lysyl Oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a member of the lysyl oxidase family of amine oxidases is known to be important in normal tissue development and homeostasis, as well as the onset and progression of solid tumors. Here we tested the anti-tumor properties of two generations of novel small molecule LOX...

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule reactive oxygen species generators as selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Alvala, Mallika; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2012-10-25

    Here, we report 5-hydroxy-1,2,3,4,4a,9a-hexahydro-1,4-ethano-9,10-anthraquinone (13), a small molecule generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pH 7.4 buffer under ambient aerobic conditions that has selective and potent Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth inhibitory activity.

  16. Adaptive evolution and elucidating the potential inhibitor against schizophrenia to target DAOA (G72 isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal,1,2 Shazia Mannan,2,* Sumaira Kanwal,2,* Ishrat Naveed,1 Asif Mir1 1Department of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal, Pakistan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Schizophrenia (SZ, a chronic mental and heritable disorder characterized by neurophysiological impairment and neuropsychological abnormalities, is strongly associated with d-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA, G72. Research studies emphasized that overexpression of DAOA may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like SZ. In the present study, a hybrid approach of comparative modeling and molecular docking followed by inhibitor identification and structure modeling was employed. Screening was performed by two-dimensional similarity search against selected inhibitor, keeping in view the physiochemical properties of the inhibitor. Here, we report an inhibitor compound which showed maximum binding affinity against four selected isoforms of DAOA. Docking studies revealed that Glu-53, Thr-54, Lys-58, Val-85, Ser-86, Tyr-87, Leu-88, Glu-90, Leu-95, Val-98, Ser-100, Glu-112, Tyr-116, Lys-120, Asp-121, and Arg-122 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. The C-terminal of selected isoforms is conserved, and binding was observed on the conserved region of isoforms. We propose that selected inhibitor might be more potent on the basis of binding energy values. Further analysis of this inhibitor through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful in designing novel therapeutic targets to cure SZ. Keywords: schizophrenia, bioinformatics, modeling, docking, DAOA, G72, DAO, computer-aided drug designing, phylogenetic analysis, d-amino acid oxidase

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Maturation via Small-Molecule Targeting of the Amino-Terminal Domain in the Viral Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Zhou, Jing; Halambage, Upul D; Jurado, Kellie A; Jamin, Augusta V; Wang, Yujie; Engelman, Alan N; Aiken, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein is an attractive therapeutic target, owing to its multifunctionality in virus replication and the high fitness cost of amino acid substitutions in capsids to HIV-1 infectivity. To date, small-molecule inhibitors have been identified that inhibit HIV-1 capsid assembly and/or impair its function in target cells. Here, we describe the mechanism of action of the previously reported capsid-targeting HIV-1 inhibitor, Boehringer-Ingelheim compound 1 (C1). We show that C1 acts during HIV-1 maturation to prevent assembly of a mature viral capsid. However, unlike the maturation inhibitor bevirimat, C1 did not significantly affect the kinetics or fidelity of Gag processing. HIV-1 particles produced in the presence of C1 contained unstable capsids that lacked associated electron density and exhibited impairments in early postentry stages of infection, most notably reverse transcription. C1 inhibited assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA in vitro and induced aberrant cross-links in mutant HIV-1 particles capable of spontaneous intersubunit disulfide bonds at the interhexamer interface in the capsid lattice. Resistance to C1 was conferred by a single amino acid substitution within the compound-binding site in the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. Our results demonstrate that the binding site for C1 represents a new pharmacological vulnerability in the capsid assembly stage of the HIV-1 life cycle.IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive but unexploited target for clinical drug development. Prior studies have identified HIV-1 capsid-targeting compounds that display different mechanisms of action, which in part reflects the requirement for capsid function at both the efferent and afferent phases of viral replication. Here, we show that one such compound, compound 1, interferes with assembly of the conical viral capsid during virion maturation and results in perturbations at a specific protein

  18. Renal function in heart transplant patients after switch to combined mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor and calcineurin inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmschrott M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Helmschrott,1 Rasmus Rivinius,1 Thomas Bruckner,2 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology, Pneumology, 2Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: A calcineurin inhibitor (CNI-based immunosuppression combined with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORs seems to be attractive in patients after heart transplantation (HTX in special clinical situations, for example, in patients with adverse drug effects of prior immunosuppression. Previous studies in patients after HTX detected advantageous effects regarding renal function of a tacrolimus (TAC-based vs cyclosporine-A (CSA-based immunosuppression (in combination with mycophenolate mofetil. However, data regarding renal function after HTX in mTOR/CNI patients remain limited. Aim: Primary end point of the present study was to analyze renal function in HTX patients 1 year after switch to an mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression. Methods: Data of 80 HTX patients after change to mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression were retrospectively analyzed. Renal function was assessed by measured serum creatinine and by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR calculated from Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Results: Twenty-nine patients received mTOR/CSA-based treatment and 51 patients received mTOR/TAC-based therapy. At time of switch and at 1-year follow-up, serum creatinine and eGFR did not differ significantly between both study groups (all P=not statistically significant. Analysis of variances with repeated measurements detected a similar change of renal function in both study groups. Conclusion: The present study detected no significant differences between both mTOR/CNI study groups, indicating a steady state of renal function in HTX patients after switch of immunosuppressive regimen. Keywords: heart transplantation, cyclosporine A, tacrolimus, risk factors

  19. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  20. Modulation of neurogenesis by targeting epigenetic enzymes using small molecules: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Amrutha; Kumar, Manoj; Halder Sinha, Sarmistha; Schneider-Anthony, Anne; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence; Kundu, Tapas K

    2014-12-17

    Neurogenesis consists of a plethora of complex cellular processes including neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, migration, maturation or differentiation to neurons, and finally integration into the pre-existing neural circuits in the brain, which are temporally regulated and coordinated sequentially. Mammalian neurogenesis begins during embryonic development and continues in postnatal brain (adult neurogenesis). It is now evident that adult neurogenesis is driven by extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways, where epigenetic modifications like reversible histone acetylation, methylation, as well as DNA methylation play a vital role. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression during neural development is governed mainly by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), histone methyltransferase (HMTs), DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), and also the enzymes for reversal, like histone deacetylases (HDACs), and many of these have also been shown to be involved in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. The contribution of these epigenetic marks to neurogenesis is increasingly being recognized, through knockout studies and small molecule modulator based studies. These small molecules are directly involved in regeneration and repair of neurons, and not only have applications from a therapeutic point of view, but also provide a tool to study the process of neurogenesis itself. In the present Review, we will focus on small molecules that act predominantly on epigenetic enzymes to enhance neurogenesis and neuroprotection and discuss the mechanism and recent advancements in their synthesis, targeting, and biology.

  1. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas K. Rimkus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  2. Small Molecules Targeting c-Myc Oncogene: Promising Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs. PMID:25332683

  3. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  4. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S. (Duke)

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  5. PARP inhibitors: review of mechanisms of action and BRCA1/2 mutation targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorowska, Emilia; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases have shown true promise in early clinical studies due to reported activity in BRCA-associated cancers. PARP inhibitors may represent a potentially important new class of chemotherapeutic agents directed at targeting cancers with defective DNA-damage repair. In order to widen the prospective patient population that would benefit from PARP inhibitors, predictive biomarkers based on a clear understanding of the mechanism of action are required. In addition, a more sophisticated understanding of the toxicity profile is required if PARP inhibitors are to be employed in the curative, rather than the palliative, setting. PARP inhibitors have successfully moved into clinical practice in the past few years, with approval granted from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) within the past two years. The United States FDA approval of olaparib applies to fourth-line treatment in germline BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer, and European EMA approval of olaparib for maintenance therapy in both germline and somatic BRCA-mutant platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. This review covers the current understanding of PARP, its inhibition, and the basis of the excitement surrounding these new agents. It also evaluates future approaches and directions required to achieve full understanding of the intricate interplay of these agents at the cellular level. PMID:28250726

  6. Inforna 2.0: A Platform for the Sequence-Based Design of Small Molecules Targeting Structured RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Winkelsas, Audrey M; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Southern, Mark; Fallahi, Mohammad; Childs-Disney, Jessica L

    2016-06-17

    The development of small molecules that target RNA is challenging yet, if successful, could advance the development of chemical probes to study RNA function or precision therapeutics to treat RNA-mediated disease. Previously, we described Inforna, an approach that can mine motifs (secondary structures) within target RNAs, which is deduced from the RNA sequence, and compare them to a database of known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. Output generated by Inforna includes the motif found in both the database and the desired RNA target, lead small molecules for that target, and other related meta-data. Lead small molecules can then be tested for binding and affecting cellular (dys)function. Herein, we describe Inforna 2.0, which incorporates all known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners reported in the scientific literature, a chemical similarity searching feature, and an improved user interface and is freely available via an online web server. By incorporation of interactions identified by other laboratories, the database has been doubled, containing 1936 RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including 244 unique small molecules and 1331 motifs. Interestingly, chemotype analysis of the compounds that bind RNA in the database reveals features in small molecule chemotypes that are privileged for binding. Further, this updated database expanded the number of cellular RNAs to which lead compounds can be identified.

  7. Phosphoflow-Based Evaluation of Mek Inhibitors as Small-Molecule Therapeutics for B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Aswathi A; Paz, Helicia; Fei, Fei; Kirzner, Jonathan; Kim, Yong-Mi; Heisterkamp, Nora; Abdel-Azim, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    Upstream mutations that lead to constitutive activation of Erk in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) are relatively common. In the era of personalized medicine, flow cytometry could be used as a rapid method for selection of optimal therapies, which may include drugs that target the Erk pathway. Here, we evaluated the utility of phospho-flow, compared to Western blotting, to monitor Erk pathway activation and its inhibition by targeted Mek kinase inhibitors in human BCP ALL. Because the Erk pathway is not only activated endogenously, by mutations, but also by normal extracellular stimulation through stromal contact and serum growth factors, we compared Erk activation ex vivo in ALL cells in the presence and absence of stroma and serum. Phospho-flow was able to readily detect changes in the pool of pErk1/2 that had been generated by normal microenvironmental stimuli in patient-derived BCP-ALL cells passaged in NSG mice, in viably frozen primary patient samples, and in fresh patient samples. Treatment with the Mek1/2 inhibitor selumetinib resulted in a rapid, complete and persistent reduction of microenvironment-generated pErk1/2. Imaging flow cytometry confirmed reduction of nuclear pErk1/2 upon selumetinib treatment. An ALL relapsing with an activating KRasG12V mutation contained higher endogenous as well as serum/stromal-stimulated levels of pErk1/2 than the matched diagnosis sample which lacked the mutation, but selumetinib treatment reduced pErk1/2 to the same level in both samples. Selumetinib and trametinib as Mek inhibitors were mainly cytostatic, but combined treatment with the PI3K∂ inhibitor CAL101 increased cytotoxicity. Thus phospho-flow cytometry could be used as a platform for rapid, individualized in vitro drug sensitivity assessment for leukemia patients at the time of diagnosis.

  8. Suppression of colitis-driven colon cancer in mice by a novel small molecule inhibitor of sphingosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanevich, Alexander A; Poudyal, Deepak; Cui, Xiangli; Davis, Tia; Wood, Patricia A; Smith, Charles D; Hofseth, Lorne J

    2010-10-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism is driven by inflammatory cytokines. These cascade of events include the activation of sphingosine kinase (SK), and subsequent production of the mitogenic and proinflammatory lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Overall, S1P is one of the crucial components in inflammation, making SK an excellent target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. We have recently shown that SK inhibitors suppress colitis and hypothesize here that the novel SK inhibitor, ABC294640, prevents the development of colon cancer. In an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model, there was a dose-dependent decrease in tumor incidence with SK inhibitor treatment. The tumor incidence (number of animals with tumors per group) in the vehicle, ABC294640 (20 mg/kg) and ABC294640 (50 mg/kg) groups were 80, 40 and 30%, respectively. Tumor multiplicity (number of tumors per animal) also decreased from 2.1 ± 0.23 tumors per animal in the AOM + DSS + vehicle group to 1.2 ± 0 tumors per animal in the AOM + DSS + ABC294640 (20 mg/kg) and to 0.8 ± 0.4 tumors per animal in the AOM + DSS + ABC294640 (50 mg/kg) group. Importantly, with ABC294640, there were no observed toxic side effects. To explore mechanisms, we isolated cells from the colon (CD45-, representing primarily colon epithelial cells) and (CD45+, representing primarily colon inflammatory cells) then measured known targets of SK that control cell survival. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhibition of SK activity by our novel SK inhibitor modulates key pathways involved in cell survival and may be a viable treatment strategy for the chemoprevention colitis-driven colon cancer.

  9. Discovery of two aminoglycoside antibiotics as inhibitors targeting the menin-mixed lineage leukaemia interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianchun; Zhou, Ran; Geng, Heji; Yue, Liyan; Ye, Fei; Xie, Yiqian; Liu, Jingqiu; Kong, Xiangqian; Jiang, Hualiang; Huang, Jiandong; Luo, Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Menin functions as an oncogenic cofactor of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) fusion proteins in leukaemogenesis. The menin-MLL interface is a potential therapeutic target in acute leukaemia cases. In this study, approximately 900 clinical compounds were evaluated and ranked using pharmacophore-based virtual screening, the top 29 hits were further evaluated by biochemical analysis to discover the inhibitors that target the menin-MLL interface. Two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and tobramycin, were identified as menin-MLL inhibitors with binding affinities of 18.8 and 59.9 μM, respectively. The results of thermal shift assay validated the direct interactions between the two antibiotics and menin. The results of isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the equilibrium dissociation constant between menin and neomycin was approximately 15.6 μM. We also predicted the binding modes of inhibitors at the menin-MLL interface through molecular docking analysis. The results indicated that neomycin and tobramycin competitively occupy the binding site of MLL. This study has shed light on the development of powerful probes and new therapies for MLL-mediated leukaemogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Managing stomatitis in patients treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotte, Amy Potter; Hohos, Melissa Beth; Polson, Kathleen M O; Huftalen, Tarsha Marie; Treister, Nathaniel

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are a class of targeted cancer therapeutic agents with clinical benefit for multiple tumor types. Oral ulcerations are a common side effect of mTOR inhibitors; however, the clinical findings resemble aphthous stomatitis rather than the mucositis seen with chemotherapy. Consequently, the appearance of aphthous-like oral ulcerations has been referred to as mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS). The severity of mIAS can be minimized by following common preventive steps and initiating treatment at the first sign of mouth discomfort, thereby reducing the likelihood of treatment discontinuation. mIAS can be managed through prophylactic measures, such as patient education in oral hygiene and avoidance of triggers. Patients who develop mIAS may be treated topically using rinses or other local therapies, including corticosteroids. In severe cases, dose modifications may be required. Oncology nurses have an important role in the management of patients with cancer and are well positioned to offer strategies for minimizing the occurrence and impact of mIAS.

  12. Proteome-wide Profiling of Clinical PARP Inhibitors Reveals Compound-Specific Secondary Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Claire E; Wright, Gabriela; Rix, Lily L Remsing; Kim, Woosuk; Kuenzi, Brent M; Luo, Yunting; Watters, January M; Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Radu, Caius; Lawrence, Harshani R; Rix, Uwe

    2016-12-22

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPi) are a promising class of targeted cancer drugs, but their individual target profiles beyond the PARP family, which could result in differential clinical use or toxicity, are unknown. Using an unbiased, mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics approach, we generated a comparative proteome-wide target map of the four clinical PARPi, olaparib, veliparib, niraparib, and rucaparib. PARPi as a class displayed high target selectivity. However, in addition to the canonical targets PARP1, PARP2, and several of their binding partners, we also identified hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) and deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) as previously unrecognized targets of rucaparib and niraparib, respectively. Subsequent functional validation suggested that inhibition of DCK by niraparib could have detrimental effects when combined with nucleoside analog pro-drugs. H6PD silencing can cause apoptosis and further sensitize cells to PARPi, suggesting that H6PD may be, in addition to its established role in metabolic disorders, a new anticancer target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MALT1 Small Molecule Inhibitors Specifically Suppress ABC-DLBCL In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Fontan, Lorena; Yang, Chenghua; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Volpon, Laurent; Osborne, Michael J.; Beltran, Elena; Garcia, Monica; Cerchietti, Leandro; Shaknovich, Rita; Yang, Shao Ning; Fang, Fang; Gascoyne, Randy D; Martinez-Climent, Jose Angel; Glickman, J. Fraser; Borden, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    MALT1 cleavage activity is linked to the pathogenesis of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL), a chemoresistant form of DLBCL. We developed a MALT1 activity assay and identified chemically diverse MALT1 inhibitors. A selected lead compound, MI-2, featured direct binding to MALT1 and suppression of its protease function. MI-2 concentrated within human ABC-DLBCL cells and irreversibly inhibited cleavage of MALT1 substrates. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activ...

  14. Fragment-Based Discovery of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher R; Dougan, Douglas R; Komandla, Mallareddy; Kanouni, Toufike; Knight, Beverly; Lawson, J David; Sabat, Mark; Taylor, Ewan R; Vu, Phong; Wyrick, Corey

    2015-07-23

    The discovery and optimization of a series of 4-aminocinnoline-3-carboxamide inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase are reported. A fragment-based screening approach incorporating X-ray co-crystallography was used to identify a cinnoline fragment and characterize its binding mode in the ATP binding site of Btk. Optimization of the fragment hit resulted in the identification of a lead compound which reduced paw swelling in a dose- and exposure-dependent fashion in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

  15. A phenotypic assay to identify Chikungunya virus inhibitors targeting the nonstructural protein nsP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Lupan, Alexandru; Desprès, Philippe; Thoret, Sylviane; Pamlard, Olivier; Dubois, Joëlle; Guillou, Catherine; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted pathogen responsible for an acute infection of abrupt onset, characterized by high fever, polyarthralgia, myalgia, headaches, chills, and rash. In 2006, CHIKV was responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in the Indian Ocean, stressing the need for therapeutic approaches. Since then, we have acquired a better understanding of CHIKV biology, but we are still missing active molecules against this reemerging pathogen. We recently reported that the nonstructural nsP2 protein of CHIKV induces a transcriptional shutoff that allows the virus to block cellular antiviral response. This was demonstrated using various luciferase-based reporter gene assays, including a trans-reporter system where Gal4 DNA binding domain is fused to Fos transcription factor. Here, we turned this assay into a high-throughput screening system to identify small molecules targeting nsP2-mediated shutoff. Among 3040 molecules tested, we identified one natural compound that partially blocks nsP2 activity and inhibits CHIKV replication in vitro. This proof of concept suggests that similar functional assays could be developed to target other viral proteins mediating a cellular shutoff and identify innovative therapeutic molecules.

  16. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  17. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J; Lory, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. Copyright © 2016 Lorenz et al.

  18. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. A. Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites.

  19. Snake venom PLA2s inhibitors isolated from Brazilian plants: synthetic and natural molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B M A; Santos, J D L; Xavier, B M; Almeida, J R; Resende, L M; Martins, W; Marcussi, S; Marangoni, S; Stábeli, R G; Calderon, L A; Soares, A M; Da Silva, S L; Marchi-Salvador, D P

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites.

  20. Rationally designed small molecules targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 are potently bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-05-18

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)(exp), is present in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)(exp) folds into a hairpin with regularly repeating 5'CUG/3'GUC motifs and sequesters muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). A variety of defects are associated with DM1, including (i) formation of nuclear foci, (ii) decreased translation of DMPK mRNA due to its nuclear retention, and (iii) pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1, which controls the alternative splicing of various pre-mRNAs. Previously, modularly assembled ligands targeting r(CUG)(exp) were designed using information in an RNA motif-ligand database. These studies showed that a bis-benzimidazole (H) binds the 5'CUG/3'GUC motif in r(CUG)(exp.) Therefore, we designed multivalent ligands to bind simultaneously multiple copies of this motif in r(CUG)(exp). Herein, we report that the designed compounds improve DM1-associated defects including improvement of translational and pre-mRNA splicing defects and the disruption of nuclear foci. These studies may establish a foundation to exploit other RNA targets in genomic sequence.

  1. Development of chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus: viral helicase as a potential target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-11-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was the first pandemic in the 21st century to claim more than 700 lives worldwide. However, effective anti-SARS vaccines or medications are currently unavailable despite being desperately needed to adequately prepare for a possible SARS outbreak. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus, and one of its components, a viral helicase, is emerging as a promising target for the development of chemical SARS inhibitors. In the following review, we describe the characterization, family classification, and kinetic movement mechanisms of the SARS coronavirus (SCV) helicase-nsP13. We also discuss the recent progress in the identification of novel chemical inhibitors of nsP13 in the context of our recent discovery of the strong inhibition of the SARS helicase by natural flavonoids, myricetin and scutellarein. These compounds will serve as important resources for the future development of anti-SARS medications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fragment-based discovery of DNA gyrase inhibitors targeting the ATPase subunit of GyrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesleh, Michael F; Cross, Jason B; Zhang, Jing; Kahmann, Jan; Andersen, Ole A; Barker, John; Cheng, Robert K; Felicetti, Brunella; Wood, Michael; Hadfield, Andrea T; Scheich, Christoph; Moy, Terence I; Yang, Qingyi; Shotwell, Joseph; Nguyen, Kien; Lippa, Blaise; Dolle, Roland; Ryan, M Dominic

    2016-02-15

    Inhibitors of the ATPase function of bacterial DNA gyrase, located in the GyrB subunit and its related ParE subunit in topoisomerase IV, have demonstrated antibacterial activity. In this study we describe an NMR fragment-based screening effort targeting Staphylococcus aureus GyrB that identified several attractive and novel starting points with good ligand efficiency. Fragment hits were further characterized using NMR binding studies against full-length S. aureus GyrB and Escherichia coli ParE. X-ray co-crystal structures of select fragment hits confirmed binding and suggested a path for medicinal chemistry optimization. The identification, characterization, and elaboration of one of these fragment series to a 0.265 μM inhibitor is described herein.

  3. TP53 Alterations Correlate with Response to VEGF/VEGFR Inhibitors: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-10-01

    TP53 tumor-suppressor gene mutations are among the most frequent abnormalities in cancer, affecting approximately 40% of patients. Yet, there is no accepted way to target these alterations in the clinic. At the same time, antagonists of VEGFR or its ligand are best-selling oncology drugs, with multiple, expensive compounds approved. Although only a subset of patients benefit from these antiangiogenesis agents, no relevant biomarker has been identified. Interestingly, TP53 mutations upregulate VEGF-A and VEGFR2. We prospectively enrolled 500 patients, to be interrogated by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) (next-generation sequencing, 236 genes), and to be matched, whenever possible, with targeted agents. Herein, we analyze outcomes based on VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor treatment and presence of TP53 mutations. Of the 500 patients, 188 (37.6%; with ≥1 alteration) were treated; 106 (56% of 188) had tumors that harbored TP53 mutations. VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor therapy was independently associated with improvement in all outcome parameters [rate of stable disease (SD) ≥6 months/partial and complete remission (PR/CR); (31% versus 7%; TP53-mutant patients (who received no other molecular-matched agents) treated with versus without VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors), time-to-treatment failure, and overall survival (multivariate analysis: all P ≤ 0.01)] for the patients harboring TP53-mutant cancers, but improvement was not seen in any of these parameters for patients with TP53 wild-type neoplasms. We conclude that TP53 mutations predict sensitivity to VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors in the clinic. TP53 alterations may therefore be a ready biomarker for treatment with antiangiogenesis agents, a finding of seminal importance across the cancer field. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2475-85. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface.

  5. Engineering fusogenic molecules to achieve targeted transduction of enveloped lentiviral vectors

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    Wang Pin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentiviral vectors with broad tropism are one of the most promising gene delivery systems capable of efficiently delivering genes of interest into both dividing and non-dividing cells while maintaining long-term transgene expression. However, there are needs for developing lentiviral vectors with the capability to deliver genes to specific cell types, thus reducing the "off-target" effect of gene therapy. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of engineering the fusion-active domain of a fusogenic molecule (FM with the aim to improve targeted transduction of lentiviral vectors co-displaying an anti-CD20 antibody (αCD20 and a FM. Results Specific mutations were introduced into the fusion domain of a binding-deficient Sindbis virus glycoprotein to generate several mutant FMs. Lentiviral vectors incorporated with αCD20 and one of the engineered FMs were successfully produced and demonstrated to be able to preferentially deliver genes to CD-20-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors bearing engineered FMs exhibited 8 to 17-fold enhanced transduction towards target cells as compared to the parental FM. Different levels of enhancement were observed for the different engineered FMs. A pH-dependent study of vector transduction showed that the broader pH range of the engineered FM is a possible mechanism for the resulted increase in transduction efficiency. Conclusion The fusion domain of Sindbis virus glycoprotein is amenable for engineering and the engineered proteins provide elevated capacity to mediate lentiviral vectors for targeted transduction. Our data suggests that application of such an engineering strategy can optimize the two-molecular targeting method of lentiviral vectors for gene delivery to predetermined cells.

  6. Target molecules of food phytochemicals: food science bound for the next dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Akira; Ohnishi, Kohta

    2012-05-01

    Phytochemicals are generally defined as secondary metabolites in plants that play crucial roles in their adaptation to a variety of environmental stressors. There is a great body of compelling evidence showing that these metabolites have pronounced potentials for regulating and modulating human health and disease onset, as shown by both experimental and epidemiological approaches. Concurrently, enormous efforts have been made to elucidate the mechanism of actions underlying their biological and physiological functions. For example, the pioneering work of Tachibana et al. uncovered the receptor for (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg) as the 67 kDa laminin receptor, which was shown to partially mediate the functions of EGCg, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, and anti-proliferative activities. Thereafter, several protein kinases were identified as binding proteins of flavonoids, including myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol. Isothiocyanates, sulfur-containing phytochemicals present in cruciferous plants, are well known to target Keap1 for activating the transcription factor Nrf2 for inducing self-defensive and anti-oxidative gene expression. In addition, we recently identified CD36 as a cell surface receptor for ursolic acid, a triterpenoid ubiquitously occurring in plants. Importantly, the above mentioned target proteins are indispensable for phytochemicals to exhibit, at least in part, their bioactivities. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to assume that some of the activities and potential toxicities of metabolites are exerted via their interactions with unidentified, off-target proteins. This notion may be supported by the fact that even rationally designed drugs occasionally display off-target effects and induce unexpected outcomes, including toxicity. Here we update the current status and future directions of research related to target molecules of food phytochemicals.

  7. Chemical–biological characterization of a cruzain inhibitor reveals a second target and a mammalian off-target

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    Jonathan W. Choy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of the Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine protease cruzain has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. Among the best-studied cruzain inhibitors to date is the vinylsulfone K777 (1, which has proven effective in animal models of Chagas’ disease. Recent structure–activity studies aimed at addressing potential liabilities of 1 have now produced analogues such as N-[(2S-1-[[(E,3S-1-(benzenesulfonyl-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]amino]-3-(4-methylphenyl-1-oxopropan-2-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide (4, which is trypanocidal at ten-fold lower concentrations than for 1. We now find that the trypanocidal activity of 4 derives primarily from the inhibition of T. cruzi 14-α-demethylase (TcCYP51, a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the parasite. Compound 4 also inhibits mammalian CYP isoforms but is trypanocidal at concentrations below those required to significantly inhibit mammalian CYPs in vitro. A chemical-proteomics approach employing an activity-based probe derived from 1 was used to identify mammalian cathepsin B as a potentially important off-target of 1 and 4. Computational docking studies and the evaluation of truncated analogues of 4 reveal structural determinants for TcCYP51 binding, information that will be useful in further optimization of this new class of inhibitors.

  8. Chemical-biological characterization of a cruzain inhibitor reveals a second target and a mammalian off-target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Jonathan W; Bryant, Clifford; Calvet, Claudia M; Doyle, Patricia S; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Leung, Siegfried S F; Ang, Kenny K H; Chen, Steven; Gut, Jiri; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Johnston, Jonathan B; Arkin, Michelle R; Burlingame, Alma L; Taunton, Jack; Jacobson, Matthew P; McKerrow, James M; Podust, Larissa M; Renslo, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine protease cruzain has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Among the best-studied cruzain inhibitors to date is the vinylsulfone K777 (1), which has proven effective in animal models of Chagas' disease. Recent structure-activity studies aimed at addressing potential liabilities of 1 have now produced analogues such as N-[(2S)-1-[[(E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]amino]-3-(4-methylphenyl)-1-oxopropan-2-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide (4), which is trypanocidal at ten-fold lower concentrations than for 1. We now find that the trypanocidal activity of 4 derives primarily from the inhibition of T. cruzi 14-α-demethylase (TcCYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the parasite. Compound 4 also inhibits mammalian CYP isoforms but is trypanocidal at concentrations below those required to significantly inhibit mammalian CYPs in vitro. A chemical-proteomics approach employing an activity-based probe derived from 1 was used to identify mammalian cathepsin B as a potentially important off-target of 1 and 4. Computational docking studies and the evaluation of truncated analogues of 4 reveal structural determinants for TcCYP51 binding, information that will be useful in further optimization of this new class of inhibitors.

  9. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker; (Wyeth)

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  10. Targeting angiogenesis: a review of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Srikala S; Shepherd, Frances A

    2003-12-01

    It has now been almost 30 years since Dr J. Folkman first proposed that inhibition of angiogenesis could play a key role in treating cancer; however, it is only recently that anti-angiogenesis agents have entered the clinical setting. The search for novel therapies is particularly important in lung cancer, where the majority of patients succumb to their disease despite aggressive treatments. Several classes of agents now exist that target the different steps involved in angiogenesis. These include drugs inhibiting matrix breakdown, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs), such as marimastat, prinomastat, BMS275291, BAY12-9566, and neovastat drugs that block endothelial cell signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) including rhuMAb VEGF, SU5416, SU6668, ZD6474, CP-547,632 and ZD4190. Drugs that are similar to endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis including endostatin, angiostatin and interferons. There has also been renewed interest in thalidomide. Drugs such as squalamine, celecoxib, ZD6126, TNP-470 and those targeting the integrins are also being evaluated in lung cancer. Despite early enthusiasm for many of these agents, Phase III trials have not yet demonstrated significant increases in overall survival and toxicity remains an issue. It is hoped that as our understanding of the complex process of angiogenesis increases, so will our ability to design more effective targeted therapies.

  11. Targeting zebrafish and murine pituitary corticotroph tumors with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Jiang, Hong; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Fan, Xue-Mo; Lin, Shuo; Melmed, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Cushing disease caused by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas leads to hypercortisolemia predisposing to diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, central obesity, cardiovascular morbidity, and increased mortality. There is no effective pituitary targeted pharmacotherapy for Cushing disease. Here, we generated germline transgenic zebrafish with overexpression of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG/securin) targeted to the adenohypophyseal proopiomelanocortin (POMC) lineage, which recapitulated early features pathognomonic of corticotroph adenomas, including corticotroph expansion and partial glucocorticoid resistance. Adult Tg:Pomc-Pttg fish develop neoplastic coticotrophs and pituitary cyclin E up-regulation, as well as metabolic disturbances mimicking hypercortisolism caused by Cushing disease. Early development of corticotroph pathologies in Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos facilitated drug testing in vivo. We identified a pharmacologic CDK2/cyclin E inhibitor, R-roscovitine (seliciclib; CYC202), which specifically reversed corticotroph expansion in live Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos. We further validated that orally administered R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH and corticosterone levels, and also restrained tumor growth in a mouse model of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Molecular analyses in vitro and in vivo showed that R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH expression, induces corticotroph tumor cell senescence and cell cycle exit by up-regulating p27, p21 and p57, and downregulates cyclin E expression. The results suggest that use of selective CDK inhibitors could effectively target corticotroph tumor growth and hormone secretion. PMID:21536883

  12. Flipping the switch: Tools for detecting small molecule inhibitors of staphylococcal virulence

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    Cassandra L. Quave

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the expression of the accessory gene regulator (agr quorum sensing cascade, S. aureus is able to produce an extensive array of enzymes, hemolysins and immunomodulators essential to its ability to spread through the host tissues and cause disease. Many have argued for the discovery and development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs to augment existing antibiotics as adjuvant therapies. Here, we discuss the state-of-the-art tools that can be used to conduct screens for the identification of such QSIs. Examples include fluorescent reporters, MS-detection of autoinducing peptide (AIP production, agar plate methods for detection of hemolysins and lipase, HPLC-detection of hemolysins from supernatants, and cell-toxicity assays for detecting damage (or relief thereof against human keratinocyte (HaCat cells. In addition to providing a description of these various approaches, we also discuss their amenability to low-, medium- and high-throughput screening efforts for the identification of novel QSIs.

  13. A structure-activity relationship study of small-molecule inhibitors of GLI1-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo; Connelly, Michele C; Mayasundari, Anand; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Fujii, Naoaki

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported ketoprofen amide compounds as inhibitors of GLI1-mediated transcription, an essential down-stream element of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. These compounds inhibited Gli-luciferase reporter in C3H10T1/2 cells that were exogenously transfected with GLI1 and in Rh30 cells that endogenously overexpress GLI1. Here we have designed new derivatives of these compounds aiming to explore the structure-activation relationship (SAR). By replacing the ketone carbonyl group of the ketoprofen moiety with an ether, amide, sulfonamide, or sulfone, we found several new compounds that are equipotent to the ketoprofen amide compounds. Among them, sulfone 30 inhibited Gli-luciferase reporter in C3H10T1/2 cells that were exogenously transfected with GLI1 and in Rh30 cells that endogenously overexpress GLI1.

  14. Sequence-Specific Biosensing of DNA Target through Relay PCR with Small-Molecule Fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Afshan; Du, Feng; Zhao, Yongyun; Dong, Juan; Chen, Haodong; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2016-07-15

    Polymerase chain reaction coupled with signal generation offers sensitive recognition of target DNA sequence; however, these procedures require fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes and high-tech equipment to achieve high specificity. Therefore, intensive research has been conducted to develop reliable, convenient, and economical DNA detection methods. The relay PCR described here is the first sequence-specific detection method using a small-molecule fluorophore as a sensor and combines the classic 5'-3' exonuclease activity of Taq polymerase with an RNA mimic of GFP to build a label-free DNA detection platform. Primarily, Taq polymerase cleaves the 5' noncomplementary overhang of the target specific probe during extension of the leading primer to release a relay oligo to initiate tandem PCR of the reporting template, which encodes the sequence of RNA aptamer. Afterward, the PCR product is transcribed to mRNA, which could generate a fluorescent signal in the presence of corresponding fluorophore. In addition to high sensitivity and specificity, the flexibility of choosing different fluorescent reporting signals makes this method versatile in either single or multiple target detection.

  15. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace of Vibrio cholerae.

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    Tanaya Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders.

  17. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  18. One Novel Multiple-Target Plasmid Reference Molecule Targeting Eight Genetically Modified Canola Events for Genetically Modified Canola Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuqing; Li, Xiang; Wang, Canhua; Song, Guiwen; Pi, Liqun; Zheng, Lan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2017-09-27

    Multiple-target plasmid DNA reference materials have been generated and utilized as good substitutes of matrix-based reference materials in the analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Herein, we report the construction of one multiple-target plasmid reference molecule, pCAN, which harbors eight GM canola event-specific sequences (RF1, RF2, MS1, MS8, Topas 19/2, Oxy235, RT73, and T45) and a partial sequence of the canola endogenous reference gene PEP. The applicability of this plasmid reference material in qualitative and quantitative PCR assays of the eight GM canola events was evaluated, including the analysis of specificity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and performance of pCAN in the analysis of various canola samples, etc. The LODs are 15 copies for RF2, MS1, and RT73 assays using pCAN as the calibrator and 10 genome copies for the other events. The LOQ in each event-specific real-time PCR assay is 20 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and PEP assays are between 91% and 97%, and the squared regression coefficients (R(2)) are all higher than 0.99. The quantification bias values varied from 0.47% to 20.68% with relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1.06% to 24.61% in the quantification of simulated samples. Furthermore, 10 practical canola samples sampled from imported shipments in the port of Shanghai, China, were analyzed employing pCAN as the calibrator, and the results were comparable with those assays using commercial certified materials as the calibrator. Concluding from these results, we believe that this newly developed pCAN plasmid is one good candidate for being a plasmid DNA reference material in the detection and quantification of the eight GM canola events in routine analysis.

  19. Masitinib (AB1010, a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT.

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    Patrice Dubreuil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stem cell factor receptor, KIT, is a target for the treatment of cancer, mastocytosis, and inflammatory diseases. Here, we characterise the in vitro and in vivo profiles of masitinib (AB1010, a novel phenylaminothiazole-type tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets KIT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro, masitinib had greater activity and selectivity against KIT than imatinib, inhibiting recombinant human wild-type KIT with an half inhibitory concentration (IC(50 of 200+/-40 nM and blocking stem cell factor-induced proliferation and KIT tyrosine phosphorylation with an IC(50 of 150+/-80 nM in Ba/F3 cells expressing human or mouse wild-type KIT. Masitinib also potently inhibited recombinant PDGFR and the intracellular kinase Lyn, and to a lesser extent, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. In contrast, masitinib demonstrated weak inhibition of ABL and c-Fms and was inactive against a variety of other tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. This highly selective nature of masitinib suggests that it will exhibit a better safety profile than other tyrosine kinase inhibitors; indeed, masitinib-induced cardiotoxicity or genotoxicity has not been observed in animal studies. Molecular modelling and kinetic analysis suggest a different mode of binding than imatinib, and masitinib more strongly inhibited degranulation, cytokine production, and bone marrow mast cell migration than imatinib. Furthermore, masitinib potently inhibited human and murine KIT with activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain. In vivo, masitinib blocked tumour growth in mice with subcutaneous grafts of Ba/F3 cells expressing a juxtamembrane KIT mutant. CONCLUSIONS: Masitinib is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT that is active, orally bioavailable in vivo, and has low toxicity.

  20. Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors against NS2B/NS3 serine protease from Zika virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Ren, Jinhong; Nocadello, Salvatore; Rice, Amy J.; Ojeda, Isabel; Light, Samuel; Minasov, George; Vargas, Jason; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC); (NWU); (Novalex); (DNSK)

    2016-12-26

    Zika flavivirus infection during pregnancy appears to produce higher risk of microcephaly, and also causes multiple neurological problems such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. The Zika virus is now widespread in Central and South America, and is anticipated to become an increasing risk in the southern United States. With continuing global travel and the spread of the mosquito vector, the exposure is expected to accelerate, but there are no currently approved treatments against the Zika virus. The Zika NS2B/NS3 protease is an attractive drug target due to its essential role in viral replication. Our studies have identified several compounds with inhibitory activity (IC50) and binding affinity (KD) of ~5–10 μM against the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease from testing 71 HCV NS3/NS4A inhibitors that were initially discovered by high-throughput screening of 40,967 compounds. Competition surface plasmon resonance studies and mechanism of inhibition analyses by enzyme kinetics subsequently determined the best compound to be a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.5 μM. We also determined the X-ray structure of the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease in a “pre-open conformation”, a conformation never observed before for any flavivirus proteases. This provides the foundation for new structure-based inhibitor design.

  1. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Ur-Rasool, Hafsa; Ahmed, Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh). The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals) and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD.

  2. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsa Amat-Ur-Rasool

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh. The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE, an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD.

  3. Small-molecule targeting of a diapophytoene desaturase inhibits S. aureus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Di, Hongxia; Wang, Youxin; Cao, Qiao; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Xue; Yang, Nana; Liu, Guijie; Yang, Cai-Guang; Xu, Yong; Jiang, Hualiang; Lian, Fulin; Zhang, Naixia; Li, Jian; Lan, Lefu

    2016-03-01

    The surge of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus has created a dire need for innovative anti-infective agents that attack new targets, to overcome resistance. In S. aureus, carotenoid pigment is an important virulence factor because it shields the bacterium from host oxidant killing. Here we show that naftifine, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved antifungal drug, blocks biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment at nanomolar concentrations. This effect is mediated by competitive inhibition of S. aureus diapophytoene desaturase (CrtN), an essential enzyme for carotenoid pigment synthesis. We found that naftifine attenuated the virulence of a variety of clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, in mouse infection models. Specifically, we determined that naftifine is a lead compound for potent CrtN inhibitors. In sum, these findings reveal that naftifine could serve as a chemical probe to manipulate CrtN activity, providing proof of concept that CrtN is a druggable target against S. aureus infections.

  4. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  5. Clinical Development of Gamitrinib, a Novel Mitochondrial-Targeted Small Molecule Hsp90 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    excretion) studies and a complete plasma distribution and pharmacokinetics profile of Gamitrinib in rats have been obtained. Second, we expanded the safety...resistance needs to be further expanded . Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of...Haq R, et al. BCL2A1 is a lineage-specific antiap- optotic melanoma oncogene that confers resis- tance to BRAF inhibition. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

  6. Ampelopsin, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infection Targeting HIV Entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE-YU LIU; JIAN-TAO YE; WEN-HUI YANG; JIN YAN; CHANG-HONG ZENG; SA ZENG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-HIV effects of ampelopsin and its interaction with HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4. Methods Through anti-virus experiments in vitro, the inhibitory effect of ampelopsin on HIV-1 infection was verified. Chemotaxis assay was performed to show the ability to induce PBMCs migration by ampelopsin, RANTES and SDF-1(. Fluorescence labelling monoclonal antibody was utilized to observe the interaction of ampelopsin and CXCR4. Mice immunosuppressant model was also established to detail the role ampelopsin played in regulating cellular immunological functions. Results Ampelopsin could protect sensitive cells against HIV-1 infection and dramatically reduce HIV-1 antigen P24 expression. HIV-1SF33 attaching to MT-4 cells was interfered by ampelopsin, and the EC50 was 0.175 mg/mL for cellular protection and 0.024 mg/mL for P24 inhibition. At co-cultivating phase, EC50 was 0.229 mg/mL and 0.197 mg/mL respectively. Furthermore, the EC50 was 0.179 mg/mL and 0.348 mg/mL in acute infection. Human PBMCs migration was induced after being challenged with ampelopsin or chemokines, and synergistic action was observed during co-treatment. Ampelopsin alone resulted in maximal chemotaxis at 1 mg/mL. HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 on the surface of PBMCs was decreased by internalization, which indicated the effect of ampelopsin on CXCR4. About 70% CXCR4 was reduced by ampelopsin at 1 mg/mL. Ampelopsin also augmented cellular immunological functions in immunosuppressive mice. Conclusion Ampelopsin displays a strong inhibitive role during HIV-1 absorption, incubation and acute infection. These results are coincident with its immune enhancement.

  7. Clinical Development of Gamitrinib, a Novel Mitochondrial-Targeted Small Molecule Hsp90 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites, succinate, fumarate and malate, pointing to extensive defects in oxidative phosphorylation (Figure 2...electron transport chain, citric acid cycle , fatty acid oxidation, amino acid synthesis and cellular redox status. Specifically, mitochondrial heat shock...Gamitrinib-treated cells exhibited aberrant accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites, succinate, fumarate and malate (Fig. 2a). This was associated with

  8. Selective human enterovirus and rhinovirus inhibitors: An overview of capsid-binding and protease-inhibiting molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hakimelahi, Gholam Hossein; Liu, Hsing-Jang; Tseng, Chen-Tso; Shia, Kak-Shan

    2004-07-01

    The absence of effective vaccines for most viral infections highlights an urgent necessity for the design and development of effective antiviral drugs. Due to the advancement in virology since the late 1980s, several key events in the viral life cycle have been well delineated and a number of molecular targets have been validated, culminating in the emergence of many new antiviral drugs in recent years. Inhibitors against enteroviruses and rhinoviruses, responsible for about half of the human common colds, are currently under active investigation. Agents targeted at either viral protein 1 (VP1), a relatively conserved capsid structure mediating viral adsorption/uncoating process, or 3C protease, which is highly conserved among different serotypes and essential for viral replication, are of great potential to become antipicornavirus drugs.

  9. Stress-induced molecules MICA as potential target for radioimmunotherapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakushina, E. V.; Anokhin, Yu N.; Abakushin, D. N.; Kaprin, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Improving the treatment of cancer, increasing their effectiveness and safety is the main objective in the medicine. Molecular nuclear medicine plays an important role in the therapy of cancer. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) involves the use of antibodies conjugated with therapeutic radionuclides. More often for RIT use the radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies against tumor-associated antigens. Encouraging results have been achieved with this technology in the management of hematologic malignancies. On the contrary, solid tumors have been less responsive. Despite these encouraging results, new potential target for radioimmunodetection and RIT should be found. It was found to increase the level of tumor-associated molecules MICA in the serum of cancer patients. Use of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies capable a specifically attach to cancer cell via NKG2D ligands and destroy it, is a very promising direction, both therapeutic and diagnostic standpoint.

  10. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S. (Pitt); (UMASS, MED); (SLUHSC); (UCSF); (UMM)

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  11. Niche-based screening identifies small-molecule inhibitors of leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Kimberly A; Miller, Peter G; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Kahn, Alissa R; Stewart, Alison L; Logan, David J; Negri, Joseph M; Duvet, Mildred; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi; Dancik, Vlado; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Kindler, Thomas; Tothova, Zuzana; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Hasaka, Thomas; Narayan, Rajiv; Dai, Mingji; Huang, Christina; Shterental, Sebastian; Chu, Lisa P; Haydu, J Erika; Shieh, Jae Hung; Steensma, David P; Munoz, Benito; Bittker, Joshua A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Carpenter, Anne E; Gilliland, D Gary; Stern, Andrew M; Moore, Malcolm A S; Scadden, David T; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ebert, Benjamin L; Golub, Todd R

    2013-12-01

    Efforts to develop more effective therapies for acute leukemia may benefit from high-throughput screening systems that reflect the complex physiology of the disease, including leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and supportive interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment. The therapeutic targeting of LSCs is challenging because LSCs are highly similar to normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and are protected by stromal cells in vivo. We screened 14,718 compounds in a leukemia-stroma co-culture system for inhibition of cobblestone formation, a cellular behavior associated with stem-cell function. Among those compounds that inhibited malignant cells but spared HSPCs was the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin showed anti-LSC activity in vitro and in an in vivo bone marrow transplantation model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effect was on target, via inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. These results illustrate the power of merging physiologically relevant models with high-throughput screening.

  12. Protein kinase Calpha and epsilon small-molecule targeted therapeutics: a new roadmap to two Holy Grails in drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Catherine A; Chu, Feng; Bornmann, William G; Maxwell, David S

    2006-02-01

    Protein kinase (PK)Calpha and epsilon are rational targets for cancer therapy. However, targeted experimental therapeutics that inhibit PKCalpha or epsilon are unavailable. The authors established recently that covalent modification of an active-site cysteine in human PKCepsilon, Cys452, by small molecules, for example 2-mercaptoethanolamine, is necessary and sufficient to render PKCepsilon kinase-dead. Cys452 is conserved in only eleven human protein kinase genes, including PKCalpha. Therefore, the design of small molecules that bind PKC active sites with an electrophile substituent positioned proximal to the Cys452 side chain may lead to targeted therapeutics that selectively inhibit PKCepsilon, PKCalpha or other PKC isozymes.

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors of ERG and ETV1 in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The research involves laboratory studies utilizing xenograft models to test the hypothesis that targeting a member of the ETS ...of TMPRSS2 (a serine protease) gene to the 3` region of ETS transcription factor genes (1). TMPRSS2 is an androgen responsive gene and contributes...only its promoter region and usually a very short exon-1 (2, 3). This causes aberrant expression of an ETS transcription factor in response to androgen

  14. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    GTPases appear to be a promising molecular target for inhibiting T cell activation in RA. Based on an innovative concept Kloog (the partnering PI) and...GTPases are molecular switches that regulate key cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. In T cells...in non-small-cell lung cancer patients (NCT00531401; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY). Thus, Salirasib® is the only available successful

  15. Targeting tumorigenesis: development and use of mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Andrea

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase positioned at a central point in a variety of cellular signaling cascades. The established involvement of mTOR activity in the cellular processes that contribute to the development and progression of cancer has identified mTOR as a major link in tumorigenesis. Consequently, inhibitors of mTOR, including temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus (formerly deforolimus have been developed and assessed for their safety and efficacy in patients with cancer. Temsirolimus is an intravenously administered agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Everolimus is an oral agent that has recently obtained US FDA and EMEA approval for the treatment of advanced RCC after failure of treatment with sunitinib or sorafenib. Ridaforolimus is not yet approved for any indication. The use of mTOR inhibitors, either alone or in combination with other anticancer agents, has the potential to provide anticancer activity in numerous tumor types. Cancer types in which these agents are under evaluation include neuroendocrine tumors, breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, sarcoma, endometrial cancer, and non-small-cell lung cancer. The results of ongoing clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors, as single agents and in combination regimens, will better define their activity in cancer.

  16. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Esposito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the retrotranscription process, characteristic of all retroviruses, the viral ssRNA genome is converted into integration-competent dsDNA. This process is accomplished by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT protein, which is a primary target in the current treatments for HIV-1 infection. In particular, in the approved therapeutic regimens two classes of drugs target RT, namely, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs. Both classes inhibit the RT-associated polymerase activity: the NRTIs compete with the natural dNTP substrate and act as chain terminators, while the NNRTIs bind to an allosteric pocket and inhibit polymerization noncompetitively. In addition to these two classes, other RT inhibitors (RTIs that target RT by distinct mechanisms have been identified and are currently under development. These include translocation-defective RTIs, delayed chain terminators RTIs, lethal mutagenesis RTIs, dinucleotide tetraphosphates, nucleotide-competing RTIs, pyrophosphate analogs, RT-associated RNase H function inhibitors, and dual activities inhibitors. This paper describes the HIV-1 RT function and molecular structure, illustrates the currently approved RTIs, and focuses on the mechanisms of action of the newer classes of RTIs.

  17. Development of purine-scaffold small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiosis, Gabriela; Lucas, Brian; Huezo, Henri; Solit, David; Basso, Andrea; Rosen, Neal

    2003-10-01

    The Hsp90 chaperones play a key role in regulating the physiology of cells exposed to environmental stress and in maintaining the malignant phenotype in tumor cells. Agents that interfere with the function of the chaperone may thus be beneficial in the treatment of cancers. The ansamycins (geldanamycin and herbimycin) and the unrelated natural product radicicol were found to bind to the N-terminal pocket of Hsp90 and inhibit its function. However, translation of these compounds to the clinic was impeded by stability and hepatoxicity issues. 17AAG, a derivative of geldanamycin, was found to be less hepatotoxic and is currently undergoing Phase I clinical trial. Unfortunately, 17AAG is insoluble, difficult to formulate and it is not yet clear if therapeutically effective doses can be administered without escalating non-Hsp90 associated toxicities. Additionally, for reasons not yet completely understood, a subset of tumor cells are insensitive to the action of the drug. The development of novel agents that lack the drawbacks of the natural products is thus necessary. Here we present an overview of such efforts with focus on a new class of purine-scaffold Hsp90 inhibitors developed by rational design.

  18. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors mitigate red blood cell lysis during freezing, transient warming and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briard, Jennie G; Poisson, Jessica S; Turner, Tracey R; Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2016-03-29

    During cryopreservation, ice recrystallization is a major cause of cellular damage. Conventional cryoprotectants such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol function by a number of different mechanisms but do not mitigate or control ice recrystallization at concentrations utilized in cryopreservation procedures. In North America, cryopreservation of human red blood cells (RBCs) utilizes high concentrations of glycerol. RBC units frozen under these conditions must be subjected to a time-consuming deglycerolization process after thawing in order to remove the glycerol to recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) that are effective cryoprotectants for human RBCs, resulting in 70-80% intact RBCs using only 15% glycerol and slow freezing rates. These compounds are capable of reducing the average ice crystal size of extracellular ice relative to a 15% glycerol control validating the positive correlation between a reduction in ice crystal size and increased post-thaw recovery of RBCs. The most potent IRI from this study is also capable of protecting frozen RBCs against the large temperature fluctuations associated with transient warming.

  19. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DRUG DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS FOR ANTICANCER TARGET GENE MELK (MATERNAL EMBRYONIC LEUCINE ZIPPER KINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha. K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK, a member of the AMP serine/threonine kinase family, exhibits multiple features consistent with the potential utility of this gene as an anticancer target. Reports show that MELK functions as a cancer-specific protein kinase, and that down-regulation of MELK results in growth suppression of breast cancer cells. There are many inhibitors which bind to kinases and are in clinical trials too. In our study we have taken a library of different inhibitors and docked those using GLIDE Induced Fit. From docking result we can conclude that Syk inhibitor II, Rho kinase inhibitor IV, p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor III, HA 1004, Dihydrochloride and IKK -2 inhibitor VI have good binding affinity towards MELK and may have anticancer activity.

  20. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles (Iowa); (Toronto)

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  1. Intermittent targeting as a tool to minimize toxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Soverini, Simona; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy has revolutionized the outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and has transformed a fatal disease into a chronic condition for most patients. At present, the therapeutic armamentarium against CML includes imatinib for newly diagnosed patients, and dasatinib and nilotinib, which have both received marketing approval, for imatinib-resistant and imatinib-intolerant disease. Research efforts are now focused on how to optimize therapeutic strategies in an attempt to improve clinical results further, counteract the development of drug resistance and reduce adverse effects. A randomized, international, phase III study of dasatinib dose and schedule optimization in imatinib-resistant and imatinib-intolerant patients with CML has demonstrated that intermittent target inhibition can preserve therapeutic efficacy and reduce toxicity. This finding has important implications, not only for patients with CML, but also for the development of targeted therapies for human malignancies in general.

  2. The selective adhesion molecule inhibitor Natalizumab decreases multiple myeloma cell growth in the bone marrow microenvironment: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Zimmerhackl, Alexander; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tonon, Giovanni; Hainz, Ursula; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Vallet, Sonia; Halama, Niels; Jäger, Dirk; Olson, Dian L; Sattler, Martin; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2011-11-01

    Recent advances regarding the introduction of anti-adhesion strategies as a novel therapeutic concept in oncology hold great promise. Here we evaluated the therapeutic potential of the new-in-class-molecule selective-adhesion-molecule (SAM) inhibitor Natalizumab, a recombinant humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody, which binds integrin-α4, in multiple myeloma (MM). Natalizumab, but not a control antibody, inhibited adhesion of MM cells to non-cellular and cellular components of the microenvironment as well as disrupted the binding of already adherent MM cells. Consequently, Natalizumab blocked both the proliferative effect of MM-bone marrow (BM) stromal cell interaction on tumour cells, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in the BM milieu. Moreover, Natalizumab also blocked VEGF- and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-induced signalling sequelae triggering MM cell migration. In agreement with our in vitro results, Natalizumab inhibited tumour growth, VEGF secretion, and angiogenesis in a human severe combined immunodeficiency murine model of human MM in the human BM microenvironment. Importantly, Natalizumab not only blocked tumour cell adhesion, but also chemosensitized MM cells to bortezomib, in an in vitro therapeutically representative human MM-stroma cell co-culture system model. Our data therefore provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of Natalizumab, preferably in combination with novel agents (e.g. bortezomib) to enhance MM cytotoxicity and improve patient outcome.

  3. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, III, Amos B. (Bryn Mawr); (NIH); (UPENN); (JHU); (DFCI)

    2012-06-19

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4-gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43{sub CD4} and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59{sub CD4} and Asp368{sub gp120}. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structures of gp120 in complex with small molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 tier 2 clades B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4-gp120 protein-protein interaction.

  4. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  5. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate, a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbertz S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Herbertz,1 J Scott Sawyer,2 Anja J Stauber,2 Ivelina Gueorguieva,3 Kyla E Driscoll,4 Shawn T Estrem,2 Ann L Cleverly,3 Durisala Desaiah,2 Susan C Guba,2 Karim A Benhadji,2 Christopher A Slapak,2 Michael M Lahn21Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany; 2Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 4Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab

  6. Angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors on angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul A Sheth; Adam S Feldman; Elahna Paul; Elizabeth A Thiele; T Gregory Walker

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin(m TOR) inhibitors on angiomyolipomas(AMLs) in a case series of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex.METHODS: All patients who underwent catheter angiography prior to and following m TOR inhibitor therapy(n = 3) were evaluated. All cross-sectional imaging studies were analyzed with three-dimensional volumetrics, and tumor volume curves for all three tissue compartments(soft tissue, vascular, and fat) were generated. Segmentation analysis tools were used to automatically create a region of interest(ROI) circumscribing the AML. On magnetic resonance images, the "fat only" map calculated from the in- and opposed-phase gradient recalled echo sequences was used to quantify fat volume within tumors. Tumor vascularity was measured by applying a thresholding toolwithin the ROI on post-contrast subtraction images. On computed tomography images, volume histogram analysis of Hounsfield unit was performed to quantify tumor tissue composition. The angiography procedures were also reviewed, and tumor vascularity based on pre-embolization angiography was characterized in a semi-quantitative manner. RESULTS: Patient 1 presented at the age of 15 with a 6.8 cm right lower pole AML and a 4.0 cm right upper pole AML. Embolization was performed of both tumors, and after a few years of size control, the tumors began to grow, and the patient was initiated on m TOR inhibitor therapy. There was an immediate reduction in the size of both lesions. The patient then underwent repeat embolization and discontinuation of m TOR inhibition, after which point there was a substantial regrowth in both tumors across all tissue compartments. Patient 2 presented at the age of 18 with a right renal AML. Following a brief period of tumor reduction after embolization, she was initiated on m TOR inhibitor therapy, with successful reduction in tumor size across all tissue compartments. As with patient 1, however

  7. Chemical Inhibitors of Non-Homologous End Joining Increase Targeted Construct Integration in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Samantha D M; Fraser, James A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biolistic transformation protocol for Cryptococcus neoformans over 25 years ago ushered in a new era of molecular characterization of virulence in this previously intractable fungal pathogen. However, due to the low rate of homologous recombination in this species, the process of creating targeted gene deletions using biolistic transformation remains inefficient. To overcome the corresponding difficulty achieving molecular genetic modifications, members of the Cryptococcus community have investigated the use of specific genetic backgrounds or construct design strategies aimed at reducing ectopic construct integration via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). One such approach involves deletion of components of the NHEJ-associated Ku heterodimer. While this strategy increases homologous recombination to nearly 100%, it also restricts strain generation to a ku80Δ genetic background and requires subsequent complex mating procedures to reestablish wild-type DNA repair. In this study, we have investigated the ability of known inhibitors of mammalian NHEJ to transiently phenocopy the C. neoformans Ku deletion strains. Testing of eight candidate inhibitors revealed a range of efficacies in C. neoformans, with the most promising compound (W7) routinely increasing the rate of gene deletion to over 50%. We have successfully employed multiple inhibitors to reproducibly enhance the deletion rate at multiple loci, demonstrating a new, easily applied methodology to expedite acquisition of precise genetic alterations in C. neoformans. Based on this success, we anticipate that the use of these inhibitors will not only become widespread in the Cryptococcus community, but may also find use in other fungal species as well.

  8. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  9. Treatment of Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer with a Small Molecule c-Myc Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Medicine). 2. Based on part of the work supported by this award, last year I have submitted a DoD BCRP Breakthrough Award application entitled: ‘Targeting...Osborne CK, Schiff R, O’Malley BW. 2014. An epigenomic approach to therapy for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. Cell Res. 24(7): 809-19. PMID...Our work has established a novel therapeutic strategy to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Based on our study, it has been proposed that BET protein

  10. Multiplexed metagenome mining using short DNA sequence tags facilitates targeted discovery of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jeremy G; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Smith, Alexandra G; Ternei, Melinda A; Calle, Paula Y; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Montiel, Daniel; Brady, Sean F

    2015-04-07

    In molecular evolutionary analyses, short DNA sequences are used to infer phylogenetic relationships among species. Here we apply this principle to the study of bacterial biosynthesis, enabling the targeted isolation of previously unidentified natural products directly from complex metagenomes. Our approach uses short natural product sequence tags derived from conserved biosynthetic motifs to profile biosynthetic diversity in the environment and then guide the recovery of gene clusters from metagenomic libraries. The methodology is conceptually simple, requires only a small investment in sequencing, and is not computationally demanding. To demonstrate the power of this approach to natural product discovery we conducted a computational search for epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors within 185 globally distributed soil metagenomes. This led to the identification of 99 unique epoxyketone sequence tags, falling into 6 phylogenetically distinct clades. Complete gene clusters associated with nine unique tags were recovered from four saturating soil metagenomic libraries. Using heterologous expression methodologies, seven potent epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors (clarepoxcins A-E and landepoxcins A and B) were produced from these pathways, including compounds with different warhead structures and a naturally occurring halohydrin prodrug. This study provides a template for the targeted expansion of bacterially derived natural products using the global metagenome.

  11. Exploration of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecule expression in cervical cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Chong Yuan; QiongYang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of FoxM1 and downstream related target molecules in cervical cancer tissue.Methods:Cervical cancer tissue and normal cervical tissue were collected to detect the expression of FoxM1, proliferation-related genes (CDK6 and CDK8) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC); Hela cells were cultured and transfected with FoxM1 siRNA, and then expression of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC were detected.Results:mRNA contents of FoxM1, CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue; mRNA content of FoxM1 was positively correlated with mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC; mRNA contents of CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC of FoxM1-siRNA group were significantly lower than those of negative control-siRNA group.Conclusion:FoxM1 expression abnormally increases in cervical cancer tissue, and its downstream target genes include CDK6, CDK8, VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC.

  12. A curated census of autophagy-modulating proteins and small molecules: candidate targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Claerhout, Sofie; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N

    2014-07-01

    Autophagy, a programmed process in which cell contents are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, appears to have both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting functions; both stimulation and inhibition of autophagy have been reported to induce cancer cell death, and particular genes and proteins have been associated both positively and negatively with autophagy. To provide a basis for incisive analysis of those complexities and ambiguities and to guide development of new autophagy-targeted treatments for cancer, we have compiled a comprehensive, curated inventory of autophagy modulators by integrating information from published siRNA screens, multiple pathway analysis algorithms, and extensive, manually curated text-mining of the literature. The resulting inventory includes 739 proteins and 385 chemicals (including drugs, small molecules, and metabolites). Because autophagy is still at an early stage of investigation, we provide extensive analysis of our sources of information and their complex relationships with each other. We conclude with a discussion of novel strategies that could potentially be used to target autophagy for cancer therapy.

  13. Novel small molecule 11β-HSD1 inhibitor from the endophytic fungus Penicillium commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Xintao; Tong, Qingyi; Zhu, Hucheng; He, Yan; Lei, Liang; Xue, Yongbo; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Wang, Jianping; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-05-19

    Two new phenone derivatives penicophenones A (1) and B (2), a new cyclic tetrapeptide penicopeptide A (3), and five known compounds were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium commune, an endophytic fungus derived from Vitis vinifera. Compounds 1-3 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of 1 and 3 were determined by comparing its ECD with related molecules and modified Marfey's analysis, respectively. Penicophenone A (1) possesses a rare benzannulated 6,6-spiroketal moiety, which is a new member of the unusual structural class with peniphenone A as the representative. Compound 3 exhibited significant inhibition activities against 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) in vitro and showed strong binding affinity to 11β-HSD1. Moreover, compound 3 treatments decreased the lipid droplet accumulation associate with the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 expression in differentiate-induced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, the molecular docking demonstrated that compound 3 coordinated in the active site of 11β-HSD1 is essential for the ability of diminishing the enzyme activity.

  14. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wan Lu, E-mail: lvvlchina@msn.cn [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Ra, E-mail: mira1125@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133{sup +} cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133{sup +} colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133{sup +} cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133{sup −} cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133{sup +} cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133{sup −} cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  15. Virtual screening of LPXTG competitive SrtA inhibitors targeting signal transduction mechanism in Bacillus anthracis: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Baskaralingam, Vaseeharan; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Members of the sortase enzyme super family decorate the surfaces of Bacillus anthracis cell wall with proteins that play key roles in microbial pathogenesis and its biofilm formation. Bacillus anthracis Sortase-A (Ba-SrtA) is a potential target for new therapeutics as it is required for B. anthracis survival and replication within macrophages. An understanding of the binding site pocket and substrate recognition mechanism by SrtA enzymes may serve to be beneficial in the rational development of sortase inhibitors. Here, the LPXTG signal peptide-based competitive inhibitors are screened against the Ba-SrtA and compounds with reasonable inhibition, specificity, and mechanisms of inactivation of SrtA have been covered. The screened compounds are experimentally validated against the phylogenetically similar Gram-positive pathogen B. cereus. In situ microscopic visualizations suggest that these screened compounds showed the microbial and biofilm inhibitory activity against B. cereus. It facilitates the further development of these molecules into useful anti-infective agents to treat infections caused by B. anthracis and other Gram-positive pathogens. These results provide insight into basic design principles for generating new clinically relevant lead molecules. It also provides an alternative strategy where a screened ligand molecule can be used in combination to battle increasingly against the Gram-positive pathogens.

  16. Identification of a new dengue virus inhibitor that targets the viral NS4B protein and restricts genomic RNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleef, K.W.R. van; Overheul, G.J.; Thomassen, M.C.; Kaptein, S.J.; Davidson, A.D.; Jacobs, M.; Neyts, J.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Rij, R.P. van

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human arthropod-borne virus with a major impact on public health. Nevertheless, a licensed vaccine or specific treatment is still lacking. We therefore screened the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC), a library of drug-like small molecules, for inhibitors of DENV repli

  17. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of BCL6 Kills DLBCL Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerchietti, L.C.; Ghetu, A.F.; Zhu, X.; Da Silva, G.F.; Zhong, S.; Matthews, M.; Bunting, K.L.; Polo, J.M.; Fares, C.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Yang, S.N.; Garcia, M.; Coop, A.; Mackerell, A.D.; Prive, G.G.; Melnick, A. (Cornell)

    2010-09-22

    The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is the most frequently involved oncogene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We combined computer-aided drug design with functional assays to identify low-molecular-weight compounds that bind to the corepressor binding groove of the BCL6 BTB domain. One such compound disrupted BCL6/corepressor complexes in vitro and in vivo, and was observed by X-ray crystallography and NMR to bind the critical site within the BTB groove. This compound could induce expression of BCL6 target genes and kill BCL6-positive DLBCL cell lines. In xenotransplantation experiments, the compound was nontoxic and potently suppressed DLBCL tumors in vivo. The compound also killed primary DLBCLs from human patients.

  18. Targeted pancreatic cancer therapy with the small molecule drug conjugate SW IV-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Spitzer, Dirk; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Hornick, Mary C; Garg, Gunjal; Hornick, John R; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to conventional therapeutics and has been shown to evade apoptosis by deregulation of the X-linked and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (XIAP and cIAP). Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) induces and amplifies cell death by reversing the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. Thus, Smac-derived peptide analogues (peptidomimetics) have been developed and shown to represent promising cancer therapeutics. Sigma-2 receptors are overexpressed in many proliferating tumor cells including pancreatic cancer. Selected ligands to this receptor are rapidly internalized by cancer cells. These characteristics have made the sigma-2 receptor an attractive target for drug delivery because selective delivery to cancer cells has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. Here, we describe the initial characterization of SW IV-134, a chemically linked drug conjugate between the sigma-2 ligand SW43 and the Smac mimetic SW IV-52 as a novel treatment option for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor killing characteristics of our dual-domain therapeutic SW IV-134 was far greater than either component in isolation or in an equimolar mix and suggests enhanced cellular delivery when chemically linked to the sigma-2 ligand. One of the key findings was that SW IV-134 retained target selectivity of the Smac cargo with the involvement of the NF-κB/TNFα signaling pathway. Importantly, SW IV-134 slowed tumor growth and improved survival in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Our data support further study of this novel therapeutic and this drug delivery strategy because it may eventually benefit patients with pancreatic cancer.

  19. When inhibitors do not inhibit: critical evaluation of rational drug design targeting chorismate mutase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munack, Steffi; Leroux, Vincent; Roderer, Kathrin; Ökvist, Mats; van Eerde, André; Gundersen, Lise-Lotte; Krengel, Ute; Kast, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating disease that claims millions of lives every year. Hindered access or non-compliance to medication, especially in developing countries, led to drug resistance, further aggravating the situation. With current standard therapies in use for over 50 years and only few new candidates in clinical trials, there is an urgent call for new TB drugs. A powerful tool for the development of new medication is structure-guided design, combined with virtual screening or docking studies. Here, we report the results of a drug-design project, which we based on a publication that claimed the structure-guided discovery of several promising and highly active inhibitors targeting the secreted chorismate mutase (*MtCM) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We set out to further improve on these compounds and synthesized a series of new derivatives. Thorough evaluation of these molecules in enzymatic assays revealed, to our dismay, that neither the claimed lead compounds, nor any of the synthesized derivatives, show any inhibitory effects against *MtCM.

  20. A Phenotypic Based Target Screening Approach Delivers New Antitubercular CTP Synthetase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marta; Szadocka, Sára; Degiacomi, Giulia; Orena, Beatrice S; Mori, Giorgia; Piano, Valentina; Boldrin, Francesca; Zemanová, Júlia; Huszár, Stanislav; Barros, David; Ekins, Sean; Lelièvre, Joel; Manganelli, Riccardo; Mattevi, Andrea; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ballell, Lluis; Mikušová, Katarína; Chiarelli, Laurent R

    2017-06-09

    Despite its great potential, the target-based approach has been mostly unsuccessful in tuberculosis drug discovery, while whole cell phenotypic screening has delivered several active compounds. However, for many of these hits, the cellular target has not yet been identified, thus preventing further target-based optimization of the compounds. In this context, the newly validated drug target CTP synthetase PyrG was exploited to assess a target-based approach of already known, but untargeted, antimycobacterial compounds. To this purpose the publically available GlaxoSmithKline antimycobacterial compound set was assayed, uncovering a series of 4-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives which efficiently inhibit the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PyrG enzyme activity, one of them showing low activity against the human CTP synthetase. The three best compounds were ATP binding site competitive inhibitors, with Ki values ranging from 3 to 20 μM, but did not show any activity against a small panel of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic kinases, thus demonstrating specificity for the CTP synthetases. Metabolic labeling experiments demonstrated that the compounds directly interfere not only with CTP biosynthesis, but also with other CTP dependent biochemical pathways, such as lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, using a M. tuberculosis pyrG conditional knock-down strain, it was shown that the activity of two compounds is dependent on the intracellular concentration of the CTP synthetase. All these results strongly suggest a role of PyrG as a target of these compounds, thus strengthening the value of this kind of approach for the identification of new scaffolds for drug development.

  1. Reversing melanoma cross-resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors by co-targeting the AKT/mTOR pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Atefi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sustained clinical activity of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib (PLX4032/RG7204 in patients with BRAF(V600 mutant melanoma is limited primarily by the development of acquired resistance leading to tumor progression. Clinical trials are in progress using MEK inhibitors following disease progression in patients receiving BRAF inhibitors. However, the PI3K/AKT pathway can also induce resistance to the inhibitors of MAPK pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sensitivity to vemurafenib or the MEK inhibitor AZD6244 was tested in sensitive and resistant human melanoma cell lines exploring differences in activation-associated phosphorylation levels of major signaling molecules, leading to the testing of co-inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway genetically and pharmacologically. There was a high degree of cross-resistance to vemurafenib and AZD6244, except in two vemurafenib-resistant cell lines that acquired a secondary mutation in NRAS. In other cell lines, acquired resistance to both drugs was associated with persistence or increase in activity of AKT pathway. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and combination therapy with an AKT inhibitor or rapamycin partially or completely reversed the resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Primary and acquired resistance to vemurafenib in these in vitro models results in frequent cross resistance to MEK inhibitors, except when the resistance is the result of a secondary NRAS mutation. Resistance to BRAF or MEK inhibitors is associated with the induction or persistence of activity within the AKT pathway in the presence of these drugs. This resistance can be potentially reversed by the combination of a RAF or MEK inhibitor with an AKT or mTOR inhibitor. These combinations should be available for clinical testing in patients progressing on BRAF inhibitors.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  3. Importance of functional groups in predicting the activity of small molecule inhibitors for Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakaveti, Vishnupriya; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Rayala, S K; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-08-01

    Evasion of apoptosis owing to aberrant expression of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma-2) anti-apoptotic proteins is a promising hallmark of cancer. These proteins are associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Currently available QSAR models are limited to a set of inhibitors corresponding to a particular chemical scaffold, and unified models are required to identify the differential specificity of diverse compounds toward inhibiting these targets. In this study, we predicted the factors driving differential activity and specificity implementing multiplexed QSAR analysis for a dataset of 1,649 reported inhibitors of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma-2) and Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large). We developed QSAR models for seven diverse scaffolds and critically analyzed the chemical space with coupling factors. The correlation values of QSAR models for Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL range from 0.95 to 0.985. The MAE and sMAPE of the models were in the range of 0.052-5.4 nm and 0.41%-10%, respectively, signifying model robustness. The crucial descriptors and moieties accounting for the activity were benchmarked against experimentally determined binding patterns. The comprehensive analysis made in the study explores latent features of the chemical space in a broad perspective. Further, we have developed a user-friendly Web server for predicting a specific/dual inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL [http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/APPLE/]. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Single-molecule interrogation of a bacterial sugar transporter allows the discovery of an extracellular inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbing; Harrington, Leon; Li, Qiuhong; Cheley, Stephen; Davis, Benjamin G.; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-08-01

    Capsular polysaccharides form the outermost protective layer around many Gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotics aimed directly at weakening this layer are not yet available. In pathogenic Escherichia coli E69, a protein, Wza, forms a pore in the outer membrane that transports K30 capsular polysaccharide from its site of synthesis to the outside of the cell. This therefore represents a prospective antibiotic target. Here we test a variety of grommet-like mimics of K30 capsular polysaccharide on wild-type Wza and on mutant open forms of the pore by electrical recording in planar lipid bilayers. The most effective glycomimetic was the unnatural cyclic octasaccharide octakis(6-deoxy-6-amino)cyclomaltooctaose (am8γCD), which blocks the α-helix barrel of Wza, a site that is directly accessible from the external medium. This glycomimetic inhibited K30 poly