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Sample records for molecule furin inhibitors

  1. Chemical structure and properties of low-molecular furin inhibitors

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    T. V. Osadchuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of the relationship between a chemical structure and properties of low-molecular weight inhibitors of furin, the most studied proprotein convertase, which is involved in the development of some pathologies, such as oncologic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, etc. The latest data concerning the influence of peptides, pseudo-peptides, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, some natural ones such as flavonoids, coumarins, and others on enzyme inactivation are considered. The power of furin inhibition is shown to rise with the increasing number of positively charged groups in the structure of these compounds. Peptidomimetics (Ki = 5-8 pM are shown to be the most effective furin inhibitors. The synthesized substances, however, have not been used in practical application yet. Nowadays it is very important to find more selective inhibitors, improve their stability, bioavailability and safety for the human organism.

  2. Rational redesign of inhibitors of furin/kexin processing proteases by electrostatic mutations.

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    Cai, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Qing; Ding, Da-fu

    2004-12-01

    To model the three-dimensional structure and investigate the interaction mechanism of the proprotein convertase furin/kexin and their inhibitors (eglin c mutants). The three-dimensional complex structures of furin/kexin with its inhibitors, eglin c mutants, were generated by modeller program using the newly published X-ray crystallographical structures of mouse furin and yeast kexin as templates. The electrostatic interaction energy of each complex was calculated and the results were compared with the experimentally determined inhibition constants to find the correlation between them. High quality models of furin/kexin-eglin c mutants were obtained and used for calculation of the electrostatic interaction energies between the proteases and their inhibitors. The calculated electrostatic energies of interaction showed a linear correlation to the experimental inhibition constants. The modeled structures give good explanations of the specificity of eglin c mutants to furin/kexin. The electrostatic interactions play important roles in inhibitory activity of eglin c mutants to furin/kexin. The results presented here provided quantitative structural and functional information concerning the role of the charge-charge interactions in the binding of furin/kexin and their inhibitors.

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of anthrax edema factor.

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    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Moayeri, Mahtab; Thai, April; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; O'Malley, Sean; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2018-01-15

    Anthrax is a highly lethal disease caused by the Gram-(+) bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Edema toxin (ET) is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of disease in humans exposed to B. anthracis. ET is a bipartite toxin composed of two proteins secreted by the vegetative bacteria, edema factor (EF) and protective antigen (PA). Our work towards identifying a small molecule inhibitor of anthrax edema factor is the subject of this letter. First we demonstrate that the small molecule probe 5'-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5'-adenosine (FSBA) reacts irreversibly with EF and blocks enzymatic activity. We then show that the adenosine portion of FSBA can be replaced to provide more drug-like molecules which are up to 1000-fold more potent against EF relative to FSBA, display low cross reactivity when tested against a panel of kinases, and are nanomolar inhibitors of EF in a cell-based assay of cAMP production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

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    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  5. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    current barriers of kinase inhibitors, including poor selectivity and emergence of drug resistance. In spite of the small number of identified allosteric inhibitors in comparison with that of inhibitors targeting the ATP pocket, encouraging results, such as the FDA-approval of the first small...

  6. Opposite Roles of Furin and PC5A in N-Cadherin Processing

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    Deborah Maret

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that lack of Furin-processing of the N-cadherin precursor (proNCAD in highly invasive melanoma and brain tumor cells results in the cell-surface expression of a nonadhesive protein favoring cell migration and invasion in vitro. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of malignant human brain tumor cells revealed that of all proprotein convertases (PCs only the levels of Furin and PC5A are modulated, being inversely (Furin or directly (PC5A correlated with brain tumor invasive capacity. Intriguingly, the N-terminal sequence following the Furin-activated NCAD site (RQKR↓DW161, mouse nomenclature reveals a second putative PC-processing site (RIRSDR↓DK189 located in the first extracellular domain. Cleavage at this site would abolish the adhesive functions of NCAD because of the loss of the critical Trp161. This was confirmed upon analysis of the fate of the endogenous prosegment of proNCAD in human malignant glioma cells expressing high levels of Furin and low levels of PC5A (U343 or high levels of PC5A and negligible Furin levels (U251. Cellular analyses revealed that Furin is the best activating convertase releasing an ∼17-kDa prosegment, whereas PC5A is the major inactivating enzyme resulting in the secretion of an ∼20-kDa product. Like expression of proNCAD at the cell surface, cleavage of the NCAD molecule at RIRSDR↓DK189 renders the U251 cancer cells less adhesive to one another and more migratory. Our work modifies the present view on posttranslational processing and surface expression of classic cadherins and clarifies how NCAD possesses a range of adhesive potentials and plays a critical role in tumor progression.

  7. Compartment-Specific Biosensors Reveal a Complementary Subcellular Distribution of Bioactive Furin and PC7

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    Pierpaolo Ginefra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Furin trafficking, and that of related proprotein convertases (PCs, may regulate which substrates are accessible for endoproteolysis, but tools to directly test this hypothesis have been lacking. Here, we develop targeted biosensors that indicate Furin activity in endosomes is 10-fold less inhibited by decanoyl-RVKR-chloromethylketone and enriched >3-fold in endosomes compared to the trans-Golgi network (TGN. Endogenous PC7, which resists this inhibitor, was active in distinct vesicles. Only overexpressed PC7 activity reached the cell surface, endosomes, and the TGN. A PLC motif in the cytosolic tail of PC7 was dispensable for endosomal activity, but it was specifically required for TGN recycling and to rescue proActivin-A cleavage in Furin-depleted B16F1 melanoma cells. In sharp contrast, PC7 complemented Furin in cleaving Notch1 independently of PLC-mediated TGN access. Our study provides a proof in principle that compartment-specific biosensors can be used to gain insight into the regulation of PC trafficking and to map the tropism of PC-specific inhibitors.

  8. The Proprotein Convertase KPC-1/Furin Controls Branching and Self-avoidance of Sensory Dendrites in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Bülow, Hannes E.

    2014-01-01

    Animals sample their environment through sensory neurons with often elaborately branched endings named dendritic arbors. In a genetic screen for genes involved in the development of the highly arborized somatosensory PVD neuron in C. elegans, we have identified mutations in kpc-1, which encodes the homolog of the proprotein convertase furin. We show that kpc-1/furin is necessary to promote the formation of higher order dendritic branches in PVD and to ensure self-avoidance of sister branches, but is likely not required during maintenance of dendritic arbors. A reporter for kpc-1/furin is expressed in neurons (including PVD) and kpc-1/furin can function cell-autonomously in PVD neurons to control patterning of dendritic arbors. Moreover, we show that kpc-1/furin also regulates the development of other neurons in all major neuronal classes in C. elegans, including aspects of branching and extension of neurites as well as cell positioning. Our data suggest that these developmental functions require proteolytic activity of KPC-1/furin. Recently, the skin-derived MNR-1/menorin and the neural cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM have been shown to act as a tripartite complex with the leucine rich transmembrane receptor DMA-1 on PVD mechanosensory to orchestrate the patterning of dendritic branches. Genetic analyses show that kpc-1/furin functions in a pathway with MNR-1/menorin, SAX-7/L1CAM and DMA-1 to control dendritic branch formation and extension of PVD neurons. We propose that KPC-1/furin acts in concert with the ‘menorin’ pathway to control branching and growth of somatosensory dendrites in PVD. PMID:25232734

  9. A novel small molecule inhibitor of hepatitis C virus entry.

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    Carl J Baldick

    Full Text Available Small molecule inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV are being developed to complement or replace treatments with pegylated interferons and ribavirin, which have poor response rates and significant side effects. Resistance to these inhibitors emerges rapidly in the clinic, suggesting that successful therapy will involve combination therapy with multiple inhibitors of different targets. The entry process of HCV into hepatocytes represents another series of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, involving viral structural proteins that have not been extensively explored due to experimental limitations. To discover HCV entry inhibitors, we utilized HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp incorporating E1-E2 envelope proteins from a genotype 1b clinical isolate. Screening of a small molecule library identified a potent HCV-specific triazine inhibitor, EI-1. A series of HCVpp with E1-E2 sequences from various HCV isolates was used to show activity against all genotype 1a and 1b HCVpp tested, with median EC50 values of 0.134 and 0.027 µM, respectively. Time-of-addition experiments demonstrated a block in HCVpp entry, downstream of initial attachment to the cell surface, and prior to or concomitant with bafilomycin inhibition of endosomal acidification. EI-1 was equally active against cell-culture adapted HCV (HCVcc, blocking both cell-free entry and cell-to-cell transmission of virus. HCVcc with high-level resistance to EI-1 was selected by sequential passage in the presence of inhibitor, and resistance was shown to be conferred by changes to residue 719 in the carboxy-terminal transmembrane anchor region of E2, implicating this envelope protein in EI-1 susceptibility. Combinations of EI-1 with interferon, or inhibitors of NS3 or NS5A, resulted in additive to synergistic activity. These results suggest that inhibitors of HCV entry could be added to replication inhibitors and interferons already in development.

  10. A novel class of small molecule inhibitors of HDAC6.

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    Inks, Elizabeth S; Josey, Benjamin J; Jesinkey, Sean R; Chou, C James

    2012-02-17

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that play significant roles in numerous biological processes and diseases. HDACs are best known for their repressive influence on gene transcription through histone deacetylation. Mapping of nonhistone acetylated proteins and acetylation-modifying enzymes involved in various cellular pathways has shown protein acetylation/deacetylation also plays key roles in a variety of cellular processes including RNA splicing, nuclear transport, and cytoskeletal remodeling. Studies of HDACs have accelerated due to the availability of small molecule HDAC inhibitors, most of which contain a canonical hydroxamic acid or benzamide that chelates the metal catalytic site. To increase the pool of unique and novel HDAC inhibitor pharmacophores, a pharmacological active compound screen was performed. Several unique HDAC inhibitor pharmacophores were identified in vitro. One class of novel HDAC inhibitors, with a central naphthoquinone structure, displayed a selective inhibition profile against HDAC6. Here we present the results of a unique class of HDAC6 inhibitors identified using this compound library screen. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of human acute myeloid leukemia cell line MV4-11 with the selective HDAC6 inhibitors decreases levels of mutant FLT-3 and constitutively active STAT5 and attenuates Erk phosphorylation, all of which are associated with the inhibitor's selective toxicity against leukemia.

  11. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Type III Secretion System

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    Lingling Gu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant pathogens have presented increasing challenges to the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents. The type III secretion system (T3SS, existing in bacterial chromosomes or plasmids, is one of the most complicated protein secretion systems. T3SSs of animal and plant pathogens possess many highly conserved main structural components comprised of about 20 proteins. Many Gram-negative bacteria carry T3SS as a major virulence determinant, and using the T3SS, the bacteria secrete and inject effector proteins into target host cells, triggering disease symptoms. Therefore, T3SS has emerged as an attractive target for antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, many T3SS-targeting small-molecule inhibitors have been discovered; these inhibitors prevent the bacteria from injecting effector proteins and from causing pathophysiology in host cells. Targeting the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens, rather than their survival, is an innovative and promising approach that may greatly reduce selection pressures on pathogens to develop drug-resistant mutations. This article summarizes recent progress in the search for promising small-molecule T3SS inhibitors that target the secretion and translocation of bacterial effector proteins.

  12. Small molecule inhibitors target the tissue transglutaminase and fibronectin interaction.

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    Bakhtiyor Yakubov

    Full Text Available Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 mediates protein crosslinking through generation of ε-(γ-glutamyl lysine isopeptide bonds and promotes cell adhesion through interaction with fibronectin (FN and integrins. Cell adhesion to the peritoneal matrix regulated by TG2 facilitates ovarian cancer dissemination. Therefore, disruption of the TG2-FN complex by small molecules may inhibit cell adhesion and metastasis. A novel high throughput screening (HTS assay based on AlphaLISA™ technology was developed to measure the formation of a complex between His-TG2 and the biotinylated FN fragment that binds TG2 and to discover small molecules that inhibit this protein-protein interaction. Several hits were identified from 10,000 compounds screened. The top candidates selected based on >70% inhibition of the TG2/FN complex formation were confirmed by using ELISA and bioassays measuring cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and proliferation. In conclusion, the AlphaLISA bead format assay measuring the TG2-FN interaction is robust and suitable for HTS of small molecules. One compound identified from the screen (TG53 potently inhibited ovarian cancer cell adhesion to FN, cell migration, and invasion and could be further developed as a potential inhibitor for ovarian cancer dissemination.

  13. Discovery and characterization of small molecule Rac1 inhibitors.

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    Arnst, Jamie L; Hein, Ashley L; Taylor, Margaret A; Palermo, Nick Y; Contreras, Jacob I; Sonawane, Yogesh A; Wahl, Andrew O; Ouellette, Michel M; Natarajan, Amarnath; Yan, Ying

    2017-05-23

    Aberrant activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 has been observed in various tumor types, including pancreatic cancer. Rac1 activates multiple signaling pathways that lead to uncontrolled proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Thus, inhibition of Rac1 activity is a viable therapeutic strategy for proliferative disorders such as cancer. Here we identified small molecule inhibitors that target the nucleotide-binding site of Rac1 through in silico screening. Follow up in vitro studies demonstrated that two compounds blocked active Rac1 from binding to its effector PAK1. Fluorescence polarization studies indicate that these compounds target the nucleotide-binding site of Rac1. In cells, both compounds blocked Rac1 binding to its effector PAK1 following EGF-induced Rac1 activation in a dose-dependent manner, while showing no inhibition of the closely related Cdc42 and RhoA activity. Furthermore, functional studies indicate that both compounds reduced cell proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines. Additionally, the two compounds suppressed the clonogenic survival of pancreatic cancer cells, while they had no effect on the survival of normal pancreatic ductal cells. These compounds do not share the core structure of the known Rac1 inhibitors and could serve as additional lead compounds to target pancreatic cancers with high Rac1 activity.

  14. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the SOX18 Transcription Factor.

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    Fontaine, Frank; Overman, Jeroen; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Salim, Angela; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Prokoph, Nina; Robertson, Avril A B; Lua, Linda; Alexandrov, Kirill; Koopman, Peter; Capon, Robert J; Sierecki, Emma; Gambin, Yann; Jauch, Ralf; Cooper, Matthew A; Zuegg, Johannes; Francois, Mathias

    2017-03-16

    Pharmacological modulation of transcription factors (TFs) has only met little success over the past four decades. This is mostly due to standard drug discovery approaches centered on blocking protein/DNA binding or interfering with post-translational modifications. Recent advances in the field of TF biology have revealed a central role of protein-protein interaction in their mode of action. In an attempt to modulate the activity of SOX18 TF, a known regulator of vascular growth in development and disease, we screened a marine extract library for potential small-molecule inhibitors. We identified two compounds, which inspired a series of synthetic SOX18 inhibitors, able to interfere with the SOX18 HMG DNA-binding domain, and to disrupt HMG-dependent protein-protein interaction with RBPJ. These compounds also perturbed SOX18 transcriptional activity in a cell-based reporter gene system. This approach may prove useful in developing a new class of anti-angiogenic compounds based on the inhibition of TF activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

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    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  16. Novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors: scaffolds and discovery strategies.

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    Song, Anran; Yu, Haiqing; Wang, Changyuan; Zhu, Xingqi; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Searching for safe and effective treatments for HIV infection is still a great challenge worldwide in spite of the 27 marketed anti-HIV drugs and the powerful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). As a promising prospect for generation of new HIV therapy drugs, multiple ligands (MDLs) were greatly focused on recently due to their lower toxicity, simplified dosing and patient adherence than single-target drugs. Till now, by disrupting two active sites or steps of HIV replications, a number of HIV dual inhibitors, such as CD4-gssucap120 inhibitors, CXCR4-gp20 inhibitors, RT-CXCR4 inhibitors, RT-protease inhibitors, RT-integrase inhibitors, and RTassociated functions inhibitors have been identified. Generally, these dual inhibitors were discovered mainly through screening approaches and design strategies. Of these compounds, the molecules bearing small skeletons exhibited strong anti-HIV activity and aroused great attention recently. Reviewing the progress of the dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors from the point of view of their scaffolds and discovery strategies will provide valuable information for producing more effective anti-HIV drugs. In this regard, novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors were illustrated, and their discovery paradigms as the major contents were also summarized in this manuscript.

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitors That Selectively Block Dengue Virus Methyltransferase*

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Sonntag, Louis Sebastian; Noble, Christian; Nilar, Shahul H.; Ng, Ru Hui; Zou, Gang; Monaghan, Paul; Chung, Ka Yan; Dong, Hongping; Liu, Boping; Bodenreider, Christophe; Lee, Gladys; Ding, Mei; Chan, Wai Ling; Wang, Gang

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structure analysis of Flavivirus methyltransferases uncovered a flavivirus-conserved cavity located next to the binding site for its cofactor, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM). Chemical derivatization of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH), the product inhibitor of the methylation reaction, with substituents that extend into the identified cavity, generated inhibitors that showed improved and selective activity against dengue virus methyltransferase (MTase), but not related human enzymes. Crysta...

  18. Luteolin restricts dengue virus replication through inhibition of the proprotein convertase furin.

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    Peng, Minhua; Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; He, Qiuyan; Zhao, Ya; Zhang, Zhongde; Lai, Xiaoping; Luo, Dahai; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Li, Geng

    2017-07-01

    In many countries afflicted with dengue fever, traditional medicines are widely used as panaceas for illness, and here we describe the systematic evaluation of a widely known natural product, luteolin, originating from the "heat clearing" class of herbs. We show that luteolin inhibits the replication of all four serotypes of dengue virus, but the selectivity of the inhibition was weak. In addition, ADE-mediated dengue virus infection of human cell lines and primary PBMCs was inhibited. In a time-of-drug-addition study, luteolin was found to reduce infectious virus particle formation, but not viral RNA synthesis, in Huh-7 cells. During the virus life cycle, the host protease furin cleaves the pr moiety from prM protein of immature virus particles in the trans-Golgi network to produce mature virions. Analysis of virus particles from luteolin-treated cells revealed that prM was not cleaved efficiently. Biochemical interrogation of human furin showed that luteolin inhibited the enzyme activity in an uncompetitive manner, with Ki value of 58.6 μM, suggesting that treatment may restrict the virion maturation process. Luteolin also exhibited in vivo antiviral activity in mice infected with DENV, causing reduced viremia. Given the mode of action of luteolin and its widespread source, it is possible that it can be tested in combination with other dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

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    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  20. FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2015-01-01

    Kinases have emerged as one of the most intensivelypursued targets in current pharmacological research,especially for cancer, due to their critical roles in cellularsignaling. To date, the US FDA has approved 28 smallmoleculekinase inhibitors, half of which were approvedin the past 3 years. While...

  1. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme: in vitro and in vivo processing of CXCL10 generates a C-terminally truncated chemokine retaining full activity.

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    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A; Dijkman, Remco; van der Schors, Roel C; van der Raaij-Helmer, Elizabeth M H; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Leurs, Rob; Deelder, André M; Smit, Martine J; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2004-04-02

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the total spectrum of chemokine variants. We have recently shown that the native chemokine CXCL10 is processed at the C terminus, thereby shedding the last four amino acids. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanism in vivo and in vitro and to study the biological activity of this novel isoform of CXCL10. Using a combination of protein purification and mass spectrometric techniques, we show that the production of C-terminally truncated CXCL10 by primary keratinocytes is inhibited in vivo by a specific inhibitor of pro-protein convertases (e.g. furin) but not by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases. Moreover, CXCL10 is processed by furin in vitro, which is abrogated by a mutation in the furin recognition site. Using GTPgammaS binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, and chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that the C-terminally truncated CXCL10 variant is a potent ligand for CXCR3. Moreover, the inverse agonist activity on the virally encoded receptor ORF74 and the direct antibacterial activity of CXCL10 are fully retained. Hence, we have identified furin as a novel chemokine-modifying enzyme in vitro and most probably also in vivo, generating a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, which fully retains its (inverse) agonistic properties.

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors That Selectively Block Dengue Virus Methyltransferase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Sonntag, Louis Sebastian; Noble, Christian; Nilar, Shahul H.; Ng, Ru Hui; Zou, Gang; Monaghan, Paul; Chung, Ka Yan; Dong, Hongping; Liu, Boping; Bodenreider, Christophe; Lee, Gladys; Ding, Mei; Chan, Wai Ling; Wang, Gang; Jian, Yap Li; Chao, Alexander Theodore; Lescar, Julien; Yin, Zheng; Vedananda, T. R.; Keller, Thomas H.; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2011-01-01

    Crystal structure analysis of Flavivirus methyltransferases uncovered a flavivirus-conserved cavity located next to the binding site for its cofactor, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM). Chemical derivatization of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH), the product inhibitor of the methylation reaction, with substituents that extend into the identified cavity, generated inhibitors that showed improved and selective activity against dengue virus methyltransferase (MTase), but not related human enzymes. Crystal structure of dengue virus MTase with a bound SAH derivative revealed that its N6-substituent bound in this cavity and induced conformation changes in residues lining the pocket. These findings demonstrate that one of the major hurdles for the development of methyltransferase-based therapeutics, namely selectivity for disease-related methyltransferases, can be overcome. PMID:21147775

  3. PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors for Immuno-oncology: From Antibodies to Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qiaohong; Jiao, Peifu; Jin, Peng; Su, Gaoxing; Dong, Jinlong; Yan, Bing

    2018-02-12

    The recent regulatory approvals of immune checkpoint protein inhibitors, such as ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab ushered a new era in cancer therapy. These inhibitors do not attack tumor cells directly but instead mobilize the immune system to re-recognize and eradicate tumors, which endows them with unique advantages including durable clinical responses and substantial clinical benefits. PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, a pillar of immune checkpoint protein inhibitors, have demonstrated unprecedented clinical efficacy in more than 20 cancer types. Besides monoclonal antibodies, diverse PD- 1/PD-L1 inhibiting candidates, such as peptides, small molecules have formed a powerful collection of weapons to fight cancer. The goal of this review is to summarize and discuss the current PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors including candidates under clinical development, their molecular interactions with PD-1 or PD-L1, the disclosed structureactivity relationships of peptides and small molecules as inhibitors. Current PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors under clinical development are exclusively dominated by antibodies. The molecular interactions of therapeutic antibodies with PD-1 or PD-L1 have been gradually elucidated for the design of novel inhibitors. Various peptides and traditional small molecules have been investigated in preclinical model to discover novel PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Peptides and small molecules may play an important role in immuno-oncology because they may bind to multiple immune checkpoint proteins via rational design, opening opportunity for a new generation of novel PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of bromodomain-acetyl-lysine interactions.

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    Brand, Michael; Measures, Angelina R; Measures, Angelina M; Wilson, Brian G; Cortopassi, Wilian A; Alexander, Rikki; Höss, Matthias; Hewings, David S; Rooney, Timothy P C; Paton, Robert S; Conway, Stuart J

    2015-01-16

    Bromodomains are protein modules that bind to acetylated lysine residues. Their interaction with histone proteins suggests that they function as "readers" of histone lysine acetylation, a component of the proposed "histone code". Bromodomain-containing proteins are often found as components of larger protein complexes with roles in fundamental cellular process including transcription. The publication of two potent ligands for the BET bromodomains in 2010 demonstrated that small molecules can inhibit the bromodomain-acetyl-lysine protein-protein interaction. These molecules display strong phenotypic effects in a number of cell lines and affect a range of cancers in vivo. This work stimulated intense interest in developing further ligands for the BET bromodomains and the design of ligands for non-BET bromodomains. Here we review the recent progress in the field with particular attention paid to ligand design, the assays employed in early ligand discovery, and the use of computational approaches to inform ligand design.

  5. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  6. A small molecule fusion inhibitor of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Mee Kian; Yip, Andy; Zhang, Summer; Priestle, John P; Ma, Ngai Ling; Smit, Jolanda M; Wilschut, Jan; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wenk, Markus R; Schul, Wouter

    2009-12-01

    The dengue virus envelope protein plays an essential role in viral entry by mediating fusion between the viral and host membranes. The crystal structure of the envelope protein shows a pocket (located at a "hinge" between Domains I and II) that can be occupied by ligand n-octyl-beta-D-glucoside (betaOG). Compounds blocking the betaOG pocket are thought to interfere with conformational changes in the envelope protein that are essential for fusion. Two fusion assays were developed to examine the anti-fusion activities of compounds. The first assay measures the cellular internalization of propidium iodide upon membrane fusion. The second assay measures the protease activity of trypsin upon fusion between dengue virions and trypsin-containing liposomes. We performed an in silico virtual screening for small molecules that can potentially bind to the betaOG pocket and tested these candidate molecules in the two fusion assays. We identified one compound that inhibits dengue fusion in both assays with an IC(50) of 6.8 microM and reduces viral titers with an EC(50) of 9.8 microM. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the compound was only active when present during viral infection but not when added 1h later, in agreement with a mechanism of action through fusion inhibition.

  7. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  8. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  9. Small-molecule kinase inhibitors: an analysis of FDA-approved drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), 28 of which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), have been actively pursued as promising targeted therapeutics. Here, we assess the key structural and physicochemical properties, target selectivity and mechanism of function, and ther......Small-molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), 28 of which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), have been actively pursued as promising targeted therapeutics. Here, we assess the key structural and physicochemical properties, target selectivity and mechanism of function...

  10. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  11. Promiscuity and selectivity of small-molecule inhibitors across TAM receptor tyrosine kinases in pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao-Hua; Chen, Shi-Bing; Yu, Juan; Liu, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-08-01

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family member Mer has been recognized as an attractive therapeutic target for pediatric leukemia. Beside Mer the family contains other two kinases, namely, Tyro3 and Axl, which are highly homologues with Mer and thus most existing small-molecule inhibitors show moderate or high promiscuity across the three kinases. Here, the structural basis and energetic property of selective binding of small-molecule inhibitors to the three kinases were investigated at molecular level. It is found that the selectivity is primarily determined by the size, shape and configuration of kinase's ATP-binding site; the Mer and Axl possess a small, closed active pocket as compared to the bulky, open pocket of Tyro3. The location and conformation of active-site residues of Mer and Axl are highly consistent, suggesting that small-molecule inhibitors generally have a low Mer-over-Axl selectivity and a high Mer-over-Tyro3 selectivity. We demonstrated that the difference in ATP binding potency to the three kinases is also responsible for inhibitor selectivity. We also found that the long-range interactions and allosteric effect arising from rest of the kinase's active site can indirectly influence inhibitor binding and selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shuchismita; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Westbrook, John; Young, Jasmine; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Berman, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    With the accumulation of a large number and variety of molecules in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) comes the need on occasion to review and improve their representation. The Worldwide PDB (wwPDB) partners have periodically updated various aspects of structural data representation to improve the integrity and consistency of the archive. The remediation effort described here was focused on improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules so that they can be easily identified and analyzed. Peptide-like inhibitors or antibiotics were identified in over 1000 PDB entries, systematically reviewed and represented either as peptides with polymer sequence or as single components. For the majority of the single-component molecules, their peptide-like composition was captured in a new representation, called the subcomponent sequence. A novel concept called "group" was developed for representing complex peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors that are composed of multiple polymer and nonpolymer components. In addition, a reference dictionary was developed with detailed information about these peptide-like molecules to aid in their annotation, identification and analysis. Based on the experience gained in this remediation, guidelines, procedures, and tools were developed to annotate new depositions containing peptide-like inhibitors and antibiotics accurately and consistently. © 2013 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Molecular Dynamics simulations of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins and identification of potential small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Jayanthi; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2014-05-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance due to over expression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) XIAP, survivin and livin has been observed in various cancers. In the current study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for all three IAPs and a common ligand binding scaffold was identified. Further, a novel sequence based motif specific to these IAPs was designed. SMAC is an endogenous inhibitor of IAPs. Screening of ChemBank for compounds similar to lead SMAC-non-peptidomimetics yielded a cemadotin related compound NCIMech_000654. Cemadotin is a derivative of natural anti-tumor peptide dolastatin-15; hence these compounds were docked against all three IAPs. Based on our analysis, we propose that NCIMech_000654/dolastatin-15/cemadotin derivatives may be investigated for their potential in inhibiting XIAP, survivin and livin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hot spot-based design of small-molecule inhibitors for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenxing; Wisniewski, John A; Ji, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are important targets for the development of chemical probes and therapeutic agents. From the initial discovery of the existence of hot spots at PPI interfaces, it has been proposed that hot spots might provide the key for developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors. However, there has been no review on the ways in which the knowledge of hot spots can be used to achieve inhibitor design, nor critical examination of successful examples. This Digest discusses the characteristics of hot spots and the identification of druggable hot spot pockets. An analysis of four examples of hot spot-based design reveals the importance of this strategy in discovering potent and selective PPI inhibitors. A general procedure for hot spot-based design of PPI inhibitors is outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  16. Approved and Experimental Small-Molecule Oncology Kinase Inhibitor Drugs: A Mid-2016 Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter M

    2017-03-01

    Kinase inhibitor research is a comparatively recent branch of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology and the first small-molecule kinase inhibitor, imatinib, was approved for clinical use only 15 years ago. Since then, 33 more kinase inhibitor drugs have received regulatory approval for the treatment of a variety of cancers and the volume of reports on the discovery and development of kinase inhibitors has increased to an extent where it is now difficult-even for those working in the field-easily to keep an overview of the compounds that are being developed, as currently there are 231 such compounds, targeting 38 different protein and lipid kinases (not counting isoforms), in clinical use or under clinical investigation. The purpose of this review is thus to provide an overview of the biomedical rationales for the kinases being targeted on the one hand, and the design principles, as well as chemical, pharmacological, pharmaceutical, and toxicological kinase inhibitor properties, on the other hand. Two issues that are especially important in kinase inhibitor research, target selectivity and drug resistance, as well as the underlying structural concepts, are discussed in general terms and in the context of relevant kinases and their inhibitors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Stanley G; Kumar, Sushil; Bansal, Nitu; Singh, Kamalendra; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Comollo, Thomas; Peng, Youyi; Kotenko, Sergei V; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Bertino, Joseph R; Welsh, William J; Birge, Raymond B

    2017-03-08

    TAM receptors (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mertk) are a family of three homologous type I receptor tyrosine kinases that are implicated in several human malignancies. Overexpression of TAMs and their major ligand Growth arrest-specific factor 6 (Gas6) is associated with more aggressive staging of cancers, poorer predicted patient survival, acquired drug resistance and metastasis. Here we describe small molecule inhibitors (RU-301 and RU-302) that target the extracellular domain of Axl at the interface of the Ig-1 ectodomain of Axl and the Lg-1 of Gas6. These inhibitors effectively block Gas6-inducible Axl receptor activation with low micromolar IC 50s in cell-based reporter assays, inhibit Gas6-inducible motility in Axl-expressing cell lines, and suppress H1299 lung cancer tumor growth in a mouse xenograft NOD-SCIDγ model. Furthermore, using homology models and biochemical verifications, we show that RU301 and 302 also inhibit Gas6 inducible activation of Mertk and Tyro3 suggesting they can act as pan-TAM inhibitors that block the interface between the TAM Ig1 ectodomain and the Gas6 Lg domain. Together, these observations establish that small molecules that bind to the interface between TAM Ig1 domain and Gas6 Lg1 domain can inhibit TAM activation, and support the further development of small molecule Gas6-TAM interaction inhibitors as a novel class of cancer therapeutics.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitor leads of ribosome-inactivating proteins developed using the doorstop approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ping Pang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2, produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2 from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays.

  19. Pre-clinical evaluation of small molecule LOXL2 inhibitors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Lucas, Morghan C; Leonte, Lidia Elena

    2017-01-01

    inhibitor in the MDA-MB-231 human model of breast cancer. We confirmed a functional role for LOXL2 activity in the progression of primary breast cancer. Inhibition of LOXL2 activity inhibited the growth of primary tumors and reduced primary tumor angiogenesis. Dual inhibition of LOXL2 and LOX showed...... a greater effect and also led to a lower overall metastatic burden in the lung and liver. Our data provides the first evidence to support a role for LOXL2 specific small molecule inhibitors as a potential therapy in breast cancer....

  20. Molecular Tracking of Proteolysis During Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation: Blockage by Therapeutic Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khokha, Rama

    2004-01-01

    ... (metastatic MDA- MB231 and non-metastatic MCF-7) transendothelial migration (TEM). Modulation of individual molecules demonstrates the functional cooperation of furin, cell surface adhesion molecules (alpha(sub v)Beta(sub3), CD44...

  1. JAK/STAT inhibitors and other small molecule cytokine antagonists for the treatment of allergic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael D; Fitzsimons, Carolyn; Smith, Paul A

    2018-04-01

    To provide an overview of janus kinase (JAK), chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on T H 2 cells (CRTH2), and phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors in allergic disorders. PubMed literature review. Articles included in this review discuss the emerging mechanism of action of small molecule inhibitors and their use in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, and allergic rhinitis (AR). Allergic diseases represent a spectrum of diseases, including AD, asthma, and AR. For decades, these diseases have been primarily characterized by increased T H 2 signaling and downstream inflammation. In recent years, additional research has identified disease phenotypes and subsets of patients with non-Th2 mediated inflammation. The increasing heterogeneity of disease has prompted investigators to move away from wide-ranging treatment approaches with immunosuppressive agents, such as corticosteroids, to consider more targeted immunomodulatory approaches focused on specific pathways. In the past decade, inhibitors that target JAK signaling, PDE4, and CRTH2 have been explored for their potential activity in models of allergic disease and therapeutic benefit in clinical trials. Interestingly, although JAK inhibitors provide an opportunity to interfere with cytokine signaling and could be beneficial in a broad range of allergic diseases, current clinical trials are focused on the treatment of AD. Conversely, both PDE4 and CRTH2 inhibitors have been evaluated in a spectrum of allergic diseases. This review summarizes the varying degrees of success that these small molecules have demonstrated across allergic diseases. Emerging therapies currently in development may provide more consistent benefit to patients with allergic diseases by specifically targeting inflammatory pathways important for disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2018 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Small-molecule inhibitors of sodium iodide sym-porter function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecat-Guillet, N.; Merer, G.; Lopez, R.; Rousseau, B.; Ambroise, Y.; Pourcher, T.

    2008-01-01

    The Na + /l - sym-porter (NIS) mediates iodide uptake into thyroid follicular cells. Although NIS has been cloned and thoroughly studied at the molecular level, the biochemical processes involved in post-translational regulation of NIS are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize inhibitors of NIS function. These small organic molecules represent a starting point in the identification of pharmacological tools for the characterization of NIS trafficking and activation mechanisms. screening of a collection of 17020 drug-like compounds revealed new chemical inhibitors with potencies down to 40 nM. Fluorescence measurement of membrane potential indicates that these inhibitors do not act by disrupting the sodium gradient. They allow immediate and total iodide discharge from preloaded cells in accord with a specific modification of NIS activity, probably through distinct mechanisms. (authors)

  3. Small-molecule inhibitors of sodium iodide sym-porter function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecat-Guillet, N.; Merer, G.; Lopez, R.; Rousseau, B.; Ambroise, Y. [CEA, DSV, Dept Bioorgan Chem et Isotop Labelling, Inst Biol et Biotechnol iBiTecS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Pourcher, T. [Univ Nice Sophia Antipolis, Dept Biochem et Nucl Toxicol, F-06107 Nice (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Na{sup +}/l{sup -} sym-porter (NIS) mediates iodide uptake into thyroid follicular cells. Although NIS has been cloned and thoroughly studied at the molecular level, the biochemical processes involved in post-translational regulation of NIS are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize inhibitors of NIS function. These small organic molecules represent a starting point in the identification of pharmacological tools for the characterization of NIS trafficking and activation mechanisms. screening of a collection of 17020 drug-like compounds revealed new chemical inhibitors with potencies down to 40 nM. Fluorescence measurement of membrane potential indicates that these inhibitors do not act by disrupting the sodium gradient. They allow immediate and total iodide discharge from preloaded cells in accord with a specific modification of NIS activity, probably through distinct mechanisms. (authors)

  4. Discovery of a Parenteral Small Molecule Coagulation Factor XIa Inhibitor Clinical Candidate (BMS-962212).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Smith, Leon M; Quan, Mimi L; Lam, Patrick Y S; Rossi, Karen A; Apedo, Atsu; Bozarth, Jeffrey M; Wu, Yiming; Zheng, Joanna J; Xin, Baomin; Toussaint, Nathalie; Stetsko, Paul; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Maxwell, Brad; Crain, Earl J; Wong, Pancras C; Lou, Zhen; Harper, Timothy W; Chacko, Silvi A; Myers, Joseph E; Sheriff, Steven; Zhang, Huiping; Hou, Xiaoping; Mathur, Arvind; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Wexler, Ruth R; Luettgen, Joseph M; Ewing, William R

    2017-12-14

    Factor XIa (FXIa) is a blood coagulation enzyme that is involved in the amplification of thrombin generation. Mounting evidence suggests that direct inhibition of FXIa can block pathologic thrombus formation while preserving normal hemostasis. Preclinical studies using a variety of approaches to reduce FXIa activity, including direct inhibitors of FXIa, have demonstrated good antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding. On the basis of this potential, we targeted our efforts at identifying potent inhibitors of FXIa with a focus on discovering an acute antithrombotic agent for use in a hospital setting. Herein we describe the discovery of a potent FXIa clinical candidate, 55 (FXIa K i = 0.7 nM), with excellent preclinical efficacy in thrombosis models and aqueous solubility suitable for intravenous administration. BMS-962212 is a reversible, direct, and highly selective small molecule inhibitor of FXIa.

  5. Rab9-dependent retrograde transport and endosomal sorting of the endopeptidase furin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Gasnereau, Isabelle; Lieu, Zi Zhao; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The endopeptidase furin and the trans-Golgi network protein TGN38 are membrane proteins that recycle between the TGN and plasma membrane. TGN38 is transported by a retromer-dependent pathway from early endosomes to the TGN, whereas the intracellular transport of furin is poorly defined. Here we have identified the itinerary and transport requirements of furin. Using internalisation assays, we show that furin transits the early and late endosomes en route to the TGN. The GTPase Rab9 and the TGN golgin GCC185, components of the late endosome-to-TGN pathway, were required for efficient TGN retrieval of furin. By contrast, TGN38 trafficking was independent of Rab9 and GCC185. To identify the sorting signals for the early endosome-to-TGN pathway, the trafficking of furin–TGN38 chimeras was investigated. The diversion of furin from the Rab9-dependent late-endosome-to-TGN pathway to the retromer-dependent early-endosome-to-TGN pathway required both the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of TGN38. We present evidence to suggest that the length of the transmembrane domain is a contributing factor in endosomal sorting. Overall, these data show that furin uses the Rab9-dependent pathway from late endosomes and that retrograde transport directly from early endosomes is dependent on both the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic tail. PMID:21693586

  6. Recent advances in the discovery of small molecule c-Met Kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Palak K; Ghate, Manjunath D

    2018-01-01

    c-Met is a prototype member of a subfamily of heterodimeric receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and is the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Binding of HGF to its receptor c-Met, initiates a wide range of cellular signalling, including those involved in proliferation, motility, migration and invasion. Importantly, dysregulated HGF/c-Met signalling is a driving factor for numerous malignancies and promotes tumour growth, invasion, dissemination and/or angiogenesis. Dysregulated HGF/c-Met signalling has also been associated with poor clinical outcomes and resistance acquisition to some approved targeted therapies. Thus, c-Met kinase has emerged as a promising target for cancer drug development. Different therapeutic approaches targeting the HGF/c-Met signalling pathway are under development for targeted cancer therapy, among which small molecule inhibitors of c-Met kinase constitute the largest effort within the pharmaceutical industry. The review is an effort to summarize recent advancements in medicinal chemistry development of small molecule c-Met kinase inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents which would certainly help future researchers to bring further developments in the discovery of small molecule c-Met kinase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Choline Kinase Identified by Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Stephan G; Kohlmann, Anna; Zhou, Tianjun; Li, Feng; Squillace, Rachel M; Parillon, Lois E; Greenfield, Matthew T; Miller, David P; Qi, Jiwei; Thomas, R Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Xu, Yongjin; Miret, Juan J; Shakespeare, William C; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David C

    2016-01-28

    Choline kinase α (ChoKα) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and thereby plays key roles in regulation of cell proliferation, oncogenic transformation, and human carcinogenesis. Since several inhibitors of ChoKα display antiproliferative activity in both cellular and animal models, this novel oncogene has recently gained interest as a promising small molecule target for cancer therapy. Here we summarize our efforts to further validate ChoKα as an oncogenic target and explore the activity of novel small molecule inhibitors of ChoKα. Starting from weakly binding fragments, we describe a structure based lead discovery approach, which resulted in novel highly potent inhibitors of ChoKα. In cancer cell lines, our lead compounds exhibit a dose-dependent decrease of phosphocholine, inhibition of cell growth, and induction of apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The druglike lead series presented here is optimizable for improvements in cellular potency, drug target residence time, and pharmacokinetic parameters. These inhibitors may be utilized not only to further validate ChoKα as antioncogenic target but also as novel chemical matter that may lead to antitumor agents that specifically interfere with cancer cell metabolism.

  8. Transgenic Overexpression of the Proprotein Convertase Furin Enhances Skin Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Furin, one of the members of the family of proprotein convertases (PCs, ubiquitously expressed as a type I membrane-bound proteinase, activates several proteins that contribute to tumor progression. In vitro studies using cancer cell lines and clinical specimens demonstrated that furin processes important substrates such as insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R and transforming growth factor β, leading to increased tumor growth and progression. Despite the numerous studies associating furin with tumor development, its effects in preclinical models has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we sought to determine the protumorigenic role of furin in vivo after a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol in transgenic mice in which furin expression was targeted to the epidermal basal layer. We found that processing of the PC substrate IGF-1R and the proliferation rate of mouse epidermis was enhanced in transgenic mice when compared with their WT counterparts. Histopathologic diagnoses of the tumors demonstrated that furin transgenic mice (line F47 developed twice as many squamous carcinomas as the control, WT mice (P < .002. Similarly, tumors cells from transgenic mice were able to process PC substrates more efficiently than tumor cells from WT mice. Furthermore, furin expression resulted in a higher SCC volume in transgenic mice as well as an increase in the percentage of high-grade SCC, including poorly differentiated and spindle cell carcinomas. In conclusion, expression of furin in the basal layer of the epidermis increased tumor development and enhanced tumor growth, supporting the consideration of furin as a potential target for cancer treatment.

  9. Small molecule inhibitor screening identifified HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG as potential therapeutic agent for gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Helga; Valbuena, José R; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Stein, Stefan; Kunkel, Hana; García, Patricia; Bizama, Carolina; Riquelme, Ismael; Espinoza, Jaime A; Kurtz, Stephen E; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Calderon, Juan Francisco; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Grez, Manuel; Pandey, Akhilesh; Leal-Rojas, Pamela; Roa, Juan C

    2017-04-18

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is a lethal cancer with poor prognosis associated with high invasiveness and poor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed in order to improve survival and response rates of GBC patients. We screened 130 small molecule inhibitors on a panel of seven GBC cell lines and identified the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG as one of the most potent inhibitory drugs across the different lines. We tested the antitumor efficacy of 17-AAG and geldanamycin (GA) in vitro and in a subcutaneous preclinical tumor model NOD-SCID mice. We also evaluated the expression of HSP90 by immunohistochemistry in human GBC tumors.In vitro assays showed that 17-AAG and GA significantly reduced the expression of HSP90 target proteins, including EGFR, AKT, phospho-AKT, Cyclin B1, phospho-ERK and Cyclin D1. These molecular changes were consistent with reduced cell viability and cell migration and promotion of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis observed in our in vitro studies.In vivo, 17-AAG showed efficacy in reducing subcutaneous tumors size, exhibiting a 69.6% reduction in tumor size in the treatment group compared to control mice (p < 0.05).The HSP90 immunohistochemical staining was seen in 182/209 cases of GBC (87%) and it was strongly expressed in 70 cases (33%), moderately in 58 cases (28%), and weakly in 54 cases (26%).Our pre-clinical observations strongly suggest that the inhibition of HSP90 function by HSP90 inhibitors is a promising therapeutic strategy for gallbladder cancer that may benefit from new HSP90 inhibitors currently in development.

  10. Assessing subunit dependency of the Plasmodium proteasome using small molecule inhibitors and active site probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Florea, Bogdan I; McAllister, Fiona E; Govindaswamy, Kavitha; Elias, Joshua E; Bhanot, Purnima; Overkleeft, Herman S; Bogyo, Matthew

    2014-08-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention for pathogens such as Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria. However, due to the essential nature of this proteolytic pathway, proteasome inhibitors must avoid inhibition of the host enzyme complex to prevent toxic side effects. The Plasmodium proteasome is poorly characterized, making rational design of inhibitors that induce selective parasite killing difficult. In this study, we developed a chemical probe that labels all catalytic sites of the Plasmodium proteasome. Using this probe, we identified several subunit selective small molecule inhibitors of the parasite enzyme complex. Treatment with an inhibitor that is specific for the β5 subunit during blood stage schizogony led to a dramatic decrease in parasite replication while short-term inhibition of the β2 subunit did not affect viability. Interestingly, coinhibition of both the β2 and β5 catalytic subunits resulted in enhanced parasite killing at all stages of the blood stage life cycle and reduced parasite levels in vivo to barely detectable levels. Parasite killing was achieved with overall low host toxicity, something that has not been possible with existing proteasome inhibitors. Our results highlight differences in the subunit dependency of the parasite and human proteasome, thus providing a strategy for development of potent antimalarial drugs with overall low host toxicity.

  11. Small-molecule quinolinol inhibitor identified provides protection against BoNT/A in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Singh

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylaminomethyl-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096 to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC(50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A.

  12. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arnoldo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibitors that can suppress the toxicity caused by heterologous expression of selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa ORFs. We identified the first small molecule inhibitor of Exoenzyme S (ExoS, a toxin involved in Type III secretion. We show that this inhibitor, exosin, modulates ExoS ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in vitro, suggesting the inhibition is direct. Moreover, exosin and two of its analogues display a significant protective effect against Pseudomonas infection in vivo. Furthermore, because the assay was performed in yeast, we were able to demonstrate that several yeast homologues of the known human ExoS targets are likely ADP-ribosylated by the toxin. For example, using an in vitro enzymatic assay, we demonstrate that yeast Ras2p is directly modified by ExoS. Lastly, by surveying a collection of yeast deletion mutants, we identified Bmh1p, a yeast homologue of the human FAS, as an ExoS cofactor, revealing that portions of the bacterial toxin mode of action are conserved from yeast to human. Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens.

  13. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsenstein, Kenneth M; Saunders, Lindsey B; Simmons, John K; Leon, Elena; Calabrese, David R; Zhang, Shuling; Michalowski, Aleksandra; Gareiss, Peter; Mock, Beverly A; Schneekloth, John S

    2016-01-15

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  14. Small-molecule inhibitors of toxT expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthouard, Rebecca; DiRita, Victor J

    2013-08-06

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative bacterium, infects humans and causes cholera, a severe disease characterized by vomiting and diarrhea. These symptoms are primarily caused by cholera toxin (CT), whose production by V. cholerae is tightly regulated by the virulence cascade. In this study, we designed and carried out a high-throughput chemical genetic screen to identify inhibitors of the virulence cascade. We identified three compounds, which we named toxtazin A and toxtazin B and B', representing two novel classes of toxT transcription inhibitors. All three compounds reduce production of both CT and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), an important colonization factor. We present evidence that toxtazin A works at the level of the toxT promoter and that toxtazins B and B' work at the level of the tcpP promoter. Treatment with toxtazin B results in a 100-fold reduction in colonization in an infant mouse model of infection, though toxtazin A did not reduce colonization at the concentrations tested. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that small-molecule inhibitors of virulence genes could be developed to treat infections, as alternatives to antibiotics become increasingly needed. V. cholerae caused more than 580,000 infections worldwide in 2011 alone (WHO, Wkly. Epidemiol. Rec. 87:289-304, 2012). Cholera is treated with an oral rehydration therapy consisting of water, glucose, and electrolytes. However, as V. cholerae is transmitted via contaminated water, treatment can be difficult for communities whose water source is contaminated. In this study, we address the need for new therapeutic approaches by targeting the production of the main virulence factor, cholera toxin (CT). The high-throughput screen presented here led to the identification of two novel classes of inhibitors of the virulence cascade in V. cholerae, toxtazin A and toxtazins B and B'. We demonstrate that (i) small-molecule inhibitors of virulence gene production can be

  15. Inhibiting AMPylation: a novel screen to identify the first small molecule inhibitors of protein AMPylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Daniel M; Sreelatha, Anju; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Madoux, Franck; Chase, Peter; Griffin, Patrick R; Orth, Kim; Hodder, Peter; Thompson, Paul R

    2014-02-21

    Enzymatic transfer of the AMP portion of ATP to substrate proteins has recently been described as an essential mechanism of bacterial infection for several pathogens. The first AMPylator to be discovered, VopS from Vibrio parahemolyticus, catalyzes the transfer of AMP onto the host GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1. Modification of these proteins disrupts downstream signaling events, contributing to cell rounding and apoptosis, and recent studies have suggested that blocking AMPylation may be an effective route to stop infection. To date, however, no small molecule inhibitors have been discovered for any of the AMPylators. Therefore, we developed a fluorescence-polarization-based high-throughput screening assay and used it to discover the first inhibitors of protein AMPylation. Herein we report the discovery of the first small molecule VopS inhibitors (e.g., calmidazolium, GW7647, and MK886) with Ki's ranging from 6 to 50 μM and upward of 30-fold selectivity versus HYPE, the only known human AMPylator.

  16. Inhibition of furin results in increased growth, invasiveness and cytokine production of synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changshun; Song, Zezhong; Liu, Huiling; Pan, Jihong; Jiang, Huiyu; Liu, Chao; Yan, Zexing; Feng, Hong; Sun, Shui

    2017-07-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis play a key role by local production of cytokines and proteolytic enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix and cartilage. These synoviocytes acquire phenotypic characteristics commonly observed in transformed cells, like anchorage-independent growth, increased proliferation and invasiveness, and insensitivity to apoptosis. Furin is a ubiquitous proprotein convertase that is capable of cleaving precursors of a wide variety of proteins. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, furin is reported to be highly expressed in the synovial pannus compared with healthy persons. However, the mechanisms are poorly understood. This study is to explore the effect of furin overexpression in rheumatoid synoviocytes. In this study, RNA interference was used to knock down furin expression and to assess the resultant effects on biological behaviors of synoviocytes, such as cell proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and cell apoptosis. In addition, the production of inflammatory cytokines was evaluated. The results showed that the inhibition of furin enhanced proliferation, invasion, and migration of synoviocytes in vitro. Cell cycle was accelerated and cell death was affected by furin knockdown. Also, the inhibition of furin increased interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion of synoviocytes. Inhibition of furin enhances invasive phenotype of synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, implying a protective role of furin. Agents targeting upregulation of furin may have therapeutic potential for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting DNA Repair and DNA Repair Deficiency in Research and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2017-09-21

    To maintain stable genomes and to avoid cancer and aging, cells need to repair a multitude of deleterious DNA lesions, which arise constantly in every cell. Processes that support genome integrity in normal cells, however, allow cancer cells to develop resistance to radiation and DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. Chemical inhibition of the key DNA repair proteins and pharmacologically induced synthetic lethality have become instrumental in both dissecting the complex DNA repair networks and as promising anticancer agents. The difficulty in capitalizing on synthetically lethal interactions in cancer cells is that many potential targets do not possess well-defined small-molecule binding determinates. In this review, we discuss several successful campaigns to identify and leverage small-molecule inhibitors of the DNA repair proteins, from PARP1, a paradigm case for clinically successful small-molecule inhibitors, to coveted new targets, such as RAD51 recombinase, RAD52 DNA repair protein, MRE11 nuclease, and WRN DNA helicase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Advances in treating psoriasis in the elderly with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Abigail; Cardwell, Leah A; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the chronic nature of psoriasis, the population of elderly psoriasis patients is increasing. However, many elderly psoriatic patients are not adequately treated because management is challenging as a result of comorbidities, polypharmacy, and progressive impairment of organ systems. Physicians may hesitate to use systemic or biologic agents in elderly psoriasis patients because of an increased risk of adverse events in this patient population. Small molecule medications are emerging as promising options for elderly patients with psoriasis and other inflammatory conditions. Areas covered: Here we review the efficacy, safety and tolerability of small molecule inhibitors apremilast, tofacitinib, ruxolitinib, baricitinib, and peficitinib in the treatment of psoriasis, with focus on their use in the elderly population. Expert opinion: Although small molecule inhibitors demonstrate efficacy in elderly patients with psoriasis, they will require larger head-to-head studies and post-marketing registries to evaluate their effectiveness and safety in specific patient populations. Apremilast, ruxolitinib, and peficitinib are effective agents with favorable side effect profiles; however, physicians should exercise caution when prescribing tofacitinib or baricitinib in elderly populations due to adverse events. The high cost of these drugs in the U.S. is likely to limit their use.

  19. Saururus cernuus lignans-Potent small molecule inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Baerson, Scott R.; Zhang Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou Yudong

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important tumor-selective therapeutic target for solid tumors. In search of novel small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors, 5400 natural product-rich extracts from plants, marine organisms, and microbes were examined for HIF-1 inhibitory activities using a cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation, followed by structure elucidation, yielded three potent natural product-derived HIF-1 inhibitors and two structurally related inactive compounds. In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, manassantin B 1 , manassantin A, and 4-O-methylsaucerneol inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation with IC 50 values of 3, 3, and 20 nM, respectively. All three compounds are relatively hypoxia-specific inhibitors of HIF-1 activation, in comparison to other stimuli. The hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes CDKN1A, VEGF, and GLUT-1 were also inhibited. These compounds inhibit HIF-1 by blocking hypoxia-induced nuclear HIF-1α protein accumulation without affecting HIF-1α mRNA levels. In addition, preliminary structure-activity studies suggest specific structural requirements for this class of HIF-1 inhibitors

  20. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    OpenAIRE

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Nichols, Timothy C.; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by fu...

  1. A small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin activating enzyme for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Marc L; Milhollen, Michael A; Ciavarri, Jeff; Fleming, Paul; Traore, Tary; Sappal, Darshan; Huck, Jessica; Shi, Judy; Gavin, James; Brownell, Jim; Yang, Yu; Stringer, Bradley; Griffin, Robert; Bruzzese, Frank; Soucy, Teresa; Duffy, Jennifer; Rabino, Claudia; Riceberg, Jessica; Hoar, Kara; Lublinsky, Anya; Menon, Saurabh; Sintchak, Michael; Bump, Nancy; Pulukuri, Sai M; Langston, Steve; Tirrell, Stephen; Kuranda, Mike; Veiby, Petter; Newcomb, John; Li, Ping; Wu, Jing Tao; Powe, Josh; Dick, Lawrence R; Greenspan, Paul; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Claiborne, Chris; Amidon, Benjamin S; Bence, Neil F

    2018-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) comprises a network of enzymes that is responsible for maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. The therapeutic potential of this pathway has been validated by the clinical successes of a number of UPS modulators, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory imide drugs (IMiDs). Here we identified TAK-243 (formerly known as MLN7243) as a potent, mechanism-based small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin activating enzyme (UAE), the primary mammalian E1 enzyme that regulates the ubiquitin conjugation cascade. TAK-243 treatment caused depletion of cellular ubiquitin conjugates, resulting in disruption of signaling events, induction of proteotoxic stress, and impairment of cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair pathways. TAK-243 treatment caused death of cancer cells and, in primary human xenograft studies, demonstrated antitumor activity at tolerated doses. Due to its specificity and potency, TAK-243 allows for interrogation of ubiquitin biology and for assessment of UAE inhibition as a new approach for cancer treatment.

  2. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  3. Development of Cholinesterase Inhibitors Using (a)-Lipoic Acid-benzyl Piperazine Hybrid Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Beomcheol; Lee, Seunghwan; Jang, Mi; Shon, Min Young; Park, Jeong Ho

    2013-01-01

    A series of hybrid molecules between (α)-lipoic acid (ALA) and benzyl piperazines were synthesized and their in vitro cholinesterase [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)] inhibitory activities were evaluated. Even though the parent compounds did not show any inhibitory activity against cholinesterase (ChE), all hybrid molecules showed BuChE inhibitory activity. Some hybrid compounds also displayed AChE inhibitory activity. Specifically, ALA-1-(3-methylbenzyl)piperazine (15) was shown to be an effective inhibitor of both BuChE (IC 50 = 2.3 ± 0.7 μM) and AChE (IC 50 = 30.31 ± 0.64 μM). An inhibition kinetic study using compound 15 indicated a mixed inhibition type. Its binding affinity (K i ) value to BuChE is 2.91 ± 0.15 μM

  4. Development of Cholinesterase Inhibitors Using (a)-Lipoic Acid-benzyl Piperazine Hybrid Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beomcheol; Lee, Seunghwan; Jang, Mi; Shon, Min Young; Park, Jeong Ho [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    A series of hybrid molecules between (α)-lipoic acid (ALA) and benzyl piperazines were synthesized and their in vitro cholinesterase [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)] inhibitory activities were evaluated. Even though the parent compounds did not show any inhibitory activity against cholinesterase (ChE), all hybrid molecules showed BuChE inhibitory activity. Some hybrid compounds also displayed AChE inhibitory activity. Specifically, ALA-1-(3-methylbenzyl)piperazine (15) was shown to be an effective inhibitor of both BuChE (IC{sub 50} = 2.3 ± 0.7 μM) and AChE (IC{sub 50} = 30.31 ± 0.64 μM). An inhibition kinetic study using compound 15 indicated a mixed inhibition type. Its binding affinity (K{sub i}) value to BuChE is 2.91 ± 0.15 μM.

  5. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  6. Selective small-molecule inhibitors as chemical tools to define the roles of matrix metalloproteinases in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Jayda E; Chang, Mayland

    2017-11-01

    The focus of this article is to highlight novel inhibitors and current examples where the use of selective small-molecule inhibitors has been critical in defining the roles of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in disease. Selective small-molecule inhibitors are surgical chemical tools that can inhibit the targeted enzyme; they are the method of choice to ascertain the roles of MMPs and complement studies with knockout animals. This strategy can identify targets for therapeutic development as exemplified by the use of selective small-molecule MMP inhibitors in diabetic wound healing, spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, cancer metastasis, and viral infection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs.

  8. Statin and rottlerin small-molecule inhibitors restrict colon cancer progression and metastasis via MACC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Manisha; Kobelt, Dennis; Walther, Wolfgang; Voss, Cynthia; Smith, Janice; Specker, Edgar; Neuenschwander, Martin; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Dahlmann, Mathias; Radetzki, Silke; Preissner, Robert; von Kries, Jens Peter; Schlag, Peter Michael; Stein, Ulrike

    2017-06-01

    MACC1 (Metastasis Associated in Colon Cancer 1) is a key driver and prognostic biomarker for cancer progression and metastasis in a large variety of solid tumor types, particularly colorectal cancer (CRC). However, no MACC1 inhibitors have been identified yet. Therefore, we aimed to target MACC1 expression using a luciferase reporter-based high-throughput screening with the ChemBioNet library of more than 30,000 compounds. The small molecules lovastatin and rottlerin emerged as the most potent MACC1 transcriptional inhibitors. They remarkably inhibited MACC1 promoter activity and expression, resulting in reduced cell motility. Lovastatin impaired the binding of the transcription factors c-Jun and Sp1 to the MACC1 promoter, thereby inhibiting MACC1 transcription. Most importantly, in CRC-xenografted mice, lovastatin and rottlerin restricted MACC1 expression and liver metastasis. This is-to the best of our knowledge-the first identification of inhibitors restricting cancer progression and metastasis via the novel target MACC1. This drug repositioning might be of therapeutic value for CRC patients.

  9. The mechanism by which a propeptide-encoded pH sensor regulates spatiotemporal activation of furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Danielle M; Elferich, Johannes; Ramakrishnan, Parvathy; Thomas, Gary; Shinde, Ujwal

    2013-06-28

    The proprotein convertase furin requires the pH gradient of the secretory pathway to regulate its multistep, compartment-specific autocatalytic activation. Although His-69 within the furin prodomain serves as the pH sensor that detects transport of the propeptide-enzyme complex to the trans-Golgi network, where it promotes cleavage and release of the inhibitory propeptide, a mechanistic understanding of how His-69 protonation mediates furin activation remains unclear. Here we employ biophysical, biochemical, and computational approaches to elucidate the mechanism underlying the pH-dependent activation of furin. Structural analyses and binding experiments comparing the wild-type furin propeptide with a nonprotonatable His-69 → Leu mutant that blocks furin activation in vivo revealed protonation of His-69 reduces both the thermodynamic stability of the propeptide as well as its affinity for furin at pH 6.0. Structural modeling combined with mathematical modeling and molecular dynamic simulations suggested that His-69 does not directly contribute to the propeptide-enzyme interface but, rather, triggers movement of a loop region in the propeptide that modulates access to the cleavage site and, thus, allows for the tight pH regulation of furin activation. Our work establishes a mechanism by which His-69 functions as a pH sensor that regulates compartment-specific furin activation and provides insights into how other convertases and proteases may regulate their precise spatiotemporal activation.

  10. The Mechanism by Which a Propeptide-encoded pH Sensor Regulates Spatiotemporal Activation of Furin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Danielle M.; Elferich, Johannes; Ramakrishnan, Parvathy; Thomas, Gary; Shinde, Ujwal

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase furin requires the pH gradient of the secretory pathway to regulate its multistep, compartment-specific autocatalytic activation. Although His-69 within the furin prodomain serves as the pH sensor that detects transport of the propeptide-enzyme complex to the trans-Golgi network, where it promotes cleavage and release of the inhibitory propeptide, a mechanistic understanding of how His-69 protonation mediates furin activation remains unclear. Here we employ biophysical, biochemical, and computational approaches to elucidate the mechanism underlying the pH-dependent activation of furin. Structural analyses and binding experiments comparing the wild-type furin propeptide with a nonprotonatable His-69 → Leu mutant that blocks furin activation in vivo revealed protonation of His-69 reduces both the thermodynamic stability of the propeptide as well as its affinity for furin at pH 6.0. Structural modeling combined with mathematical modeling and molecular dynamic simulations suggested that His-69 does not directly contribute to the propeptide-enzyme interface but, rather, triggers movement of a loop region in the propeptide that modulates access to the cleavage site and, thus, allows for the tight pH regulation of furin activation. Our work establishes a mechanism by which His-69 functions as a pH sensor that regulates compartment-specific furin activation and provides insights into how other convertases and proteases may regulate their precise spatiotemporal activation. PMID:23653353

  11. Identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of a PHD finger§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Elise K.; Nath, Nidhi; Flemming, Rod; Feltenberger, John B.; Denu, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A number of histone-binding domains are implicated in cancer through improper binding of chromatin. In a clinically reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a genetic fusion protein between nucleoporin 98 and the third plant homeodomain (PHD) finger of JARID1A drives an oncogenic transcriptional program that is dependent on histone binding by the PHD finger. By exploiting the requirement for chromatin binding in oncogenesis, therapeutics targeting histone readers may represent a new paradigm in drug development. In this study, we developed a novel small molecule screening strategy that utilizes HaloTag technology to identify several small molecules that disrupt binding of the JARID1A PHD finger to histone peptides. Small molecule inhibitors were validated biochemically through affinity pull downs, fluorescence polarization, and histone reader specificity studies. One compound was modified through medicinal chemistry to improve its potency while retaining histone reader selectivity. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis of JARID1A PHD3 provided insights into the biochemical basis of competitive inhibition. PMID:22994852

  12. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, Christoph; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-01-01

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands

  13. Small-molecule MAPK inhibitors restore radioiodine incorporation in mouse thyroid cancers with conditional BRAF activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Debyani; Santos, Elmer; Ryder, Mabel; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Liao, Xiao-Hui; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Kolesnick, Richard; Thin, Tin Htwe; Rosen, Neal; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.; Refetoff, Samuel; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced human thyroid cancers, particularly those that are refractory to treatment with radioiodine (RAI), have a high prevalence of BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) mutations. However, the degree to which these cancers are dependent on BRAF expression is still unclear. To address this question, we generated mice expressing one of the most commonly detected BRAF mutations in human papillary thyroid carcinomas (BRAFV600E) in thyroid follicular cells in a doxycycline-inducible (dox-inducible) manner. Upon dox induction of BRAFV600E, the mice developed highly penetrant and poorly differentiated thyroid tumors. Discontinuation of dox extinguished BRAFV600E expression and reestablished thyroid follicular architecture and normal thyroid histology. Switching on BRAFV600E rapidly induced hypothyroidism and virtually abolished thyroid-specific gene expression and RAI incorporation, all of which were restored to near basal levels upon discontinuation of dox. Treatment of mice with these cancers with small molecule inhibitors of either MEK or mutant BRAF reduced their proliferative index and partially restored thyroid-specific gene expression. Strikingly, treatment with the MAPK pathway inhibitors rendered the tumor cells susceptible to a therapeutic dose of RAI. Our data show that thyroid tumors carrying BRAFV600E mutations are exquisitely dependent on the oncoprotein for viability and that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of its expression or activity is associated with tumor regression and restoration of RAI uptake in vivo in mice. These findings have potentially significant clinical ramifications. PMID:22105174

  14. Target Therapy Using a Small Molecule Inhibitor against Angiogenic Receptors in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Büchler

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PD173074, a small molecule inhibitor of VEGF-RII and FGF-RI, targets neoangiogenesis and mitogenesis. This study aimed to analyze a singlecompound-driven inhibition of FGF and VEGF receptors in pancreatic cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: RT-PCR and Western blots were performed to quantify protein expression and phosphorylation. Anchorage dependent and independent growth assays were used to study cell growth. With flow cytometry, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis were studied. In vivo HPAF-II and MIA PaCa-2 cells were xenografted. Animals were treated daily for 10 weeks. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify microvessel density and apoptosis. RESULTS: Highest levels of FGF-RI were detectable in MIA PaCa-2 cells, lowest in HPAF-II cells. PD173074 inhibited cell growth most prominently in cells expressing high levels of FGF-RI. Cell cycle progression was inhibited by blocking transition in the G0/G1 phase, and consequently, apoptosis was increased. In vivo significant inhibition of orthotopic tumor growth was achieved by a combination effect of inhibition of mitogenesis, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of angiogenesis in PD173074-treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: These data highlight VEGF-RII and FGF-RI as therapeutic targets and suggest a potential role for the combined use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the management of inoperable pancreatic cancer patients.

  15. Small Molecules Inspired by the Natural Product Withanolides as Potent Inhibitors of Wnt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, Michael; Kapoor, Shobhna; Schröder, Peter; Kumar, Kamal; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert

    2017-09-19

    Wnt signaling is a fundamental pathway that drives embryonic development and is essential for stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of Wnt signaling is linked to various diseases, and a constitutively active Wnt pathway drives tumorigenesis. Thus, disruption of the Wnt response is deemed a promising strategy for cancer drug discovery. However, only few clinical drug candidates that target Wnt signaling are available so far, and new small-molecule modulators of Wnt-related processes are in high demand. Here we describe the synthesis of small molecules inspired by withanolide natural products by using a pregnenolone-derived β-lactone as the key intermediate that was transformed into a δ-lactone appended to the D-ring of the steroidal scaffold. This natural-product-inspired compound library contained potent inhibitors of Wnt signaling that act upstream of the destruction complex to stabilize Axin in a tankyrase-independent manner. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The small molecule inhibitor QLT0267 Radiosensitizes squamous cell carcinoma cells of the head and neck.

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    Iris Eke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The constant increase of cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy hampers improvement of patient survival and requires novel targeting approaches. Integrin-Linked Kinase (ILK has been postulated as potent druggable cancer target. On the basis of our previous findings clearly showing that ILK transduces antisurvival signals in cells exposed to ionizing radiation, this study evaluated the impact of the small molecule inhibitor QLT0267, reported as putative ILK inhibitor, on the cellular radiation survival response of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (hHNSCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parental FaDu cells and FaDu cells stably transfected with a constitutively active ILK mutant (FaDu-IH or empty vectors, UTSCC45 cells, ILK(floxed/floxed(fl/fl and ILK(-/- mouse fibroblasts were used. Cells grew either two-dimensionally (2D on or three-dimensionally (3D in laminin-rich extracellular matrix. Cells were treated with QLT0267 alone or in combination with irradiation (X-rays, 0-6 Gy single dose. ILK knockdown was achieved by small interfering RNA transfection. ILK kinase activity, clonogenic survival, number of residual DNA double strand breaks (rDSB; gammaH2AX/53BP1 foci assay, cell cycle distribution, protein expression and phosphorylation (e.g. Akt, p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were measured. Data on ILK kinase activity and phosphorylation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK revealed a broad inhibitory spectrum of QLT0267 without specificity for ILK. QLT0267 significantly reduced basal cell survival and enhanced the radiosensitivity of FaDu and UTSCC45 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. QLT0267 exerted differential, cell culture model-dependent effects with regard to radiogenic rDSB and accumulation of cells in the G2 cell cycle phase. Relative to corresponding controls, FaDu-IH and ILK(fl/fl fibroblasts showed enhanced radiosensitivity, which failed to be antagonized by QLT0267. A

  17. Furin proteolytically processes the heparin-binding region of extracellular superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowler, Russell P; Nicks, Mike; Olsen, Dorte Aa

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that attenuates brain and lung injury from oxidative stress. A polybasic region in the carboxyl terminus distinguishes EC-SOD from other superoxide dismutases and determines EC-SOD's tissue half-life and affinity for heparin....... There are two types of EC-SOD that differ based on the presence or absence of this heparin-binding region. It has recently been shown that proteolytic removal of the heparin-binding region is an intracellular event (Enghild, J. J., Thogersen, I. B., Oury, T. D., Valnickova, Z., Hojrup, P., and Crapo, J. D...... of intracellular proteases implicate furin as a processing protease. In vitro experiments using furin and purified EC-SOD suggest that furin proteolytically cleaves EC-SOD in the middle of the polybasic region and then requires an additional carboxypeptidase to remove the remaining lysines and arginines...

  18. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo

  19. Defining RNA-Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Luo, Yiling; Tran, Tuan; Haniff, Hafeez S; Nakai, Yoshio; Fallahi, Mohammad; Martinez, Gustavo J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-22

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif-small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule-RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  20. A SMYD3 Small-Molecule Inhibitor Impairing Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Armenio Jorge; Di Virgilio, Valeria; Fittipaldi, Raffaella; Fabini, Edoardo; Bertucci, Carlo; Varchi, Greta; Moyer, Mary Pat; Caretti, Giuseppina; Del Rio, Alberto; Simone, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    SMYD3 is a histone lysine methyltransferase that plays an important role in transcriptional activation as a member of an RNA polymerase complex, and its oncogenic role has been described in different cancer types. We studied the expression and activity of SMYD3 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer (CRC) and found that it is strongly upregulated throughout tumorigenesis both at the mRNA and protein level. Our results also showed that RNAi-mediated SMYD3 ablation impairs CRC cell proliferation indicating that SMYD3 is required for proper cancer cell growth. These data, together with the importance of lysine methyltransferases as a target for drug discovery, prompted us to carry out a virtual screening to identify new SMYD3 inhibitors by testing several candidate small molecules. Here we report that one of these compounds (BCI-121) induces a significant reduction in SMYD3 activity both in vitro and in CRC cells, as suggested by the analysis of global H3K4me2/3 and H4K5me levels. Of note, the extent of cell growth inhibition by BCI-121 was similar to that observed upon SMYD3 genetic ablation. Most of the results described above were obtained in CRC; however, when we extended our observations to tumor cell lines of different origin, we found that SMYD3 inhibitors are also effective in other cancer types, such as lung, pancreatic, prostate, and ovarian. These results represent the proof of principle that SMYD3 is a druggable target and suggest that new compounds capable of inhibiting its activity may prove useful as novel therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:25728514

  1. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  2. Discovering Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeted to Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signaling Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinhong

    The receptor of advanced glycation end product (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules, which plays an important role in immune responses. Full-length RAGE includes three extracellular immunoglobulin domains, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular domain. It is a pattern recognition receptor that can bind diverse ligands. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. It is found that calgranulin binding to the C1C2 domain or AGEs binding to the V domain activates extracellular signaling, which triggers interactions of the RAGE cytoplasmic tail (ctRAGE) with intracellular effector, such as diaphanous 1 (DIAPH1), to initiate signal transduction cascades. ctRAGE is essential for RAGE-ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE is over-expressed in diseased tissues of most RAGE-associated pathogenic conditions, such as complications of Alzheimer's diseases, diabetes, vascular diseases, inflammation, cancers and neurodegeneration. They are the major diseases affecting a large population worldwide. RAGE can function as a biomarker or drug target for these diseases. The cytoplasmic tail of RAGE can be used as a drug target to inhibit RAGE-induced intracellular signaling by small molecule inhibitors to treat RAGE-associated diseases. We developed a high throughput screening assay with which we probed a small molecule library of 58,000 compounds to find that 777 small molecules displayed 50% inhibition and 97 compounds demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the binding of ctRAGE-DIAPH1. Eventually, there were 13 compounds which displayed dose-dependent inhibition of ctRAGE binding to DIAPH1 and direct binding to ctRAGE analyzed by 15N HSQC-NMR and native tryptophan fluorescence titration experiments; thus, they were

  3. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  4. ETV6-NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Hoang Thanh, E-mail: kk086406@mgs.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Ly, Bui Thi Kim [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Kano, Yasuhiko [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Tochigi Cancer Center, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Tojo, Arinobu [Division of Molecular Therapy, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Toshiki [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Sato, Yuko [Musashimurayama Hospital, Musashimurayama, Tokyo 208-0011 (Japan)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETV6-NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC412 could block ETV6-NTRK3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ETV6-NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0-91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  5. ETV6–NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Hoang Thanh; Ly, Bui Thi Kim; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tojo, Arinobu; Watanabe, Toshiki; Sato, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ETV6–NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. ► PKC412 could block ETV6–NTRK3 activation. ► Loss of ETV6–NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. ► Inhibition of ETV6–NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6–NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0–91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  6. Differential action of small molecule HER kinase inhibitors on receptor heterodimerization: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, M; Pandiella, A

    2012-07-01

    Deregulation of ErbB/HER receptor tyrosine kinases has been linked to several types of cancer. The mechanism of activation of these receptors includes establishment of receptor dimers. Here, we have analyzed the action of different small molecule HER tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) on HER receptor dimerization. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with distinct TKIs and the formation of HER2-HER3 dimers was analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation and western blot or by Förster resonance energy transfer assays. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was analyzed by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell viability. Lapatinib and neratinib interfered with ligand-induced dimerization of HER receptors; while pelitinib, gefitinib, canertinib or erlotinib did not. Moreover, lapatinib and neratinib were able to disrupt previously formed receptor dimers. Structural analyses allowed the elucidation of the mechanism by which some TKIs prevent the formation of HER receptor dimers, while others do not. Experiments aimed at defining the functional importance of dimerization indicated that TKIs that impeded dimerization prevented down-regulation of HER2 receptors, and favored the action of trastuzumab. We postulate that TKIs that prevent dimerization and down-regulation of HER2 may augment the antitumoral action of trastuzumab, and this mechanism of action should be considered in the treatment of HER2 positive tumors which combine TKIs with antireceptor antibodies. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  7. In Search of Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting the Flexible CK2 Subunit Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Bestgen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2 is a tetrameric holoenzyme composed of two catalytic (α and/or α’ subunits and two regulatory (β subunits. Crystallographic data paired with fluorescence imaging techniques have suggested that the formation of the CK2 holoenzyme complex within cells is a dynamic process. Although the monomeric CK2α subunit is endowed with a constitutive catalytic activity, many of the plethora of CK2 substrates are exclusively phosphorylated by the CK2 holoenzyme. This means that the spatial and high affinity interaction between CK2α and CK2β subunits is critically important and that its disruption may provide a powerful and selective way to block the phosphorylation of substrates requiring the presence of CK2β. In search of compounds inhibiting this critical protein–protein interaction, we previously designed an active cyclic peptide (Pc derived from the CK2β carboxy-terminal domain that can efficiently antagonize the CK2 subunit interaction. To understand the functional significance of this interaction, we generated cell-permeable versions of Pc, exploring its molecular mechanisms of action and the perturbations of the signaling pathways that it induces in intact cells. The identification of small molecules inhibitors of this critical interaction may represent the first-choice approach to manipulate CK2 in an unconventional way.

  8. Anticancer activity of a novel small molecule tubulin inhibitor STK899704.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisada Sakchaisri

    Full Text Available We have identified the small molecule STK899704 as a structurally novel tubulin inhibitor. STK899704 suppressed the proliferation of cancer cell lines from various origins with IC50 values ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 μM. STK899704 prevented the polymerization of purified tubulin in vitro and also depolymerized microtubule in cultured cells leading to mitotic arrest, associated with increased Cdc25C phosphorylation and the accumulation of both cyclin B1 and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, and apoptosis. Unlike many anticancer drugs such as Taxol and doxorubicin, STK899704 effectively displayed antiproliferative activity against multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines. The proposed binding mode of STK899704 is at the interface between αβ-tubulin heterodimer overlapping with the colchicine-binding site. Our in vivo carcinogenesis model further showed that STK 899704 is potent in both the prevention and regression of tumors, remarkably reducing the number and volume of skin tumor by STK899704 treatment. Moreover, it was significant to note that the efficacy of STK899704 was surprisingly comparable to 5-fluorouracil, a widely used anticancer therapeutic. Thus, our results demonstrate the potential of STK899704 to be developed as an anticancer chemotherapeutic and an alternative candidate for existing therapies.

  9. Optimal Classes of Chemotherapeutic Agents Sensitized by Specific Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Akt In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that transduces survival signals from survival/growth factors. Deregulation and signal imbalance in cancer cells make them prone to apoptosis. Upregulation or activation of Akt to aid the survival of cancer cells is a common theme in human malignancies. We have developed small-molecule Akt inhibitors that are potent and specific. These Akt inhibitors can inhibit Akt activity and block phosphorylation by Akt on multiple downstream targets in cells. Synergy in apoptosis induction was observed when Akt inhibitors were combined with doxorubicin or camptothecin. Akt inhibitor-induced enhancement of topoisomerase inhibitor cytotoxicity was also evident in long-term cell survival assay. Synergy with paclitaxel in apoptosis induction was evident in cells pretreated with paclitaxel, and enhancement of tumor delay by paclitaxel was demonstrated through cotreatment with Akt inhibitor Compound A (A-443654. Combination with other classes of chemotherapeutic agents did not yield any enhancement of cytotoxicity. These findings provide important guidance in selecting appropriate classes of chemotherapeutic agents for combination with Akt inhibitors in cancer treatment.

  10. DMH1, a small molecule inhibitor of BMP type i receptors, suppresses growth and invasion of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun Hao

    Full Text Available The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling cascade is aberrantly activated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC but not in normal lung epithelial cells, suggesting that blocking BMP signaling may be an effective therapeutic approach for lung cancer. Previous studies demonstrated that some BMP antagonists, which bind to extracellular BMP ligands and prevent their association with BMP receptors, dramatically reduced lung tumor growth. However, clinical application of protein-based BMP antagonists is limited by short half-lives, poor intra-tumor delivery as well as resistance caused by potential gain-of-function mutations in the downstream of the BMP pathway. Small molecule BMP inhibitors which target the intracellular BMP cascades would be ideal for anticancer drug development. In a zebrafish embryo-based structure and activity study, we previously identified a group of highly selective small molecule inhibitors specifically antagonizing the intracellular kinase domain of BMP type I receptors. In the present study, we demonstrated that DMH1, one of such inhibitors, potently reduced lung cell proliferation, promoted cell death, and decreased cell migration and invasion in NSCLC cells by blocking BMP signaling, as indicated by suppression of Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation and gene expression of Id1, Id2 and Id3. Additionally, DMH1 treatment significantly reduced the tumor growth in human lung cancer xenograft model. In conclusion, our study indicates that small molecule inhibitors of BMP type I receptors may offer a promising novel strategy for lung cancer treatment.

  11. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-κB activation and nuclear translocation in an IκBα-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor IκB kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations

  12. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Perry

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin (Ub is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs. However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR. WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1 through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  13. Effects of 31 FDA approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors on isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Salminen, Alec; Yang, Xi; Luo, Yong; Wu, Qiangen; White, Matthew; Greenhaw, James; Ren, Lijun; Bryant, Matthew; Salminen, William; Papoian, Thomas; Mattes, William; Shi, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    The FDA has approved 31 small-molecule kinase inhibitors (KIs) for human use as of November 2016, with six having black box warnings for hepatotoxicity (BBW-H) in product labeling. The precise mechanisms and risk factors for KI-induced hepatotoxicity are poorly understood. Here, the 31 KIs were tested in isolated rat liver mitochondria, an in vitro system recently proposed to be a useful tool to predict drug-induced hepatotoxicity in humans. The KIs were incubated with mitochondria or submitochondrial particles at concentrations ranging from therapeutic maximal blood concentrations (Cmax) levels to 100-fold Cmax levels. Ten endpoints were measured, including oxygen consumption rate, inner membrane potential, cytochrome c release, swelling, reactive oxygen species, and individual respiratory chain complex (I-V) activities. Of the 31 KIs examined only three including sorafenib, regorafenib and pazopanib, all of which are hepatotoxic, caused significant mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations equal to the Cmax, indicating that mitochondrial toxicity likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity associated with these KIs. At concentrations equal to 100-fold Cmax, 18 KIs were found to be toxic to mitochondria, and among six KIs with BBW-H, mitochondrial injury was induced by regorafenib, lapatinib, idelalisib, and pazopanib, but not ponatinib, or sunitinib. Mitochondrial liability at 100-fold Cmax had a positive predictive power (PPV) of 72% and negative predictive power (NPV) of 33% in predicting human KI hepatotoxicity as defined by product labeling, with the sensitivity and specificity being 62% and 44%, respectively. Similar predictive power was obtained using the criterion of Cmax ≥1.1 µM or daily dose ≥100 mg. Mitochondrial liability at 1-2.5-fold Cmax showed a 100% PPV and specificity, though the NPV and sensitivity were 32% and 14%, respectively. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into KI hepatotoxicity and indicate that

  14. Small molecule inhibitors of the annexin A2 heterotetramer prevent human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodham, Andrew W; Taylor, Julia R; Jimenez, Andrew I; Skeate, Joseph G; Schmidt, Thomas; Brand, Heike E; Da Silva, Diane M; Kast, W Martin

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection leads to the development of several human cancers that cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. HPV type 16 (HPV16) is the most common of the cancer-causing genotypes and gains entry to the basal cells of the epithelium through a non-canonical endocytic pathway that involves the annexin A2/S100A10 heterotetramer (A2t). A2t is composed of two annexin A2 monomers bound to an S100A10 dimer and this interaction is a potential target to block HPV16 infection. Here, recently identified small molecule inhibitors of A2t (A2ti) were investigated for their ability to prevent HPV16 infection in vitro. A2ti were added to HeLa cells in increasing concentrations prior to the addition of HPV16. Cytotoxicity was evaluated via trypan blue exclusion. HPV16 pseudovirion infection and fluorescently labelled HPV16 capsid internalization was measured with flow cytometry. A2ti blocked HPV16 infection by 100% without substantial cellular toxicity or reduction in cell growth. Furthermore, A2ti blocked HPV16 entry into epithelial cells by 65%, indicating that the observed inhibition of HPV16 infection is in part due to a block in entry and that non-infectious entry may occur in the absence of A2t binding. These results demonstrate that targeting A2t may be an effective strategy to prevent HPV16 infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the Shigella flexneri Master Virulence Regulator VirF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Osaka, Ichie; Skredenske, Jeff M.; Kettle, Bria; Hefty, P. Scott; Li, Jiaqin

    2013-01-01

    VirF is an AraC family transcriptional activator that is required for the expression of virulence genes associated with invasion and cell-to-cell spread by Shigella flexneri, including multiple components of the type three secretion system (T3SS) machinery and effectors. We tested a small-molecule compound, SE-1 (formerly designated OSSL_051168), which we had identified as an effective inhibitor of the AraC family proteins RhaS and RhaR, for its ability to inhibit VirF. Cell-based reporter gene assays with Escherichia coli and Shigella, as well as in vitro DNA binding assays with purified VirF, demonstrated that SE-1 inhibited DNA binding and transcription activation (likely by blocking DNA binding) by VirF. Analysis of mRNA levels using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) further demonstrated that SE-1 reduced the expression of the VirF-dependent virulence genes icsA, virB, icsB, and ipaB in Shigella. We also performed eukaryotic cell invasion assays and found that SE-1 reduced invasion by Shigella. The effect of SE-1 on invasion required preincubation of Shigella with SE-1, in agreement with the hypothesis that SE-1 inhibited the expression of VirF-activated genes required for the formation of the T3SS apparatus and invasion. We found that the same concentrations of SE-1 had no detectable effects on the growth or metabolism of the bacterial cells or the eukaryotic host cells, respectively, indicating that the inhibition of invasion was not due to general toxicity. Overall, SE-1 appears to inhibit transcription activation by VirF, exhibits selectivity toward AraC family proteins, and has the potential to be developed into a novel antibacterial agent. PMID:24002059

  16. Yeast based small molecule screen for inhibitors of SARS-CoV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Frieman

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory coronavirus (SARS-CoV emerged in 2002, resulting in roughly 8000 cases worldwide and 10% mortality. The animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV precursors still exist and the likelihood of future outbreaks in the human population is high. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLP is an attractive target for pharmaceutical development because it is essential for virus replication and is conserved among human coronaviruses. A yeast-based assay was established for PLP activity that relies on the ability of PLP to induce a pronounced slow-growth phenotype when expressed in S. cerevisiae. Induction of the slow-growth phenotype was shown to take place over a 60-hour time course, providing the basis for conducting a screen for small molecules that restore growth by inhibiting the function of PLP. Five chemical suppressors of the slow-growth phenotype were identified from the 2000 member NIH Diversity Set library. One of these, NSC158362, potently inhibited SARS-CoV replication in cell culture without toxic effects on cells, and it specifically inhibited SARS-CoV replication but not influenza virus replication. The effect of NSC158362 on PLP protease, deubiquitinase and anti-interferon activities was investigated but the compound did not alter these activities. Another suppressor, NSC158011, demonstrated the ability to inhibit PLP protease activity in a cell-based assay. The identification of these inhibitors demonstrated a strong functional connection between the PLP-based yeast assay, the inhibitory compounds, and SARS-CoV biology. Furthermore the data with NSC158362 suggest a novel mechanism for inhibition of SARS-CoV replication that may involve an unknown activity of PLP, or alternatively a direct effect on a cellular target that modifies or bypasses PLP function in yeast and mammalian cells.

  17. A historical overview of protein kinases and their targeted small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2015-10-01

    catalytic subunits. PKA and all other protein kinase domains have a small amino-terminal lobe and large carboxyterminal lobe as determined by X-ray crystallography. The N-lobe and C-lobe form a cleft that serves as a docking site for MgATP. Nearly all active protein kinases contain a K/E/D/D signature sequence that plays important structural and catalytic roles. Protein kinases contain hydrophobic catalytic and regulatory spines and collateral shell residues that are required to assemble the active enzyme. There are two general kinds of conformational changes associated with most protein kinases. The first conformational change involves the formation of an intact regulatory spine to form an active enzyme. The second conformational change occurs in active kinases as they toggle between open and closed conformations during their catalytic cycles. Because mutations and dysregulation of protein kinases play causal roles in human disease, this family of enzymes has become one of the most important drug targets over the past two decades. Imatinib was approved by the United States FDA for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia in 2001; this small molecule inhibits the BCR-Abl protein kinase oncoprotein that results from the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome. More than two dozen other orally effective mechanism-based small molecule protein kinase inhibitors have been subsequently approved by the FDA. These drugs bind to the ATP-binding site of their target enzymes and extend into nearby hydrophobic pockets. Most of these protein kinase inhibitors prolong survival in cancer patients only weeks or months longer than standard cytotoxic therapies. In contrast, the clinical effectiveness of imatinib against chronic myelogenous leukemia is vastly superior to that of any other targeted protein kinase inhibitor with overall survival lasting a decade or more. However, the near universal and expected development of drug resistance in the treatment of neoplastic disorders

  18. Small Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of ErbB2/HER2/Neu in the Treatment of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Schroeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is a member of the erbB class of tyrosine kinase receptors. These proteins are normally expressed at the surface of healthy cells and play critical roles in the signal transduction cascade in a myriad of biochemical pathways responsible for cell growth and differentiation. However, it is widely known that amplification and subsequent overexpression of the HER2 encoding oncogene results in unregulated cell proliferation in an aggressive form of breast cancer known as HER2-positive breast cancer. Existing therapies such as trastuzumab (Herceptin® and lapatinib (Tyverb/Tykerb®, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor and a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, respectively, are currently used in the treatment of HER2-positive cancers, although issues with high recurrence and acquired resistance still remain. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide attractive therapeutic targets, as they are able to block cell signaling associated with many of the proposed mechanisms for HER2 resistance. In this regard we aim to present a review on the available HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as those currently in development. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as sequential or combinatorial therapeutic strategies with other HER family inhibitors is also discussed.

  19. Immune responses to the smallpox vaccine given in combination with ST-246, a small-molecule inhibitor of poxvirus dissemination

    OpenAIRE

    Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Jordan, Robert; King, David S.; Berhanu, Aklile; Warren, Travis K.; Kirkwood-Watts, Dana L.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Tan, Ying; Wilson, Rebecca L.; Jones, Kevin F.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2007-01-01

    The re-emerging threat of smallpox and the emerging threat of monkeypox highlight the need for effective poxvirus countermeasures. Currently approved smallpox vaccines have unacceptable safety profiles and, consequently, the general populace is no longer vaccinated, leading to an increasingly susceptible population. ST-246, a small-molecule inhibitor of poxvirus dissemination, has been demonstrated in various animal models to be safe and effective in preventing poxviral disease. This suggests...

  20. Screening of Potential Lead Molecule as Novel MurE Inhibitor: Virtual Screening, Molecular Dynamics and In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Kunal; Kiranmayi, Patnala

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of multi-drug resistance S. aureus is one of the most challenging tasks for the treatment of nosocomial infections. Proteins and enzymes of peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway are one among the well-studied targets, but many of the enzymes are unexplored as targets. MurE is one such enzyme featured to be a promising target. As MurE plays an important role in ligating the L-lys to stem peptide at third position that is crucial for peptidoglycan synthesis. To screen the potential MurE inhibitor by in silico approach and evaluate the best potential lead molecule by in vitro methods. In the current study, we have employed structure based virtual screening targeting the active site of MurE, followed by Molecular dynamics and in vitro studies. Virtual screening resulted in successful screening of potential lead molecule ((2R)-2-[[1-[(2R)- 2-(benzyloxycarbonylamino) propanoyl] piperidine-4-carbonyl]amino]-5-guanidino-pentan). The molecular dynamics of the MurE and Lead molecule complex emphasizes that lead molecule has shown stable interactions with active site residues Asp 406 and with Glu 460. In vitro studies demonstrate that the lead molecule shows antibacterial activity close to standard antibiotic Vancomycin and higher than that of Ampicillin, Streptomycin and Rifampicin. The MIC of lead molecule at 50μg/mL was observed to be 3.75 μg/mL, MBC being bactericidal with value of 6.25 μg/mL, cytotoxicity showing 34.44% and IC50 of 40.06μg/mL. These results suggest ((2R)-2-[[1-[(2R)-2-(benzyloxycarbonylamino) propanoyl] piperidine-4-carbonyl]amino]-5-guanidino-pentan) as a promising lead molecule for developing a MurE inhibitor against treatment of S. aureus infections. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrostatic similarities between protein and small molecule ligands facilitate the design of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnout Voet

    Full Text Available One of the underlying principles in drug discovery is that a biologically active compound is complimentary in shape and molecular recognition features to its receptor. This principle infers that molecules binding to the same receptor may share some common features. Here, we have investigated whether the electrostatic similarity can be used for the discovery of small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors (SMPPIIs. We have developed a method that can be used to evaluate the similarity of electrostatic potentials between small molecules and known protein ligands. This method was implemented in a software called EleKit. Analyses of all available (at the time of research SMPPII structures indicate that SMPPIIs bear some similarities of electrostatic potential with the ligand proteins of the same receptor. This is especially true for the more polar SMPPIIs. Retrospective analysis of several successful SMPPIIs has shown the applicability of EleKit in the design of new SMPPIIs.

  3. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  4. Evaluation of EML4-ALK Fusion Proteins in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Small Molecule Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The echinoderm microtubule–associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK fusion gene resulting from an inversion within chromosome 2p occurs in approximately 5% of non–small cell lung cancer and is mu-tually exclusive with Ras and EGFR mutations. In this study, we have used a potent and selective ALK small molecule inhibitor, NPV-TAE684, to assess the oncogenic role of EML4-ALK in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We show here that TAE684 inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor regression in two NSCLC models that harbor EML4-ALK fusions. TAE684 inhibits EML4-ALK activation and its downstream signaling including ERK, AKT, and STAT3. We used microarray analysis to carry out targeted pathway studies of gene expression changes in H2228 NSCLC xenograft model after TAE684 treatment and identified a gene signature of EML4-ALK inhibition. The gene signature represents 1210 known human genes, and the top biologic processes represented by these genes are cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell death. We also compared the effect of TAE684 with PF2341066, a c-Met and ALK small molecule inhibitor currently in clinical trial in cancers harboring ALK fusions, and demonstrated that TAE684 is a much more potent inhibitor of EML4-ALK. Our data demonstrate that EML4-ALK plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a subset of NSCLC and provides insight into the mech-anism of EML4-ALK inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor.

  5. Small-molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein/StarD2 identified by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Neil; Xian, Jun; Shishova, Ekaterina Y; Wei, Jie; Glicksman, Marcie A; Cuny, Gregory D; Stein, Ross L; Cohen, David E

    2008-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, also referred to as StarD2) is a highly specific intracellular lipid-binding protein that catalyzes the transfer of phosphatidylcholines between membranes in vitro. Recent studies have suggested that PC-TP in vivo functions to regulate fatty acid and glucose metabolism, possibly via interactions with selected other proteins. To begin to address the relationship between activity in vitro and biological function, we undertook a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity of PC-TP. After adapting a fluorescence quench assay to measure phosphatidylcholine transfer activity, we screened 114,752 compounds of a small-molecule library. The high-throughput screen identified 14 potential PC-TP inhibitors. Of these, 6 compounds exhibited characteristics consistent with specific inhibition of PC-TP activity, with IC(50) values that ranged from 4.1 to 95.0muM under conditions of the in vitro assay. These compounds should serve as valuable reagents to elucidate the biological function of PC-TP. Because mice with homozygous disruption of the PC-TP gene (Pctp) are sensitized to insulin action and relatively resistant to the development of atherosclerosis, these inhibitors may also prove to be of value in the management of diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Call for Action: Invasive Fungal Infections Associated With Ibrutinib and Other Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors Targeting Immune Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamilos, Georgios; Lionakis, Michail S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2018-01-06

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and ubiquitous airborne filamentous fungi have been recently reported in patients with hematological cancers historically considered at low risk for invasive fungal infections (IFIs), after receipt of the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. The spectrum and severity of IFIs often observed in these patients implies the presence of a complex immunodeficiency that may not be solely attributed to mere inhibition of Bruton tyrosine kinase. In view of the surge in development of small molecule kinase inhibitors for treatment of malignant and autoimmune diseases, it is possible that there would be an emergence of IFIs associated with the effects of these molecules on the immune system. Preclinical assessment of the immunosuppressive effects of kinase inhibitors and human studies aimed at improving patient risk stratification for development of IFIs could lead to prevention, earlier diagnosis, and better outcomes in affected patients. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Small-molecule inhibitors of Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3 related kinase (ATR) sensitize lymphoma cells to UVA radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskup, Edyta; Naym, David Gram; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    inhibited by small molecule antagonists VE-821, VE-822 or Chir-124, or by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Cell cycle and viability were assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Small molecule inhibitors of ATR and Chk1 potently sensitized all cell lines to PUVA and, importantly, also to UVA, which by itself...... did not cause apoptotic response. VE-821/2 blocked ATR pathway activation and released the cells from the G2/M block caused by UVA and PUVA, but did not affect apoptosis caused by other chemotherapeutics (etoposide, gemcitabine, doxorubicine) or by hydrogen peroxide. Knockdown of ATR and Chk1 with si......RNA also blocked the ATR pathway and released the cells from G2/M block but did not sensitize the cells to UVA as observed with the small molecule inhibitors. The latter suggested that the synergism between VE-821/2 or Chir-124 and UVA was not solely caused by specific blocking of ATR kinase but also ATR...

  8. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JM, and the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study Investigators. Validation of Nijmegen-Bethesda assay modifications to allow inhibitor ... webinars on blood disorders Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  9. Small molecule inhibitors of the Candida albicans budded-to-hyphal transition act through multiple signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Midkiff

    Full Text Available The ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans to interconvert between budded and hyphal growth states, herein termed the budded-to-hyphal transition (BHT, is important for C. albicans development and virulence. The BHT is under the control of multiple cell signaling pathways that respond to external stimuli, including nutrient availability, high temperature, and pH. Previous studies identified 21 small molecules that could inhibit the C. albicans BHT in response to carbon limitation in Spider media. However, the studies herein show that the BHT inhibitors had varying efficacies in other hyphal-inducing media, reflecting their varying abilities to block signaling pathways associated with the different media. Chemical epistasis analyses suggest that most, but not all, of the BHT inhibitors were acting through either the Efg1 or Cph1 signaling pathways. Notably, the BHT inhibitor clozapine, a FDA-approved drug used to treat atypical schizophrenia by inhibiting G-protein-coupled dopamine receptors in the brain, and several of its functional analogs were shown to act at the level of the Gpr1 G-protein-coupled receptor. These studies are the first step in determining the target and mechanism of action of these BHT inhibitors, which may have therapeutic anti-fungal utility in the future.

  10. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay.Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics.The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  11. Novel p38α MAP kinase inhibitors identified from yoctoReactor DNA-encoded small molecule library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L. K.; Blakskjær, P.; Chaikuad, A.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific and potent (7 nM cellular IC50) inhibitor of p38α kinase was identified directly from a 12.6 million membered DNA-encoded small molecule library. This was achieved using the high fidelity yoctoReactor technology (yR) for preparing the DNA-encoded library, and a homogeneous...... interactions. Moreover, the crystal structure showed, that although buried in the p38α active site, the original DNA attachment point of the compound was accessible through a channel created by the distorted P-loop conformation. This study demonstrates the usability of DNA-encoded library technologies...

  12. Implication of Crystal Water Molecules in Inhibitor Binding at ALR2 Active Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hymavati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding.

  13. Fragment-based lead discovery of small molecule inhibitors for the EPHA4 receptor tyrosine kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linden, O.P.J.; Farenc, C; Zoutman, W.H.; Hameetman, L; Wijtmans, M.; Leurs, R.; Tensen, C.P.; Siegal, G.; de Esch, I.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The in silico identification, optimization and crystallographic characterization of a 6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-3H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]isoquinolin-1-amine scaffold as an inhibitor for the EPHA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is described. A database containing commercially available compounds was subjected to an in

  14. Assessing Subunit Dependency of the Plasmodium Proteasome Using Small Molecule Inhibitors and Active Site Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Florea, B.I.; McAllister, F.E.; Govindaswamy, K.; Elias, J.E.; Bhanot, P.; Overkleeft, H.S.; Bogyo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention for pathogens such as Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria. However, due to the essential nature of this proteolytic pathway, proteasome inhibitors must avoid inhibition of the host enzyme complex to

  15. The small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 disrupts the chordamesoderm to notochord transition in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó Gábor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Key molecules involved in notochord differentiation and function have been identified through genetic analysis in zebrafish and mice, but MEK1 and 2 have so far not been implicated in this process due to early lethality (Mek1-/- and functional redundancy (Mek2-/- in the knockout animals. Results Here, we reveal a potential role for Mek1/2 during notochord development by using the small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 which blocks phosphorylation of the Mek1/2 target gene Erk1/2 in vivo. Applying the inhibitor from early gastrulation until the 18-somite stage produces a specific and consistent phenotype with lack of dark pigmentation, shorter tail and an abnormal, undulated notochord. Using morphological analysis, in situ hybridization, immunhistochemistry, TUNEL staining and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that in treated embryos the chordamesoderm to notochord transition is disrupted and identify disorganization in the medial layer of the perinotochordal basement mebrane as the probable cause of the undulations and bulges in the notochord. We also examined and excluded FGF as the upstream signal during this process. Conclusion Using the small chemical U0126, we have established a novel link between MAPK-signaling and notochord differentiation. Our phenotypic analysis suggests a potential connection between the MAPK-pathway, the COPI-mediated intracellular transport and/or the copper-dependent posttranslational regulatory processes during notochord differentiation.

  16. Single-molecule supercoil-relaxation assay as a screening tool to determine the mechanism and efficacy of human topoisomerase IB inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Zhang, Hongliang; Agama, Keli; Lorence, Nicholas; Pommier, Yves; Neuman, Keir C.

    2015-01-01

    Human nuclear type IB topoisomerase (Top1) inhibitors are widely used and powerful anti-cancer agents. In this study, we introduce and validate a single-molecule supercoil relaxation assay as a molecular pharmacology tool for characterizing therapeutically relevant Top1 inhibitors. Using this assay, we determined the effects on Top1 supercoil relaxation activity of four Top1 inhibitors; three clinically relevant: camptothecin, LMP-400, LMP-776 (both indenoisoquinoline derivatives), and one natural product in preclinical development, lamellarin-D. Our results demonstrate that Top1 inhibitors have two distinct effects on Top1 activity: a decrease in supercoil relaxation rate and an increase in religation inhibition. The type and magnitude of the inhibition mode depend both on the specific inhibitor and on the topology of the DNA substrate. In general, the efficacy of inhibition is significantly higher with supercoiled than with relaxed DNA substrates. Comparing single-molecule inhibition with cell growth inhibition (IC50) measurements showed a correlation between the binding time of the Top1 inhibitors and their cytotoxic efficacy, independent of the mode of inhibition. This study demonstrates that the single-molecule supercoil relaxation assay is a sensitive method to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of Top1 inhibitors and is relevant for the cellular efficacy of Top1 inhibitors. PMID:26351326

  17. Antiinfective therapy with a small molecule inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus sortase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Zhu, Kongkai; Gong, Shouzhe; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Wang, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiafei; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Ruihan; Zhou, Lu; Lan, Lefu; Jiang, Hualiang; Schneewind, Olaf; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2014-09-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most frequent cause of hospital-acquired infection, which manifests as surgical site infections, bacteremia, and sepsis. Due to drug-resistance, prophylaxis of MRSA infection with antibiotics frequently fails or incites nosocomial diseases such as Clostridium difficile infection. Sortase A is a transpeptidase that anchors surface proteins in the envelope of S. aureus, and sortase mutants are unable to cause bacteremia or sepsis in mice. Here we used virtual screening and optimization of inhibitor structure to identify 3-(4-pyridinyl)-6-(2-sodiumsulfonatephenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole and related compounds, which block sortase activity in vitro and in vivo. Sortase inhibitors do not affect in vitro staphylococcal growth yet protect mice against lethal S. aureus bacteremia. Thus, sortase inhibitors may be useful as antiinfective therapy to prevent hospital-acquired S. aureus infection in high-risk patients without the side effects of antibiotics.

  18. Identification of Small Molecule Translesion Synthesis Inhibitors That Target the Rev1-CT/RIR Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sail, Vibhavari; Rizzo, Alessandro A; Chatterjee, Nimrat; Dash, Radha C; Ozen, Zuleyha; Walker, Graham C; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Hadden, M Kyle

    2017-07-21

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is an important mechanism through which proliferating cells tolerate DNA damage during replication. The mutagenic Rev1/Polζ-dependent branch of TLS helps cancer cells survive first-line genotoxic chemotherapy and introduces mutations that can contribute to the acquired resistance so often observed with standard anticancer regimens. As such, inhibition of Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS has recently emerged as a strategy to enhance the efficacy of first-line chemotherapy and reduce the acquisition of chemoresistance by decreasing tumor mutation rate. The TLS DNA polymerase Rev1 serves as an integral scaffolding protein that mediates the assembly of the active multiprotein TLS complexes. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between the C-terminal domain of Rev1 (Rev1-CT) and the Rev1-interacting region (RIR) of other TLS DNA polymerases play an essential role in regulating TLS activity. To probe whether disrupting the Rev1-CT/RIR PPI is a valid approach for developing a new class of targeted anticancer agents, we designed a fluorescence polarization-based assay that was utilized in a pilot screen for small molecule inhibitors of this PPI. Two small molecule scaffolds that disrupt this interaction were identified, and secondary validation assays confirmed that compound 5 binds to Rev1-CT at the RIR interface. Finally, survival and mutagenesis assays in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells treated with cisplatin and ultraviolet light indicate that these compounds inhibit mutagenic Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS in cells, validating the Rev1-CT/RIR PPI for future anticancer drug discovery and identifying the first small molecule inhibitors of TLS that target Rev1-CT.

  19. Inhibition of TLR2 signaling by small molecule inhibitors targeting a pocket within the TLR2 TIR domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Laird, Michelle H. W.; Schwarz, Ryan S.; Greene, Shannon; Dyson, Tristan; Snyder, Greg A.; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Chauhan, Jay; Fletcher, Steven; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by dimerization of intracellular Toll/IL-1 receptor resistance (TIR) domains. For all TLRs except TLR3, recruitment of the adapter, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), to TLR TIR domains results in downstream signaling culminating in proinflammatory cytokine production. Therefore, blocking TLR TIR dimerization may ameliorate TLR2-mediated hyperinflammatory states. The BB loop within the TLR TIR domain is critical for mediating certain protein–protein interactions. Examination of the human TLR2 TIR domain crystal structure revealed a pocket adjacent to the highly conserved P681 and G682 BB loop residues. Using computer-aided drug design (CADD), we sought to identify a small molecule inhibitor(s) that would fit within this pocket and potentially disrupt TLR2 signaling. In silico screening identified 149 compounds and 20 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs based on their predicted ability to bind in the BB loop pocket. These compounds were screened in HEK293T-TLR2 transfectants for the ability to inhibit TLR2-mediated IL-8 mRNA. C16H15NO4 (C29) was identified as a potential TLR2 inhibitor. C29, and its derivative, ortho-vanillin (o-vanillin), inhibited TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 signaling induced by synthetic and bacterial TLR2 agonists in human HEK-TLR2 and THP-1 cells, but only TLR2/1 signaling in murine macrophages. C29 failed to inhibit signaling induced by other TLR agonists and TNF-α. Mutagenesis of BB loop pocket residues revealed an indispensable role for TLR2/1, but not TLR2/6, signaling, suggesting divergent roles. Mice treated with o-vanillin exhibited reduced TLR2-induced inflammation. Our data provide proof of principle that targeting the BB loop pocket is an effective approach for identification of TLR2 signaling inhibitors. PMID:25870276

  20. Discovery of a small-molecule inhibitor of Dvl-CXXC5 interaction by computational approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songling; Choi, Jiwon; Jin, Xuemei; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Weontae; Choi, Kang-Yell; No, Kyoung Tai

    2018-05-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a significant role in the control of osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. CXXC finger protein 5 (CXXC5) has been recently identified as a negative feedback regulator of osteoblast differentiation through a specific interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) protein. It was reported that targeting the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction could be a novel anabolic therapeutic target for osteoporosis. In this study, complex structure of Dvl PDZ domain and CXXC5 peptide was simulated with molecular dynamics (MD). Based on the structural analysis of binding modes of MD-simulated Dvl PDZ domain with CXXC5 peptide and crystal Dvl PDZ domain with synthetic peptide-ligands, we generated two different pharmacophore models and applied pharmacophore-based virtual screening to discover potent inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction for the anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Analysis of 16 compounds selected by means of a virtual screening protocol yielded four compounds that effectively disrupted the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction in the fluorescence polarization assay. Potential compounds were validated by fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. We successfully identified a highly potent inhibitor, BMD4722, which directly binds to the Dvl PDZ domain and disrupts the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction. Overall, CXXC5-Dvl PDZ domain complex based pharmacophore combined with various traditional and simple computational methods is a promising approach for the development of modulators targeting the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction, and the potent inhibitor BMD4722 could serve as a starting point to discover or design more potent and specific the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction disruptors.

  1. Discovery of a small-molecule inhibitor of Dvl-CXXC5 interaction by computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songling; Choi, Jiwon; Jin, Xuemei; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Weontae; Choi, Kang-Yell; No, Kyoung Tai

    2018-04-07

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a significant role in the control of osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. CXXC finger protein 5 (CXXC5) has been recently identified as a negative feedback regulator of osteoblast differentiation through a specific interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) protein. It was reported that targeting the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction could be a novel anabolic therapeutic target for osteoporosis. In this study, complex structure of Dvl PDZ domain and CXXC5 peptide was simulated with molecular dynamics (MD). Based on the structural analysis of binding modes of MD-simulated Dvl PDZ domain with CXXC5 peptide and crystal Dvl PDZ domain with synthetic peptide-ligands, we generated two different pharmacophore models and applied pharmacophore-based virtual screening to discover potent inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction for the anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Analysis of 16 compounds selected by means of a virtual screening protocol yielded four compounds that effectively disrupted the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction in the fluorescence polarization assay. Potential compounds were validated by fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. We successfully identified a highly potent inhibitor, BMD4722, which directly binds to the Dvl PDZ domain and disrupts the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction. Overall, CXXC5-Dvl PDZ domain complex based pharmacophore combined with various traditional and simple computational methods is a promising approach for the development of modulators targeting the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction, and the potent inhibitor BMD4722 could serve as a starting point to discover or design more potent and specific the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction disruptors.

  2. Potent host-directed small-molecule inhibitors of myxovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A Krumm

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid

  3. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Pharmacokinetic drivers of toxicity for basic molecules: Strategy to lower pKa results in decreased tissue exposure and toxicity for a small molecule Met inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Dolores; Ford, Kevin A.; Hartley, Dylan P.; Harstad, Eric B.; Cain, Gary R.; Achilles-Poon, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung; Peng, Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Merchant, Mark; Sutherlin, Daniel P.; Gaudino, John J.; Kaus, Robert; Lewin-Koh, Sock C.; Choo, Edna F.; Liederer, Bianca M.; Dambach, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Several toxicities are clearly driven by free drug concentrations in plasma, such as toxicities related to on-target exaggerated pharmacology or off-target pharmacological activity associated with receptors, enzymes or ion channels. However, there are examples in which organ toxicities appear to correlate better with total drug concentrations in the target tissues, rather than with free drug concentrations in plasma. Here we present a case study in which a small molecule Met inhibitor, GEN-203, with significant liver and bone marrow toxicity in preclinical species was modified with the intention of increasing the safety margin. GEN-203 is a lipophilic weak base as demonstrated by its physicochemical and structural properties: high LogD (distribution coefficient) (4.3) and high measured pKa (7.45) due to the basic amine (N-ethyl-3-fluoro-4-aminopiperidine). The physicochemical properties of GEN-203 were hypothesized to drive the high distribution of this compound to tissues as evidenced by a moderately-high volume of distribution (Vd > 3 l/kg) in mouse and subsequent toxicities of the compound. Specifically, the basicity of GEN-203 was decreased through addition of a second fluorine in the 3-position of the aminopiperidine to yield GEN-890 (N-ethyl-3,3-difluoro-4-aminopiperidine), which decreased the volume of distribution of the compound in mouse (Vd = 1.0 l/kg), decreased its tissue drug concentrations and led to decreased toxicity in mice. This strategy suggests that when toxicity is driven by tissue drug concentrations, optimization of the physicochemical parameters that drive tissue distribution can result in decreased drug concentrations in tissues, resulting in lower toxicity and improved safety margins. -- Highlights: ► Lower pKa for a small molecule: reduced tissue drug levels and toxicity. ► New analysis tools to assess electrostatic effects and ionization are presented. ► Chemical and PK drivers of toxicity can be leveraged to improve safety.

  5. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B. M. A.; Santos, J. D. L.; Xavier, B. M.; Almeida, J. R.; Resende, L. M.; Martins, W.; Marcussi, S.; Marangoni, S.; Stábeli, R. G.; Calderon, L. A.; Soares, A. M.; Da Silva, S. L.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites. PMID:24171158

  6. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. A. Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites.

  7. A small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tryptophan synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Samantha; Nag, Partha P.; Michalska, Karolina; Johnston, Stephen E.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Kaushik, Virendar K.; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Siddiqi, Noman; McCarren, Patrick; Bajrami, Besnik; Maltseva, Natalia I.; Combs, Senya; Fisher, Stewart L.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2017-07-03

    New antibiotics with novel targets are greatly needed. Bacteria have numerous essential functions, but only a small fraction of such processes—primarily those involved in macromolecular synthesis—are inhibited by current drugs. Targeting metabolic enzymes has been the focus of recent interest, but effective inhibitors have been difficult to identify. We describe a synthetic azetidine derivative, BRD4592, that kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) through allosteric inhibition of tryptophan synthase (TrpAB), a previously untargeted, highly allosterically regulated enzyme. BRD4592 binds at the TrpAB a–b-subunit interface and affects multiple steps in the enzyme’s overall reaction, resulting in inhibition not easily overcome by changes in metabolic environment. We show that TrpAB is required for the survival of Mtb and Mycobacterium marinum in vivo and that this requirement may be independent of an adaptive immune response. This work highlights the effectiveness of allosteric inhibition for targeting proteins that are naturally highly dynamic and that are essential in vivo, despite their apparent dispensability under in vitro conditions, and suggests a framework for the discovery of a next generation of allosteric inhibitors.

  8. A small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tryptophan synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Samantha; Nag, Partha P.; Michalska, Karolina; Johnston, Stephen E.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Kaushik, Virendar K.; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Siddiqi, Noman; McCarren, Patrick; Bajrami, Besnik; Maltseva, Natalia I.; Combs, Senya; Fisher, Stewart L.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2017-07-03

    New antibiotics with novel targets are greatly needed. Bacteria have numerous essential functions, but only a small fraction of such processes—primarily those involved in macromolecular synthesis—are inhibited by current drugs. Targeting metabolic enzymes has been the focus of recent interest, but effective inhibitors have been difficult to identify. We describe a synthetic azetidine derivative, BRD4592, that kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) through allosteric inhibition of tryptophan synthase (TrpAB), a previously untargeted, highly allosterically regulated enzyme. BRD4592 binds at the TrpAB α–β-subunit interface and affects multiple steps in the enzyme's overall reaction, resulting in inhibition not easily overcome by changes in metabolic environment. We show that TrpAB is required for the survival of Mtb and Mycobacterium marinum in vivo and that this requirement may be independent of an adaptive immune response. This work highlights the effectiveness of allosteric inhibition for targeting proteins that are naturally highly dynamic and that are essential in vivo, despite their apparent dispensability under in vitro conditions, and suggests a framework for the discovery of a next generation of allosteric inhibitors.

  9. A Novel Small-molecule WNT Inhibitor, IC-2, Has the Potential to Suppress Liver Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Kenzo; Sakabe, Tomohiko; Itaba, Noriko; Azumi, Junya; Oka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Minoru; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Shiota, Goshi

    2017-07-01

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) contributes to metastasis, recurrence, and resistance to chemo/radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The WNT signaling pathway is reportedly linked to the maintenance of stemness of CSCs. In the present study, in order to eliminate liver CSCs and improve the prognosis of patients with HCC, we explored whether small-molecule compounds targeting WNT signaling pathway suppress liver CSCs. The screening was performed using cell proliferation assay and reporter assay. We next investigated whether these compounds suppress liver CSC properties by using flow cytometric analysis and sphere-formation assays. A mouse xenograft model transplanted with CD44-positive HuH7 cells was used to examine the in vivo antitumor effect of IC-2. In HuH7 human HCC cells, 10 small-molecule compounds including novel derivatives, IC-2 and PN-3-13, suppressed cell viability and WNT signaling activity. Among them, IC-2 significantly reduced the CD44-positive population, also known as liver CSCs, and dramatically reduced the sphere-forming ability of both CD44-positive and CD44-negative HuH7 cells. Moreover, CSC marker-positive populations, namely CD90-positive HLF cells, CD133-positive HepG2 cells, and epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive cells, were also reduced by IC-2 treatment. Finally, suppressive effects of IC-2 on liver CSCs were also observed in a xenograft model using CD44-positive HuH7 cells. The novel derivative of small-molecule WNT inhibitor, IC-2, has the potential to suppress liver CSCs and can serve as a promising therapeutic agent to improve the prognosis of patients with HCC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Gene expression profiles of cell adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in canine oral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisamai, Sirinun; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kalpravidh, Chanin; Suriyaphol, Gunnaporn

    2017-08-01

    Perturbation of cell adhesion can be essential for tumor cell invasion and metastasis, but the current knowledge on the gene expression of molecules that mediate cell adhesion in canine oral tumors is limited. The present study aimed to investigate changes in the gene expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-cadherin or CDH1, syndecan 1 or SDC1, NECTIN2 and NECTIN4), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), in canine oral tumors, including benign tumors, oral melanoma (OM) and non-tonsillar oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. When compared with the normal gingival controls, decreased CDH1, SDC1 and NECTIN4 expression levels were observed in OSCC and OM, reflecting a possible role as cell adhesion molecules and tumor suppressors in canine oral cancers in contrast to the upregulation of MMP2 expression. Downregulated MMP7 was specifically revealed in the OM group. In the late-stage OM, the positive correlation of MMP7 and CDH1 expression was noticed as well as that of SDC1 and NECTIN4. Enhanced TIMP1 expression was shown in all tumor groups with prominent expression in the benign tumors and the early-stage OM. MMP14 expression was notable in the early-stage OM. Higher MMP9 and TIMP1 expression was observed in the acanthomatous ameloblastoma. In conclusion, this study revealed that the altered expression of cell adhesion molecules, MMP7 and MMP2 was correlated with clinicopathologic features in canine oral cancers whereas TIMP1 and MMP14 expression was probably associated with early-stage tumors; therefore, these genes might serve as molecular markers for canine oral tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan eP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 value of 200 µg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylaminocyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC¬50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 µg/mL and 65 µg/mL respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal

  12. Identification of a selective small molecule inhibitor of breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Andrew R; Carmody, Leigh C; Morgan, Barbara; Fernandez, Cristina; Forbeck, Erin; Lewis, Timothy A; Nag, Partha P; Ting, Amal; VerPlank, Lynn; Feng, Yuxiong; Perez, Jose R; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Palmer, Michelle; Lander, Eric S; Gupta, Piyush B; Schreiber, Stuart L; Munoz, Benito

    2012-05-15

    A high-throughput screen (HTS) with the National Institute of Health-Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (NIH-MLSMR) compound collection identified a class of acyl hydrazones to be selectively lethal to breast cancer stem cell (CSC) enriched populations. Medicinal chemistry efforts were undertaken to optimize potency and selectivity of this class of compounds. The optimized compound was declared as a probe (ML239) with the NIH Molecular Libraries Program and displayed greater than 20-fold selective inhibition of the breast CSC-like cell line (HMLE_sh_Ecad) over the isogenic control line (HMLE_sh_GFP). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cinnamides as selective small-molecule inhibitors of a cellular model of breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Andrew R; Carmody, Leigh C; Nag, Partha P; Morgan, Barbara; Verplank, Lynn; Fernandez, Cristina; Donckele, Etienne; Feng, Yuxiong; Perez, Jose R; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Palmer, Michelle; Lander, Eric S; Gupta, Piyush B; Schreiber, Stuart L; Munoz, Benito

    2013-03-15

    A high-throughput screen (HTS) was conducted against stably propagated cancer stem cell (CSC)-enriched populations using a library of 300,718 compounds from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR). A cinnamide analog displayed greater than 20-fold selective inhibition of the breast CSC-like cell line (HMLE_sh_Ecad) over the isogenic control cell line (HMLE_sh_eGFP). Herein, we report structure-activity relationships of this class of cinnamides for selective lethality towards CSC-enriched populations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Potent new small-molecule inhibitor of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A endopeptidase developed by synthesis-based computer-aided molecular design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ping Pang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNTA causes a life-threatening neuroparalytic disease known as botulism. Current treatment for post exposure of BoNTA uses antibodies that are effective in neutralizing the extracellular toxin to prevent further intoxication but generally cannot rescue already intoxicated neurons. Effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNTA endopeptidase (BoNTAe are desirable because such inhibitors potentially can neutralize the intracellular BoNTA and offer complementary treatment for botulism. Previously we reported a serotype-selective, small-molecule BoNTAe inhibitor with a K(i (app value of 3.8+/-0.8 microM. This inhibitor was developed by lead identification using virtual screening followed by computer-aided optimization of a lead with an IC(50 value of 100 microM. However, it was difficult to further improve the lead from micromolar to even high nanomolar potency due to the unusually large enzyme-substrate interface of BoNTAe. The enzyme-substrate interface area of 4,840 A(2 for BoNTAe is about four times larger than the typical protein-protein interface area of 750-1,500 A(2. Inhibitors must carry several functional groups to block the unusually large interface of BoNTAe, and syntheses of such inhibitors are therefore time-consuming and expensive. Herein we report the development of a serotype-selective, small-molecule, and competitive inhibitor of BoNTAe with a K(i value of 760+/-170 nM using synthesis-based computer-aided molecular design (SBCAMD. This new approach accounts the practicality and efficiency of inhibitor synthesis in addition to binding affinity and selectivity. We also report a three-dimensional model of BoNTAe in complex with the new inhibitor and the dynamics of the complex predicted by multiple molecular dynamics simulations, and discuss further structural optimization to achieve better in vivo efficacy in neutralizing BoNTA than those of our early micromolar leads. This work provides new insight

  15. Flipping the switch: Tools for detecting small molecule inhibitors of staphylococcal virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Quave

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the expression of the accessory gene regulator (agr quorum sensing cascade, S. aureus is able to produce an extensive array of enzymes, hemolysins and immunomodulators essential to its ability to spread through the host tissues and cause disease. Many have argued for the discovery and development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs to augment existing antibiotics as adjuvant therapies. Here, we discuss the state-of-the-art tools that can be used to conduct screens for the identification of such QSIs. Examples include fluorescent reporters, MS-detection of autoinducing peptide (AIP production, agar plate methods for detection of hemolysins and lipase, HPLC-detection of hemolysins from supernatants, and cell-toxicity assays for detecting damage (or relief thereof against human keratinocyte (HaCat cells. In addition to providing a description of these various approaches, we also discuss their amenability to low-, medium- and high-throughput screening efforts for the identification of novel QSIs.

  16. Small molecule inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF protein-protein interaction synergize alkylating agents in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Barakat, Khaled H; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Matera, Eva-Laure; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Bouledrak, Karima; El Sabeh, Rana; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Wishart, David S; Cohen, Richard; Tuszynski, Jack; Dumontet, Charles

    2013-07-01

    The benefit of cancer chemotherapy based on alkylating agents is limited because of the action of DNA repair enzymes, which mitigate the damage induced by these agents. The interaction between the proteins ERCC1 and XPF involves two major components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Here, novel inhibitors of this interaction were identified by virtual screening based on available structures with use of the National Cancer Institute diversity set and a panel of DrugBank small molecules. Subsequently, experimental validation of the in silico screening was undertaken. Top hits were evaluated on A549 and HCT116 cancer cells. In particular, the compound labeled NSC 130813 [4-[(6-chloro-2-methoxy-9-acridinyl)amino]-2-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)methyl

  17. State-of-the-art of small molecule inhibitors of the TAM family: the point of view of the chemist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Tom; Abet, Valentina; Piguel, Sandrine

    2015-11-13

    The TAM family of tyrosine kinases receptors (Tyro3, Axl and Mer) is implicated in cancer development, autoimmune reactions and viral infection and is therefore emerging as an effective and attractive therapeutic target. To date, only a few small molecules have been intentionally designed to block the TAM kinases, while most of the inhibitors were developed for blocking different protein kinases and then identified through selectivity profile studies. This minireview will examine in terms of chemical structure the different compounds able to act on either one, two or three TAM kinases with details about structure-activity relationships, drug-metabolism and pharmacokinetics properties where they exist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of small-molecule modification on single-cell pharmacokinetics of PARP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer H; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging, given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and intertumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small-molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small-molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model.

  19. Effect of Small Molecule Modification on Single Cell Pharmacokinetics of PARP Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model. PMID:24552776

  20. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors.

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    Andrew R Schwendeman

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery.

  1. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  2. Lifting the mask: identification of new small molecule inhibitors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli group 2 capsule biogenesis.

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    Carlos C Goller

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the leading cause of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs, with over 100 million UTIs occurring annually throughout the world. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among UPEC limits ambulatory care options, delays effective treatment, and may increase overall morbidity and mortality from complications such as urosepsis. The polysaccharide capsules of UPEC are an attractive target a therapeutic, based on their importance in defense against the host immune responses; however, the large number of antigenic types has limited their incorporation into vaccine development. The objective of this study was to identify small-molecule inhibitors of UPEC capsule biogenesis. A large-scale screening effort entailing 338,740 compounds was conducted in a cell-based, phenotypic screen for inhibition of capsule biogenesis in UPEC. The primary and concentration-response assays yielded 29 putative inhibitors of capsule biogenesis, of which 6 were selected for further studies. Secondary confirmatory assays identified two highly active agents, named DU003 and DU011, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.0 µM and 0.69 µM, respectively. Confirmatory assays for capsular antigen and biochemical measurement of capsular sugars verified the inhibitory action of both compounds and demonstrated minimal toxicity and off-target effects. Serum sensitivity assays demonstrated that both compounds produced significant bacterial death upon exposure to active human serum. DU011 administration in mice provided near complete protection against a lethal systemic infection with the prototypic UPEC K1 isolate UTI89. This work has provided a conceptually new class of molecules to combat UPEC infection, and future studies will establish the molecular basis for their action along with efficacy in UTI and other UPEC infections.

  3. Chemical screening identifies filastatin, a small molecule inhibitor of Candida albicans adhesion, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazly, Ahmed; Jain, Charu; Dehner, Amie C; Issi, Luca; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Ali, Akbar; Cao, Hong; Fidel, Paul L; Rao, Reeta P; Kaufman, Paul D

    2013-08-13

    Infection by pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans, begins with adhesion to host cells or implanted medical devices followed by biofilm formation. By high-throughput phenotypic screening of small molecules, we identified compounds that inhibit adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. Our lead candidate compound also inhibits binding of C. albicans to cultured human epithelial cells, the yeast-to-hyphal morphological transition, induction of the hyphal-specific HWP1 promoter, biofilm formation on silicone elastomers, and pathogenesis in a nematode infection model as well as alters fungal morphology in a mouse mucosal infection assay. We term this compound filastatin based on its strong inhibition of filamentation, and we use chemical genetic experiments to show that it acts downstream of multiple signaling pathways. These studies show that high-throughput functional assays targeting fungal adhesion can provide chemical probes for study of multiple aspects of fungal pathogenesis.

  4. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate, a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

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    Herbertz S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Herbertz,1 J Scott Sawyer,2 Anja J Stauber,2 Ivelina Gueorguieva,3 Kyla E Driscoll,4 Shawn T Estrem,2 Ann L Cleverly,3 Durisala Desaiah,2 Susan C Guba,2 Karim A Benhadji,2 Christopher A Slapak,2 Michael M Lahn21Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany; 2Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 4Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab

  5. Therapeutic strategies for metabolic diseases: Small-molecule diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ravi; Obiang-Obounou, Brice W; Kim, Minkyoung; Choi, Yongseok; Lee, Hyun Sun; Lee, Kyeong

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic diseases such as atherogenic dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and type II diabetes are emerging as major global health problems. Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) is responsible for catalyzing the final reaction in the glycerol phosphate pathway of triglycerol synthesis. It has two isoforms, DGAT-1 and DGAT-2, which are widely expressed and present in white adipose tissue. DGAT-1 is most highly expressed in the small intestine, whereas DGAT-2 is primarily expressed in the liver. Therefore, the selective inhibition of DGAT-1 has become an attractive target with growing potential for the treatment of obesity and type II diabetes. Furthermore, DGAT-2 has been suggested as a new target for the treatment of DGAT-2-related liver diseases including hepatic steatosis, hepatic injury, and fibrosis. In view the discovery of drugs that target DGAT, herein we attempt to provide insight into the scope and further reasons for optimization of DGAT inhibitors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. C-terminal peptides of tissue factor pathway inhibitor are novel host defense molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Rydengård, Victoria; Albiger, Barbara; Lundqvist, Katarina; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2010-09-03

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) inhibits tissue factor-induced coagulation, but may, via its C terminus, also modulate cell surface, heparin, and lipopolysaccharide interactions as well as participate in growth inhibition. Here we show that C-terminal TFPI peptide sequences are antimicrobial against the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungi Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen for the "classic" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. The killing of E. coli, but not P. aeruginosa, by the C-terminal peptide GGLIKTKRKRKKQRVKIAYEEIFVKNM (GGL27), was enhanced in human plasma and largely abolished in heat-inactivated plasma, a phenomenon linked to generation of antimicrobial C3a and activation of the classic pathway of complement activation. Furthermore, GGL27 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS shock. Importantly, TFPI was found to be expressed in the basal layers of normal epidermis, and was markedly up-regulated in acute skin wounds as well as wound edges of chronic leg ulcers. Furthermore, C-terminal fragments of TFPI were associated with bacteria present in human chronic leg ulcers. These findings suggest a new role for TFPI in cutaneous defense against infections.

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Trafficking Discovered by Phenotypic Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul R.; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Whiteaker, James D.; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A.

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  8. Small-molecule inhibitors of gram-negative lipoprotein trafficking discovered by phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sarah M; Fleming, Paul R; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A

    2015-03-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Small molecule inhibitors reveal Niemann-Pick C1 is essential for Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Marceline; Misasi, John; Ren, Tao; Bruchez, Anna; Lee, Kyungae; Filone, Claire Marie; Hensley, Lisa; Li, Qi; Ory, Daniel; Chandran, Kartik; Cunningham, James

    2011-08-24

    Ebola virus (EboV) is a highly pathogenic enveloped virus that causes outbreaks of zoonotic infection in Africa. The clinical symptoms are manifestations of the massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection and in many outbreaks, mortality exceeds 75%. The unpredictable onset, ease of transmission, rapid progression of disease, high mortality and lack of effective vaccine or therapy have created a high level of public concern about EboV. Here we report the identification of a novel benzylpiperazine adamantane diamide-derived compound that inhibits EboV infection. Using mutant cell lines and informative derivatives of the lead compound, we show that the target of the inhibitor is the endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We find that NPC1 is essential for infection, that it binds to the virus glycoprotein (GP), and that antiviral compounds interfere with GP binding to NPC1. Combined with the results of previous studies of GP structure and function, our findings support a model of EboV infection in which cleavage of the GP1 subunit by endosomal cathepsin proteases removes heavily glycosylated domains to expose the amino-terminal domain, which is a ligand for NPC1 and regulates membrane fusion by the GP2 subunit. Thus, NPC1 is essential for EboV entry and a target for antiviral therapy.

  10. Small molecule inhibitors of ER α-glucosidases are active against multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinhong; Warren, Travis K; Zhao, Xuesen; Gill, Tina; Guo, Fang; Wang, Lijuan; Comunale, Mary Ann; Du, Yanming; Alonzi, Dominic S; Yu, Wenquan; Ye, Hong; Liu, Fei; Guo, Ju-Tao; Mehta, Anand; Cuconati, Andrea; Butters, Terry D; Bavari, Sina; Xu, Xiaodong; Block, Timothy M

    2013-06-01

    Host cellular endoplasmic reticulum α-glucosidases I and II are essential for the maturation of viral glycosylated envelope proteins that use the calnexin mediated folding pathway. Inhibition of these glycan processing enzymes leads to the misfolding and degradation of these viral glycoproteins and subsequent reduction in virion secretion. We previously reported that, CM-10-18, an imino sugar α-glucosidase inhibitor, efficiently protected the lethality of dengue virus infection of mice. In the current study, through an extensive structure-activity relationship study, we have identified three CM-10-18 derivatives that demonstrated superior in vitro antiviral activity against representative viruses from four viral families causing hemorrhagic fever. Moreover, the three novel imino sugars significantly reduced the mortality of two of the most pathogenic hemorrhagic fever viruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, in mice. Our study thus proves the concept that imino sugars are promising drug candidates for the management of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by variety of viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potent New Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Endopeptidase Developed by Synthesis-Based Computer-Aided Molecular Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    simulations; (4) synthesis and evaluation of the molecules from Step 2 or 3 (e.g., synthesizing and testing AHP). From synthetic chemistry point of view...2000) Synthesis of 6H-indolo [2,3-b][1,6]naphthyridines and related compounds as the 5-Aza analogues of ellipticine alkaloids . J Org Chem 65: 7977–7983...Potent New Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Endopeptidase Developed by Synthesis -Based Computer-Aided Molecular Design

  12. Small-molecule aggregation inhibitors reduce excess amyloid in a trisomy 16 mouse cortical cell line

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    ANDRÉA C PAULA LIMA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously characterized a number of small molecule organic compounds that prevent the aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide and its neurotoxicity in hippocampal neuronal cultures. We have now evaluated the effects of such compounds on amyloid precursor protein (APP accumulation in the CTb immortalized cell line derived from the cerebral cortex of a trisomy 16 mouse, an animal model of Down's syndrome. Compared to a non-trisomic cortical cell line (CNh, CTb cells overexpress APP and exhibit slightly elevated resting intracellular Ca2+ levéis ([Ca2+]¡. Here, we show that the compounds 2,4-dinitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol and 4-anisidine decreased intracellular accumulation of APP in CTb cells. Those compounds were non-toxic to the cells, and slightly increased the basal [Ca2+]¡. Results indícate that the compounds tested can be leads for the development of drugs to decrease intracellular vesicular accumulation of APP in trisomic cells.

  13. Versatility of 7-Substituted Coumarin Molecules as Antimycobacterial Agents, Neuronal Enzyme Inhibitors and Neuroprotective Agents

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    Erika Kapp

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A medium-throughput screen using Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv was employed to screen an in-house library of structurally diverse compounds for antimycobacterial activity. In this initial screen, eleven 7-substituted coumarin derivatives with confirmed monoamine oxidase-B and cholinesterase inhibitory activities, demonstrated growth inhibition of more than 50% at 50 µM. This prompted further exploration of all the 7-substituted coumarins in our library. Four compounds showed promising MIC99 values of 8.31–29.70 µM and 44.15–57.17 µM on M. tuberculosis H37Rv in independent assays using GAST-Fe and 7H9+OADC media, respectively. These compounds were found to bind to albumin, which may explain the variations in MIC between the two assays. Preliminary data showed that they were able to maintain their activity in fluoroquinolone resistant mycobacteria. Structure-activity relationships indicated that structural modification on position 4 and/or 7 of the coumarin scaffold could direct the selectivity towards either the inhibition of neuronal enzymes or the antimycobacterial effect. Moderate cytotoxicities were observed for these compounds and slight selectivity towards mycobacteria was indicated. Further neuroprotective assays showed significant neuroprotection for selected compounds irrespective of their neuronal enzyme inhibitory properties. These coumarin molecules are thus interesting lead compounds that may provide insight into the design of new antimicrobacterial and neuroprotective agents.

  14. The small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor HA14-1 sensitizes cervical cancer cells, but not normal fibroblasts, to heavy-ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kataoka, Keiko; Sora, Sakura; Hara, Takamitsu; Omura-Minamisawa, Motoko; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that the small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor HA14-1 renders human cervical cancer cells and their Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant counterparts, but not normal fibroblasts, more susceptible to heavy ions. Thus, Bcl-2 may be an attractive target for improving the efficacy of heavy-ion therapy

  15. Selective and membrane-permeable small molecule inhibitors of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase reverse high fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Vance, Virginia; Wetzel, Michael D; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; McHardy, Stanton F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Hommel, Jonathan D; Watowich, Stanley J

    2018-01-01

    There is a critical need for new mechanism-of-action drugs that reduce the burden of obesity and associated chronic metabolic comorbidities. A potentially novel target to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes is nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase (NNMT), a cytosolic enzyme with newly identified roles in cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. To validate NNMT as an anti-obesity drug target, we investigated the permeability, selectivity, mechanistic, and physiological properties of a series of small molecule NNMT inhibitors. Membrane permeability of NNMT inhibitors was characterized using parallel artificial membrane permeability and Caco-2 cell assays. Selectivity was tested against structurally-related methyltransferases and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) salvage pathway enzymes. Effects of NNMT inhibitors on lipogenesis and intracellular levels of metabolites, including NNMT reaction product 1-methylnicotianamide (1-MNA) were evaluated in cultured adipocytes. Effects of a potent NNMT inhibitor on obesity measures and plasma lipid were assessed in diet-induced obese mice fed a high-fat diet. Methylquinolinium scaffolds with primary amine substitutions displayed high permeability from passive and active transport across membranes. Importantly, methylquinolinium analogues displayed high selectivity, not inhibiting related SAM-dependent methyltransferases or enzymes in the NAD + salvage pathway. NNMT inhibitors reduced intracellular 1-MNA, increased intracellular NAD + and S-(5'-adenosyl)-l-methionine (SAM), and suppressed lipogenesis in adipocytes. Treatment of diet-induced obese mice systemically with a potent NNMT inhibitor significantly reduced body weight and white adipose mass, decreased adipocyte size, and lowered plasma total cholesterol levels. Notably, administration of NNMT inhibitors did not impact total food intake nor produce any observable adverse effects. These results support development of small molecule NNMT inhibitors as therapeutics to

  16. Small molecule ErbB inhibitors decrease proliferative signaling and promote apoptosis in philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Irwin

    Full Text Available The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+ALL is a negative prognostic indicator. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI that target BCR/ABL, such as imatinib, have improved treatment of Ph(+ALL and are generally incorporated into induction regimens. This approach has improved clinical responses, but molecular remissions are seen in less than 50% of patients leaving few treatment options in the event of relapse. Thus, identification of additional targets for therapeutic intervention has potential to improve outcomes for Ph+ALL. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2 is expressed in ~30% of B-ALLs, and numerous small molecule inhibitors are available to prevent its activation. We analyzed a cohort of 129 ALL patient samples using reverse phase protein array (RPPA with ErbB2 and phospho-ErbB2 antibodies and found that activity of ErbB2 was elevated in 56% of Ph(+ALL as compared to just 4.8% of Ph(-ALL. In two human Ph+ALL cell lines, inhibition of ErbB kinase activity with canertinib resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of an ErbB kinase signaling target p70S6-kinase T389 (by 60% in Z119 and 39% in Z181 cells at 3 µM. Downstream, phosphorylation of S6-kinase was also diminished in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner (by 91% in both cell lines at 3 µM. Canertinib treatment increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim by as much as 144% in Z119 cells and 49% in Z181 cells, and further produced caspase-3 activation and consequent apoptotic cell death. Both canertinib and the FDA-approved ErbB1/2-directed TKI lapatinib abrogated proliferation and increased sensitivity to BCR/ABL-directed TKIs at clinically relevant doses. Our results suggest that ErbB signaling is an additional molecular target in Ph(+ALL and encourage the development of clinical strategies combining ErbB and BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors for this subset of ALL patients.

  17. Prospecting for novel plant-derived molecules of Rauvolfia serpentina as inhibitors of Aldose Reductase, a potent drug target for diabetes and its complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivalika Pathania

    Full Text Available Aldose Reductase (AR is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes, providing an interesting target for therapeutic intervention. Extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina, a medicinal plant endemic to the Himalayan mountain range, have been known to be effective in alleviating diabetes and its complications. In this study, we aim to prospect for novel plant-derived inhibitors from R. serpentina and to understand structural basis of their interactions. An extensive library of R. serpentina molecules was compiled and computationally screened for inhibitory action against AR. The stability of complexes, with docked leads, was verified using molecular dynamics simulations. Two structurally distinct plant-derived leads were identified as inhibitors: indobine and indobinine. Further, using these two leads as templates, 16 more leads were identified through ligand-based screening of their structural analogs, from a small molecules database. Thus, we obtained plant-derived indole alkaloids, and their structural analogs, as potential AR inhibitors from a manually curated dataset of R. serpentina molecules. Indole alkaloids reported herein, as a novel structural class unreported hitherto, may provide better insights for designing potential AR inhibitors with improved efficacy and fewer side effects.

  18. Prospecting for novel plant-derived molecules of Rauvolfia serpentina as inhibitors of Aldose Reductase, a potent drug target for diabetes and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Shivalika; Randhawa, Vinay; Bagler, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Aldose Reductase (AR) is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes, providing an interesting target for therapeutic intervention. Extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina, a medicinal plant endemic to the Himalayan mountain range, have been known to be effective in alleviating diabetes and its complications. In this study, we aim to prospect for novel plant-derived inhibitors from R. serpentina and to understand structural basis of their interactions. An extensive library of R. serpentina molecules was compiled and computationally screened for inhibitory action against AR. The stability of complexes, with docked leads, was verified using molecular dynamics simulations. Two structurally distinct plant-derived leads were identified as inhibitors: indobine and indobinine. Further, using these two leads as templates, 16 more leads were identified through ligand-based screening of their structural analogs, from a small molecules database. Thus, we obtained plant-derived indole alkaloids, and their structural analogs, as potential AR inhibitors from a manually curated dataset of R. serpentina molecules. Indole alkaloids reported herein, as a novel structural class unreported hitherto, may provide better insights for designing potential AR inhibitors with improved efficacy and fewer side effects.

  19. Host cell entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus after two-step, furin-mediated activation of the spike protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a newly identified betacoronavirus causing high morbidity and mortality in humans. The coronavirus spike (S) protein is the main determinant of viral entry, and although it was previously shown that MERS-CoV S can be activated by various proteases, the details of the mechanisms of proteolytic activation of fusion are still incompletely characterized. Here, we have uncovered distinctive characteristics of MERS-CoV S. We identify, by bioinformatics and peptide cleavage assays, two cleavage sites for furin, a ubiquitously expressed protease, which are located at the S1/S2 interface and at the S2′ position of the S protein. We show that although the S1/S2 site is proteolytically processed by furin during protein biosynthesis, the S2′ site is cleaved upon viral entry. MERS-CoV pseudovirion infection was shown to be enhanced by elevated levels of furin expression, and entry could be decreased by furin siRNA silencing. Enhanced furin activity appeared to partially override the low pH-dependent nature of MERS-CoV entry. Inhibition of furin activity was shown to decrease MERS-CoV S-mediated entry, as well as infection by the virus. Overall, we show that MERS-CoV has evolved an unusual two-step furin activation for fusion, suggestive of a role during the process of emergence into the human population. The ability of MERS-CoV to use furin in this manner, along with other proteases, may explain the polytropic nature of the virus. PMID:25288733

  20. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieslaw Swietnicki

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  1. Discovery of non-peptidic small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilin D as neuroprotective agents in Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Insun; Londhe, Ashwini M.; Lim, Ji Woong; Park, Beoung-Geon; Jung, Seo Yun; Lee, Jae Yeol; Lim, Sang Min; No, Kyoung Tai; Lee, Jiyoun; Pae, Ae Nim

    2017-10-01

    Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a mitochondria-specific cyclophilin that is known to play a pivotal role in the formation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP).The formation and opening of the mPTP disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis, cause mitochondrial dysfunction and eventually lead to cell death. Several recent studies have found that CypD promotes the formation of the mPTP upon binding to β amyloid (Aβ) peptides inside brain mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal CypD has a potential to be a promising therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we generated an energy-based pharmacophore model by using the crystal structure of CypD—cyclosporine A (CsA) complex and performed virtual screening of ChemDiv database, which yielded forty-five potential hit compounds with novel scaffolds. We further tested those compounds using mitochondrial functional assays in neuronal cells and identified fifteen compounds with excellent protective effects against Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. To validate whether these effects derived from binding to CypD, we performed surface plasmon resonance (SPR)—based direct binding assays with selected compounds and discovered compound 29 was found to have the equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) value of 88.2 nM. This binding affinity value and biological activity correspond well with our predicted binding mode. We believe that this study offers new insights into the rational design of small molecule CypD inhibitors, and provides a promising lead for future therapeutic development.

  2. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietnicki, Wieslaw; Carmany, Daniel; Retford, Michael; Guelta, Mark; Dorsey, Russell; Bozue, Joel; Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50) values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  3. Mutations that promote furin-independent growth of Semliki Forest virus affect p62-E1 interactions and membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinyong; Kielian, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the E1 protein. E1's fusion activity is regulated by its heterodimeric interaction with a companion membrane protein E2. Mature E2 protein is generated by furin processing of the precursor p62. Processing destabilizes the heterodimer, allowing dissociation at acidic pH, E1 conformational changes, and membrane fusion. We used a furin-deficient cell line, FD11, to select for SFV mutants that show increased growth in the absence of p62 processing. We isolated and characterized 7 such pci mutants (p62 cleavage independent), which retained the parental furin cleavage site but showed significant increases in their ability to carry out membrane fusion in the p62 form. Sequence analysis of the pci mutants identified mutations primarily on the E2 protein, and suggested sites important in the interaction of p62 with E1 and the regulation of fusion

  4. Computational Characterization of Small Molecules Binding to the Human XPF Active Site and Virtual Screening to Identify Potential New DNA Repair Inhibitors Targeting the ERCC1-XPF Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gentile

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA excision repair protein ERCC-1-DNA repair endonuclease XPF (ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric endonuclease essential for the nucleotide excision repair (NER DNA repair pathway. Although its activity is required to maintain genome integrity in healthy cells, ERCC1-XPF can counteract the effect of DNA-damaging therapies such as platinum-based chemotherapy in cancer cells. Therefore, a promising approach to enhance the effect of these therapies is to combine their use with small molecules, which can inhibit the repair mechanisms in cancer cells. Currently, there are no structures available for the catalytic site of the human ERCC1-XPF, which performs the metal-mediated cleavage of a DNA damaged strand at 5′. We adopted a homology modeling strategy to build a structural model of the human XPF nuclease domain which contained the active site and to extract dominant conformations of the domain using molecular dynamics simulations followed by clustering of the trajectory. We investigated the binding modes of known small molecule inhibitors targeting the active site to build a pharmacophore model. We then performed a virtual screening of the ZINC Is Not Commercial 15 (ZINC15 database to identify new ERCC1-XPF endonuclease inhibitors. Our work provides structural insights regarding the binding mode of small molecules targeting the ERCC1-XPF active site that can be used to rationally optimize such compounds. We also propose a set of new potential DNA repair inhibitors to be considered for combination cancer therapy strategies.

  5. New small molecule inhibitors of UPR activation demonstrate that PERK, but not IRE1α signaling is essential for promoting adaptation and survival to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocari, Dan; Vellanki, Ravi N.; Sit, Brandon; Uehling, David; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in response to hypoxia-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and consists of three distinct signaling arms. Here we explore the potential of targeting two of these arms with new potent small-molecule inhibitors designed against IRE1α and PERK. Methods: We utilized shRNAs and small-molecule inhibitors of IRE1α (4μ8c) and PERK (GSK-compound 39). XBP1 splicing and DNAJB9 mRNA was measured by qPCR and was used to monitor IRE1α activity. PERK activity was monitored by immunoblotting eIF2α phosphorylation and qPCR of DDIT3 mRNA. Hypoxia tolerance was measured using proliferation and clonogenic cell survival assays of cells exposed to mild or severe hypoxia in the presence of the inhibitors. Results: Using knockdown experiments we show that PERK is essential for survival of KP4 cells while knockdown of IRE1α dramatically decreases the proliferation and survival of HCT116 during hypoxia. Further, we show that in response to both hypoxia and other ER stress-inducing agents both 4μ8c and the PERK inhibitor are selective and potent inhibitors of IRE1α and PERK activation, respectively. However, despite potent inhibition of IRE1α activation, 4μ8c had no effect on cell proliferation or clonogenic survival of cells exposed to hypoxia. This was in contrast to the inactivation of PERK signaling with the PERK inhibitor, which reduced tolerance to hypoxia and other ER stress inducing agents. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that IRE1α but not its splicing activity is important for hypoxic cell survival. The PERK signaling arm is uniquely important for promoting adaptation and survival during hypoxia-induced ER stress and should be the focus of future therapeutic efforts

  6. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy. Background The major challenge for developing gene-based therapies for hemophilia A is that human factor VIII (hFVIII) has intrinsic properties that result in inefficient biosynthesis. During intracellular processing, hFVIII is predominantly cleaved at a paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE) or furin cleavage site to yield a heterodimer that is the major form of secreted protein. Previous studies with B-domain-deleted (BDD) canine FVIII and hFVIII-R1645H, both differing from hFVIII by a single amino acid at this site, suggested that these proteins are secreted mainly in a single polypeptide chain (SC) form and exhibit enhanced function. Objective We hypothesized that deletion(s) of the furin site modulates FVIII biology and may enhance its function. Methods A series of recombinant hFVIII-furin deletion variants were introduced into hFVIII-BDD [Δ1645, 1645-46(Δ2), 1645-47(Δ3), 1645-48(Δ4), or Δ1648] and characterized. Results In vitro, recombinant purified Δ3 and Δ4 were primarily SC and, interestingly, had 2-fold higher procoagulant activity compared with FVIII-BDD. In vivo, the variants also have improved hemostatic function. After adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector delivery, the expression of these variants is 2-4-fold higher than hFVIII-BDD. Protein challenges of each variant in mice tolerant to hFVIII-BDD showed no anti-FVIII immune response. Conclusions These data suggest that the furin deletion hFVIII variants are superior to hFVIII-BDD without increased immunogenicity. In the setting of gene-based therapeutics, these novel variants provide a unique strategy to increase FVIII expression, thus lowering the vector dose, a

  7. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Comparison of chlorthalidone, indapamide, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide X-ray crystal structures in adducts with isozyme II, when several water molecules make the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperini, Claudia; Cecchi, Alessandro; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-02-01

    Thiazide and high ceiling diuretics were recently shown to inhibit all mammalian isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) with a very different profile as compared to classical inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, and ethoxzolamide. Some of these structurally related compounds have a very different behavior against the widespread isozyme CA II, with chlorthalidone, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide being efficient inhibitors against CA II (K(I)s of 65-138 nM), whereas indapamide is a much weaker one (K(I) of 2520 nM). Furthermore, some of these diuretics are quite efficient (low nanomolar) inhibitors of other isoforms, for example, chlorthalidone against hCA VB, VII, IX, and XIII; indapamide against CA VII, IX, XII, and XIII, trichloromethiazide against CA VII and IX, and furosemide against CA I and XIV. Examining the four X-ray crystal structures of their CA II adducts, we observed several (2-3) active site water molecules interacting with the chlorthalidone, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide scaffolds which may be responsible for this important difference of activity. Indeed, indapamide bound to CA II has no interactions with active site water molecules. Chlorthalidone bound within the CA II active site is in an enolic (lactimic) tautomeric form, with the enolic OH also participating in two strong hydrogen bonds with Asn67 and a water molecule. The newly evidenced binding modes of these diuretics may be exploited for designing better CA II inhibitors as well as compounds with selectivity/affinity for various isoforms with medicinal chemistry applications.

  8. New approaches of PARP-1 inhibitors in human lung cancer cells and cancer stem-like cells by some selected anthraquinone-derived small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Lee

    Full Text Available Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and telomerase, as well as DNA damage response pathways are targets for anticancer drug development, and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate anticancer activities of anthraquinone-derived tricyclic and tetracyclic small molecules and their structure-activity relationships with PARP-1 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and NSCLC-overexpressing Oct4 and Nanog clone, which show high-expression of PARP-1 and more resistance to anticancer drug. We applied our library selected compounds to NCI's 60 human cancer cell-lines (NCI-60 in order to generate systematic profiling data. Based on our analysis, it is hypothesized that these drugs might be, directly and indirectly, target components to induce mitochondrial permeability transition and the release of pro-apoptotic factors as potential anti-NSCLC or PARP inhibitor candidates. Altogether, the most active NSC747854 showed its cytotoxicity and dose-dependent PARP inhibitory manner, thus it emerges as a promising structure for anti-cancer therapy with no significant negative influence on normal cells. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics. These findings will be of great value to facilitate structure-based design of selective PARP inhibitors, in general, and telomerase inhibitors, in particular. Together, the data presented here expand our insight into the PARP inhibitors and support the resource-demanding lead optimization of structurally related small molecules for human cancer therapy.

  9. New Approaches of PARP-1 Inhibitors in Human Lung Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem-Like Cells by Some Selected Anthraquinone-Derived Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dah-Shyong; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chen, Tsung-Chih; Lee, Chia-Chung; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Huang, Hsu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and telomerase, as well as DNA damage response pathways are targets for anticancer drug development, and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate anticancer activities of anthraquinone-derived tricyclic and tetracyclic small molecules and their structure-activity relationships with PARP-1 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and NSCLC-overexpressing Oct4 and Nanog clone, which show high-expression of PARP-1 and more resistance to anticancer drug. We applied our library selected compounds to NCI's 60 human cancer cell-lines (NCI-60) in order to generate systematic profiling data. Based on our analysis, it is hypothesized that these drugs might be, directly and indirectly, target components to induce mitochondrial permeability transition and the release of pro-apoptotic factors as potential anti-NSCLC or PARP inhibitor candidates. Altogether, the most active NSC747854 showed its cytotoxicity and dose-dependent PARP inhibitory manner, thus it emerges as a promising structure for anti-cancer therapy with no significant negative influence on normal cells. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics. These findings will be of great value to facilitate structure-based design of selective PARP inhibitors, in general, and telomerase inhibitors, in particular. Together, the data presented here expand our insight into the PARP inhibitors and support the resource-demanding lead optimization of structurally related small molecules for human cancer therapy. PMID:23451039

  10. Cancer/testis Antigen-Plac1 Promotes Invasion and Metastasis of Breast Cancer through Furin/NICD/PTEN Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfei; Chu, Jiahui; Li, Jun; Feng, Wanting; Yang, Fan; Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanhong; Sun, Chunxiao; Yang, Mengzhu; Vasilatos, Shauna N; Huang, Yi; Fu, Ziyi; Yin, Yongmei

    2018-04-28

    Plac1 is a cancer-testis antigen that plays a critical role in promoting cancer initiation and progression. However, the clinical significance and mechanism of Plac1 in cancer progression remains elusive. Here we report that Plac1 is an important oncogenic and prognostic factor which physically interacts with Furin to drive breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We have shown that Plac1 expression positively correlates with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, HR status and overall patient survival. Overexpression of Plac1 promoted invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence cell staining assays revealed that interaction of Plac1 and Furin degraded Notch1 and generated Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) that could inhibit PTEN activity. These findings are consistent with the results of microarray study in MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing Plac1. A rescue study showed that inhibition of Furin and overexpression of PTEN in Plac1 overexpression cells blocked Plac1-induced tumor cell progression. Taken together, our findings suggest that functional interaction between Plac1 and Furin enhances breast cancer invasion and metastasis and the Furin/NICD/PTEN axis may act as an important therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. Molecular Oncology (2018) © 2018 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Chimeric forms of furin and TGN38 are transported with the plasma membrane in the trans-Golgi network via distinct endosomal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, W G; Maxfield, F R

    1999-07-26

    Furin and TGN38 are menbrane proteins that cycle between the plasma membrane and the trans-Golgi network (TGN), each maintaining a predominant distribution in the TGN. We have used chimeric proteins with an extracellular Tac domain and the cytoplasmic domain of TGN38 or furin to study the trafficking of these proteins in endosomes. Previously, we demonstrated that the postendocytic trafficking of Tac-TGN38 to the TGN is via the endocytic recycling pathway (Ghosh, R.N.,W.G. Mallet,T.T. Soe,T.E.McGraw, and F.R. Maxfield.1998.J. Cell Biol.142:923-936). Here we show that internalized Tac-furin is delivered to the TGN through late endosomes, bypassing the endocytic recycling compartment. The transport of Tac-furin from late endosomes to the TGN appears to proceed via an efficient, single-pass mechanism. Delivery of Tac-furin but not Tac-TGN38 to the TGN is blocked by nocodazole, and the two pathways are also differentially affected by wortmannin. These studies demonstrate the existence of two independentpathways for endosomal transport of proteins to the TGN from the plasma membrane.

  12. Discovering Bisdemethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome as a potent small molecule inhibitor of human pancreatic α-amylase, a target for type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Rajamohanan, P R; Ravikumar, Ameeta

    2012-12-15

    Curcuma longa rhizome is used extensively in culinary preparations in Far East and South-East Asia. Health benefits of curcuminoids from C. longa as antioxidants, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory molecules have been well documented. We report here for the first time that Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) from C. longa, acts as an inhibitor to inactivate human pancreatic α-amylase, a therapeutic target for oral hypoglycemic agents in type-2 diabetes. Bioactivity guided isolation of rhizome isopropanol extract led to the identification by HPLC and NMR of BDMC as a lead small molecule inhibitor of porcine and human pancreatic α-amylase with an IC(50) value of 0.026 and 0.025 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, HPA exhibited an uncompetitive mode of inhibition with an apparent K(i) of 3.0 μM. The study gains importance as BDMC could be a good drug candidate in development of new inhibitors of HPA and of functional foods for controlling starch digestion in order to reduce post-prandial hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human HDAC isoform selectivity achieved via exploitation of the acetate release channel with structurally unique small molecule inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Lewis; Dobler, Markus R.; Radetich, Branko; Zhu, Yanyi; Atadja, Peter W.; Claiborne, Tavina; Grob, Jonathan E.; McRiner, Andrew; Pancost, Margaret R.; Patnaik, Anup; Shao, Wenlin; Shultz, Michael; Tichkule, Ritesh; Tommasi, Ruben A.; Vash, Brian; Wang, Ping; Stams, Travis (Novartis)

    2013-11-20

    Herein we report the discovery of a family of novel yet simple, amino-acid derived class I HDAC inhibitors that demonstrate isoform selectivity via access to the internal acetate release channel. Isoform selectivity criteria is discussed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling of these novel inhibitors bound to HDAC8, potentially revealing insights into the mechanism of enzymatic function through novel structural features revealed at the atomic level.

  14. Identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of the calcium-dependent S100B-p53 tumor suppressor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Joseph; Chen, Ijen; Gitti, Rossi; Baldisseri, Donna M; Pan, Yongping; Udan, Ryan; Carrier, France; MacKerell, Alexander D; Weber, David J

    2004-10-07

    The binding of S100B to p53 down-regulates wild-type p53 tumor suppressor activity in cancer cells such as malignant melanoma, so a search for small molecules that bind S100B and prevent S100B-p53 complex formation was undertaken. Chemical databases were computationally searched for potential inhibitors of S100B, and 60 compounds were selected for testing on the basis of energy scoring, commercial availability, and chemical similarity clustering. Seven of these compounds bound to S100B as determined by steady state fluorescence spectroscopy (1.0 microM model of one such inhibitor, pentamidine, bound to Ca(2+)-loaded S100B was calculated using intermolecular NOE data between S100B and the drug, and indicates that pentamidine binds into the p53 binding site on S100B defined by helices 3 and 4 and loop 2 (termed the hinge region).

  15. The small molecule inhibitor YK-4-279 disrupts mitotic progression of neuroblastoma cells, overcomes drug resistance and synergizes with inhibitors of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollareddy, Madhu; Sherrard, Alice; Park, Ji Hyun; Szemes, Marianna; Gallacher, Kelli; Melegh, Zsombor; Oltean, Sebastian; Michaelis, Martin; Cinatl, Jindrich; Kaidi, Abderrahmane; Malik, Karim

    2017-09-10

    Neuroblastoma is a biologically and clinically heterogeneous pediatric malignancy that includes a high-risk subset for which new therapeutic agents are urgently required. As well as MYCN amplification, activating point mutations of ALK and NRAS are associated with high-risk and relapsing neuroblastoma. As both ALK and RAS signal through the MEK/ERK pathway, we sought to evaluate two previously reported inhibitors of ETS-related transcription factors, which are transcriptional mediators of the Ras-MEK/ERK pathway in other cancers. Here we show that YK-4-279 suppressed growth and triggered apoptosis in nine neuroblastoma cell lines, while BRD32048, another ETV1 inhibitor, was ineffective. These results suggest that YK-4-279 acts independently of ETS-related transcription factors. Further analysis reveals that YK-4-279 induces mitotic arrest in prometaphase, resulting in subsequent cell death. Mechanistically, we show that YK-4-279 inhibits the formation of kinetochore microtubules, with treated cells showing a broad range of abnormalities including multipolar, fragmented and unseparated spindles, together leading to disrupted progression through mitosis. Notably, YK-4-279 does not affect microtubule acetylation, unlike the conventional mitotic poisons paclitaxel and vincristine. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that YK-4-279 overcomes vincristine-induced resistance in two neuroblastoma cell-line models. Furthermore, combinations of YK-4-279 with vincristine, paclitaxel or the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237/Alisertib show strong synergy, particularly at low doses. Thus, YK-4-279 could potentially be used as a single-agent or in combination therapies for the treatment of high-risk and relapsing neuroblastoma, as well as other cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A fluorescence polarization based screening assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of the PICK1 PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thor S; Madsen, Kenneth L; Dyhring, Tino

    2011-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology) domains represent putative targets in several diseases including cancer, stroke, addiction and neuropathic pain. Here we describe the application of a simple and fast screening assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) to identify inhibitors of the PDZ...

  17. Small molecule inhibitors uncover synthetic genetic interactions of human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 with DNA damage response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ward

    Full Text Available Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 is a structure selective endonuclease required for proficient DNA replication and the repair of DNA damage. Cellularly active inhibitors of this enzyme have previously been shown to induce a DNA damage response and, ultimately, cell death. High-throughput screens of human cancer cell-lines identify colorectal and gastric cell-lines with microsatellite instability (MSI as enriched for cellular sensitivity to N-hydroxyurea series inhibitors of FEN1, but not the PARP inhibitor olaparib or other inhibitors of the DNA damage response. This sensitivity is due to a synthetic lethal interaction between FEN1 and MRE11A, which is often mutated in MSI cancers through instabilities at a poly(T microsatellite repeat. Disruption of ATM is similarly synthetic lethal with FEN1 inhibition, suggesting that disruption of FEN1 function leads to the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. These are likely a result of the accumulation of aberrant replication forks, that accumulate as a consequence of a failure in Okazaki fragment maturation, as inhibition of FEN1 is toxic in cells disrupted for the Fanconi anemia pathway and post-replication repair. Furthermore, RAD51 foci accumulate as a consequence of FEN1 inhibition and the toxicity of FEN1 inhibitors increases in cells disrupted for the homologous recombination pathway, suggesting a role for homologous recombination in the resolution of damage induced by FEN1 inhibition. Finally, FEN1 appears to be required for the repair of damage induced by olaparib and cisplatin within the Fanconi anemia pathway, and may play a role in the repair of damage associated with its own disruption.

  18. Significant blockade of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases by MGCD516 (Sitravatinib), a novel small molecule inhibitor, shows potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models of sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Parag P; Ivy, Kathryn S; Musi, Elgilda; de Stanchina, Elisa; Schwartz, Gary K

    2016-01-26

    Sarcomas are rare but highly aggressive mesenchymal tumors with a median survival of 10-18 months for metastatic disease. Mutation and/or overexpression of many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including c-Met, PDGFR, c-Kit and IGF1-R drive defective signaling pathways in sarcomas. MGCD516 (Sitravatinib) is a novel small molecule inhibitor targeting multiple RTKs involved in driving sarcoma cell growth. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of MGCD516 both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models in vivo. MGCD516 treatment resulted in significant blockade of phosphorylation of potential driver RTKs and induced potent anti-proliferative effects in vitro. Furthermore, MGCD516 treatment of tumor xenografts in vivo resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth. Efficacy of MGCD516 was superior to imatinib and crizotinib, two other well-studied multi-kinase inhibitors with overlapping target specificities, both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report describing MGCD516 as a potent multi-kinase inhibitor in different models of sarcoma, superior to imatinib and crizotinib. Results from this study showing blockade of multiple driver signaling pathways provides a rationale for further clinical development of MGCD516 for the treatment of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma.

  19. A Rapid Phenotypic Whole Cell Screening Approach for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors that Counter Beta-lactamase Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collia, Deanna; Bannister, Thomas D.; Tan, Hao; Jin, Shouguang; Langaee, Taimour; Shumate, Justin; Scampavia, Louis; Spicer, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is prevalent in hospitals and continues to develop resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Historically, β-lactam antibiotics have been the first line of therapeutic defense. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of P. aeruginosa, such as AmpC β-lactamase overproducing mutants, limits the effectiveness of current antibiotics. Among AmpC hyper producing clinical isolates, inactivation of AmpG, which is essential for the expression of AmpC, increases bacterial sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. We hypothesize that inhibition of AmpG activity will enhance the efficacy of β-lactams against P. aeruginosa. Here, using a highly drug resistant AmpC inducible laboratory strain PAO1, we describe an ultra-high throughput whole cell turbidity assay designed to identify small molecule inhibitors of the AmpG. We screened 645K compounds to identify compounds with the ability to inhibit bacterial growth in the presence of Cefoxitin; an AmpC inducer, and identified 2,663 inhibitors which were also tested in the absence of Cefoxitin to determine AmpG specificity. The Z′ and S:B were robust at 0.87 ± 0.05 and 2.2 ± 0.2, respectively. Through a series of secondary and tertiary studies, including a novel luciferase based counterscreen, we ultimately identified 8 potential AmpG specific inhibitors. PMID:28850797

  20. Characterization of three small molecule inhibitors of enterovirus 71 identified from screening of a library of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiming; Gao, Qianqian; Yuan, Shilin; Wang, Lili; Altmeyer, Ralf; Lan, Ke; Yin, Feifei; Zou, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a major cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Infection with EV-A71 is more often associated with neurological complications in children and is responsible for the majority of fatalities, but currently there is no approved antiviral therapy for treatment. Here, we identified auraptene, formononetin, and yangonin as effective inhibitors of EV-A71 infection in the low-micromolar range from screening of a natural product library. Among them, formononetin and yangonin selectively inhibited EV-A71 while auraptene could inhibit viruses within the enterovirus species A. Time of addition studies showed that all the three inhibitors inhibit both attachment and postattachment step of entry. We found mutations conferring the resistance to these inhibitors in the VP1 and VP4 capsid proteins and confirmed the target residues using a reverse genetic approach. Interestingly, auraptene- and formononetin-resistant viruses exhibit cross-resistance to other inhibitors while yangonin-resistant virus still remains susceptible to auraptene and formononetin. Moreover, auraptene and formononetin, but not yangonin protected EV-A71 against thermal inactivation, indicating a direct stabilizing effect of both compounds on virion capsid conformation. Finally, neither biochanin A (an analog of formononetin) nor DL-Kavain (an analog of yangonin) exhibited anti-EV-A71 activity, suggesting the structural elements required for anti-EV-A71 activity. Taken together, these compounds could become potential lead compounds for anti-EV-A71 drug development and also serve as tool compounds for studying virus entry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In Silico Docking of Small-Molecule Inhibitors to the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System EscN ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) Broad-spectrum antibiotic Drug discovery Enzyme inhibitors Enzyme structure Injectosome Molecular modeling Protein...Kagawa, Y.; Yoshida, M. The Crystal Structure of the Nucleotide- Free Alpha 3 Beta 3 Subcomplex of F1-ATPase from the Thermophilic Bacillus PS3 is...Kinases and other ATP- Requiring Enzymes and a Common Nucleotide Binding Fold. EMBO J. 1982, 1, 945–951. Zarivach, R.; Vuckovic, M.; Deng, W

  2. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Ur-Rasool, Hafsa; Ahmed, Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh). The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals) and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD.

  3. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsa Amat-Ur-Rasool

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh. The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE, an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD.

  4. Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors against NS2B/NS3 serine protease from Zika virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Ren, Jinhong; Nocadello, Salvatore; Rice, Amy J.; Ojeda, Isabel; Light, Samuel; Minasov, George; Vargas, Jason; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC); (NWU); (Novalex); (DNSK)

    2016-12-26

    Zika flavivirus infection during pregnancy appears to produce higher risk of microcephaly, and also causes multiple neurological problems such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. The Zika virus is now widespread in Central and South America, and is anticipated to become an increasing risk in the southern United States. With continuing global travel and the spread of the mosquito vector, the exposure is expected to accelerate, but there are no currently approved treatments against the Zika virus. The Zika NS2B/NS3 protease is an attractive drug target due to its essential role in viral replication. Our studies have identified several compounds with inhibitory activity (IC50) and binding affinity (KD) of ~5–10 μM against the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease from testing 71 HCV NS3/NS4A inhibitors that were initially discovered by high-throughput screening of 40,967 compounds. Competition surface plasmon resonance studies and mechanism of inhibition analyses by enzyme kinetics subsequently determined the best compound to be a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.5 μM. We also determined the X-ray structure of the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease in a “pre-open conformation”, a conformation never observed before for any flavivirus proteases. This provides the foundation for new structure-based inhibitor design.

  5. Inhibitor of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Small Molecule Promotes Motor Neuron Differentiation of Human Endometrial Stem Cells Cultured on Electrospun Biocomposite Polycaprolactone/Collagen Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hoveizi, Elham; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Ai, Jafar; Khakbiz, Mehrdad; Faghihi, Faezeh; Tajerian, Roksana; Bayat, Neda

    2017-05-01

    Small molecules as useful chemical tools can affect cell differentiation and even change cell fate. It is demonstrated that LY294002, a small molecule inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway, can inhibit proliferation and promote neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the differentiation effect of Ly294002 small molecule on the human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) into motor neuron-like cells on polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen scaffolds. hEnSCs were cultured in a neurogenic inductive medium containing 1 μM LY294002 on the surface of PCL/collagen electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Cell attachment and viability of cells on scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazoyl-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The expression of neuron-specific markers was assayed by real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry analysis after 15 days post induction. Results showed that attachment and differentiation of hEnSCs into motor neuron-like cells on the scaffolds with Ly294002 small molecule were higher than that of the cells on tissue culture plates as control group. In conclusion, PCL/collagen electrospun scaffolds with Ly294002 have potential for being used in neural tissue engineering because of its bioactive and three-dimensional structure which enhances viability and differentiation of hEnSCs into neurons through inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Thus, manipulation of this pathway by small molecules can enhance neural differentiation.

  6. Alteration of RNA splicing by small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between NHP2L1 and U4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Lin, Wenwei; Goktug, Asli; Grace, Christy R. R.; Waddell, Michael Brett; Bao, Ju; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard J.; Zheng, Jie J.; Shelat, Anang A.; Relling, Mary V.; Chen, Taosheng; Evans, William E.

    2018-01-01

    Splicing is an important eukaryotic mechanism for expanding the transcriptome and proteome, influencing a number of biological processes. Understanding its regulation and identifying small molecules that modulate this process remains a challenge. We developed an assay based on time-resolved FRET (TR-FRET) to detect the interaction between the protein NHP2L1 and U4 RNA, which are two key components of the spliceosome. We used this assay to identify small molecules that interfere with this interaction in a high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign. Topotecan and other camptothecin derivatives were among the top hits. We confirmed that topotecan disrupts the interaction between NHP2L1 and U4 by binding to U4 and inhibits RNA splicing. Our data reveal new functions of known drugs which could facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies to modify splicing and alter gene function. PMID:28985478

  7. Determination of Histidine pKa Values in the Propeptides of Furin and Proprotein Convertase 1/3 Using Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M; David, Larry L; Shinde, Ujwal

    2015-08-04

    Propeptides of proprotein convertases regulate activation of their protease domains by sensing the organellar pH within the secretory pathway. Earlier experimental work highlighted the importance of a conserved histidine residue within the propeptide of a widely studied member, furin. A subsequent evolutionary analysis found an increase in histidine content within propeptides of secreted eukaryotic proteases compared with their prokaryotic orthologs. However, furin activates in the trans-golgi network at a pH of 6.5 while a paralog, proprotein convertase 1/3, activates in secretory vesicles at a pH of 5.5. It is unclear how a conserved histidine can mediate activation at two different pH values. In this manuscript, we measured the pKa values of histidines within the propeptides of furin and proprotein convertase 1/3 using a histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry approach. The high density of histidine residues combined with an abundance of basic residues provided challenges for generation of peptide ions with unique histidine residues, which were overcome by employing ETD fragmentation. During this analysis, we found slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange in residues other than histidine at basic pH. Finally, we demonstrate that the pKa of the conserved histidine in proprotein convertase 1/3 is acid-shifted compared with furin and is consistent with its lower pH of activation.

  8. Cleavage of group 1 coronavirus spike proteins: how furin cleavage is traded off against heparan sulfate binding upon cell culture adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de C.A.M.; Haijema, B.J.; Schellen, P.; Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Lintelo, te E.; Vennema, H.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A longstanding enigmatic feature of the group 1 coronaviruses is the uncleaved phenotype of their spike protein, an exceptional property among class I fusion proteins. Here, however, we show that some group 1 coronavirus spike proteins carry a furin enzyme recognition motif and can actually be

  9. A small molecule inhibitor of signal peptide peptidase inhibits Plasmodium development in the liver and decreases malaria severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iana Parvanova

    Full Text Available The liver stage of Plasmodium's life cycle is the first, obligatory step in malaria infection. Decreasing the hepatic burden of Plasmodium infection decreases the severity of disease and constitutes a promising strategy for malaria prophylaxis. The efficacy of the gamma-secretase and signal peptide peptidase inhibitor LY411,575 in targeting Plasmodium liver stages was evaluated both in human hepatoma cell lines and in mouse primary hepatocytes. LY411,575 was found to prevent Plasmodium's normal development in the liver, with an IC(50 of approximately 80 nM, without affecting hepatocyte invasion by the parasite. In vivo results with a rodent model of malaria showed that LY411,575 decreases the parasite load in the liver and increases by 55% the resistance of mice to cerebral malaria, one of the most severe malaria-associated syndromes. Our data show that LY411,575 does not exert its effect via the Notch signaling pathway suggesting that it may interfere with Plasmodium development through an inhibition of the parasite's signal peptide peptidase. We therefore propose that selective signal peptide peptidase inhibitors could be potentially used for preventive treatment of malaria in humans.

  10. Dual-Targeting Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus FMN Riboswitch Disrupt Riboflavin Homeostasis in an Infectious Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Mann, Paul A; Xiao, Li; Gill, Charles; Galgoci, Andrew M; Howe, John A; Villafania, Artjohn; Barbieri, Christopher M; Malinverni, Juliana C; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; McCurry, Megan D; Murgolo, Nicholas; Flattery, Amy; Mack, Matthias; Roemer, Terry

    2017-05-18

    Riboswitches are bacterial-specific, broadly conserved, non-coding RNA structural elements that control gene expression of numerous metabolic pathways and transport functions essential for cell growth. As such, riboswitch inhibitors represent a new class of potential antibacterial agents. Recently, we identified ribocil-C, a highly selective inhibitor of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch that controls expression of de novo riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. Here, we provide a mechanistic characterization of the antibacterial effects of ribocil-C as well as of roseoflavin (RoF), an antimetabolite analog of RF, among medically significant Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis. We provide genetic, biophysical, computational, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence that ribocil-C and RoF specifically inhibit dual FMN riboswitches, separately controlling RF biosynthesis and uptake processes essential for MRSA growth and pathogenesis. Such a dual-targeting mechanism is specifically required to develop broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial agents targeting RF metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Secretion of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor is impaired by amino acid deletion in a small region of the molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, S; Hirosawa, S; Aoki, N

    1994-02-01

    Alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) deficiency Okinawa results from defective secretion of the inhibitor from the liver and appears to be a direct consequence of the deletion of Glu137 in the amino acid sequence of alpha 2PI. To examine the effects of replacing the amino acid occupying position 137 or deleting its neighboring amino acid on alpha 2PI secretion, we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of alpha 2PI cDNA to change the codon specifying Glu137 or delete a codon specifying its neighboring amino acid. The effects were determined by pulse-chase experiments and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of media from transiently transfected COS-7 cells. Replacement of Glu137 with an amino acid other than Cys had little effect on alpha 2PI secretion. In contrast, deletion of an amino acid in a region spanning a sequence of less than 30 amino acids including positions 127 and 137 severely impaired the secretion. The results suggest that structural integrity of the region, rather than its component amino acids, is important for the intracellular transport and secretion of alpha 2PI.

  12. A small molecule inhibitor of mutant IDH2 rescues cardiomyopathy in a D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria type II mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Travins, Jeremy; Lin, Zhizhong; Si, Yaguang; Chen, Yue; Powe, Josh; Murray, Stuart; Zhu, Dongwei; Artin, Erin; Gross, Stefan; Santiago, Stephanie; Steadman, Mya; Kernytsky, Andrew; Straley, Kimberly; Lu, Chenming; Pop, Ana; Struys, Eduard A; Jansen, Erwin E W; Salomons, Gajja S; David, Muriel D; Quivoron, Cyril; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Regan, Karen S; Liu, Wei; Dang, Lenny; Yang, Hua; Silverman, Lee; Agresta, Samuel; Dorsch, Marion; Biller, Scott; Yen, Katharine; Cang, Yong; Su, Shin-San Michael; Jin, Shengfang

    2016-11-01

    D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D2HGA) type II is a rare neurometabolic disorder caused by germline gain-of-function mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), resulting in accumulation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG). Patients exhibit a wide spectrum of symptoms including cardiomyopathy, epilepsy, developmental delay and limited life span. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic interventions. We generated a D2HGA type II mouse model by introducing the Idh2R140Q mutation at the native chromosomal locus. Idh2R140Q mice displayed significantly elevated 2HG levels and recapitulated multiple defects seen in patients. AGI-026, a potent, selective inhibitor of the human IDH2R140Q-mutant enzyme, suppressed 2HG production, rescued cardiomyopathy, and provided a survival benefit in Idh2R140Q mice; treatment withdrawal resulted in deterioration of cardiac function. We observed differential expression of multiple genes and metabolites that are associated with cardiomyopathy, which were largely reversed by AGI-026. These findings demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefit of an IDH2R140Q inhibitor in patients with D2HGA type II.

  13. Biologic activity of the novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor LLL12 against canine osteosarcoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto Jason I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background STAT3 [1] has been shown to be dysregulated in nearly every major cancer, including osteosarcoma (OS. Constitutive activation of STAT3, via aberrant phosphorylation, leads to proliferation, cell survival and resistance to apoptosis. The present study sought to characterize the biologic activity of a novel allosteric STAT3 inhibitor, LLL12, in canine OS cell lines. Results We evaluated the effects of LLL12 treatment on 4 canine OS cell lines and found that LLL12 inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased the expression of several transcriptional targets of STAT3 in these cells. Lastly, LLL12 exhibited synergistic anti-proliferative activity with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin in the OS lines. Conclusion LLL12 exhibits biologic activity against canine OS cell lines through inhibition of STAT3 related cellular functions supporting its potential use as a novel therapy for OS.

  14. Small molecule inhibitors of the LEDGF site of human immunodeficiency virus integrase identified by fragment screening and structure based design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Peat

    Full Text Available A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  15. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wan Lu, E-mail: lvvlchina@msn.cn [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Ra, E-mail: mira1125@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133{sup +} cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133{sup +} colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133{sup +} cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133{sup −} cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133{sup +} cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133{sup −} cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  16. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wan Lu; Lee, Mi-Ra; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133"+ cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133"+ colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133"+ cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133"− cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133"+ cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133"− cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133"− cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  17. Discovery and characterization of LY2784544, a small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of JAK2V617F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L; Clayton, J R; Walgren, R A; Zhao, B; Evans, R J; Smith, M C; Heinz-Taheny, K M; Kreklau, E L; Bloem, L; Pitou, C; Shen, W; Strelow, J M; Halstead, C; Rempala, M E; Parthasarathy, S; Gillig, J R; Heinz, L J; Pei, H; Wang, Y; Stancato, L F; Dowless, M S; Iversen, P W; Burkholder, T P

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the prevalence of the JAK2V617F mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), its constitutive activity, and ability to recapitulate the MPN phenotype in mouse models, JAK2V617F kinase is an attractive therapeutic target. We report the discovery and initial characterization of the orally bioavailable imidazopyridazine, LY2784544, a potent, selective and ATP-competitive inhibitor of janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase. LY2784544 was discovered and characterized using a JAK2-inhibition screening assay in tandem with biochemical and cell-based assays. LY2784544 in vitro selectivity for JAK2 was found to be equal or superior to known JAK2 inhibitors. Further studies showed that LY2784544 effectively inhibited JAK2V617F-driven signaling and cell proliferation in Ba/F3 cells (IC 50 =20 and 55 nM, respectively). In comparison, LY2784544 was much less potent at inhibiting interleukin-3-stimulated wild-type JAK2-mediated signaling and cell proliferation (IC 50 =1183 and 1309 nM, respectively). In vivo, LY2784544 effectively inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation in Ba/F3-JAK2V617F-GFP (green fluorescent protein) ascitic tumor cells (TED 50 =12.7 mg/kg) and significantly reduced (P<0.05) Ba/F3-JAK2V617F-GFP tumor burden in the JAK2V617F-induced MPN model (TED 50 =13.7 mg/kg, twice daily). In contrast, LY2784544 showed no effect on erythroid progenitors, reticulocytes or platelets. These data suggest that LY2784544 has potential for development as a targeted agent against JAK2V617F and may have properties that allow suppression of JAK2V617F-induced MPN pathogenesis while minimizing effects on hematopoietic progenitor cells

  18. Identification of a coumarin-based antihistamine-like small molecule as an anti-filoviral entry inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han; Schafer, Adam; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima; Kenny, Tara; Retterer, Cary; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Bavari, Sina; Peet, Norton P; Rong, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus, Marburg virus and Cuevavirus, cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans with high mortality rates up to 90%. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or therapy available for the prevention and treatment of filovirus infection in humans. The recent 2013-2015 West African Ebola epidemic underscores the urgency to develop antiviral therapeutics against these infectious diseases. Our previous study showed that GPCR antagonists, particularly histamine receptor antagonists (antihistamines) inhibit Ebola and Marburg virus entry. In this study, we screened a library of 1220 small molecules with predicted antihistamine activity, identified multiple compounds with potent inhibitory activity against entry of both Ebola and Marburg viruses in human cancer cell lines, and confirmed their anti-Ebola activity in human primary cells. These small molecules target a late-stage of Ebola virus entry. Further structure-activity relationship studies around one compound (cp19) reveal the importance of the coumarin fused ring structure, especially the hydrophobic substituents at positions 3 and/or 4, for its antiviral activity, and this identified scaffold represents a favorable starting point for the rapid development of anti-filovirus therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. General Method to Determine the Flux of Charged Molecules through Nanopores Applied to β-Lactamase Inhibitors and OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Ishan; Pira, Alessandro; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Bodrenko, Igor; Benier, Lorraine; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Winterhalter, Mathias; Wagner, Richard

    2017-03-16

    A major challenge in the discovery of the new antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria is to achieve sufficiently fast permeation in order to avoid high doses causing toxic side effects. So far, suitable assays for quantifying the uptake of charged antibiotics into bacteria are lacking. We apply an electrophysiological zero-current assay using concentration gradients of β-lactamase inhibitors combined with single-channel conductance to quantify their flux rates through OmpF. Molecular dynamic simulations provide in addition details on the interactions between the nanopore wall and the charged solutes. In particular, the interaction barrier for three β-lactamase inhibitors is surprisingly as low as 3-5 kcal/mol and only slightly above the diffusion barrier of ions such as chloride. Within our macroscopic constant field model, we determine that at a zero-membrane potential a concentration gradient of 10 μM of avibactam, sulbactam, or tazobactam can create flux rates of roughly 620 molecules/s per OmpF trimer.

  20. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  1. The small-molecule kinase inhibitor D11 counteracts 17-AAG-mediated up-regulation of HSP70 in brain cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Susanne; Svenstrup, Tina H; Guerra, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Many types of cancer express high levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are molecular chaperones regulating protein folding and stability ensuring protection of cells from potentially lethal stress. HSPs in cancer cells promote survival, growth and spreading even in situations of growth factors deprivation by associating with oncogenic proteins responsible for cell transformation. Hence, it is not surprising that the identification of potent inhibitors of HSPs, notably HSP90, has been the primary research focus, in recent years. Exposure of cancer cells to HSP90 inhibitors, including 17-AAG, has been shown to cause resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment mostly attributable to induction of the heat shock response and increased cellular levels of pro-survival chaperones. In this study, we show that treatment of glioblastoma cells with 17-AAG leads to HSP90 inhibition indicated by loss of stability of the EGFR client protein, and significant increase in HSP70 expression. Conversely, co-treatment with the small-molecule kinase inhibitor D11 leads to suppression of the heat shock response and inhibition of HSF1 transcriptional activity. Beside HSP70, Western blot and differential mRNA expression analysis reveal that combination treatment causes strong down-regulation of the small chaperone protein HSP27. Finally, we demonstrate that incubation of cells with both agents leads to enhanced cytotoxicity and significantly high levels of LC3-II suggesting autophagy induction. Taken together, results reported here support the notion that including D11 in future treatment regimens based on HSP90 inhibition can potentially overcome acquired resistance induced by the heat shock response in brain cancer cells.

  2. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. PMID

  3. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J; Lory, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. Copyright © 2016 Lorenz et al.

  4. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Brum Ortigoza

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  5. Gibbs Free Energy of Hydrolytic Water Molecule in Acyl-Enzyme Intermediates of a Serine Protease: A Potential Application for Computer-Aided Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the potencies of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors, the relationships between calculated Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule in acyl-trypsin intermediates and experimentally measured catalytic rate constants (k cat ) were investigated. After obtaining representative solution structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, hydration thermodynamics analyses using WaterMap™ were conducted. Consequently, we found for the first time that when Gibbs free energy of the hydrolytic water molecule was lower, logarithms of k cat were also lower. The hydrolytic water molecule with favorable Gibbs free energy may hydrolyze acylated serine slowly. Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule might be a useful descriptor for computer-aided discovery of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors of hydrolytic enzymes.

  6. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee

    2007-01-01

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC 50 s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article

  7. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part II. Integrase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular modeling and functional confirmation of Ole and HT binding to HIV-1 integrase. Docking simulations identified two binding regions for Ole within the integrase active site. Region I encompasses the conserved D64-D116-E152 motif, while region II involves the flexible loop region formed by amino acid residues 140-149. HT, on the other hand, binds to region II. Both Ole and HT exhibit favorable interactions with important amino acid residues through strong H-bonding and van der Waals contacts, predicting integrase inhibition. To test and confirm modeling predictions, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 integrase activities including 3'-processing, strand transfer, and disintegration. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on all three activities, with EC 50 s in the nanomolar range. These studies demonstrate that molecular modeling of target-ligand interaction coupled with structural-activity analysis should facilitate the design and identification of innovative integrase inhibitors and other therapeutics

  8. An orally available, small-molecule polymerase inhibitor shows efficacy against a lethal morbillivirus infection in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Stefanie A; Yan, Dan; Hovingh, Elise S; Evers, Taylor J; Enkirch, Theresa; Reddy, G Prabhakar; Sun, Aiming; Saindane, Manohar T; Arrendale, Richard F; Painter, George; Liotta, Dennis C; Natchus, Michael G; von Messling, Veronika; Plemper, Richard K

    2014-04-16

    Measles virus is a highly infectious morbillivirus responsible for major morbidity and mortality in unvaccinated humans. The related, zoonotic canine distemper virus (CDV) induces morbillivirus disease in ferrets with 100% lethality. We report an orally available, shelf-stable pan-morbillivirus inhibitor that targets the viral RNA polymerase. Prophylactic oral treatment of ferrets infected intranasally with a lethal CDV dose reduced viremia and prolonged survival. Ferrets infected with the same dose of virus that received post-infection treatment at the onset of viremia showed low-grade viral loads, remained asymptomatic, and recovered from infection, whereas control animals succumbed to the disease. Animals that recovered also mounted a robust immune response and were protected against rechallenge with a lethal CDV dose. Drug-resistant viral recombinants were generated and found to be attenuated and transmission-impaired compared to the genetic parent virus. These findings may pioneer a path toward an effective morbillivirus therapy that could aid measles eradication by synergizing with vaccination to close gaps in herd immunity due to vaccine refusal.

  9. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general.

  10. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A small molecule inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, prevents prostate cancer growth and metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Rahim

    Full Text Available The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer.We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells.Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be evaluated as a potential

  12. Exploring the multifunctionality of thioflavin- and deferiprone-based molecules as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for potential application in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Patrick, Brian O; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Orvig, Chris

    2013-04-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people worldwide. With no prevention or cure available, this progressive disease has a significant impact on society - dementia patients and their caretakers, healthcare systems, and the economy. Previously, we have reported initial developments of multifunctional drug candidates for AD based on two scaffolds - thioflavin-T and deferiprone. Individually, these molecules have shown several favorable functionalities, including dissociation of toxic amyloid-β aggregates, antioxidant and/or metal chelating ability that can pacify reactive oxygen species, plaque targeting, and blood-brain barrier penetration. In this work, the two scaffolds are augmented with a new functionality - acetylcholinesterase inhibition. This functionality is incorporated by derivatization with a carbamate group, which is the active group in some AD drugs currently in the market. We present the rationale for designing three novel compounds, their synthesis and characterization, including X-ray crystallographic data, and encouraging results from in vitro and computational acetylcholinesterase inhibition studies. Also, we evaluate the compounds as potential drug candidates by Lipinski's rules and cytotoxicity studies in a neuronal cell line. Overall, we demonstrate the feasibility of improving on two well established scaffolds, as well as show in vitro efficacy plus initial mode of action and biological compatibility data.

  13. Pore Polarity and Charge Determine Differential Block of Kir1.1 and Kir7.1 Potassium Channels by Small-Molecule Inhibitor VU590.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharade, Sujay V; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Figueroa, Eric E; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S

    2017-09-01

    VU590 was the first publicly disclosed, submicromolar-affinity (IC 50 = 0.2 μ M), small-molecule inhibitor of the inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel and diuretic target, Kir1.1. VU590 also inhibits Kir7.1 (IC 50 ∼ 8 μ M), and has been used to reveal new roles for Kir7.1 in regulation of myometrial contractility and melanocortin signaling. Here, we employed molecular modeling, mutagenesis, and patch clamp electrophysiology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying VU590 inhibition of Kir1.1 and Kir7.1. Block of both channels is voltage- and K + -dependent, suggesting the VU590 binding site is located within the pore. Mutagenesis analysis in Kir1.1 revealed that asparagine 171 (N171) is the only pore-lining residue required for high-affinity block, and that substituting negatively charged residues (N171D, N171E) at this position dramatically weakens block. In contrast, substituting a negatively charged residue at the equivalent position in Kir7.1 enhances block by VU590, suggesting the VU590 binding mode is different. Interestingly, mutations of threonine 153 (T153) in Kir7.1 that reduce constrained polarity at this site (T153C, T153V, T153S) make wild-type and binding-site mutants (E149Q, A150S) more sensitive to block by VU590. The Kir7.1-T153C mutation enhances block by the structurally unrelated inhibitor VU714 but not by a higher-affinity analog ML418, suggesting that the polar side chain of T153 creates a barrier to low-affinity ligands that interact with E149 and A150. Reverse mutations in Kir1.1 suggest that this mechanism is conserved in other Kir channels. This study reveals a previously unappreciated role of membrane pore polarity in determination of Kir channel inhibitor pharmacology. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Development of Anti-Virulence Approaches for Candidiasis via a Novel Series of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Candida albicans Filamentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A. Romo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans remains the main etiologic agent of candidiasis, the most common fungal infection and now the third most frequent infection in U.S. hospitals. The scarcity of antifungal agents and their limited efficacy contribute to the unacceptably high morbidity and mortality rates associated with these infections. The yeast-to-hypha transition represents the main virulence factor associated with the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections. In addition, filamentation is pivotal for robust biofilm development, which represents another major virulence factor for candidiasis and further complicates treatment. Targeting pathogenic mechanisms rather than growth represents an attractive yet clinically unexploited approach in the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we performed large-scale phenotypic screening assays with 30,000 drug-like small-molecule compounds within ChemBridge’s DIVERSet chemical library in order to identify small-molecule inhibitors of C. albicans filamentation, and our efforts led to the identification of a novel series of bioactive compounds with a common biaryl amide core structure. The leading compound of this series, N-[3-(allyloxy-phenyl]-4-methoxybenzamide, was able to prevent filamentation under all liquid and solid medium conditions tested, suggesting that it impacts a common core component of the cellular machinery that mediates hypha formation under different environmental conditions. In addition to filamentation, this compound also inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation. This leading compound also demonstrated in vivo activity in clinically relevant murine models of invasive and oral candidiasis. Overall, our results indicate that compounds within this series represent promising candidates for the development of novel anti-virulence approaches to combat C. albicans infections.

  15. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  16. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor blocks androgen-induced oxidative stress and delays prostate cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Hirak S; Thompson, Todd A; Church, Dawn R; Clower, Cynthia C; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Amlong, Corey A; Martin, Christopher T; Woster, Patrick M; Lindstrom, Mary J; Wilding, George

    2009-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in human prostate epithelia are an important etiologic factor in prostate cancer (CaP) occurrence, recurrence, and progression. Androgen induces ROS production in the prostate by a yet unknown mechanism. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that androgen induces an overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine oxidation pathway. As prostatic epithelia produce a large excess of polyamines, the androgen-induced polyamine oxidation that produces H2O2 could be a major reason for the high ROS levels in the prostate epithelia. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-butanedienyl butanediamine (MDL 72,527 or CPC-200) effectively blocks androgen-induced ROS production in human CaP cells, as well as significantly delays CaP progression and death in animals developing spontaneous CaP. These data show that polyamine oxidation is not only a major pathway for ROS production in prostate, but inhibiting this pathway also successfully delays CaP progression.

  17. A Small Molecule Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Blocks Androgen-Induced Oxidative Stress and Delays Prostate Cancer Progression in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Hirak S.; Thompson, Todd A.; Church, Dawn R.; Clower, Cynthia C.; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Amlong, Corey A.; Martin, Christopher T.; Woster, Patrick M.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Wilding, George

    2009-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in human prostate epithelia are an important etiological factor in prostate cancer (CaP) occurrence, recurrence and progression. Androgen induces ROS production in the prostate by a yet unknown mechanism. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that androgen induces an overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine oxidation pathway. As prostatic epithelia produce a large excess of polyamines, the androgen-induced polyamine oxidation that produces H2O2 could be a major reason for the high ROS levels in the prostate epithelia. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-butanedienyl butanediamine (MDL 72,527 or CPC-200) effectively blocks androgen-induced ROS production in human CaP cells as well as significantly delays CaP progression and death in animals developing spontaneous CaP. These data demonstrate that polyamine oxidation is not only a major pathway for ROS production in prostate, but inhibiting this pathway also successfully delays prostate cancer progression. PMID:19773450

  18. TGF-β Small Molecule Inhibitor SB431542 Reduces Rotator Cuff Muscle Fibrosis and Fatty Infiltration By Promoting Fibro/Adipogenic Progenitor Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Davies

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tears represent a large burden of muscle-tendon injuries in our aging population. While small tears can be repaired surgically with good outcomes, critical size tears are marked by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration, which can lead to failed repair, frequent re-injury, and chronic disability. Previous animal studies have indicated that Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β signaling may play an important role in the development of these muscle pathologies after injury. Here, we demonstrated that inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling with the small molecule inhibitor SB431542 in a mouse model of massive rotator cuff tear results in decreased fibrosis, fatty infiltration, and muscle weight loss. These observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by decreased fibrotic, adipogenic, and atrophy-related gene expression in the injured muscle of mice treated with SB431542. We further demonstrated that treatment with SB431542 reduces the number of fibro/adipogenic progenitor (FAP cells-an important cellular origin of rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration, in injured muscle by promoting apoptosis of FAPs. Together, these data indicate that the TGF-β pathway is a critical regulator of the degenerative muscle changes seen after massive rotator cuff tears. TGF-β promotes rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration by preventing FAP apoptosis. TGF-β regulated FAP apoptosis may serve as an important target pathway in the future development of novel therapeutics to improve muscle outcomes following rotator cuff tear.

  19. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactive molecules; Quantification of tricyclic pyrones from pharmacokinetic studies; Nanodelivery of siRNA; and Synthesis of viral protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekara, Sahani Manjitha

    Four research projects were carried out and they are described in this dissertation. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3?) plays a pivotal and central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and protein kinase C (PKC) controls the function of other proteins via phosphorylation and involves in tumor promotion. In pursuit of identifying novel GSK3beta and/or PKC inhibitors, substituted quinoline molecules were designed and synthesized based on the structure-activity-relationship studies. Synthesized molecules were evaluated for their neural protective activities and selected molecules were further tested for inhibitory activities on GSK3beta and PKC enzymes. Among these compounds, compound 2 was found to have better GSK3beta enzyme inhibitory and MC65 cell protection activities at low nanomolar concentrations and poor PKC inhibitory activity whereas compound 3 shows better PKC inhibitory activity. This demonstrates the potential for uses of quinoline scaffold in designing novel compounds for AD and cancer. Pharmacokinetics and distribution profiles of two anti-Alzheimer molecules, CP2 and TP70, discovered in our laboratory were assessed using HPLC/MS. Plasma samples of mice and rats fed with TP70 via different routes over various times were analyzed to quantify the amounts of TP70 in plasma of both species. Distribution profiles of TP70 in various tissues of mice were studied and results show that TP70 penetrated the blood brain barrier and accumulated in the brain tissue in significant amounts. Similarly, the amount of CP2 in plasma of mice was analyzed. The HPLC analysis revealed that both compounds have good PK profiles and bioavailability, which would make them suitable candidates for further in vivo efficacy studies. Nanodelivery of specific dsRNA for suppressing the western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) genes was studied using modified chitosan or modified polyvinylpyrrolidinone (PVP) as nanocarriers. Computational

  20. Propeptides are sufficient to regulate organelle-specific pH-dependent activation of furin and proprotein convertase 1/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Stephanie L; Williamson, Danielle M; Elferich, Johannes; Radler, David; Joshi, Rajendra; Thomas, Gary; Shinde, Ujwal

    2012-10-12

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin and proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1) cleave substrates at dibasic residues along the eukaryotic secretory/endocytic pathway. PCs are evolutionarily related to bacterial subtilisin and are synthesized as zymogens. They contain N-terminal propeptides (PRO) that function as dedicated catalysts that facilitate folding and regulate activation of cognate proteases through multiple-ordered cleavages. Previous studies identified a histidine residue (His69) that functions as a pH sensor in the propeptide of furin (PRO(FUR)), which regulates furin activation at pH~6.5 within the trans-Golgi network. Although this residue is conserved in the PC1 propeptide (PRO(PC1)), PC1 nonetheless activates at pH~5.5 within the dense core secretory granules. Here, we analyze the mechanism by which PRO(FUR) regulates furin activation and examine why PRO(FUR) and PRO(PC1) differ in their pH-dependent activation. Sequence analyses establish that while both PRO(FUR) and PRO(PC1) are enriched in histidines when compared with cognate catalytic domains and prokaryotic orthologs, histidine content in PRO(FUR) is ~2-fold greater than that in PRO(PC1), which may augment its pH sensitivity. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics establish that histidine protonation significantly unfolds PRO(FUR) when compared to PRO(PC1) to enhance autoproteolysis. We further demonstrate that PRO(FUR) and PRO(PC1) are sufficient to confer organelle sensing on folding and activation of their cognate proteases. Swapping propeptides between furin and PC1 transfers pH-dependent protease activation in a propeptide-dictated manner in vitro and in cells. Since prokaryotes lack organelles and eukaryotic PCs evolved from propeptide-dependent, not propeptide-independent prokaryotic subtilases, our results suggest that histidine enrichment may have enabled propeptides to evolve to exploit pH gradients to activate within specific organelles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PHA665752, a small-molecule inhibitor of c-Met, inhibits hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated migration and proliferation of c-Met-positive neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosswell, Hal E; Dasgupta, Anindya; Alvarado, Carlos S; Watt, Tanya; Christensen, James G; De, Pradip; Durden, Donald L; Findley, Harry W

    2009-01-01

    c-Met is a tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and both c-Met and its ligand are expressed in a variety of tissues. C-Met/HGF/SF signaling is essential for normal embryogenesis, organogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Abnormal c-Met/HGF/SF signaling has been demonstrated in different tumors and linked to aggressive and metastatic tumor phenotypes. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated inhibition of c-Met/HGF/SF signaling by the small-molecule inhibitor PHA665752. This study investigated c-Met and HGF expression in two neuroblastoma (NBL) cell lines and tumor tissue from patients with NBL, as well as the effects of PHA665752 on growth and motility of NBL cell lines. The effect of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN on migration and proliferation of tumor cells treated with PHA665752 was also evaluated. Expression of c-Met and HGF in NBL cell lines SH-EP and SH-SY5Y and primary tumor tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. The effect of PHA665752 on c-Met/HGF signaling involved in NBL cell proliferation and migration was evaluated in c-Met-positive cells and c-Met-transfected cells. The transwell chemotaxis assay and the MTT assay were used to measure migration and proliferation/cell-survival of tumor cells, respectively. The PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone was used to assess the effect of PTEN on PHA665752-induced inhibition of NBL cell proliferation/cell-survival and migration High c-Met expression was detected in SH-EP cells and primary tumors from patients with advanced-stage disease. C-Met/HGF signaling induced both migration and proliferation of SH-EP cells. Migration and proliferation/cell-survival were inhibited by PHA665752 in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that induced overexpression of PTEN following treatment with rosiglitazone significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect of PHA665752 on NBL-cell migration and proliferation. c-Met is highly expressed in most tumors from

  2. High-level expression of an antimicrobial peptide histonin as a natural form by multimerization and furin-mediated cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Min; Jang, Su A; Yu, Byung Jo; Sung, Bong Hyun; Cho, Ju Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang

    2008-02-01

    Direct expression of an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) in Escherichia coli causes several problems such as the toxicity of AMP to the host cell, its susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and decreased antimicrobial activity due to the additional residue(s) introduced after cleavage of AMPs from fusion partners. To overcome these problems and produce a large quantity of a potent AMP histonin (RAGLQFPVGKLLKKLLKRLKR) in E. coli, an efficient expression system was developed, in which the toxicity of histonin was neutralized by a fusion partner F4 (a truncated fragment of PurF protein) and the productivity was increased by a multimeric expression of a histonin gene. The expression level of the fusion proteins reached a maximum with a 12-mer of a histonin gene. In addition, because of the RLKR residues present at the C terminus of histonin, furin cleavage of the multimeric histonin expressed produces an intact, natural histonin. The AMP activity of the histonin produced in E. coli was identical to that of a synthetic histonin. With our expression system, 167 mg of histonin was obtained from 1 l of E. coli culture. These results may lead to a cost-effective solution for the mass production of AMPs that are toxic to a host.

  3. Phase I Study of SU5416, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (VEGFR) in Refractory Pediatric Central Nervous System Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieran, Mark W.; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Wallace, Dana; Fruscio, Robert; Poussaint, Tina Young; Phillips, Peter; Pollack, Ian; Packer, Roger; Boyett, James M.; Blaney, Susan; Prados, Michael; Geyer, Russ; Friedman, Henry; Goldman, Stewart; Kun, Larry E.; MacDonald, Tobey

    2009-01-01

    SU5416 is a novel small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGF receptors 1 and 2. A phase I dose escalation study stratified by concurrent use (stratum II) or absence (Stratum I) of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs was undertaken to estimate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the toxicity profile of SU5416 in pediatric patients with refractory brain tumors. Dose escalations were conducted independently for stratum I starting at 110mg/m2 while stratum II started at 48mg/m2. Thirty-three eligible patients were treated on stratum I (n=23) and stratum II (n=10). Tumor types included 23 glial tumors, 4 neural tumors, 4 ependymomas and 2 choroid plexus carcinomas. The MTD in Stratum I was initially estimated to be 110mg/m2. The protocol was amended to determine the MTD after excluding transient AST elevation. Re-estimation of the MTD began at the 145mg/m2 dose level but due to development of SU5416 being stopped by the sponsor, the trial was closed before completion. The most serious drug-related toxicities were grade 3 liver enzyme abnormalities, arthralgia and hallucinations. The plasma pharmacokinetics of SU5416 was not significantly affected by the concurrent administration of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs. Mean values of the total body clearance, apparent volume of distribution, and terminal phase half-life of SU5416 for the 19 patients in Stratum I were 26.1 ± 12.5 liter/h/m2, 41.9 ± 21.4 liter/m2, and 1.11 ± 0.41 h, respectively. The plasma pharmacokinetics of SU5416 in children was similar to previously reported findings in adult cancer patients. Prolonged disease stabilization was observed in 4 of 16 stratum 1 patients. PMID:19065567

  4. Impact of the putative cancer stem cell markers and growth factor receptor expression on the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Puvanenthiran, Soozana; Essapen, Sharadah; Seddon, Alan M.; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression and activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 have been reported in numerous cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a large panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines (OCCLs) to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs. The aim was to see if there was any association between the protein expression of various biomarkers including three putative ovarian cancer s...

  5. Role of an indole-thiazolidine molecule PPAR pan-agonist and COX inhibitor on inflammation and microcirculatory damage in acute gastric lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Santin

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to show the in vivo mechanisms of action of an indole-thiazolidine molecule peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor pan-agonist (PPAR pan and cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitor, LYSO-7, in an ethanol/HCl-induced (Et/HCl gastric lesion model. Swiss male mice were treated with vehicle, LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate (p.o. 1 hour before oral administration of Et/HCl (60%/0.03M. In another set of assays, animals were injected i.p. with an anti-granulocyte antibody, GW9962 or L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME before treatment. One hour after Et/HCl administration, neutrophils were quantified in the blood and bone marrow and the gastric microcirculatory network was studied in situ. The gastric tissue was used to quantify the percentage of damaged area, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS protein and PPARγ protein and gene expression. Acid secretion was evaluated by the pylorus ligation model. LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate treatment reduced the necrotic area. LYSO-7 treatment enhanced PPARγ gene and protein expression in the stomach, and impaired local neutrophil influx and stasis of the microcirculatory network caused by Et/HCl administration. The effect seemed to be due to PPARγ agonist activity, as the LYSO-7 effect was abolished in GW9962 pre-treated mice. The reversal of microcirculatory stasis, but not neutrophil influx, was mediated by nitric oxide (NO, as L-NAME pre-treatment abolished the LYSO-7-mediated reestablishment of microcirculatory blood flow. This effect may depend on enhanced eNOS protein expression in injured gastric tissue. The pH and concentration of H(+ in the stomach were not modified by LYSO-7 treatment. In addition, LYSO-7 may induce less toxicity, as 28 days of oral treatment did not induce weight loss, as detected in pioglitazone treated mice. Thus, we show that LYSO-7 may be an effective treatment for gastric lesions by controlling

  6. Small Molecule Inhibitors of AI-2 Signaling in Bacteria: State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives for Anti-Quorum Sensing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Gamby, Sonja; Zheng, Yue; Sintim, Herman O.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria respond to different small molecules that are produced by other neighboring bacteria. These molecules, called autoinducers, are classified as intraspecies (i.e., molecules produced and perceived by the same bacterial species) or interspecies (molecules that are produced and sensed between different bacterial species). AI-2 has been proposed as an interspecies autoinducer and has been shown to regulate different bacterial physiology as well as affect virulence factor production and biofilm formation in some bacteria, including bacteria of clinical relevance. Several groups have embarked on the development of small molecules that could be used to perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria, with the ultimate goal that these molecules could be used to inhibit bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. Additionally, these molecules have the potential to be used in synthetic biology applications whereby these small molecules are used as inputs to switch on and off AI-2 receptors. In this review, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the development of small molecules that perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria and offer our perspective on the future development and applications of these classes of molecules. PMID:23994835

  7. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Prince

    Full Text Available The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states.

  8. New small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl transferase DOT1L with a nitrile as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Sophie S; Bayle, Elliott D; Yu, Wenyu; Li, Fengling; Tempel, Wolfram; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu; Fish, Paul V

    2016-09-15

    A number of new nucleoside derivatives are disclosed as inhibitors of DOT1L activity. SARs established that DOT1L inhibition could be achieved through incorporation of polar groups and small heterocycles at the 5-position (5, 6, 12) or by the application of alternative nitrogenous bases (18). Based on these results, CN-SAH (19) was identified as a potent and selective inhibitor of DOT1L activity where the polar 5-nitrile group was shown by crystallography to bind in the hydrophobic pocket of DOT1L. In addition, we show that a polar nitrile group can be used as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Strong synergism between small molecule inhibitors of HER2, PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamunyela, Roswita H; Serafin, Antonio M; Akudugu, John M

    2017-02-01

    Targeting pro-survival cell signaling components has been promising in cancer therapy, but the benefit of targeting with single agents is limited. For malignancies such as triple-negative breast cancer, there is a paucity of targets that are amenable to existing interventions as they are devoid of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), progesterone receptor (PR), and estrogen receptor (ER). Concurrent targeting of cell signaling entities other than HER2, PR and ER with multiple agents may be more effective. Evaluating modes of interaction between agents can inform efficient selection of agents when used in cocktails. Using clonogenic cell survival, interaction between inhibitors of HER2 (TAK-165), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (NVP-BEZ235), and the pro-survival gene (Bcl-2) (ABT-263) in three human breast cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MCF-12A) ranged from strong to very strong synergism. The strongest synergy was demonstrated in PR and ER negative cells. Inhibition of PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 could potentially be effective in the treatment of triple-negative cancers. The very strong synergy observed even at lowest concentrations of inhibitors indicates that these cocktails might be able to be used at a minimised risk of systemic toxicity. Concurrent use of multiple inhibitors can potentiate conventional interventions like radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  11. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyuan Li

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2 were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas.

  12. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical...... by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action....

  13. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A.; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C.; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J.; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E.; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A.; Storer, R. Ian; Stupple, Paul A.; Castle, Neil A.; Hounshell, James A.; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G.; Patel, Manoj K.; Butt, Richard P.; Stevens, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7’s role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission. PMID:27050761

  14. Structure-based development of small molecule PFKFB3 inhibitors: a framework for potential cancer therapeutic agents targeting the Warburg effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuh Seo

    Full Text Available Cancer cells adopt glycolysis as the major source of metabolic energy production for fast cell growth. The HIF-1-induced PFKFB3 plays a key role in this adaptation by elevating the concentration of Fru-2,6-BP, the most potent glycolysis stimulator. As this metabolic conversion has been suggested to be a hallmark of cancer, PFKFB3 has emerged as a novel target for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report that a small molecular inhibitor, N4A, was identified as an initial lead compound for PFKFB3 inhibitor with therapeutic potential. In an attempt to improve its potency, we determined the crystal structure of the PFKFB3•N4A complex to 2.4 Å resolution and, exploiting the resulting molecular information, attained the more potent YN1. When tested on cultured cancer cells, both N4A and YN1 inhibited PFKFB3, suppressing the Fru-2,6-BP level, which in turn suppressed glycolysis and, ultimately, led to cell death. This study validates PFKFB3 as a target for new cancer therapies and provides a framework for future development efforts.

  15. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos J Alexandrou

    Full Text Available Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7 is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  16. Plant-derived mPGES-1 inhibitors or suppressors: A new emerging trend in the search for small molecules to combat inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Pervaiz, Aini; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Atanasov, Atanas G; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2017-12-23

    Inflammation comprises the reaction of the body to injury, in which a series of changes of the terminal vascular bed, blood, and connective tissue tends to eliminate the injurious agent and to repair the damaged tissue. It is a complex process, which involves the release of diverse regulatory mediators. The current anti-inflammatory agents are challenged by multiple side effects and thus, new effective therapies are highly needed. The aim of this review is to summarize the described microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) inhibitors or transcriptional suppressors from medicinal plants, which could be an ideal approach in the management of inflammatory disorders, but need further clinical trials in order to be ultimately validated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Virtual screening of natural inhibitors to the predicted HBx protein structure of Hepatitis B Virus using molecular docking for identification of potential lead molecules for liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rajesh Kumar; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The HBx protein in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a potential target for anti-liver cancer molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to screen known natural compounds against the HBx protein using molecular docking. However, the structure of HBx is not yet known. Therefore, the predicted structure of HBx using threading in LOMET was used for docking against plant derived natural compounds (curcumin, oleanolic acid, resveratrol, bilobetin, luteoline, ellagic acid, betulinic acid and rutin) by Molegro Virtual Docker. The screening identified rutin with binding energy of -161.65 Kcal/mol. Thus, twenty derivatives of rutin were further designed and screened against HBx. These in silico experiments identified compounds rutin01 (-163.16 Kcal/mol) and rutin08 (- 165.76 Kcal/mol) for further consideration and downstream validation. PMID:25187683

  18. Nature of isomerism of solid isothiourea salts, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, as studied by 1H-14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance, X-ray, and density functional theory/quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, J N; Latosińska, M; Seliger, J; Žagar, V; Maurin, J K; Kazimierczuk, Z

    2012-02-09

    Isothioureas, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, have been studied experimentally in solid state by nuclear quadrupole double resonance (NQDR) and X-ray methods and theoretically by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules/density functional theory. Resonance frequencies on (14)N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in each molecule. The crystal packings of (S)-3,4-dichlorobenzyl-N-methylisothiouronium chloride with the disordered chlorine positions in benzene ring and (S)-butyloisothiouronium bromide have been resolved in X-ray diffraction studies. (14)N NQDR spectra have been found good indicators of isomer type and strength of intra- or intermolecular N-H···X (X = Cl, Br) interactions. From among all salts studied, only for (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium chloride are both nitrogen sites equivalent, which has been explained by the slow exchange. This unique structural feature can be a key factor in the high biological activity of (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium salts.

  19. Impact of the putative cancer stem cell markers and growth factor receptor expression on the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanenthiran, Soozana; Essapen, Sharadah; Seddon, Alan M; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression and activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 have been reported in numerous cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a large panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines (OCCLs) to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs. The aim was to see if there was any association between the protein expression of various biomarkers including three putative ovarian cancer stem cell (CSC) markers (CD24, CD44, CD117/c-Kit), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and HER family members and response to treatment with these agents. The sensitivity of 10 ovarian tumour cell lines to the treatment with various forms of HER TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sapitinib, afatinib, canertinib, neratinib), as well as other TKIs (dasatinib, imatinib, NVP-AEW541, crizotinib) and cytotoxic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin), as single agents or in combination, was determined by SRB assay. The effect on these agents on the cell cycle distribution, and downstream signaling molecules and tumour migration were determined using flow cytometry, western blotting, and the IncuCyte Clear View cell migration assay respectively. Of the HER inhibitors, the irreversible pan-TKIs (canertinib, neratinib and afatinib) were the most effective TKIs for inhibiting the growth of all ovarian cancer cells, and for blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR, HER-2, AKT and MAPK in SKOV3 cells. Interestingly, while the majority of cancer cells were highly sensitive to treatment with dasatinib, they were relatively resistant to treatment with imatinib (i.e., IC50 >10 µM). Of the cytotoxic agents, paclitaxel was the most effective for inhibiting the growth of OCCLs, and of various combinations of these drugs, only treatment with a combination of NVP-AEW541 and paclitaxel produced a synergistic or additive anti-proliferative effect in all three cell lines examined (i.e., SKOV3, Caov3, ES2

  20. EXEL-8232, a small-molecule JAK2 inhibitor, effectively treats thrombocytosis and extramedullary hematopoiesis in a murine model of myeloproliferative neoplasm induced by MPLW515L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernig, G; Kharas, M G; Mullally, A; Leeman, D S; Okabe, R; George, T; Clary, D O; Gilliland, D G

    2012-04-01

    About 10% of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) that lack mutations in JAK2 harbor an activating mutation in the thrombopoietin receptor, MPLW515L. Distinct from the JAK2V617F retroviral transplant model, the MPLW515L model recapitulates many features of ET and MF, including severe fibrosis and thrombocytosis. We have tested EXEL-8232, an experimental potent JAK2 inhibitor, for efficacy in suppression of thrombocytosis in vivo and for its ability to attenuate MPLW515L myeloproliferative disease. EXEL-8232 was administered for 28 days q12 h by oral gavage at doses of 30 or 100 mg/kg, prospectively. Animals treated with EXEL-8232 at 100 mg/kg had normalized high platelet counts, eliminated extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and eliminated bone marrow fibrosis, whereas the wild-type controls did not develop thrombocytopenia. Consistent with a clinical response in this model, we validated surrogate end points for response to treatment, including a reduction of endogenous colony growth and signaling inhibition in immature erythroid and myeloid primary cells both in vitro and upon treatment in vivo. We conclude that EXEL-8232 has efficacy in treatment of thrombocytosis in vivo in a murine model of ET and MF, and may be of therapeutic benefit for patients with MPL-mutant MPN.

  1. Inhibition of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) by the putative tumor suppressor G0S2 or a small molecule inhibitor attenuates the growth of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagani, Rachid; El-Assaad, Wissal; Gamache, Isabelle; Teodoro, Jose G

    2015-09-29

    The G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is methylated and silenced in a wide range of human cancers. The protein encoded by G0S2 is an endogenous inhibitor of lipid catabolism that directly binds adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). ATGL is the rate-limiting step in triglyceride metabolism. Although the G0S2 gene is silenced in cancer, the impact of ATGL in the growth and survival of cancer cells has never been addressed. Here we show that ectopic expression of G0S2 in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCL) inhibits triglyceride catabolism and results in lower cell growth. Similarly, knockdown of ATGL increased triglyceride levels, attenuated cell growth and promoted apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous G0S2 enhanced the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. G0S2 is strongly induced in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells in response to all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and we show that inhibition of ATGL in these cells by G0S2 is required for efficacy of ATRA treatment. Our data uncover a novel tumor suppressor mechanism by which G0S2 directly inhibits activity of a key intracellular lipase. Our results suggest that elevated ATGL activity may be a general property of many cancer types and potentially represents a novel target for chemotherapy.

  2. A novel selective small-molecule PI3K inhibitor is effective against human multiple myeloma in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glauer, J; Pletz, N; Schön, M; Schneider, P; Liu, N; Ziegelbauer, K; Emmert, S; Wulf, G G; Schön, M P

    2013-01-01

    Developing effective therapies against multiple myeloma (MM) is an unresolved challenge. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activation may be associated with tumor progression and drug resistance, and inhibiting PI3K can induce apoptosis in MM cells. Thus, targeting of PI3K is predicted to increase the susceptibility of MM to anticancer therapy. The lead compound of a novel class of PI3K inhibitors, BAY80-6946 (IC 50 =0.5 nM against PI3K-α), was highly efficacious in four different MM cell lines, where it induced significant antitumoral effects in a dose-dependent manner. The compound inhibited cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis (P<0.001 compared with controls). Moreover, it abrogated the stimulation conferred by insulin-like growth-factor-1, a mechanism relevant for MM progression. These cellular effects were paralleled by decreased Akt phosphorylation, the main downstream target of PI3K. Likewise, profound antitumoral activity was observed ex vivo, as BAY80-6946 significantly inhibited proliferation of freshly isolated myeloma cells from three patients (P<0.001 compared with vehicle). In addition, BAY80-6946 showed convincing in vivo activity against the human AMO-1 and MOLP-8 myeloma cell lines in a preclinical murine xenograft model, where treatment with 6 mg/kg every other day for 2 weeks reduced the cell numbers by 87.0% and 69.3%, respectively (P<0.001 compared with vehicle), without overt toxicity in treated animals

  3. TG101209, a small molecule JAK2-selective kinase inhibitor potently inhibits myeloproliferative disorder-associated JAK2V617F and MPLW515L/K mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, A; Hood, J; Lasho, T; Levine, R L; Martin, M B; Noronha, G; Finke, C; Mak, C C; Mesa, R; Zhu, H; Soll, R; Gilliland, D G; Tefferi, A

    2007-08-01

    JAK2V617F and MPLW515L/K represent recently identified mutations in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) that cause dysregulated JAK-STAT signaling, which is implicated in MPD pathogenesis. We developed TG101209, an orally bioavailable small molecule that potently inhibits JAK2 (IC(50)=6 nM), FLT3 (IC(50)=25 nM) and RET (IC(50)=17 nM) kinases, with significantly less activity against other tyrosine kinases including JAK3 (IC(50)=169 nM). TG101209 inhibited growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing JAK2V617F or MPLW515L mutations with an IC(50) of approximately 200 nM. In a human JAK2V617F-expressing acute myeloid leukemia cell line, TG101209-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibited phosphorylation of JAK2V617F, STAT5 and STAT3. Therapeutic efficacy of TG101209 was demonstrated in a nude mouse model. Furthermore, TG101209 suppressed growth of hematopoietic colonies from primary progenitor cells harboring JAK2V617F or MPL515 mutations.

  4. Antibody fragments directed against different portions of the human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 act as inhibitors or activators of L1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 plays important roles in neuronal migration and survival, neuritogenesis and synaptogenesis. L1 has also been found in tumors of different origins, with levels of L1 expression correlating positively with the metastatic potential of tumors. To select antibodies targeting the varied functions of L1, we screened the Tomlinson library of recombinant human antibody fragments to identify antibodies binding to recombinant human L1 protein comprising the entire extracellular domain of human L1. We obtained four L1 binding single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs, named I4, I6, I13, and I27 and showed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA that scFvs I4 and I6 have high affinity to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig domains 1-4 of L1, while scFvs I13 and I27 bind strongly to the fibronectin type III homologous (Fn domains 1-3 of L1. Application of scFvs I4 and I6 to human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells reduced proliferation and transmigration of these cells. Treatment of SK-N-SH cells with scFvs I13 and I27 enhanced cell proliferation and migration, neurite outgrowth, and protected against the toxic effects of H(2O(2 by increasing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. In addition, scFvs I4 and I6 inhibited and scFvs I13 and I27 promoted phosphorylation of src and Erk. Our findings indicate that scFvs reacting with the immunoglobulin-like domains 1-4 inhibit L1 functions, whereas scFvs interacting with the fibronectin type III domains 1-3 trigger L1 functions of cultured neuroblastoma cells.

  5. The small-molecule TNF-α inhibitor, UTL-5g, delays deaths and increases survival rates for mice treated with high doses of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jiajiu; Media, Joseph; Chen, Ben; Valeriote, Fredrick

    2013-09-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UTL-5g can reduce the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increase cisplatin tolerability in mice. BDF1 female mice were treated individually with UTL-5g (suspended in Ora-Plus) by oral gavage at 60 mg/kg, 30 min before i.p. injection of cisplatin at 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg, respectively, on Day 0. Starting from Day 1, individual mice were again treated daily by the same dose of UTL-5g for 4 consecutive days. Survivals and body weights were monitored. UTL-5g treatment increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death for mice treated with 150 % of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of cisplatin (15 mg/kg). Likewise, at 200 % of the MTD of cisplatin (20 mg/kg), treatment of UTL-5g increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death. Treatment of UTL-5g did not have a significant effect on weight loss induced by cisplatin, indicating that body weight may not be a sensitive-enough measure for chemoprotection of UTL-5g against cisplatin. In summary, UTL-5g delayed deaths and increased survival rates of mice treated by high doses of cisplatin, indicating that UTL-5g is capable of reducing the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increased cisplatin tolerability in mice; this is in line with the specific chemoprotective effects of UTL-5g previously reported. Further investigation of UTL-5g in combination with cisplatin is warranted.

  6. GNX-4728, a Novel Small Molecule Drug Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition, is Therapeutic in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J Martin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurological disorder in humans characterized by progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebral cortex causing skeletal muscle paralysis, respiratory insufficiency, and death. There are no cures or effective treatments for ALS. ALS can be inherited, but most cases are not associated with a family history of the disease. Mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis but definitive proof of causal mechanisms is lacking. Identification of new clinically translatable disease mechanism-based molecular targets and small molecule drug candidates are needed for ALS patients. We tested the hypothesis in an animal model that drug modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP is therapeutic in ALS. A prospective randomized placebo-controlled drug trial was done in a transgenic mouse model of ALS. We explored GNX-4728 as a therapeutic drug. GNX-4728 inhibits mPTP opening as evidenced by increased mitochondrial calcium retention capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Chronic systemic treatment of G37R-human mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (hSOD1 transgenic mice with GNX-4728 resulted in major therapeutic benefits. GNX-4728 slowed disease progression and significantly improved motor function. The survival of ALS mice was increased significantly by GNX-4728 treatment as evidence by a nearly 2-fold extension of lifespan (360 days to 750 days. GNX-4728 protected against motor neuron degeneration and mitochondrial degeneration, attenuated spinal cord inflammation, and preserved neuromuscular junction innervation in the diaphragm in ALS mice. This work demonstrates that a mPTP-acting drug has major disease-modifying efficacy in a preclinical mouse model of ALS and establishes mitochondrial calcium retention, and indirectly the mPTP, as targets for ALS drug development.

  7. Using a simple HPLC approach to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g, a small molecule TNF-α inhibitor, from porcine esterase and from rabbit esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Kenneth; Zhang, Yiguan; Valeriote, Frederick; Chen, Ben; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2013-12-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. As a prelude to investigating the metabolites of UTL-5g, we set out to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g under the treatment of both porcine liver esterase (PLE) and rabbit liver esterase (RLE). First, a number of mixtures made by UTL-5g and PLE were incubated at 25°C. At predetermined time points, individual samples were quenched by acetonitrile, vortexed, and centrifuged. The supernatants were then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC (using a C18 column). The retention times and UV/vis spectra of individual peaks were compared to those of UTL-5g and its two postulated enzymatic products; thus the enzymatic products of UTL-5g were tentatively identified. Secondly, a different HPLC method (providing different retentions times) was used to cross-check and to confirm the identities of the two enzymatic products. Based on the observations, it was concluded that under the treatment of PLE, the major enzymatic products of UTL-5g were 5-methyliosxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX) and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Treatment of UTL-5g by RLE also provided the same enzymatic products of UTL-5g from esterase. These results indicate that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by PLE/RLE. Michaelis-Menten kinetics showed that the Km values of UTL-5g were 2.07mM with PLE and 0.37mM with RLE indicating that UTL-5g had a higher affinity with RLE. In summary, by a simple HPLC approach, we have concluded that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by esterase from either porcine liver or rabbit liver in vitro and afforded DCA (at a mole ratio of 1:1) and ISOX. However, further studies are needed in order to determine whether UTL-5g is metabolized by microsomal enzymes to produce ISOX and DCA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GPR107, a G-protein-coupled receptor essential for intoxication by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, localizes to the Golgi and is cleaved by furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafesse, Fikadu G; Guimaraes, Carla P; Maruyama, Takeshi; Carette, Jan E; Lory, Stephen; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-08-29

    A number of toxins, including exotoxin A (PE) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. PE kills by ADP-ribosylation of the translation elongation factor 2, but many of the host factors required for entry, membrane translocation, and intracellular transport remain to be elucidated. A genome-wide genetic screen in human KBM7 cells was performed to uncover host factors used by PE, several of which were confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing in a different cell type. Several proteins not previously implicated in the PE intoxication pathway were identified, including GPR107, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor. GPR107 localizes to the trans-Golgi network and is essential for retrograde transport. It is cleaved by the endoprotease furin, and a disulfide bond connects the two cleaved fragments. Compromising this association affects the function of GPR107. The N-terminal region of GPR107 is critical for its biological function. GPR107 might be one of the long-sought receptors that associates with G-proteins to regulate intracellular vesicular transport. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. ZL006, a small molecule inhibitor of PSD-95/nNOS interaction, does not induce antidepressant-like effects in two genetically predisposed rat models of depression and control animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tillmann

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R antagonists and nitric oxide inhibitors have shown promising efficacy in depression but commonly induce adverse events. To circumvent these, a more indirect disruption of the nitric oxide synthase/postsynaptic density protein 95 kDa complex at the NMDA-R has been proposed. This disruption can be achieved using small molecule inhibitors such as ZL006, which has attracted attention as ischemic stroke therapy in rodents and has been proposed as a potential novel treatment for depression. Based on this, our aim was to translate these findings to animal models of depression to elucidate antidepressant-like properties in more detail. In the present study, we administered ZL006 to two established animal models of depression and control rodents. Following treatment, we measured locomotion in the Open Field and depressive-like behavior in the Forced Swim Test and Tail Suspension Test. Our experimental designs included the use of different species (rats, mice, strains (Flinders Sensitive Line rats, Flinders Resistant Line rats, Wistar Kyoto rats, Wistar Hanover rats, Sprague Dawley rats, B6NTac mice, routes of administration (intraperitoneal, intracerebroventricular, times of administration (single injection, repeated injections, treatment regimens (acute, sustained, and doses (5, 10, 15, 50 mg/kg. ZL006 did not affect behavior in any of the described settings. On a molecular level, ZL006 significantly reduced total nitrate/nitrite concentrations in the cerebellum, supporting that it is capable of reducing nitric oxide metabolites in the brain. Future studies using different experimental parameters are needed to further investigate the behavioral profile of ZL006.

  10. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Undurti N

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a β blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by ~80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs and their long-chain metabolites: γ-linolenic acid (GLA, dihomo-GLA (DGLA, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1, prostacyclin (PGI2, PGI3, lipoxins (LXs, resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-γ ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and the co

  11. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  12. SCH-C (SCH 351125), an orally bioavailable, small molecule antagonist of the chemokine receptor CCR5, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizki, J M; Xu, S; Wagner, N E; Wojcik, L; Liu, J; Hou, Y; Endres, M; Palani, A; Shapiro, S; Clader, J W; Greenlee, W J; Tagat, J R; McCombie, S; Cox, K; Fawzi, A B; Chou, C C; Pugliese-Sivo, C; Davies, L; Moreno, M E; Ho, D D; Trkola, A; Stoddart, C A; Moore, J P; Reyes, G R; Baroudy, B M

    2001-10-23

    We describe here the identification and properties of SCH-C (SCH 351125), a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 coreceptor. SCH-C, an oxime-piperidine compound, is a specific CCR5 antagonist as determined in multiple receptor binding and signal transduction assays. This compound specifically inhibits HIV-1 infection mediated by CCR5 in U-87 astroglioma cells but has no effect on infection of CXCR4-expressing cells. SCH-C has broad and potent antiviral activity in vitro against primary HIV-1 isolates that use CCR5 as their entry coreceptor, with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging between 0.4 and 9 nM. Moreover, SCH-C strongly inhibits the replication of an R5-using HIV-1 isolate in SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice. SCH-C has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in rodents and primates with an oral bioavailability of 50-60% and a serum half-life of 5-6 h. On the basis of its novel mechanism of action, potent antiviral activity, and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile, SCH-C is a promising new candidate for therapeutic intervention of HIV infection.

  13. Trichloroacetimidates as Alkylating Reagents and Their Application in the Synthesis of Pyrroloindoline Natural Products and Synthesis of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arijit A.

    was applied towards the synthesis of natural products and their analogs. The pyrroloindoline ring system is found in many alkaloids and cyclic peptides which mainly differ in the substitution at the C3a position. To provide rapid access to these natural products a diversity-oriented strategy was established via displacement of C3a-trichloroacetimidate pyrroloindoline. Carbon, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles were all shown to undergo substitution reactions with these trichloroacetimidates in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. In order to demonstrate the utility of this new method it was applied towards the synthesis of arundinine and a formal synthesis of psychotriasine. Current investigations involve the application of this method towards the synthesis of a complex pyrroloindoline natural product kapakahine C and the progress made therein has been discussed. The reactivity of trichloroacetimidates was also investigated for the selective C3-alkylation of 2,3-disubstituted indoles to provide indolenines. Indolenines serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of many complex alkaloids. Different benzylic and allylic trichloroacetimidates were shown to provide 3,3'-disubstituted indolenines with high yields in the presence of catalytic amounts of Lewis acids. Various substituted indoles were evaluated under these reaction conditions. This methodology was also applied towards the synthesis of the core tetracyclic ring system found in communesin natural products. In addition to the above work, synthesis of small molecule inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP) has also been described. Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) cellular signaling pathway can lead to diseased cellular states like cancer. Herein we have reported stereoselective synthesis of two quinoline based small molecule SHIP inhibitors. The lead compounds and their analogs were tested for their activities against SHIP by Malachite green assay

  14. Rational Design of a Highly Potent and Selective Peptide Inhibitor of PACE4 by Salt Bridge Interaction with D160 at Position P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianati, Vahid; Shamloo, Azar; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Desjardins, Roxane; Soldera, Armand; Day, Robert; Dory, Yves L

    2017-08-08

    PACE4, a member of the proprotein convertases (PCs) family of serine proteases, is a validated target for prostate cancer. Our group has developed a potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor: Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH 2 . In seeking for modifications to increase the selectivity of this ligand toward PACE4, we replaced one of its P3 Val methyl groups with a basic group capable of forming a salt bridge with D160 of PACE4. The resulting inhibitor is eight times more potent than the P3 Val parent inhibitor and two times more selective over furin, because the equivalent salt bridge with furin E257 is not optimal. Moreover, the β-branched nature of the new P3 residue favors the extended β-sheet conformation usually associated with substrates of proteases. This work provides new insight for better understanding of β-sheet backbone-backbone interactions between serine proteases and their peptidic ligands. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicholas; Koppel, Juraj; Zsila, Ferenc; Juhas, Stefan; Il'kova, Gabriela; Kogan, Faina Yurgenzon; Lahmy, Orly; Wildbaum, Gizi; Karin, Nathan; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Elucidate the mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans, RX-111 and assay its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models of inflammatory disease. The glycosaminoglycan, heparin, was used in the mechanism of action study of RX-111. Human T lymphocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to assay the in vitro activity of RX-111. Mouse and rat models of disease were used to assay the anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. Circular dichroism and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy were used to study the binding of RX-111 to the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. T lymphocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow was used to assay RX-111 activity in vitro. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats were used to assay anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. RX-111 was shown to bind directly to heparin. It inhibited leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow and reduced inflammation in the mouse model of DTH. RX-111 was efficacious in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease, TNBS-induced colitis and the rat model of multiple sclerosis, EAE. RX-111 exercises its broad spectrum anti-inflammatory activity by a singular mechanism of action, inhibition of protein binding to the cell surface GAG, heparan sulfate. RX-111 and related thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives are potential therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  16. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Peng, Feng [Department of Thoracic Oncology of the Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhao, Yinglan, E-mail: alancenxb@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  17. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  18. Measurement of neutralizing serum antibodies of patients vaccinated with human papillomavirus L1 or L2-based immunogens using furin-cleaved HPV Pseudovirions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Wang

    Full Text Available Antibodies specific for neutralizing epitopes in either Human papillomavirus (HPV capsid protein L1 or L2 can mediate protection from viral challenge and thus their accurate and sensitive measurement at high throughput is likely informative for monitoring response to prophylactic vaccination. Here we compare measurement of L1 and L2-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera using the standard Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (L1-PBNA with the newer Furin-Cleaved Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (FC-PBNA, a modification of the L1-PBNA intended to improve sensitivity towards L2-specific neutralizing antibodies without compromising assay of L1-specific responses. For detection of L1-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera, the FC- PBNA and L1-PBNA assays showed similar sensitivity and a high level of correlation using WHO standard sera (n = 2, and sera from patients vaccinated with Gardasil (n = 30 or an experimental human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 L1 VLP vaccine (n = 70. The detection of L1-specific cross-neutralizing antibodies in these sera using pseudovirions of types phylogenetically-related to those targeted by the L1 virus-like particle (VLP vaccines was also consistent between the two assays. However, for sera from patients (n = 17 vaccinated with an L2-based immunogen (TA-CIN, the FC-PBNA was more sensitive than the L1-PBNA in detecting L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Further, the neutralizing antibody titers measured with the FC-PBNA correlated with those determined with the L2-PBNA, another modification of the L1-PBNA that spacio-temporally separates primary and secondary receptor engagement, as well as the protective titers measured using passive transfer studies in the murine genital-challenge model. In sum, the FC-PBNA provided sensitive measurement for both L1 VLP and L2-specific neutralizing antibody in human sera. Vaccination with TA-CIN elicits weak cross-protective antibody in a

  19. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  20. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  1. JAK inhibitors in autoinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hal M; Broderick, Lori

    2018-06-11

    Interferonopathies are a subset of autoinflammatory disorders with a prominent type I IFN gene signature. Treatment of these patients has been challenging, given the lack of response to common autoinflammatory therapeutics including IL-1 and TNF blockade. JAK inhibitors (Jakinibs) are a family of small-molecule inhibitors that target the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and have shown clinical efficacy, with FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA) approval for arthritic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Sanchez and colleagues repurposed baricitinib to establish a significant role for JAK inhibition as a novel therapy for patients with interferonopathies, demonstrating the power of translational rare disease research with lifesaving effects.

  2. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Novel diamide-based inhibitors of IMPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Henry H; Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Guo, Junqing; Watterson, Scott H; Shen, Zhongqi; Pitts, William J; Dhar, T G Murali; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Witmer, Mark; Tredup, Jeffrey; Hollenbaugh, Diane

    2002-05-06

    A series of novel amide-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase is described. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are presented.

  6. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  7. LEGO-inspired drug design: Discovery of novel fungal Plasma membrane H+-ATPase (Pma1) inhibitors from small molecule libraries: An introduction of HFSA-SBS_DOS-RD strategy in drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tung, Truong Thanh; Dao, Trong Tuan; Palmgren, Michael B.

    to extracellular, this enzyme generates a transmembrane electrochem. gradient, as a consequence, fungi can uptake nutrients by secondary transport systems. Until now, only low resoln. of protein structure has been reported, and notably there a no report of co-crystal structure of Pma1 with inhibitors. Therefore......-oriented synthesis (SBS_DOS) and rational design (RD), so called HFSA-SBS_DOS-RD strategy in drug discovery and development process. Using HFSA-SBS_DOS-RD, our group successfully designed, synthesized, and performed SAR studies of novel compds. potent Pma1 inhibitors. An expeditious, high yield and scalable...... microwave-assisted synthesis was developed and applied for synthesis of library compds. To our delight, ours compd. libraries were able to inhibit Pma1 activity and growth inhibitory activity of C. albican and S. cerevisiae revealed the most promising example for future development of antifungal drugs...

  8. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, N.; Koppel, J.; Zsila, F.; Juhás, Štefan; Ilková, G.; Kogan, F. Y.; Lahmy, O.; Wildbaum, G.; Karin, N.; Zhuk, R.; Gregor, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2016), s. 285-294 ISSN 1023-3830 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : small molecule drug * glycosaminoglycan * heparin binding protein * heparan sulfate * inflammation * autoimmune disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  9. Vildagliptin: the first innovative DDP-4 inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvin Villkhauer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the main stages of investigation undertaken by Novartis Pharmaceuticals in search of a new molecule for the treatment of type 2 diabetesmellitus, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor (Vildaglyptin. The data on specificity and selectivity of the action of this molecule are presentedalong with the results of its comparison with another agent of this group (sitagliptin.

  10. Retracted: Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation, by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle. British Journal of Pharmacology, volume 172(20): 4905-4918, published in October 2015; DOI 10.1111/bph.13259.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-07-01

    The above article, published by the British Journal of Pharmacology in October 2015 (https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.13259), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief and John Wiley & Sons Limited. The retraction has been agreed owing to the discovery of errors in the chemical structure of the synthetic compounds generated. The corrected structure is now available in the article PF-06526290 can both enhance and inhibit conduction through voltage gated sodium channels by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle, 2018, https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.14338. Reference Wang L, Zellmer SG, Printzenhoff DM, Castle NA (2015). Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation. Br J Pharmacol 172: 4905-4918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bph.13259. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. First-in-Human Study of PF-05212384 (PKI-587), a Small-Molecule, Intravenous, Dual Inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR in Patients with Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M; Molina, Julian R; Bendell, Johanna; Spicer, James; Kwak, Eunice L; Pandya, Susan S; Millham, Robert; Borzillo, Gary; Pierce, Kristen J; Han, Lixin; Houk, Brett E; Gallo, Jorge D; Alsina, Maria; Braña, Irene; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-04-15

    To evaluate safety (primary endpoint), tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic profile, and preliminary activity of the intravenous, pan-class I isoform PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PF-05212384 in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 1 of this open-label phase I study was designed to estimate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with nonselected solid tumors, using a modified continual reassessment method to guide dose escalation. Objectives of part 2 were MTD confirmation and assessment of preliminary activity in patients with selected tumor types and PI3K pathway dysregulation. Seventy-seven of the 78 enrolled patients received treatment. The MTD for PF-05212384, administered intravenously once weekly, was estimated to be 154 mg. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AE) were mucosal inflammation/stomatitis (58.4%), nausea (42.9%), hyperglycemia (26%), decreased appetite (24.7%), fatigue (24.7%), and vomiting (24.7%). The majority of patients treated at the MTD experienced only grade 1 treatment-related AEs. Grade 3 treatment-related AEs occurred in 23.8% of patients at the MTD. No treatment-related grade 4-5 AEs were reported at any dose level. Antitumor activity was noted in this heavily pretreated patient population, with two partial responses (PR) and an unconfirmed PR. Eight patients had long-lasting stable disease (>6 months). Pharmacokinetic analyses showed a biphasic concentration-time profile for PF-05212384 (half-life, 30-37 hours after multiple dosing). PF-05212384 inhibited downstream effectors of the PI3K pathway in paired tumor biopsies. These findings demonstrate the manageable safety profile and antitumor activity of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PF-05212384, supporting further clinical development for patients with advanced solid malignancies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. In vitro Cytotoxicity, Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Metabolism of Small-Molecule Protein Kinase D Inhibitors, kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09, in Mice bearing Human Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianxia; Clausen, Dana M.; Beumer, Jan H.; Parise, Robert A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Bravo-Altamirano, Karla; Wipf, Peter; Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Qiming Jane; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Protein kinase D (PKD) mediates diverse biological responses including cell growth and survival. Therefore, PKD inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. We evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of two PKD inhibitors, kb-NB142-70 and its methoxy analog, kb-NB165-09, and examined their in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics. Methods The in vitro cytotoxicities of kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were evaluated by MTT assay against PC-3, androgen independent prostate cancer cells, and CFPAC-1 and PANC-1, pancreatic cancer cells. Efficacy studies were conducted in mice bearing either PC-3 or CPFAC-1 xenografts. Tumor-bearing mice were euthanized between 5 and 1440 min after iv dosing, and plasma and tissue concentrations were measured by HPLC-UV. Metabolites were characterized by LC-MS/MS. Results kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 inhibited cellular growth in the low-mid μM range. The compounds were inactive when administered to tumor-bearing mice. In mice treated with kb-NB142-70, the plasma Cmax was 36.9 nmol/mL and the PC-3 tumor Cmax was 11.8 nmol/g. In mice dosed with kb-NB165-09, the plasma Cmax was 61.9 nmol/mL while the PANC-1 tumor Cmax was 8.0 nmol/g. The plasma half-lives of kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were 6 and 14 min, respectively. Both compounds underwent oxidation and glucuronidation. Conclusions kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were rapidly metabolized, and concentrations in tumor were lower than those required for in vitro cytotoxicity. Replacement of the phenolic hydroxyl group with a methoxy group increased the plasma half-life of kb-NB165-09 2.3-fold over that of kb-NB142-70. Rapid metabolism in mice suggests that next-generation compounds will require further structural modifications to increase potency and/or metabolic stability. PMID:23108699

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. [Syk inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-07-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in the University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is known to be essential for the various physiological functions, especially in hematopoietic lineage cells. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Recently, novel Syk inhibitors were developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure, and function of Syk, and then describe the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. Furthermore, we will introduce our findings of the adaptor protein 3BP2 (c-Abl SH3 domain-binding protein-2), as a novel target of Syk.

  15. Large-scale label-free comparative proteomics analysis of polo-like kinase 1 inhibition via the small-molecule inhibitor BI 6727 (Volasertib) in BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Brian D; Pellitteri-Hahn, Molly C; Scarlett, Cameron O; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-11-07

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays a key role during the cell cycle by regulating mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Plk1 is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and is essential to sustained oncogenic proliferation, thus making Plk1 an attractive therapeutic target. However, the clinical efficacy of Plk1 inhibition has not emulated the preclinical success, stressing an urgent need for a better understanding of Plk1 signaling. This study addresses that need by utilizing a quantitative proteomics strategy to compare the proteome of BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma cells following treatment with the Plk1-specific inhibitor BI 6727. Employing label-free nano-LC-MS/MS technology on a Q-exactive followed by SIEVE processing, we identified more than 20 proteins of interest, many of which have not been previously associated with Plk1 signaling. Here we report the down-regulation of multiple metabolic proteins with an associated decrease in cellular metabolism, as assessed by lactate and NAD levels. Furthermore, we have also identified the down-regulation of multiple proteasomal subunits, resulting in a significant decrease in 20S proteasome activity. Additionally, we have identified a novel association between Plk1 and p53 through heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC), thus providing valuable insight into Plk1's role in cancer cell survival.

  16. Syk inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Kazuyasu; Kimura, Yukihiro; Honjo, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao

    2013-01-01

    Non-receptor type of protein-tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) was isolated in University of Fukui in 1991. Syk is most highly expressed by haemopoietic cells and known to play crucial roles in the signal transduction through various immunoreceptors of the adaptive immune response. However, recent reports demonstrate that Syk also mediates other biological functions, such as innate immune response, osteoclast maturation, platelet activation and cellular adhesion. Moreover, ectopic expression of Syk by epigenetic changes is reported to cause retinoblastoma. Because of its critical roles on the cellular functions, the development of Syk inhibitors for clinical use has been desired. Although many candidate compounds were produced, none of them had progressed to clinical trials. However, novel Syk inhibitors were finally developed and its usefulness has been evaluated in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, we will summarize the history, structure and function of Syk, and then the novel Syk inhibitors and their current status. In addition, we will introduce our research focused on the functions of Syk on Dectin-1-mediated mast cell activation.

  17. TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4 signalling, unveils similarities and differences in lipopolysaccharide- and lipid-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Sophie E; Liang, Hanyu; Costford, Sheila R; Klip, Amira; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Sanchez-Avila, Alicia; Ely, Brian; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-11-30

    Emerging evidence suggests that TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 and downstream pathways [MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) and NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)] play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and saturated NEFA (non-esterified fatty acids) activate TLR4, and plasma concentrations of these TLR4 ligands are elevated in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Our goals were to define the role of TLR4 on the insulin resistance caused by LPS and saturated NEFA, and to dissect the independent contribution of LPS and NEFA to the activation of TLR4-driven pathways by employing TAK-242, a specific inhibitor of TLR4. LPS caused robust activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways in L6 myotubes, along with impaired insulin signalling and glucose transport. TAK-242 completely prevented the inflammatory response (MAPK and NF-κB activation) caused by LPS, and, in turn, improved LPS-induced insulin resistance. Similar to LPS, stearate strongly activated MAPKs, although stimulation of the NF-κB axis was modest. As seen with LPS, the inflammatory response caused by stearate was accompanied by impaired insulin action. TAK-242 also blunted stearate-induced inflammation; yet, the protective effect conferred by TAK-242 was partial and observed only on MAPKs. Consequently, the insulin resistance caused by stearate was only partially improved by TAK-242. In summary, TAK-242 provides complete and partial protection against LPS- and NEFA-induced inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively. Thus, LPS-induced insulin resistance depends entirely on TLR4, whereas NEFA works through TLR4-dependent and -independent mechanisms to impair insulin action.

  18. TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4 signalling, unveils similarities and differences in lipopolysaccharide- and lipidinduced inflammation and insulin resistance in muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Sophie E.; Liang, Hanyu; Costford, Sheila R.; Klip, Amira; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Avila, Alicia; Ely, Brian; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 and downstream pathways [MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) and NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)] play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and saturated NEFA (non-esterified fatty acids) activate TLR4, and plasma concentrations of these TLR4 ligands are elevated in obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Our goals were to define the role of TLR4 on the insulin resistance caused by LPS and saturated NEFA, and to dissect the independent contribution of LPS and NEFA to the activation of TLR4-driven pathways by employing TAK-242, a specific inhibitor of TLR4. LPS caused robust activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways in L6 myotubes, along with impaired insulin signalling and glucose transport. TAK-242 completely prevented the inflammatory response (MAPK and NF-κB activation) caused by LPS, and, in turn, improved LPS-induced insulin resistance. Similar to LPS, stearate strongly activated MAPKs, although stimulation of the NF-κB axis was modest. As seen with LPS, the inflammatory response caused by stearate was accompanied by impaired insulin action. TAK-242 also blunted stearate-induced inflammation; yet, the protective effect conferred by TAK-242 was partial and observed only on MAPKs. Consequently, the insulin resistance caused by stearate was only partially improved by TAK-242. In summary, TAK-242 provides complete and partial protection against LPS- and NEFA-induced inflammation and insulin resistance, respectively. Thus, LPS-induced insulin resistance depends entirely on TLR4, whereas NEFA works through TLR4-dependent and -independent mechanisms to impair insulin action. PMID:23050932

  19. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several High-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the High-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors.

  20. The sequence of the CA-SP1 junction accounts for the differential sensitivity of HIV-1 and SIV to the small molecule maturation inhibitor 3-O-{3',3'-dimethylsuccinyl}-betulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiken Christopher

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the effectiveness of currently available antiretroviral therapies in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, a continuing need exists for novel compounds that can be used in combination with existing drugs to slow the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. We previously reported that the small molecule 3-O-{3',3'-dimethylsuccinyl}-betulinic acid (DSB specifically inhibits HIV-1 replication by delaying the processing of the CA-SP1 junction in Pr55Gag. By contrast, SIVmac239 replicates efficiently in the presence of high concentrations of DSB. To determine whether sequence differences in the CA-SP1 junction can fully account for the differential sensitivity of HIV-1 and SIV to DSB, we engineered mutations in this region of two viruses and tested their sensitivity to DSB in replication assays using activated human primary CD4+ T cells. Results Substitution of the P2 and P1 residues of HIV-1 by the corresponding amino acids of SIV resulted in strong resistance to DSB, but the mutant virus replicated with reduced efficiency. Conversely, replication of an SIV mutant containing three amino acid substitutions in the CA-SP1 cleavage site was highly sensitive to DSB, and the mutations resulted in delayed cleavage of the CA-SP1 junction in the presence of the drug. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the CA-SP1 junction in Pr55Gag represents the primary viral target of DSB. They further suggest that the therapeutic application of DSB will be accompanied by emergence of mutant viruses that are highly resistant to the drug but which exhibit reduced fitness relative to wild type HIV-1.

  1. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The application of neutron reflectometry and atomic force microscopy in the study of corrosion inhibitor films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Douglas; Blom, Annabelle; Bailey, Stuart; Nelson, Andrew; Schulz, Jamie; De Marco, Roland; Kinsella, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitor molecules function by adsorbing to a steel surface and thus prevent oxidation of the metal. The interfacial structures formed by a range of corrosion inhibitor molecules have been investigated by in situ measurements based on atomic force microscopy and neutron reflectometry. Inhibitors investigated include molecules cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), dodecyl pyridinium chloride (DPC), 1-hydroxyethyl-2-oleic imidazoline (OHEI) and cetyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (CDMBAC). This has shown that the inhibitor molecules adsorb onto a surface in micellar structures. Corrosion measurements confirmed that maximum inhibition efficiency coincides with the solution critical micelle concentration

  3. Inhibiting prolyl isomerase activity by hybrid organic-inorganic molecules containing rhodium(II) fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jane M; Kundu, Rituparna; Cooper, Julian C; Ball, Zachary T

    2014-11-15

    A small molecule containing a rhodium(II) tetracarboxylate fragment is shown to be a potent inhibitor of the prolyl isomerase FKBP12. The use of small molecules conjugates of rhodium(II) is presented as a general strategy for developing new protein inhibitors based on distinct structural and sequence features of the enzyme active site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  5. Rapid synthesis of triazine inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, William J; Guo, Junqing; Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Gu, Henry H; Watterson, Scott H; Bednarz, Mark S; Chen, Bang Chi; Barrish, Joel C; Bassolino, Donna; Cheney, Daniel; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-08-19

    A series of novel triazine-based small molecule inhibitors (IV) of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase was prepared. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SAR) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  6. Novel amide-based inhibitors of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Liu, Chunjian; Dhar, T G Murali; Gu, Henry H; Pitts, William J; Barrish, Joel C; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-10-21

    A series of novel amide-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  7. Novel guanidine-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Watterson, Scott H; Liu, Chunjian; Gu, Henry H; Mitt, Toomas; Leftheris, Katerina; Barrish, Joel C; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Hollenbaugh, Diane L

    2002-10-21

    A series of novel guanidine-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. IMPDH catalyzes the rate determining step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis and is a target for anticancer, immunosuppressive and antiviral therapy. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs), derived from in vitro studies, for this new series of inhibitors is given.

  8. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based drug discovery approach, we have identified small-molecule histidine-kinase

  9. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  10. A small molecule fusion inhibitor of dengue virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poh, Mee Kian; Yip, Andy; Zhang, Summer; Priestle, John P.; Ma, Ngai Ling; Smit, Jolanda M.; Wischut, Jan; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wenk, Markus R.; Schul, Wouter

    2009-01-01

    The dengue virus envelope protein plays an essential role in viral entry by mediating fusion between the viral and host membranes. The crystal structure of the envelope protein shows a pocket (located at a "hinge" between Domains I and II) that can be occupied by ligand n-octyl-beta-D-glucoside

  11. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  12. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  13. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  14. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  15. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the tota...

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  18. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  20. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Hoffmann, Marcin; Grotthuss, Marcin von; Knizewski, Lukasz; Rychewski, Leszek; Eitner, Krystian; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation

  1. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  2. Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, FL; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL; 3DBS Labs Inc, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Disagreement exists regarding the etiology of cessation of the observed clinical results with administration of reuptake inhibitors. Traditionally, when drug effects wane, it is known as tachyphylaxis. With reuptake inhibitors, the placebo effect is significantly greater than the drug effect in the treatment of depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, leading some to assert that waning of drug effects is placebo relapse, not tachyphylaxis.Methods: Two groups were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 was composed of subjects with depression and Group 2 was composed of bariatric subjects treated with reuptake inhibitors for appetite suppression.Results: In Group 1, 200 subjects with depression were treated with citalopram 20 mg per day. A total of 46.5% (n = 93 achieved relief of symptoms (Hamilton-D rating score ≤ 7, of whom 37 (39.8% of whom experienced recurrence of depression symptoms, at which point an amino acid precursor formula was started. Within 1–5 days, 97.3% (n = 36 experienced relief of depression symptoms. In Group 2, 220 subjects were treated with phentermine 30 mg in the morning and citalopram 20 mg at 4 pm. In this group, 90.0% (n = 198 achieved adequate appetite suppression. The appetite suppression ceased in all 198 subjects within 4–48 days. Administration of an amino acid precursor formula restored appetite suppression in 98.5% (n = 195 of subjects within 1–5 days.Conclusion: Reuptake inhibitors do not increase the total number of monoamine molecules in the central nervous system. Their mechanism of action facilitates redistribution of monoamines from one place to another. In the process, conditions are induced that facilitate depletion of monoamines. The "reuptake inhibitor monoamine depletion theory" of this paper

  3. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  4. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  5. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  6. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  7. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  8. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  9. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  10. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  12. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  13. Small molecule annotation for the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanchayita; Young, Jasmine; Berrisford, John M; Chen, Minyu; Conroy, Matthew J; Dutta, Shuchismita; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Gao, Guanghua; Ghosh, Sutapa; Hudson, Brian P; Igarashi, Reiko; Kengaku, Yumiko; Liang, Yuhe; Peisach, Ezra; Persikova, Irina; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Narayanan, Buvaneswari Coimbatore; Sahni, Gaurav; Sato, Junko; Sekharan, Monica; Shao, Chenghua; Tan, Lihua; Zhuravleva, Marina A

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the single global repository for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes, and its more than 100,000 structures contain more than 20,000 distinct ligands or small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. Information about these small molecules and their interactions with proteins and nucleic acids is crucial for our understanding of biochemical processes and vital for structure-based drug design. Small molecules present in a deposited structure may be attached to a polymer or may occur as a separate, non-covalently linked ligand. During curation of a newly deposited structure by wwPDB annotation staff, each molecule is cross-referenced to the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary (CCD). If the molecule is new to the PDB, a dictionary description is created for it. The information about all small molecule components found in the PDB is distributed via the ftp archive as an external reference file. Small molecule annotation in the PDB also includes information about ligand-binding sites and about covalent and other linkages between ligands and macromolecules. During the remediation of the peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors present in the PDB archive in 2011, it became clear that additional annotation was required for consistent representation of these molecules, which are quite often composed of several sequential subcomponents including modified amino acids and other chemical groups. The connectivity information of the modified amino acids is necessary for correct representation of these biologically interesting molecules. The combined information is made available via a new resource called the Biologically Interesting molecules Reference Dictionary, which is complementary to the CCD and is now routinely used for annotation of peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  15. Fluoxetine Is a Potent Inhibitor of Coxsackievirus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Jun; Quinn, Kevin K.; Kye, Steve; Cooper, Paige; Damoiseaux, Robert; Krogstad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    No antiviral drugs currently exist for the treatment of enterovirus infections, which are often severe and potentially life threatening. Molecular screening of small molecule libraries identified fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, as a potent inhibitor of coxsackievirus replication. Fluoxetine did not interfere with either viral entry or translation of the viral genome. Instead, fluoxetine and its metabolite norfluoxetine markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNA and prot...

  16. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  17. Novel ROCK inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Duncan; Hollingworth, Greg; Soldermann, Nicolas; Sprague, Elizabeth; Schuler, Walter; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Duggan, Nicholas; Thomas, Matthew; Kosaka, Takatoshi; Waters, Nigel; van Eis, Maurice J. (Novartis)

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of selective inhibitors of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has been identified by structural based drug design. PK/PD experiments using a set of highly selective Rho kinase inhibitors suggest that systemic Rho kinase inhibition is linked to a reversible reduction in lymphocyte counts. These results led to the consideration of topical delivery of these molecules, and to the identification of a lead molecule 7 which shows promising PK and PD in a murine model of pulmonary hypertension after intra-tracheal dosing.

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  20. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  2. OMG: Open molecule generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely, J.E.; Rojas-Chertó, M.; Fichera, D.; Reijmers, T.; Coulier, L.; Faulon, J.-L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical

  3. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material ... synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be catego- ... maintained stably per organic molecule, stabilization of a ..... rotating freely under an applied field because it is a magne-.

  4. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  6. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  7. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  8. Structure based design of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suresh; Tice, Colin

    2010-11-01

    Controlling elevated tissue-specific levels of cortisol may provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating metabolic syndrome. This concept has spurred large scale medicinal chemistry efforts in the pharmaceutical industry for the design of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors in complex with the enzyme have facilitated the structure-based design of diverse classes of molecules. A summary of binding modes, trends in structure-activity relationships, and the pharmacodynamic data of inhibitors from each class is presented.

  9. Advances of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Tumor Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Immune checkpoints are cell surface molecules that can fine-tune the immune responses, they are crucial for modulating the duration and amplitude of immune reactions while maintaining self-tolerance in order to minimize autoimmune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that tumors cells can directly express immune-checkpoint molecules, or induce many inhibitory molecules expression in the tumor microenvironment to inhibit the anti-tumor immunity. Releasing these brakes has emerged as an exciting strategy to cure cancer. In the past few years, clinical trials with therapeutic antibodies targeting to the checkpoint molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1 have rekindled the hope for cancer immunotherapy. In contrast to the conventional treatment, checkpoint inhibitors induce broad and durable antitumor responses. In the future, treatment may involve combination therapy to target different checkpoint molecules and stages of the adaptive immune responses. In this review, we summarized the recent advances of the study and development of other checkpoint molecules in tumor immunotherapy.

  10. Urea transporter proteins as targets for small-molecule diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-02-01

    Conventional diuretics such as furosemide and thiazides target salt transporters in kidney tubules, but urea transporters (UTs) have emerged as alternative targets. UTs are a family of transmembrane channels expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, in particular the kidney. UT knockout mice and humans with UT mutations exhibit reduced maximal urinary osmolality, demonstrating that UTs are necessary for the concentration of urine. Small-molecule screening has identified potent and selective inhibitors of UT-A, the UT protein expressed in renal tubule epithelial cells, and UT-B, the UT protein expressed in vasa recta endothelial cells. Data from UT knockout mice and from rodents administered UT inhibitors support the diuretic action of UT inhibition. The kidney-specific expression of UT-A1, together with high selectivity of the small-molecule inhibitors, means that off-target effects of such small-molecule drugs should be minimal. This Review summarizes the structure, expression and function of UTs, and looks at the evidence supporting the validity of UTs as targets for the development of salt-sparing diuretics with a unique mechanism of action. UT-targeted inhibitors may be useful alone or in combination with conventional diuretics for therapy of various oedemas and hyponatraemias, potentially including those refractory to treatment with current diuretics.

  11. Small Molecule Modifiers of the microRNA and RNA Interference Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Deiters, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has become the target of small molecule inhibitors and activators. RNAi has been well established as a research tool in the sequence-specific silencing of genes in eukaryotic cells and organisms by using exogenous, small, double-stranded RNA molecules of approximately 20 nucleotides. Moreover, a recently discovered post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanism employs microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of endogenously expressed small RNA molecules, whic...

  12. Novel inhibitors of IMPDH: a highly potent and selective quinolone-based series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Carlsen, Marianne; Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Pitts, William J; Guo, Junqing; Gu, Henry H; Norris, Derek; Chorba, John; Chen, Ping; Cheney, Daniel; Witmer, Mark; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Townsend, Robert; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2003-02-10

    A series of novel quinolone-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  13. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  14. Superexcited states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Takagi, Hidekazu.

    1990-01-01

    The report addresses the nature and major features of molecule's superexcited states, focusing on their involvement in dynamic processes. It also outlines the quantum defect theory which allows various processes involving these states to be treated in a unified way. The Rydberg state has close relation with an ionized state with a positive energy. The quantum defect theory interprets such relation. Specifically, the report first describes the quantum defect theory focusing on its basic principle. The multi-channel quantum defect theory is then outlined centering on how to describe a Rydberg-type superexcited state. Description of a dissociative double-electron excited state is also discussed. The quantum defect theory is based on the fact that the physics of the motion of a Rydberg electron vary with the region in the electron's coordinate space. Finally, various molecular processes that involve a superexcited state are addressed focusing on autoionization, photoionization, dissociative recombination and bonding ionization of diatomic molecules. (N.K.)

  15. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  16. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  17. Interstellar molecules and masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Guibert, J.

    1978-01-01

    The study of dense and dark clouds, in which hydrogen is mostly in molecular form, became possible since the discovery of interstellar molecules, emitting in the centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The molecular lines are generally not in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Their intensity can often be explained by invoking a population inversion mechanism. Maser emission lines due to OH, H 2 O and SiO molecules are among the most intense molecular lines. The H 2 CO molecule, detected in absorption in front of the cold cosmic background radiation of 2.7 K, illustrates the inverse phenomenon, the antimaser absorption. For a radio transition of frequency v, the inversion rate Δn (relative population difference between the upper and lower level) as well as the maser gain can be determined from the radio observations. In the case of the OH lines in the 2 PIsub(3/2), J=3/2 state, the inversion rates approximately 1 to 2% derived from the observations, are comparable with those obtained in the laboratory. The determination of the excitation mechanisms of the masers, through the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations, implies the knowledge of collisional and radiative transition probabilities. A pumping model, which can satisfactorily explain the radio observations of some interstellar OH clouds, will be discussed [fr

  18. Discovery, Synthesis, And Structure-Based Optimization of a Series of N-(tert-Butyl)-2-(N-arylamido)-2-(pyridin-3-yl) Acetamides (ML188) as Potent Noncovalent Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3CL Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Grum-Tokars, Valerie [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Zhou, Ya [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Turlington, Mark [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Saldanha, S. Adrian [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Chase, Peter [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Eggler, Aimee [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Dawson, Eric S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Baez-Santos, Yahira M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Tomar, Sakshi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Mielech, Anna M. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Baker, Susan C. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Lindsley, Craig W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Hodder, Peter [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Mesecar, Andrew [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Stauffer, Shaun R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-12-11

    A high-throughput screen of the NIH molecular libraries sample collection and subsequent optimization of a lead dipeptide-like series of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) main protease (3CLpro) inhibitors led to the identification of probe compound ML188 (16-(R), (R)-N-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-N-(2-(tert-butylamino)-2-oxo-1-(pyridin-3-yl)ethyl)furan-2-carboxamide, Pubchem CID: 46897844). But, unlike the majority of reported coronavirus 3CLpro inhibitors that act via covalent modification of the enzyme, 16-(R) is a noncovalent SARS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitor with moderate MW and good enzyme and antiviral inhibitory activity. A multicomponent Ugi reaction was utilized to rapidly explore structure–activity relationships within S1', S1, and S2enzyme binding pockets. Moreover, the X-ray structure of SARS-CoV 3CLpro bound with 16-(R) was instrumental in guiding subsequent rounds of chemistry optimization. 16-(R) provides an excellent starting point for the further design and refinement of 3CLpro inhibitors that act by a noncovalent mechanism of action.

  19. 3-cyanoindole-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: synthesis and initial structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Gu, Henry H; Chen, Ping; Norris, Derek; Watterson, Scott H; Ballentine, Shelley K; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Barrish, Joel C; Townsend, Robert; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2003-10-20

    A series of novel small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), based upon a 3-cyanoindole core, were explored. IMPDH catalyzes the rate determining step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis and is a target for anticancer, immunosuppressive and antiviral therapy. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SAR), derived from in vitro studies, for this new series of inhibitors is given.

  20. A survey of cyclic replacements for the central diamide moiety of inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Liu, Chunjian; Pitts, William J; Guo, Junquing; Watterson, Scott H; Gu, Henry; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Barrish, Joel C; Hollenbaugh, Diane; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-11-04

    A series of heterocyclic replacements for the central diamide moiety of 1, a potent small molecule inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) were explored The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs), derived from in vitro studies, for these new series of inhibitors is given.

  1. Discovery and X-ray crystallographic analysis of a spiropiperidine iminohydantoin inhibitor of beta-secretase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, James C; Stauffer, Shaun R; Rittle, Kenneth E; Ngo, Phung L; Yang, ZhiQiang; Selnick, Harold G; Graham, Samuel L; Munshi, Sanjeev; McGaughey, Georgia B; Holloway, M Katharine; Simon, Adam J; Price, Eric A; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Lai, Ming-Tain; Espeseth, Amy S; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Wolfe, Abigail; Pietrak, Beth; Zuck, Paul; Levorse, Dorothy A; Hazuda, Daria; Vacca, Joseph P

    2008-10-23

    A high-throughput screen at 100 microM inhibitor concentration for the BACE-1 enzyme revealed a novel spiropiperidine iminohydantoin aspartyl protease inhibitor template. An X-ray cocrystal structure with BACE-1 revealed a novel mode of binding whereby the inhibitor interacts with the catalytic aspartates via bridging water molecules. Using the crystal structure as a guide, potent compounds with good brain penetration were designed.

  2. Quark chemistry: charmonium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rujula, A.; Jaffe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidence for two quark-two antiquark hadrons is reviewed. Concentration is placed on predictions for S-wave ''charmonium molecules,'' built of a c anti c charmonium pair and a light quark-antiquark pair. Their spectrum and quantum numbers are predicted and an estimate of their decay couplings and their prediction in monochromatic pion decays from charmonium resonances produced in e + e - -annihilation is given. Some S-wave charmonium resonances should be detectable in these decays, but typical branching ratios are only at the 1% level. 19 references

  3. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  4. New synthetic thrombin inhibitors: molecular design and experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinauridze, Elena I; Romanov, Alexey N; Gribkova, Irina V; Kondakova, Olga A; Surov, Stepan S; Gorbatenko, Aleksander S; Butylin, Andrey A; Monakov, Mikhail Yu; Bogolyubov, Alexey A; Kuznetsov, Yuryi V; Sulimov, Vladimir B; Ataullakhanov, Fazoyl I

    2011-01-01

    The development of new anticoagulants is an important goal for the improvement of thromboses treatments. The design, synthesis and experimental testing of new safe and effective small molecule direct thrombin inhibitors for intravenous administration. Computer-aided molecular design of new thrombin inhibitors was performed using our original docking program SOL, which is based on the genetic algorithm of global energy minimization in the framework of a Merck Molecular Force Field. This program takes into account the effects of solvent. The designed molecules with the best scoring functions (calculated binding energies) were synthesized and their thrombin inhibitory activity evaluated experimentally in vitro using a chromogenic substrate in a buffer system and using a thrombin generation test in isolated plasma and in vivo using the newly developed model of hemodilution-induced hypercoagulation in rats. The acute toxicities of the most promising new thrombin inhibitors were evaluated in mice, and their stabilities in aqueous solutions were measured. New compounds that are both effective direct thrombin inhibitors (the best K(I) was 50) in the thrombin generation assay of approximately 100 nM) were discovered. These compounds contain one of the following new residues as the basic fragment: isothiuronium, 4-aminopyridinium, or 2-aminothiazolinium. LD(50) values for the best new inhibitors ranged from 166.7 to >1111.1 mg/kg. A plasma-substituting solution supplemented with one of the new inhibitors prevented hypercoagulation in the rat model of hemodilution-induced hypercoagulation. Activities of the best new inhibitors in physiological saline (1 µM solutions) were stable after sterilization by autoclaving, and the inhibitors remained stable at long-term storage over more than 1.5 years at room temperature and at 4°C. The high efficacy, stability and low acute toxicity reveal that the inhibitors that were developed may be promising for potential medical applications.

  5. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  6. Kinase inhibitors: a new class of antirheumatic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyttaris VC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasileios C KyttarisDivision of Rheumatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The outlook for patients with rheumatoid arthritis has improved significantly over the last three decades with the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. However, despite the use of methotrexate, cytokine inhibitors, and molecules targeting T and B cells, a percentage of patients do not respond or lose their response over time. The autoimmune process in rheumatoid arthritis depends on activation of immune cells, which utilize intracellular kinases to respond to external stimuli such as cytokines, immune complexes, and antigens. In the past decade, small molecules targeting several kinases, such as p38 MAPK, Syk, and JAK have been developed. Several p38 MAPK inhibitors proved ineffective in treating rheumatoid arthritis. The Syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, proved superior to placebo in Phase II trials and is currently under Phase III investigation. Tofacitinib, a JAK1/3 inhibitor, was shown to be efficacious in two Phase III trials, while VX-509, a JAK3 inhibitor, showed promising results in a Phase II trial. Fostamatinib and tofacitinib were associated with increased rates of infection, elevation of liver enzymes, and neutropenia. Moreover, fostamatinib caused elevations of blood pressure and diarrhea, while tofacitinib was associated with an increase in creatinine and elevation of lipid levels.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, kinase inhibitors, mitogen-activated phosphokinase p38, spleen tyrosine kinase, Janus kinases

  7. Novel targeted therapeutics: inhibitors of MDM2, ALK and PARP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We reviewed preclinical data and clinical development of MDM2 (murine double minute 2, ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase and PARP (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase inhibitors. MDM2 binds to p53, and promotes degradation of p53 through ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. JNJ-26854165 and RO5045337 are 2 small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2 in clinical development. ALK is a transmembrane protein and a member of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinases. EML4-ALK fusion gene is identified in approximately 3-13% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Early-phase clinical studies with Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, in NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK have demonstrated promising activity with high response rate and prolonged progression-free survival. PARPs are a family of nuclear enzymes that regulates the repair of DNA single-strand breaks through the base excision repair pathway. Randomized phase II study has shown adding PARP-1 inhibitor BSI-201 to cytotoxic chemotherapy improves clinical outcome in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Olaparib, another oral small-molecule PARP inhibitor, demonstrated encouraging single-agent activity in patients with advanced breast or ovarian cancer. There are 5 other PARP inhibitors currently under active clinical investigation.

  8. Novel nonpeptidic inhibitors of peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekera, M M; Kendall, A; Shammas, R; Dermyer, M; Tomala, M; Shapiro, M A; Holler, T P

    2000-09-15

    A novel series of nonpeptidic compounds structurally related to the known anticholesteremic thyropropic acid were found to inhibit Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF), with IC50 values in the low-micromolar range. Kinetic analysis of [4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-3,5-diiodophenyl]acetic acid reveals competitive inhibition, with a Ki value of 0.66 +/- 0.007 microM. A structure-activity relationship study demonstrates that the carboxylate is required for activity, while the distal phenolic function can be methylated without significant effect. Either decreasing the number of iodine atoms on the molecule to one or increasing the number of iodine atoms to four results in the loss of an order of magnitude in potency. These compounds are the first nonpeptidic inhibitors disclosed and represent a template from which better inhibitors might be designed.

  9. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  10. A New Urease Inhibitor from Viola betonicifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Urease has attracted much attention, as it is directly involved in the formation of infection stones and contributes to the pathogenesis of urolithiasis, pyelonephritis, ammonia and hepatic encephalopathy, hepatic coma and urinary catheter encrustation. Moreover, urease is the major cause of pathologies induced by H. pylori, such as gastritis and peptic ulcer. In the present work, the new natural compound, 3-methoxydalbergione, was isolated from Viola betonicifolia. A mechanistic study of this compound as a natural urease inhibitor was performed by using enzyme kinetics and docking studies. 3-Methoxydalbergione could be considered as a lead molecule for drugs useful in the urease associated diseases.

  11. Tetomilast: new promise for phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickston, Stephen J; Snider, Kenneth R; Kappus, Matthew R

    2012-12-01

    Tetomilast is a novel thiazole phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE-4) inhibitor, which may prove useful in both the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Here, the authors review the pharmacology of the drug, and offer critical review of the available data for use of tetomilast in the treatment of IBD. Peer-reviewed publications, including Phase I and II clinical trials, all other formats included. Tetomilast may be beneficial in IBD. Small differences in molecules and in recombinant proteins can translate into substantial differences in clinical effects and toxicity in IBD. This is a reasonable approach when exploring new options like tetomilast.

  12. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  13. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  14. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  15. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  16. Endogenous Natural Complement Inhibitor Regulates Cardiac Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Skov, Louise L; Kjaer-Sorensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms during fetal development and adult homeostasis. In this article, we describe the function of an endogenous complement inhibitor, mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated protein (MAp)44, in regulating the composition of a serine protease-pattern recognition receptor complex, MBL-associated serine...... of MAp44 caused impaired cardiogenesis, lowered heart rate, and decreased cardiac output. These defects were associated with aberrant neural crest cell behavior. We found that MAp44 competed with MASP-3 for pattern recognition molecule interaction, and knockdown of endogenous MAp44 expression could...... be rescued by overexpression of wild-type MAp44. Our observations provide evidence that immune molecules are centrally involved in the orchestration of cardiac tissue development....

  17. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...

  18. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Jan M; Hero, Matti; Nunez, Susan B

    2011-10-25

    Aromatase, an enzyme located in the endoplasmic reticulum of estrogen-producing cells, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many tissues. The clinical features of patients with defects in CYP19A1, the gene encoding aromatase, have revealed a major role for this enzyme in epiphyseal plate closure, which has promoted interest in the use of inhibitors of aromatase to improve adult height. The availability of the selective aromatase inhibitors letrozole and anastrozole--currently approved as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer--have stimulated off-label use of aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics for the following conditions: hyperestrogenism, such as aromatase excess syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, McCune-Albright syndrome and functional follicular ovarian cysts; hyperandrogenism, for example, testotoxicosis (also known as familial male-limited precocious puberty) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia; pubertal gynecomastia; and short stature and/or pubertal delay in boys. Current data suggest that aromatase inhibitors are probably effective in the treatment of patients with aromatase excess syndrome or testotoxicosis, partially effective in Peutz-Jeghers and McCune-Albright syndrome, but probably ineffective in gynecomastia. Insufficient data are available in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia or functional ovarian cysts. Although aromatase inhibitors appear effective in increasing adult height of boys with short stature and/or pubertal delay, safety concerns, including vertebral deformities, a decrease in serum HDL cholesterol levels and increase of erythrocytosis, are reasons for caution.

  20. New synthetic thrombin inhibitors: molecular design and experimental verification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I Sinauridze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of new anticoagulants is an important goal for the improvement of thromboses treatments. OBJECTIVES: The design, synthesis and experimental testing of new safe and effective small molecule direct thrombin inhibitors for intravenous administration. METHODS: Computer-aided molecular design of new thrombin inhibitors was performed using our original docking program SOL, which is based on the genetic algorithm of global energy minimization in the framework of a Merck Molecular Force Field. This program takes into account the effects of solvent. The designed molecules with the best scoring functions (calculated binding energies were synthesized and their thrombin inhibitory activity evaluated experimentally in vitro using a chromogenic substrate in a buffer system and using a thrombin generation test in isolated plasma and in vivo using the newly developed model of hemodilution-induced hypercoagulation in rats. The acute toxicities of the most promising new thrombin inhibitors were evaluated in mice, and their stabilities in aqueous solutions were measured. RESULTS: New compounds that are both effective direct thrombin inhibitors (the best K(I was 1111.1 mg/kg. A plasma-substituting solution supplemented with one of the new inhibitors prevented hypercoagulation in the rat model of hemodilution-induced hypercoagulation. Activities of the best new inhibitors in physiological saline (1 µM solutions were stable after sterilization by autoclaving, and the inhibitors remained stable at long-term storage over more than 1.5 years at room temperature and at 4°C. CONCLUSIONS: The high efficacy, stability and low acute toxicity reveal that the inhibitors that were developed may be promising for potential medical applications.

  1. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  2. Towards ligand docking including explicit interface water molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemmon

    Full Text Available Small molecule docking predicts the interaction of a small molecule ligand with a protein at atomic-detail accuracy including position and conformation the ligand but also conformational changes of the protein upon ligand binding. While successful in the majority of cases, docking algorithms including RosettaLigand fail in some cases to predict the correct protein/ligand complex structure. In this study we show that simultaneous docking of explicit interface water molecules greatly improves Rosetta's ability to distinguish correct from incorrect ligand poses. This result holds true for both protein-centric water docking wherein waters are located relative to the protein binding site and ligand-centric water docking wherein waters move with the ligand during docking. Protein-centric docking is used to model 99 HIV-1 protease/protease inhibitor structures. We find protease inhibitor placement improving at a ratio of 9:1 when one critical interface water molecule is included in the docking simulation. Ligand-centric docking is applied to 341 structures from the CSAR benchmark of diverse protein/ligand complexes [1]. Across this diverse dataset we see up to 56% recovery of failed docking studies, when waters are included in the docking simulation.

  3. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Structures and Biological Functions of Protein Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-04-01

    The self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) calculation method reduces the computational effort from M3 to about M1 (M is the number of atoms in the system) with unchanged calculation precision. So the ab initio, all-electron calculation of the electronic structure and biological function of protein molecule becomes a reality, which will promote new proteomics considerably. The calculated results of two real protein molecules, the trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I, 436 atoms) and the Ascaris trypsin inhibitor (912 atoms, two three-dimensional structures), are presented. The reactive sites of the inhibitors are determined and explained. The precision of structure determination of inhibitors are tested theoretically.

  4. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502

  5. Structure-Guided Strategy for the Development of Potent Bivalent ERK Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C. [Cancer; Mace, Peter D. [Cancer; Sessions, E. Hampton [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona, Orlando, Florida 32827, United States; Williamson, Robert [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona, Orlando, Florida 32827, United States; Stalder, Romain [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona, Orlando, Florida 32827, United States; Wallez, Yann [Cancer; Roth, Gregory P. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona, Orlando, Florida 32827, United States; Riedl, Stefan J. [Cancer; Pasquale, Elena B. [Cancer; Pathology

    2017-06-13

    ERK is the effector kinase of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling cascade, which promotes cell transformation and malignancy in many cancers and is thus a major drug target in oncology. Kinase inhibitors targeting RAF or MEK are already used for the treatment of certain cancers, such as melanoma. Although the initial response to these drugs can be dramatic, development of drug resistance is a major challenge, even with combination therapies targeting both RAF and MEK. Importantly, most resistance mechanisms still rely on activation of the downstream effector kinase ERK, making it a promising target for drug development efforts. Here, we report the design and structural/functional characterization of a set of bivalent ERK inhibitors that combine a small molecule inhibitor that binds to the ATP-binding pocket with a peptide that selectively binds to an ERK protein interaction surface, the D-site recruitment site (DRS). Our studies show that the lead bivalent inhibitor, SBP3, has markedly improved potency compared to the small molecule inhibitor alone. Unexpectedly, we found that SBP3 also binds to several ERK-related kinases that contain a DRS, highlighting the importance of experimentally verifying the predicted specificity of bivalent inhibitors. However, SBP3 does not target any other kinases belonging to the same CMGC branch of the kinome. Additionally, our modular click chemistry inhibitor design facilitates the generation of different combinations of small molecule inhibitors with ERK-targeting peptides.

  6. Cathepsin D inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gacko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of cathepsin D belong to chemical compounds that estrify carboxyl groups of the Asp33 and Asp231residues of its catalytic site, penta-peptides containing statin, i.e. the amino acid similar in structure to the tetraedric indirectproduct, and polypeptides found in the spare organs of many plants and forming permanent noncovalent complexes withcathepsin. Cathepsin D activity is also inhibited by alpha2-macroglobulin and antibodies directed against this enzyme.Methods used to determine the activity and concentration of these inhibitors and their analytical, preparative and therapeuticapplications are discussed.

  7. [Isomeric derivatives of lupinine and epilupinine--organophosphorus inhibitors of cholinesterases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basova, N E; Kormilitsyn, B N; Perchenok, A Iu; Rosengart, E V; Saakov, V S; Suvorov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The isomeric-structure analysis data of anticholinesterase action of organophosphorous inhibitors with similar structure help in the search of specific effectors and detection of differences in reactivity of various animals' enzymes. This study compared the data of efficacy in respect of 4 mammal and 5 arthropoda cholinesterase preparations for 26 quinolizidine inhibitors, which molecules contain both the isomeric unbranched and branched alkoxyl radicals in the phosphoryl group, and the epimeric lupinine and epilupinine derivatives in the leaving group. The changes in the alkoxyl radical structure of inhibitor molecules act on their efficacy only with respect to the mammal enzymes ("group" inhibitor specificity). The differences between lupinine and epilupinine derivatives were revealed. Highly specific inhibitors of different enzymes were detected among the tested compounds.

  8. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  9. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  10. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  11. Cellular growth kinetics distinguish a cyclophilin inhibitor from an HSP90 inhibitor as a selective inhibitor of hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf K F Beran

    Full Text Available During antiviral drug discovery, it is critical to distinguish molecules that selectively interrupt viral replication from those that reduce virus replication by adversely affecting host cell viability. In this report we investigate the selectivity of inhibitors of the host chaperone proteins cyclophilin A (CypA and heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90 which have each been reported to inhibit replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV. By comparing the toxicity of the HSP90 inhibitor, 17-(Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG to two known cytostatic compounds, colchicine and gemcitabine, we provide evidence that 17-AAG exerts its antiviral effects indirectly through slowing cell growth. In contrast, a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, exhibited selective antiviral activity without slowing cell proliferation. Furthermore, we observed that 17-AAG had little antiviral effect in a non-dividing cell-culture model of HCV replication, while CsA reduced HCV titer by more than two orders of magnitude in the same model. The assays we describe here are useful for discriminating selective antivirals from compounds that indirectly affect virus replication by reducing host cell viability or slowing cell growth.

  12. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  13. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  14. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Kelso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  15. Transglutaminase inhibitor from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A.H. de; Wijngaards, G.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cross-linking experiments of skimmed bovine milk with bacterial transglutaminase isolated from Streptoverticillium mobaraense showed only some degree of formation of high-molecular-weight casein polymers. Studies on the nature of this phenomenon revealed that bovine milk contains an inhibitor of

  16. Inhibitors of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Brian; Kristensen, Jesper L; Kristensen, Line H

    2011-01-01

    Methylated lysines are important epigenetic marks. The enzymes involved in demethylation have recently been discovered and found to be involved in cancer development and progression. Despite the relative recent discovery of these enzymes a number of inhibitors have already appeared. Most of the i...

  17. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  18. Raman spectroscopic studies of the interaction of oxalic acid and sodium oxalate used as corrosion inhibitors with copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeziorowski, H.; Moser, B.

    1985-09-01

    The Raman spectra of the liquid-solid interface recorded in situ show the formation of a salt complex of the inhibitor molecules and the copper ions. This suggests that this chemisorbed surface species produces the protective layer.

  19. Growing interstellar molecules with ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions continue to provide important insights into the chemistry of molecular growth in interstellar environments. It is also true that the measurements are becoming more demanding as larger molecules capture our interest. While some of these measurements are motivated by current developments in chemical models of interstellar environments or by new molecular observations by astronomers, others explore novel chemistry which can lead to predictions of new interstellar molecules. Here the author views the results of some recent measurements, taken in the Ion Chemistry Laboratory at York University with the SIFT technique, which address some of the current needs of modellers and observers and which also provide some new fundamental insight into molecular growth, particularly when it occurs in the presence of large molecules such as PAH molecules which are now thought to have a major influence on the chemistry of interstellar environments in which they are present

  20. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib, ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111.

  1. PTP1B Inhibitors from the Entomogenous Fungi Isaria fumosorosea

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zhang; Lin-Lin Meng; Jing-Jing Wei; Peng Fan; Sha-Sha Liu; Wei-Yu Yuan; You-Xing Zhao; Du-Qiang Luo

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of PTP1B can be considered as an attractive approach for the design of new therapeutic agents of type II diabetes and cancer diseases. In a continuing search for new PTP1B inhibitors, a new tetramic acid possessing a rare pyrrolidinedione skele...

  2. The Azaindole Framework in the Design of Kinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Mérour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article illustrates the growing use of azaindole derivatives as kinase inhibitors and their contribution to drug discovery and innovation. The different protein kinases which have served as targets and the known molecules which have emerged from medicinal chemistry and Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD programs are presented. The various synthetic routes used to access these compounds and the chemical pathways leading to their synthesis are also discussed. An analysis of their mode of binding based on X-ray crystallography data gives structural insights for the design of more potent and selective inhibitors.

  3. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated coagulation factor IX prevents inhibitor formation and fatal anaphylaxis in hemophilia B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dheeraj; Moghimi, Babak; LoDuca, Paul A; Singh, Harminder D; Hoffman, Brad E; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2010-04-13

    To address complications of pathogenic antibody or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions in protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia or other inherited protein deficiencies, we have developed a prophylactic protocol using a murine hemophilia B model. Oral delivery of coagulation factor IX fused with cholera toxin beta-subunit (with or without a furin cleavage site; CTB-FFIX or CTB-FIX), expressed in chloroplasts (up to 3.8% soluble protein or 0.4 mg/g leaf tissue), bioencapsulated in plant cells, effectively blocked formation of inhibitory antibodies (undetectable or up to 100-fold less than controls). Moreover, this treatment eliminated fatal anaphylactic reactions that occurred after four to six exposures to intravenous F.IX. Whereas only 20-25% of control animals survived after six to eight F.IX doses, 90-93% of F.IX-fed mice survived 12 injections without signs of allergy or anaphylaxis. Immunostaining confirmed delivery of F.IX to Peyer's patches in the ileum. Within 2-5 h, feeding of CTB-FFIX additionally resulted in systemic delivery of F.IX antigen. This high-responder strain of hemophilia B mice represents a new animal model to study anaphylactic reactions. The protocol was effective over a range of oral antigen doses (equivalent to 5-80 microg recombinant F.IX/kg), and controlled inhibitor formation and anaphylaxis long-term, up to 7 months (approximately 40% life span of this mouse strain). Oral antigen administration caused a deviant immune response that suppressed formation of IgE and inhibitory antibodies. This cost-effective and efficient approach of antigen delivery to the gut should be applicable to several genetic diseases that are prone to pathogenic antibody responses during treatment.

  4. Recent advances in botulinum neurotoxin inhibitor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Erkan; Burnett, James C; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are endopeptidases that target motor neurons and block acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. This action results in the muscle paralysis that defines the disease botulism. To date, there are no FDA-approved therapeutics to treat BoNT-mediated paralysis after intoxication of the motor neuron. Importantly, the rationale for pursuing treatments to counter these toxins is driven by their potential misuse. Current drug discovery efforts have mainly focused on small molecules, peptides, and peptidomimetics that can directly and competitively inhibit BoNT light chain proteolytic activity. Although this is a rational approach, direct inhibition of the Zn(2+) metalloprotease activity has been elusive as demonstrated by the dearth of candidates undergoing clinical evaluation. Therefore, broadening the scope of viable targets beyond that of active site protease inhibitors represents an additional strategy that could move the field closer to the clinic. Here we review the rationale, and discuss the outcomes of earlier approaches and highlight potential new targets for BoNT inhibition. These include BoNT uptake and processing inhibitors, enzymatic inhibitors, and modulators of neuronal processes associated with toxin clearance, neurotransmitter potentiation, and other pathways geared towards neuronal recovery and repair.

  5. Janus Associated Kinases Inhibitors in the Pharmacological Thera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Santos1

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Janus associated kinases inhibitors are a new strategy for the treatment of different clinical conditions like immunologic, inflammatory and oncology disorders. The aim of this study was to perform a review of all Janus associated kinases inhibitors available in national and international pharmaceutical market, their therapeutic indications and adverse effects, and the potential indications for investigation of those already available in the pharmaceutical market. It was also performed a review of the main new Janus associated kinases inhibitors that are still in clinical research. A literature review was conducted by consulting the summary of product characteristics of Janus associated kinases inhibitors available in the pharmaceutical market and a research in the bibliographic database PubMed using the terms «JAK inhibitors», «Janus associated kinases inhibitors» and «Janus kinases inhibitors». Ninety-five publications were included in the present review, published from January 2014 to January 2015. Drug databases of the European Medicines Agency and United States Food and Drug Administration were also consulted to search for Janus associated kinases inhibitors authorized in clinical practice. Currently, ruxolitinib and tofacitinib are available in the pharmaceutical market and oclatinib is approved as a veterinary medicinal product. Both drugs approved for human use have major adverse effects at hematological and immunological levels, which enhance the importance of the pharmacist’s role in the monitoring of patients involved in these treatments. However, several molecules are in pre-clinical and clinical studies trying to prove its potential in the treatment of several immunologic, inflammatory and oncology disorders. Thus, it is still necessary to deepen the knowledge in this area in order to overcome the risks of therapy with these agents. These risks weighed against the benefits of its clinical use have compromised the progress of

  6. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  7. Organizing and addressing magnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatteschi, Dante; Cornia, Andrea; Mannini, Matteo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2009-04-20

    Magnetic molecules ranging from simple organic radicals to single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are intensively investigated for their potential applications in molecule-based information storage and processing. The goal of this Article is to review recent achievements in the organization of magnetic molecules on surfaces and in their individual probing and manipulation. We stress that the inherent fragility and redox sensitivity of most SMM complexes, combined with the noninnocent role played by the substrate, ask for a careful evaluation of the structural and electronic properties of deposited molecules going beyond routine methods for surface analysis. Detailed magnetic information can be directly obtained using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or newly emerging scanning probe techniques with magnetic detection capabilities.

  8. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  9. Acid corrosion inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N G

    1964-04-28

    An acid corrosion inhibitor is prepared by a 2-stage vacuum evaporation of effluents obtained from the ammonia columns of the coking oven plant. The effluent, leaving a scrubber in which the phenols are removed at a temperature of 98$C, passes through a quartz filter and flows into a heated chamber in which it is used for preheating a solution circulating through a vacuum unit, maintaining the temperature of the solution at 55$ to 60$C. The effluent enters a large tank in which it is boiled at 55$ to 60$C under 635 to 640 mm Hg pressure. Double evaporation of this solution yields a very effective acid corrosion inhibitor. Its corrosion-preventing effect is 97.9% compared with 90.1% for thiourea and 88.5% for urotropin under identical conditions.

  10. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs.

  11. Quorum sensing Inhibitors as anti-pathogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2006-01-01

    as well as elevated tolerance to the activity of the innate immune system. Gram-negative bacteria commonly use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as QS signal molecules. The use of signal molecule based drugs to attenuate bacterial pathogenecity rather than bacterial growth is attractive for several reasons......, particularly considering the emergence of increasingly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Compounds capable of this type of interference have been termed anti-pathogenic drugs. A large variety of synthetic AHL analogues and natural products libraries have been screened and a number of QS inhibitors (QSI) have been...

  12. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  13. Synthesis and Application of Pyrrolidone-containing Shale Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonggui; Hou, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Jing; Song, Tao; Xu, Yongjun

    2018-03-01

    New generation polyamine inhibitors are amino-terminated polyethers with excellent inhibiting capabilities; they play a key role in borehole stabilization and reservoir protection. However, polyamine inhibitors are limited by their poor thermal stability, which can be attributed to the presence of ether bonds in their molecular structures. We propose a three-step synthesis approach fora novel pyrrolidone-containing polyamine inhibitor (DYNP) by introducing N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) on divinyloxyethane. This polyamine inhibitor exhibits an optimized molecular structure and has enhanced heat resistance. Characterizations by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and evaluation tests demonstrate several advantages of DYNP inhibitors, including excellent inhibiting capability (superior to similar materials such as polyamines), improved heat resistance (reasonable stability at temperatures up to 240°C), and good compatibility with both fresh water and salt water drilling fluids. These can be attributed to the presence of considerable amounts of amino groups in the repeating unit of DYNP molecules. The DYNP inhibitor was applied in over 20 boreholes in tight oil blocks in Daqing Oilfield to relieve hydration of formations with high shale contents. For instance, drilling in the 2033.5m horizontal section of Dragon 2 borehole was smooth, with a borehole diameter expansion ratio below 10%.

  14. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  15. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor...... concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema...

  16. Inhibition of Metalloprotease Botulinum Serotype A from a Pseudo-Peptide Binding Mode to a Small Molecule that is Active in Primary Neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burnett, James C; Ruthel, Gordon; Stegmann, Christian M; Panchal, Rekha G; Nguyen, Tam L; Hermone, Ann R; Stafford, Robert G; Lane, Douglas J; Kenny, Tara A; McGarth, Connor F

    2007-01-01

    An efficient research strategy integrating empirically-guided, structure-based modeling and chemoinformatics was used to discover potent small molecule inhibitors of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain...

  17. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hong

    Full Text Available Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  18. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  19. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  20. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  1. Photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed

  2. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  3. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors improve micturition control in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Redaelli

    Full Text Available Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg, to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition.

  4. Two strategies for the development of mitochondrion-targeted small molecule radiation damage mitigators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Beck, Barbara; Wang, Wei; Doemling, Alexander; Epperly, Michael W.; Shields, Donna; Goff, Julie P.; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Wipf, Peter; Tyurina, Yulia; Kagan, Valerian E.; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation of acute ionizing radiation damage by mitochondrion-targeted small molecules. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the ability of nitroxide-linked alkene peptide isostere JP4-039, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-linked alkene peptide esostere

  5. DGAT inhibitors for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Daisuke; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    Obesity is characterized by the accumulation of triacylglycerol in adipocytes. Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyzes the final reaction of triacylgycerol synthesis. Two isozymes of DGAT, DGAT1 and DGAT2, have been reported. Increased DGAT2 activity has a role in steatosis, while DGAT1 plays a role in very (V)LDL synthesis; increased plasma VLDL concentrations may promote obesity and thus DGAT1 is considered a potential therapeutic target of inhibition for obesity control. Several DGAT inhibitors of natural and synthetic origin have been reported, and their future prospect as anti-obesity drugs is discussed in this review.

  6. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  7. Imidazopyridine and Pyrazolopiperidine Derivatives as Novel Inhibitors of Serine Palmitoyl Transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Michael J; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C; Holloway, William G; Lamar, Jason; Mosior, Marian; Hawkins, Eric; Estridge, Thomas; Weidner, Jeffrey; Seng, Thomas; Yurek, David; Adams, Lisa A; Weller, Jennifer; Reynolds, Vincent L; Brozinick, Joseph T

    2016-06-23

    To develop novel treatments for type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia, we pursued inhibitors of serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT). To this end compounds 1 and 2 were developed as potent SPT inhibitors in vitro. 1 and 2 reduce plasma ceramides in rodents, have a slight trend toward enhanced insulin sensitization in DIO mice, and reduce triglycerides and raise HDL in cholesterol/cholic acid fed rats. Unfortunately these molecules cause a gastric enteropathy after chronic dosing in rats.

  8. Oligopeptidase B from Serratia proteamaculans. III. Inhibition analysis. Specific interactions with metalloproteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, A G; Khairullin, R F; Kolomijtseva, G Ya; Rumsh, L D

    2012-03-01

    Inhibition of the novel oligopeptidase B from Serratia proteamaculans (PSP) by basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, Zn2+ ions, and o- and m-phenanthroline was investigated. A pronounced effect of calcium ions on the interaction of PSP with inhibitors was demonstrated. Inversion voltamperometry and atomic absorption spectrometry revealed no zinc ions in the PSP molecule. Hydrophobic nature of the enzyme inhibition by o- and m-phenanthroline was established.

  9. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  10. Small Molecule Supplements Improve Cultured Megakaryocyte Polyploidization by Modulating Multiple Cell Cycle Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaojing; Qu, Mingyi; Fang, Fang; Fan, Zeng; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Xie, Xiaoyan; Pei, Xuetao

    2017-01-01

    Platelets (PLTs) are produced by megakaryocytes (MKs) that completed differentiation and endomitosis. Endomitosis is an important process in which the cell replicates its DNA without cytokinesis and develops highly polyploid MK. In this study, to gain a better PLTs production, four small molecules (Rho-Rock inhibitor (RRI), nicotinamide (NIC), Src inhibitor (SI), and Aurora B inhibitor (ABI)) and their combinations were surveyed as MK culture supplements for promoting polyploidization. Three leukemia cell lines as well as primary mononuclear cells were chosen in the function and mechanism studies of the small molecules. In an optimal culture method, cells were treated with different small molecules and their combinations. The impact of the small molecules on megakaryocytic surface marker expression, polyploidy, proliferation, and apoptosis was examined for the best MK polyploidization supplement. The elaborate analysis confirmed that the combination of SI and RRI together with our MK induction system might result in efficient ploidy promotion. Our experiments demonstrated that, besides direct downregulation on the expression of cytoskeleton protein actin, SI and RRI could significantly enhance the level of cyclins through the suppression of p53 and p21. The verified small molecule combination might be further used in the in vitro PLT manufacture and clinical applications.

  11. Small Molecule Supplements Improve Cultured Megakaryocyte Polyploidization by Modulating Multiple Cell Cycle Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets (PLTs are produced by megakaryocytes (MKs that completed differentiation and endomitosis. Endomitosis is an important process in which the cell replicates its DNA without cytokinesis and develops highly polyploid MK. In this study, to gain a better PLTs production, four small molecules (Rho-Rock inhibitor (RRI, nicotinamide (NIC, Src inhibitor (SI, and Aurora B inhibitor (ABI and their combinations were surveyed as MK culture supplements for promoting polyploidization. Three leukemia cell lines as well as primary mononuclear cells were chosen in the function and mechanism studies of the small molecules. In an optimal culture method, cells were treated with different small molecules and their combinations. The impact of the small molecules on megakaryocytic surface marker expression, polyploidy, proliferation, and apoptosis was examined for the best MK polyploidization supplement. The elaborate analysis confirmed that the combination of SI and RRI together with our MK induction system might result in efficient ploidy promotion. Our experiments demonstrated that, besides direct downregulation on the expression of cytoskeleton protein actin, SI and RRI could significantly enhance the level of cyclins through the suppression of p53 and p21. The verified small molecule combination might be further used in the in vitro PLT manufacture and clinical applications.

  12. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for [ 3 H]NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections

  13. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity of Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilmas, Corey; Adler, Michael; Baskin, Steven I; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2006-01-01

    .... Whereas nerve agents were produced primarily for military deployment, other cholinesterase inhibitors were used for treating conditions such as myasthenia gravis and as pretreaunents for nerve agent exposure...

  15. Classification of Breast Cancer Resistant Protein (BCRP) Inhibitors and Non-Inhibitors Using Machine Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belekar, Vilas; Lingineni, Karthik; Garg, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) is an important transporter and its inhibitors play an important role in cancer treatment by improving the oral bioavailability as well as blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability of anticancer drugs. In this work, a computational model was developed to predict the compounds as BCRP inhibitors or non-inhibitors. Various machine learning approaches like, support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to develop the models. The Matthews correlation coefficients (MCC) of developed models using ANN, k-NN and SVM are 0.67, 0.71 and 0.77, and prediction accuracies are 85.2%, 88.3% and 90.8% respectively. The developed models were tested with a test set of 99 compounds and further validated with external set of 98 compounds. Distribution plot analysis and various machine learning models were also developed based on druglikeness descriptors. Applicability domain is used to check the prediction reliability of the new molecules.

  16. Physics of Complex Polymeric Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Joshua Walter

    The statistical physics of complex polymers with branches and circuits is the topic of this dissertation. An important motivation are large, single-stranded (ss) RNA molecules. Such molecules form complex ``secondary" and ``tertiary" structures that can be represented as branched polymers with circuits. Such structures are in part directly determined by the nucleotide sequence and in part subject to thermal fluctuations. The polymer physics literature on molecules in this class has mostly focused on randomly branched polymers without circuits while there has been minimal research on polymers with specific structures and on polymers that contain circuits. The dissertation is composed of three parts: Part I studies branched polymers with thermally fluctuating structure confined to a potential well as a simple model for the encapsidation of viral RNA. Excluded volume interactions were ignored. In Part II, I apply Flory theory to the study of the encapsidation of viral ss RNA molecules with specific branched structures, but without circuits, in the presence of excluded volume interaction. In Part III, I expand on Part II and consider complex polymers with specific structure including both branching and circuits. I introduce a method based on the mathematics of Laplacian matrices that allows me to calculate density profiles for such molecules, which was not possible within Flory theory.

  17. Quantum transport through organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport for the model of benzene-1, 4-dithiolate (BDT) molecule and some other geometric models of benzene molecule attached with two semi-infinite metallic electrodes by the use of Green's function technique. An analytic approach for the electronic transport through the molecular bridges is presented, based on the tight-binding model. Transport of electrons in such molecular bridges is strongly affected by the geometry of the molecules and their coupling strength with the electrodes. Conductance (g) shows resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy eigenstates. In the weak molecule-to-electrodes coupling limit current (I) passing through the molecules shows staircase-like behavior with sharp steps, while, it varies quite continuously in the limit of strong molecular coupling with the applied bias voltage (V). In presence of the transverse magnetic field conductance gives oscillatory behavior with flux φ, threaded by the molecular ring, showing φ 0 ( = ch/e) flux-quantum periodicity. Though conductance changes with the application of transverse magnetic field, but the current-voltage characteristics remain same in presence of this magnetic field for these molecular bridge systems

  18. Detection of protein-small molecule binding using a self-referencing external cavity laser biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng Zhang; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening of protein-small molecule binding interactions using label-free optical biosensors is challenging, as the detected signals are often similar in magnitude to experimental noise. Here, we describe a novel self-referencing external cavity laser (ECL) biosensor approach that achieves high resolution and high sensitivity, while eliminating thermal noise with sub-picometer wavelength accuracy. Using the self-referencing ECL biosensor, we demonstrate detection of binding between small molecules and a variety of immobilized protein targets with binding affinities or inhibition constants in the sub-nanomolar to low micromolar range. The demonstrated ability to perform detection in the presence of several interfering compounds opens the potential for increasing the throughput of the approach. As an example application, we performed a "needle-in-the-haystack" screen for inhibitors against carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (CA II), in which known inhibitors are clearly differentiated from inactive molecules within a compound library.

  19. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  20. Hierarchical virtual screening approaches in small molecule drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2015-01-01

    Virtual screening has played a significant role in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of therapeutic targets in last two decades. Various ligand and structure-based virtual screening approaches are employed to identify small molecule ligands for proteins of interest. These approaches are often combined in either hierarchical or parallel manner to take advantage of the strength and avoid the limitations associated with individual methods. Hierarchical combination of ligand and structure-based virtual screening approaches has received noteworthy success in numerous drug discovery campaigns. In hierarchical virtual screening, several filters using ligand and structure-based approaches are sequentially applied to reduce a large screening library to a number small enough for experimental testing. In this review, we focus on different hierarchical virtual screening strategies and their application in the discovery of small molecule modulators of important drug targets. Several virtual screening studies are discussed to demonstrate the successful application of hierarchical virtual screening in small molecule drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of novel human dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors of natural origin (Part II: in silico prediction in antidiabetic extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012 [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors.

  2. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoun [Sungshin Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  3. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry

  4. Clinical trials for BET inhibitors run ahead of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V

    2016-03-01

    Several cancer clinical trials for small molecule inhibitors of BET bromodomain proteins have been initiated. There is enthusiasm for the anti-proliferative effect of inhibiting BRD4, one of the targets of these inhibitors, which is thought to cooperate with MYC, a long-desired target for cancer therapeutics. However, no current inhibitor is selective for BRD4 among the three somatic BET proteins, which include BRD2 and BRD3; their respective functions are partially overlapping and none are functionally redundant with BRD4. Each BET protein controls distinct transcriptional pathways that are important for functions beyond cancer cell proliferation, including insulin production, cytokine gene transcription, T cell differentiation, adipogenesis and most seriously, active repression of dangerous latent viruses like HIV. BET inhibitors have been shown to reactivate HIV in human cells. Failure to appreciate that at concentrations used, no available BET inhibitor is member-selective, or to develop a sound biological basis to understand the diverse functions of BET proteins before undertaking for these clinical trials is reckless and likely to lead to adverse events. More mechanistic information from new basic science studies should enable proper focus on the most relevant cancers and define the expected side effect profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors possessing a turn mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Miyamoto, Naoko; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid β peptide, the main component of senile plaques found in the brain of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, is a molecular target for AD therapeutic intervention. A number of potential AD therapeutics have been reported, including inhibitors of β-secretase, γ-secretase, and Aβ aggregation, and anti-amyloid agents, such as neprilysin, insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), and Aβ antibodies. Recently, we reported potent small-sized β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors, which could serve as anti-AD drugs. However AD is a progressive disorder, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over several decades, and therefore may require many years to get cured. One possible way to achieve a greater therapeutic effect is through simultaneous administration of multiple drugs, similar to those used in Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) used to treat AIDS. In order to overcome AD, we took a drug discovery approach to evaluate, novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors. Previously, we reported that a tong-type compound possessing a turn mimic as the inhibitor of HIV-1 protease dimerization. Oligomerized amyloid β peptides contain a turn structure within the molecule. Here, we designed and synthesized novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors with a turn-mimic template, based on the turn conformer of the oligomerized amyloid β peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B; Auld, Douglas S; Ferraris, Dana V; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2013-08-23

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280))) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  9. Lonafarnib is a potential inhibitor for neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Sun

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease that involves the build-up of plaque on the inner walls of the arteries. Intraplaque neovacularization has been shown to be essential in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Previous studies showed that small-molecule compounds targeting farnesyl transferase have the ability to prevent atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that lonafarnib, a specific inhibitor of farnesyl transferase, elicits inhibitory effect on vascular endothelial capillary assembly in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that lonafarnib treatment led to a dose-dependent decrease in scratch wound closure in vitro, whereas it had little effect on endothelial cell proliferation. These data indicate that lonafarnib inhibits neovascularization via directly targeting endothelial cells and disturbing their motility. Moreover, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of farnesyl transferase by lonafarnib significantly impaired centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge of endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we found that the catalytic β subunit of farnesyl transferase associated with a cytoskeletal protein important for the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. Additionally, we showed that lonafarnib remarkably inhibited the expression of the cytoskeletal protein and interrupted its interaction with farnesyl transferase. Our findings thus offer novel mechanistic insight into the protective effect of farnesyl transferase inhibitors on atherosclerosis and provide encouraging evidence for the potential use of this group of agents in inhibiting plaque neovascularization.

  10. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  11. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-10-30

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)).

  12. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Enterovirus (EV and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV. They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors.

  13. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  14. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  15. Turning a Substrate Peptide into a Potent Inhibitor for the Histone Methyltransferase SETD8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Russell A.; Zhu, Haizhong; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Bodelle, Pierre M.; Hutchins, Charles W.; Torrent, Maricel; Marin, Violeta L.; Yu, Wenyu; Vedadi, Masoud; Li, Fengling; Brown, Peter J.; Pappano, William N.; Sun, Chaohong; Petros, Andrew M.

    2016-12-08

    SETD8 is a histone H4–K20 methyltransferase that plays an essential role in the maintenance of genomic integrity during mitosis and in DNA damage repair, making it an intriguing target for cancer research. While some small molecule inhibitors for SETD8 have been reported, the structural binding modes for these inhibitors have not been revealed. Using the complex structure of the substrate peptide bound to SETD8 as a starting point, different natural and unnatural amino acid substitutions were tested, and a potent (Ki 50 nM, IC50 0.33 μM) and selective norleucine containing peptide inhibitor has been obtained.

  16. An Isochemogenic Set of Inhibitors To Define the Therapeutic Potential of Histone Deacetylases in β-Cell Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Florence F; Lundh, Morten; Kaya, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been implicated as a potential therapeutic strategy for multiple diseases. However, it has been difficult to dissect the role of individual HDACs due to a lack of selective small-molecule inhibitors. Here, we report the synthesis of a series...... of highly potent and isoform-selective class I HDAC inhibitors, rationally designed by exploiting minimal structural changes to the clinically experienced HDAC inhibitor CI-994. We used this toolkit of isochemogenic or chemically matched inhibitors to probe the role of class I HDACs in β-cell pathobiology...... pancreatic β-cells from inflammatory cytokines and nutrient overload in diabetes....

  17. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  18. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  19. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  20. Chemoproteomics-Aided Medicinal Chemistry for the Discovery of EPHA2 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Lohse, Jonas; Treiber, Tobias; Kudlinzki, Denis; Linhard, Verena; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Saxena, Krishna; Liu, Xiaofeng; Wilhelm, Mathias; Schwalbe, Harald; Kuster, Bernhard; Médard, Guillaume

    2017-06-21

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EPHA2 has gained attention as a therapeutic drug target for cancer and infectious diseases. However, EPHA2 research and EPHA2-based therapies have been hampered by the lack of selective small-molecule inhibitors. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of dedicated EPHA2 inhibitors based on the clinical BCR-ABL/SRC inhibitor dasatinib as a lead structure. We designed hybrid structures of dasatinib and the previously known EPHA2 binders CHEMBL249097, PD-173955, and a known EPHB4 inhibitor in order to exploit both the ATP pocket entrance as well as the ribose pocket as binding epitopes in the kinase EPHA2. Medicinal chemistry and inhibitor design were guided by a chemical proteomics approach, allowing early selectivity profiling of the newly synthesized inhibitor candidates. Concomitant protein crystallography of 17 inhibitor co-crystals delivered detailed insight into the atomic interactions that underlie the structure-affinity relationship. Finally, the anti-proliferative effect of the inhibitor candidates was confirmed in the glioblastoma cell line SF-268. In this work, we thus discovered a novel EPHA2 inhibitor candidate that features an improved selectivity profile while maintaining potency against EPHA2 and anticancer activity in SF-268 cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  2. Proteinaceous alpha-araylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    -amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha...

  3. Corrosion inhibitors. Manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, M.W.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed information is presented relating to corrosion inhibitors. Areas covered include: cooling water, boilers and water supply plants; oil well and refinery operations; fuel and lubricant additives for automotive use; hydraulic fluids and machine tool lubes; grease compositions; metal surface treatments and coatings; and general processes for corrosion inhibitors

  4. Inhibitors of Ras-SOS Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-19

    Activating Ras mutations are found in about 30 % of human cancers. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, such as the son of sevenless (SOS), which form protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with Ras and catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP. This is the rate-limiting step in Ras activation. However, Ras surfaces lack any evident suitable pockets where a molecule might bind tightly, rendering Ras proteins still 'undruggable' for over 30 years. Among the alternative approaches is the design of inhibitors that target the Ras-SOS PPI interface, a strategy that is gaining increasing recognition for treating Ras mutant cancers. Herein we focus on data that has accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the design of small-molecule modulators or peptide mimetics aimed at the interface of the Ras-SOS PPI. We emphasize, however, that even if such Ras-SOS therapeutics are potent, drug resistance may emerge. To counteract this development, we propose "pathway drug cocktails", that is, drug combinations aimed at parallel (or compensatory) pathways. A repertoire of classified cancer, cell/tissue, and pathway/protein combinations would be beneficial toward this goal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. In silico development of new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoini, A L; Federico, L B; Arêas, A L F; Verde, B A; Freitas, P G; Camps, I

    2018-04-19

    In this work, we made use of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) and de novo design to obtain more powerful acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. AChE is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). It was found that the cholinergic pathways in the cerebral cortex are compromised in AD and the accompanying cholinergic deficiency contributes to the cognitive deterioration of AD patients. In the FBDD approach, fragments are docked into the active site of the protein. As fragments are molecular groups with a low number of atoms, it is possible to study their interaction with localized amino acids. Once the interactions are measured, the fragments are organized by affinity and then linked together to form new molecules with a high degree of interaction with the active site. In the other approach, we used the de novo design technique starting from reference drugs used in the AD treatment. These drugs were broken into fragments (seeds). In the growing strategy, fragments were added to each seed, growing new molecules. In the linking strategy, two or more separated seeds were linked with different fragments. Both strategies combined produced a library of more than 2 million compounds. This library was filtered using absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. The resulting library with around six thousand compounds was filtered again. In this case, structures with Tanimoto coefficients >.85 were discarded. The final library with 1500 compounds was submitted to docking studies. As a result, 10 compounds with better interaction energy than the reference drugs were obtained.

  6. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  7. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  8. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  9. Mass spectrometry of large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchetti, S.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures in this volume were given at a course on mass spectrometry of large molecules, organized within the framework of the Training and Education programme of the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities. Although first presented in 1983, most of the lectures have since been updated by their authors. (orig.)

  10. WHAT ARE THE MOLECULES DOING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa ... [African Journal of Chemical Education—AJCE 6(2), July 2016] ... understand science concepts: in essence these are macroscopic (phenomena), microscopic .... than the simple freeing up of already-existing smaller molecules: this implies a high melting point.

  11. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Using a Natural ... Road Banashankari 2nd Stage Bangalore 560 070, India. Department of Chemistry Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning Brindavan Campus Bangalore 560 067, India.

  12. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Sweet Stimulants of ... Road Banashankari 2nd Stage Bangalore 560 070, India. Department of Chemistry Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning Brindavan Campus Bangalore 560 067, India.

  13. Multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, P.A.

    1979-10-01

    The dynamics of infrared multiphoton excitation and dissociation of SF 6 was investigated under collision free conditions by a crossed laser-molecular beam method. In order to understand the excitation mechanism and to elucidate the requirements of laser intensity and energy fluence, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the dissociation yield dependences on energy fluence, vibrational temperature of SF 6 , the pulse duration of the CO 2 laser and the frequency in both one and two laser experiments. Translational energy distributions of the SF 5 dissociation product measured by time of flight and angular distributions and the dissociation lifetime of excited SF 6 as inferred from the observation of secondary dissociation of SF 5 into SF 4 and F during the laser pulse suggest that the dynamics of dissociation of excited molecules is dominated by complete energy randomization and rapid intramolecular energy transfer on a nanosecond timescale, and can be adequately described by RRKM theory. An improved phenomenological model including the initial intensity dependent excitation, a rate equation describing the absorption and stimulated emission of single photons, and the unimolecular dissociation of excited molecules is constructed based on available experimental results. The model shows that the energy fluence of the laser determines the excitation of molecules in the quasi-continuum and the excess energy with which molecules dissociate after the laser pulse. The role played by the laser intensity in multiphoton dissociation is more significant than just that of overcoming the intensity dependent absorption in the lowest levels. 63 references

  14. TSH Receptor Signaling Abrogation by a Novel Small Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rauf; Realubit, Ronald B; Karan, Charles; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F

    2016-01-01

    Pathological activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is caused by thyroid-stimulating antibodies in patients with Graves' disease (GD) or by somatic and rare genomic mutations that enhance constitutive activation of the receptor influencing both G protein and non-G protein signaling. Potential selective small molecule antagonists represent novel therapeutic compounds for abrogation of such abnormal TSHR signaling. In this study, we describe the identification and in vitro characterization of a novel small molecule antagonist by high-throughput screening (HTS). The identification of the TSHR antagonist was performed using a transcription-based TSH-inhibition bioassay. TSHR-expressing CHO cells, which also expressed a luciferase-tagged CRE response element, were optimized using bovine TSH as the activator, in a 384 well plate format, which had a Z score of 0.3-0.6. Using this HTS assay, we screened a diverse library of ~80,000 compounds at a final concentration of 16.7 μM. The selection criteria for a positive hit were based on a mean signal threshold of ≥50% inhibition of control TSH stimulation. The screening resulted in 450 positive hits giving a hit ratio of 0.56%. A secondary confirmation screen against TSH and forskolin - a post receptor activator of adenylyl cyclase - confirmed one TSHR-specific candidate antagonist molecule (named VA-K-14). This lead molecule had an IC 50 of 12.3 μM and a unique chemical structure. A parallel analysis for cell viability indicated that the lead inhibitor was non-cytotoxic at its effective concentrations. In silico docking studies performed using a TSHR transmembrane model showed the hydrophobic contact locations and the possible mode of inhibition of TSHR signaling. Furthermore, this molecule was capable of inhibiting TSHR stimulation by GD patient sera and monoclonal-stimulating TSHR antibodies. In conclusion, we report the identification of a novel small molecule TSHR inhibitor, which has the

  15. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T; Mundell, Stuart J; Coxon, Carmen H

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  16. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Metcalfe

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (Trx is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12 to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase. In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb. This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  17. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  18. Preparation of translationally cold neutral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenicantonio, Giulia; Bertsche, Benjamin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Efforts at EPFL to obtain translationally cold neutral molecules are described. Active deceleration of polar molecules is performed by confining the molecules in moving three-dimensional electrostatic traps, and by appropriately choosing the velocity of those traps. Alternatively, cold molecules can be obtained by velocity filtering. Here, the velocity of the molecules is not changed, but instead the cold molecules are extracted from a thermal sample by using the competition between the electrostatic force and the centrifugal force inside a bent electrostatic guide for polar molecules.

  19. Progress in Small Molecule Therapeutics for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Eleanor M; Dyer, Michael A; Guy, R Kiplin

    2016-01-01

    While mortality is low for intraocular retinoblastoma patients in the developed world who receive aggressive multimodal therapy, partial or full loss of vision occurs in approximately 50% of patients with advanced bilateral retinoblastoma. Therapies that preserve vision and reduce late effects are needed. Because clinical trials for retinoblastoma are difficult due to the young age of the patient population and relative rarity of the disease, robust preclinical testing of new therapies is critical. The last decade has seen advances towards identifying new therapies including the development of animal models of retinoblastoma for preclinical testing, progress in local drug delivery to reach intraocular targets, and improved understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms that give rise to retinoblastoma. This review discusses advances in these areas, with a focus on discovery and development of small molecules for the treatment of retinoblastoma, including novel targeted therapeutics such as inhibitors of the MDMX-p53 interaction (nutlin-3a), histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) inhibitors.

  20. Strategies for Discovery of Small Molecule Radiation Protectors and Radiation Mitigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S Greenberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial targeted radiation damage protectors (delivered prior to irradiation and mitigators (delivered after irradiation, but before the appearance of symptoms associated with radiation syndrome have been a recent focus in drug discovery for 1 normal tissue radiation protection during fractionated radiotherapy, and 2 radiation terrorism counter measures. Several categories of such molecules have been discovered: nitroxide-linked hybrid molecules, including GS-nitroxide, GS-nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitors, and pharmaceutical agents including inhibitors of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathway and the anti-seizure medicine, carbamazepine. Evaluation of potential new irradiation dose modifying molecules to protect normal tissue includes: clonagenic radiation survival curves; assays for apoptosis and DNA repair, and irradiation-induced depletion of antioxidant stores. Studies of organ specific radioprotection and in total body irradiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome in the mouse model for protection/mitigation facilitate rational means by which to move candidate small molecule drugs along the drug discovery pipeline into clinical development.

  1. Strategies for Discovery of Small Molecule Radiation Protectors and Radiation Mitigators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, Joel S.; Clump, David [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kagan, Valerian [Environmental and Occupational Health Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bayir, Hülya [Critical Care Medicine Department, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lazo, John S. [Pharmacology Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wipf, Peter [Department of Chemistry, Accelerated Chemical Discovery Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Li, Song; Gao, Xiang [Pharmaceutical Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Epperly, Michael W., E-mail: greenbergerjs@upmc.edu [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Mitochondrial targeted radiation damage protectors (delivered prior to irradiation) and mitigators (delivered after irradiation, but before the appearance of symptoms associated with radiation syndrome) have been a recent focus in drug discovery for (1) normal tissue radiation protection during fractionated radiotherapy, and (2) radiation terrorism counter measures. Several categories of such molecules have been discovered: nitroxide-linked hybrid molecules, including GS-nitroxide, GS-nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitors, and pharmaceutical agents including inhibitors of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathway and the anti-seizure medicine, carbamazepine. Evaluation of potential new radiation dose modifying molecules to protect normal tissue includes: clonogenic radiation survival curves, assays for apoptosis and DNA repair, and irradiation-induced depletion of antioxidant stores. Studies of organ specific radioprotection and in total body irradiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome in the mouse model for protection/mitigation facilitate rational means by which to move candidate small molecule drugs along the drug discovery pipeline into clinical development.

  2. Effect of organic molecules on hydrolysis of peptide bond: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makshakova, Olga; Ermakova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► DFT study of the effects of small organic molecules on the hydrolysis reactions of peptide bonds. ► Organic molecules can activate nonenzymatic hydrolysis reaction. ► Influence of organic acids on activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. - Abstract: The activation and inhibition effects of small organic molecules on peptide hydrolysis have been studied using a model compound dialanine and DFT approach. Solvent-assisted and non-assisted concerted mechanisms were analyzed. Several transition states for the systems: alanine dipeptide–water molecule in complexes with alcohol molecules, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, propionic, lactic and pyruvic acids and water molecules were localized. The formation of hydrogen bonds between dipeptide, reactive water molecule and molecules of solvents influences the activation energy barrier of the peptide bond hydrolytic reaction. Strong effect of organic acids on the activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. Acetonitrile can act as an inhibitor of reaction. Mechanisms of regulation of the activation energy barrier are discussed in the terms of donor-acceptor interactions

  3. Observing electron motion in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelkowski, S; Yudin, G L; Bandrauk, A D

    2006-01-01

    We study analytically the possibility for monitoring electron motion in a molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses. The first prepares a coherent superposition of two electronic molecular states whereas the second (attosecond pulse) photoionizes the molecule. We show that interesting information about electron dynamics can be obtained from measurement of the photoelectron spectra as a function of the time delay between two pulses. In particular, asymmetries in photoelectron angular distribution provide a simple signature of the electron motion within the initial time-dependent coherently coupled two molecular states. Both asymmetries and electron spectra show very strong two-centre interference patterns. We illustrate these effects using as an example a dissociating hydrogen molecular ion probed by the attosecond pulses

  4. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  5. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  6. Anti-chemokine small molecule drugs: a promising future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Power, Christine A; Schwarz, Matthias K

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines have principally been associated with inflammation due to their role in the control of leukocyte migration, but just over a decade ago chemokine receptors were also identified as playing a pivotal role in the entry of the HIV virus into cells. Chemokines activate seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, making them extremely attractive therapeutic targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Although there are now a large number of molecules targeting chemokines and chemokine receptors including neutralizing antibodies in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, the results to date have not always been positive, which has been disappointing for the field. These failures have often been attributed to redundancy in the chemokine system. However, other difficulties have been encountered in drug discovery processes targeting the chemokine system, and these will be addressed in this review. In this review, the reader will get an insight into the hurdles that have to be overcome, learn about some of the pitfalls that may explain the lack of success, and get a glimpse of the outlook for the future. In 2007, the FDA approved maraviroc, an inhibitor of CCR5 for the prevention of HIV infection, the first triumph for a small-molecule drug acting on the chemokine system. The time to market, 11 years from discovery of CCR5, was fast by industry standards. A second small-molecule drug, a CXCR4 antagonist for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, was approved by the FDA at the end of 2008. The results of a Phase III trial with a CCR9 inhibitor for Crohn's disease are also promising. This could herald the first success for a chemokine receptor antagonist as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic and confirms the importance of chemokine receptors as a target class for anti-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  7. First steps in the direction of synthetic, allosteric, direct inhibitors of thrombin and factor Xa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Jenson; Liang, Aiye; Sidhu, Preet Pal Singh; Hindle, Michael; Zhou, Qibing; Desai, Umesh R

    2009-08-01

    Designing non-saccharide functional mimics of heparin is a major challenge. In this work, a library of small, aromatic molecules based on the sulfated DHP scaffold was synthesized and screened against thrombin and factor Xa. The results reveal that (i) selected monomeric benzofuran derivatives inhibit the two enzymes, albeit weakly; (ii) the two enzymes recognize different structural features in the benzofurans studied suggesting significant selectivity of recognition; and (iii) the mechanism of inhibition is allosteric. The molecules represent the first allosteric small molecule inhibitors of the two enzymes.

  8. First Steps in the Direction of Synthetic, Allosteric, Direct Inhibitors of Thrombin and Factor Xa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Jenson; Liang, Aiye; Sidhu, Preet Pal Singh; Hindle, Michael; Zhou, Qibing; Desai, Umesh R.

    2009-01-01

    Designing non-saccharide functional mimics of heparin is a major challenge. In this work, a library of small, aromatic molecules based on the sulfated DHP scaffold was synthesized and screened against thrombin and factor Xa. The results reveal that i) selected monomeric benzofuran derivatives inhibit the two enzymes, albeit weakly; ii) the two enzymes recognize different structural features in the benzofurans studied suggesting significant selectivity of recognition; and iii) the mechanism of inhibition is allosteric. The molecules represent the first allosteric small molecule inhibitors of the two enzymes. PMID:19540113

  9. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  10. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  11. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  12. Electron interactions with polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a number of the features of discrete and continuous spectra of electrons interacting with polar molecules. Attention is focused on the extent to which theoretical predictions concerning cross sections, resonances, and bound states are strongly influenced by the various approximations that are so ubiquitous in the treatment of such problems. Similarly, threshold scattering and photodetachment processes are examined for the case of weakly bound dipole states whose higher members overlap the continuum

  13. Clinical utility of the oral JAK inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutolo M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Cutolo, Marianna Meroni Research Laboratories and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova, Italy Abstract: Immune/inflammatory cells act in rheumatoid arthritis (RA-affected patients by synthesizing several inflammatory mediators, including cytokines that initiate intracellular signaling. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of transduction and transcription signals that influence the intracellular pathways (such as the Janus kinase [JAK] family of tyrosine kinases have been tested for RA treatment. Four members of the JAK family are known: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and TyK2. JAK1/JAK3 constitutively binds to the cytoplasmic portion of the cytokine receptor – the common gamma chain – that represents a common subunit of several cytokines involved in T-cell and natural killer cell development, as well as in B-cell activation. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that is now available and effective in RA treatment, as shown in multiple Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. However, long-term safety data and comparisons with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and small molecule inhibitors are necessary to better determine the role of tofacitinib in RA. Keywords: Janus kinase inhibitors, tofacitinib, rheumatoid arthritis, kinases, small molecules inhibitors, intracellular signaling

  14. A single-molecule diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  15. The largest molecules in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The bulk of complex molecules in the space between the stars is shown to be in the small frozen particles of interstellar dust. Each dust grain typically contains some 10 9 atoms of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in an amorphous molecular mixture. As a result of chemical processing of the particles by ultraviolet photons over times spanning proportional10 8 -10 9 years a substantial portion of each dust grain is converted into complex organic molecules whose maximum molecular weight is limited only by the size of the grain. Laboratory studies of evolution of analog grain materials shows that molecular weights of the order of 500 are readily created and that there is an excellent probability of much more complex molecules being produced. The organic dust component constitutes about one tenth of a percent of the total mass of the Milky Way and far outweighs any estimates of the total mass of all the planets. A planet like the earth is continually accreting matter from space and there was a high probability that in the first five hundred million years after its crust formed it passed through several dark clouds and accreted from a hundred million to ten thousand million tonnes of the organic material of the interstellar dust during each passage. It is suggested that this rain of material could have provided the molecular templates for the origin of life. (orig.)

  16. Electric moments in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenberger, Sandra; Gerlich, Stefan; Arndt, Markus; Tuexen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different electric moments on the shift and dephasing of molecules in a matter wave interferometer. Firstly, we provide a quantitative comparison of two molecules that are non-polar yet polarizable in their thermal ground state and that differ in their stiffness and response to thermal excitations. While C 25 H 20 is rather rigid, its larger derivative C 49 H 16 F 52 is additionally equipped with floppy side chains and vibrationally activated dipole moment variations. Secondly, we elucidate the role of a permanent electric dipole momentby contrasting the quantum interference pattern of a (nearly) non-polar and a polar porphyrin derivative. We find that a high molecular polarizability and even sizeable dipole moment fluctuations are still well compatible with high-contrast quantum interference fringes. The presence of permanent electric dipole moments, however, can lead to a dephasing and rapid degradation of the quantum fringe pattern already at moderate electric fields. This finding is of high relevance for coherence experiments with large organic molecules, which are generally equipped with strong electric moments.

  17. Hydroxylamine-O-sulfonamide is a versatile lead compound for the development of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Anna; Vergara, Alessandro; Caterino, Marco; Alterio, Vincenzo; Monti, Simona M; Ombouma, Joanna; Dumy, Pascal; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2015-07-21

    Hydroxylamine-O-sulfonamide, a molecule incorporating two zinc-binding groups (ZBGs), has been investigated as a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (CAI) by means of kinetic, crystallographic and Raman spectroscopy studies, highlighting interesting results on its mechanism of action. These data can be exploited to design new, effective and selective CAIs.

  18. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors which stabilize inactive kinase conformations in p38 alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simard, J.R.; Grutter, C.; Pawar, V.; Aust, B.; Wolf, A.; Rabiller, M.; Wulfert, S.; Robubi, A.; Kluter, S.; Ottmann, C.; Rauh, D.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecule kinase inhibitors are an attractive means to modulate kinase activities in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology research. In the physiological setting of a cell, kinase function is orchestrated by a plethora of regulatory processes involving the structural transition of kinases

  19. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2...

  20. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1, and Cluster of Differentiation 146 Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoglu-Emre, F Sinem; Saribal, Devrim; Yenmis, Guven; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multisystemic, chronic disease accompanied by microvascular complications involving various complicated mechanisms. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and cluster of differentiation-146 (CD146) are mainly expressed by endothelial cells, and facilitate the adhesion and transmigration of immune cells, leading to inflammation. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of soluble adhesion molecules in patients with microvascular complications of T2DM. Serum and whole blood samples were collected from 58 T2DM patients with microvascular complications and 20 age-matched healthy subjects. Levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while flow cytometry was used to determine CD146 levels. Serum sICAM-1 levels were lower in T2DM patients with microvascular complications than in healthy controls (Pmolecule levels were not correlated with the complication type. In the study group, most of the patients were on insulin therapy (76%), and 95% of them were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor agents. Insulin and ACE-inhibitors have been shown to decrease soluble adhesion molecule levels via various mechanisms, so we suggest that the decreased or unchanged levels of soluble forms of cellular adhesion molecules in our study group may have resulted from insulin and ACE-inhibitor therapy, as well as tissue-localized inflammation in patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Korean Endocrine Society

  1. p38 MAPK inhibitors: a patent review (2012 - 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Stefanie; Laufer, Stefan A

    2014-05-01

    The p38 MAPK is a ubiquitous target in the research-based pharmaceutical industry. It plays a decisive role in the regulation of the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Since novel biological therapies have revolutionized the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, an intensive global search is underway for small molecules for the same application. Herein, the patents and the corresponding publications of international companies, which focus on the development and identification of a new generation of small-molecule p38 inhibitors, are summarized. The most promising approach is the development of linear binders, which induce a glycine flip at Gly110 of the kinase hinge region by a carbonyl oxygen atom of the respective ligand. The major focus of the patent works was the application of molecules in new indications. Previous applications were in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; currently, there are several new applications, including pulmonary diseases, cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Targeting p38 upstream kinases and downstream effectors has also proved to be a very promising step in the development of more effective inhibitors. A further trend is drug combination, applied to a wide range of indications, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer.

  2. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S. [National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 9800 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Ferraris, Dana V. [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Tsukamoto, Takashi [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Slusher, Barbara S., E-mail: bslusher@jhmi.edu [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC{sup 1280})) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease.

  3. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC 1280 )) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease

  4. A Pareto Algorithm for Efficient De Novo Design of Multi-functional Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeyaert, Frits; Deem, Micheal W

    2017-01-01

    We have introduced a Pareto sorting algorithm into Synopsis, a de novo design program that generates synthesizable molecules with desirable properties. We give a detailed description of the algorithm and illustrate its working in 2 different de novo design settings: the design of putative dual and selective FGFR and VEGFR inhibitors, and the successful design of organic structure determining agents (OSDAs) for the synthesis of zeolites. We show that the introduction of Pareto sorting not only enables the simultaneous optimization of multiple properties but also greatly improves the performance of the algorithm to generate molecules with hard-to-meet constraints. This in turn allows us to suggest approaches to address the problem of false positive hits in de novo structure based drug design by introducing structural and physicochemical constraints in the designed molecules, and by forcing essential interactions between these molecules and their target receptor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy......, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include...... chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like...

  6. Small Molecule Screen for Candidate Antimalarials Targeting Plasmodium Kinesin-5*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqiong; Richard, Jessica; Kim, Sunyoung; Wojcik, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and vivax are responsible for the majority of malaria infections worldwide, resulting in over a million deaths annually. Malaria parasites now show measured resistance to all currently utilized drugs. Novel antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. The Plasmodium Kinesin-5 mechanoenzyme is a suitable “next generation” target. Discovered via small molecule screen experiments, the human Kinesin-5 has multiple allosteric sites that are “druggable.” One site in particular, unique in its sequence divergence across all homologs in the superfamily and even within the same family, exhibits exquisite drug specificity. We propose that Plasmodium Kinesin-5 shares this allosteric site and likewise can be targeted to uncover inhibitors with high specificity. To test this idea, we performed a screen for inhibitors selective for Plasmodium Kinesin-5 ATPase activity in parallel with human Kinesin-5. Our screen of nearly 2000 compounds successfully identified compounds that selectively inhibit both P. vivax and falciparum Kinesin-5 motor domains but, as anticipated, do not impact human Kinesin-5 activity. Of note is a candidate drug that did not biochemically compete with the ATP substrate for the conserved active site or disrupt the microtubule-binding site. Together, our experiments identified MMV666693 as a selective allosteric inhibitor of Plasmodium Kinesin-5; this is the first identified protein target for the Medicines of Malaria Venture validated collection of parasite proliferation inhibitors. This work demonstrates that chemical screens against human kinesins are adaptable to homologs in disease organisms and, as such, extendable to strategies to combat infectious disease. PMID:24737313

  7. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  8. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    films. Different scenarios were evaluated in this section of the work, such as the loss of corrosion inhibitor due to the formation of foam, and the effect of different substrates on the adsorption of corrosion inhibitor. Erosion/corrosion effects due to solids carried by a multiphase flow were investigated both on a small and large scale. Small scale experiments were performed in order to determine whether the corrosion inhibitor concentration was diminished because of adsorption onto the large surface area of entrained solid particles. The large scale experiments were done to evaluate the effect of mechanical erosion corrosion on inhibitor film performance, and vice versa. The analysis of the results obtained by electrochemical characterization shows that the adsorption mechanism having a corrosion inhibitor competing with water molecules for a place on the steel surface is an accurate approach to describe this phenomenon. From the experimental results obtained in the multiphase part of this research project, it can be concluded that the performance of corrosion inhibitor films is not significantly impacted by mechanical forces alone; even under the worst case scenarios tested here (standing slug and erosion/corrosion). Reduction of inhibitor performance was found to be primarily due to the loss of inhibitor due to consumption by adsorption particularly when a gas phase was present, leading to foam formation.

  9. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of iodide uptake inhibitors in thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacotte, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This work was intended to discover small organic molecules acting as iodide uptake inhibitors in thyroid cells. These compounds can indeed be derivatized into biochemical probes for further characterization of proteins involved in iodide transport mechanisms. On the long term, these inhibitors also appear as attractive drug candidates for treatment of thyroid pathologies or radioprotection against iodine isotopes. A similar strategy was adopted for both of the two inhibitor families. First, we synthesized a chemical library of around 100 analogues; we measured their IC50 against iodide uptake in FRTL-5 cells to get structure-activity relationships. Absolute configuration of stereo-genic centers was also investigated, and a preferential stereochemistry was found to be responsible for activity. From this basis, around twenty 'second-generation' analogues were synthesized by combining fragments contributing to biological activity. Biological evaluation indicated that nine were very potent inhibitors, with IC50 ≤ 6 nM and satisfying physicochemical properties required for drug candidates. Finally, one photoactivatable biotinylated probe was developed in each family and used for photoaffinity labeling. Several specifically labeled proteins are still under identification and constitute new potential therapeutic targets. (author)

  11. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sulimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program, postprocessing (DISCORE program, direct generalized docking (FLM program, and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package, search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM.

  12. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, William H; Zhu, Chunfang; Clark, Curtis; Christensen, James G; Sun, Zijie

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR) signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

  13. Covalent docking of selected boron-based serine beta-lactamase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Novati, Beatrice; Colombo, Giorgio; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    AmpC β-lactamase is a hydrolytic enzyme conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, identification of non-β-lactam compounds able to inhibit the enzyme is crucial for the development of novel antibacterial therapies. In general, AmpC inhibitors have to engage the highly solvent-exposed catalytic site of the enzyme. Therefore, understanding the implications of ligand-protein induced-fit and water-mediated interactions behind the inhibitor-enzyme recognition process is fundamental for undertaking structure-based drug design process. Here, we focus on boronic acids, a promising class of beta-lactamase covalent inhibitors. First, we optimized a docking protocol able to reproduce the experimentally determined binding mode of AmpC inhibitors bearing a boronic group. This goal was pursued (1) performing rigid and flexible docking calculations aiming to establish the role of the side chain conformations; and (2) investigating the role of specific water molecules in shaping the enzyme active site and mediating ligand protein interactions. Our calculations showed that some water molecules, conserved in the majority of the considered X-ray structures, are needed to correctly predict the binding pose of known covalent AmpC inhibitors. On this basis, we formalized our findings in a docking and scoring protocol that could be useful for the structure-based design of new boronic acid AmpC inhibitors.

  14. Potent and Selective BACE-1 Peptide Inhibitors Lower Brain Aβ Levels Mediated by Brain Shuttle Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Ruderisch

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic approaches to fight Alzheimer's disease include anti-Amyloidβ (Aβ antibodies and secretase inhibitors. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB limits the brain exposure of biologics and the chemical space for small molecules to be BBB permeable. The Brain Shuttle (BS technology is capable of shuttling large molecules into the brain. This allows for new types of therapeutic modalities engineered for optimal efficacy on the molecular target in the brain independent of brain penetrating properties. To this end, we designed BACE1 peptide inhibitors with varying lipid modifications with single-digit picomolar cellular potency. Secondly, we generated active-exosite peptides with structurally confirmed dual binding mode and improved potency. When fused to the BS via sortase coupling, these BACE1 inhibitors significantly reduced brain Aβ levels in mice after intravenous administration. In plasma, both BS and non-BS BACE1 inhibitor peptides induced a significant time- and dose-dependent decrease of Aβ. Our results demonstrate that the BS is essential for BACE1 peptide inhibitors to be efficacious in the brain and active-exosite design of BACE1 peptide inhibitors together with lipid modification may be of therapeutic relevance.

  15. PTP1B Inhibitors from the Entomogenous Fungi Isaria fumosorosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of PTP1B can be considered as an attractive approach for the design of new therapeutic agents of type II diabetes and cancer diseases. In a continuing search for new PTP1B inhibitors, a new tetramic acid possessing a rare pyrrolidinedione skeleton named fumosorinone A (1, together with five known ones 2–6 were isolated from the entomogenous fungus Isaria fumosorosea. The structures of 2–6 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. Fumosorinone A (1 and beauvericin (6 showed significant PTP1B inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 3.24 μM and 0.59 μM.

  16. PTP1B Inhibitors from the Entomogenous Fungi Isaria fumosorosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Meng, Lin-Lin; Wei, Jing-Jing; Fan, Peng; Liu, Sha-Sha; Yuan, Wei-Yu; Zhao, You-Xing; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2017-11-24

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of PTP1B can be considered as an attractive approach for the design of new therapeutic agents of type II diabetes and cancer diseases. In a continuing search for new PTP1B inhibitors, a new tetramic acid possessing a rare pyrrolidinedione skeleton named fumosorinone A ( 1 ), together with five known ones 2 - 6 were isolated from the entomogenous fungus Isaria fumosorosea. The structures of 2 - 6 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. Fumosorinone A ( 1 ) and beauvericin ( 6 ) showed significant PTP1B inhibitory activity with IC 50 value of 3.24 μM and 0.59 μM.

  17. Tyrosine-like condensed derivatives as tyrosinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Maria João; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Serra, Silvia; Corda, Marcella; Fadda, Maria Benedetta; Era, Benedetta; Fais, Antonella

    2012-05-01

    We report the pharmacological evaluation of a new series of 3-aminocoumarins differently substituted with hydroxyl groups, which have been synthesized because they include in their structures the tyrosine fragment (tyrosine-like compounds), with the aim of discovering structural features necessary for tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The synthesized compounds 4 and 7-9 were evaluated in vitro as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. Two of the described compounds showed lower IC50 (concentration giving 50% inhibition of tyrosinase activity) than umbelliferone, used as a reference compound. Compound 7 (IC50=53µm) was the best tyrosinase inhibitor of this small series, having an IC50 value 10-fold lower than umbelliferone. Compound 7 (3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin) had amino and hydroxyl groups precisely mimicking the same positions that both groups occupy on the tyrosine molecule. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Discovery of DNA repair inhibitors by combinatorial library profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of DNA repair are emerging as potent and selective anti-cancer therapies, but the sheer magnitude of the protein networks involved in DNA repair processes poses obstacles to discovery of effective candidate drugs. To address this challenge, we used a subtractive combinatorial selection approach to identify a panel of peptide ligands that bind DNA repair complexes. Supporting the concept that these ligands have therapeutic potential, we show that one selected peptide specifically binds and non-competitively inactivates DNA-PKcs, a protein kinase critical in double-strand DNA break repair. In doing so, this ligand sensitizes BRCA-deficient tumor cells to genotoxic therapy. Our findings establish a platform for large-scale parallel screening for ligand-directed DNA repair inhibitors, with immediate applicability to cancer therapy. PMID:21343400

  19. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail V. Pokrovskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Crystal structure of NTPDase2 in complex with the sulfoanthraquinone inhibitor PSB-071.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebisch, Matthias; Baqi, Younis; Schäfer, Petra; Müller, Christa E; Sträter, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    In many vertebrate tissues CD39-like ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) act in concert with ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e5NT, CD73) to convert extracellular ATP to adenosine. Extracellular ATP is a cytotoxic, pro-inflammatory signalling molecule whereas its product adenosine constitutes a universal and potent immune suppressor. Interference with these ectonucleotidases by use of small molecule inhibitors or inhibitory antibodies appears to be an effective strategy to enhance anti-tumour immunity and suppress neoangiogenesis. Here we present the first crystal structures of an NTPDase catalytic ectodomain in complex with the Reactive Blue 2 (RB2)-derived inhibitor PSB-071. In both of the two crystal forms presented the inhibitor binds as a sandwich of two molecules at the nucleoside binding site. One of the molecules is well defined in its orientation. Specific hydrogen bonds are formed between the sulfonyl group and the nucleoside binding loop. The methylphenyl side chain functionality that improved NTPDase2-specificity is sandwiched between R245 and R394, the latter of which is exclusively found in NTPDase2. The second molecule exhibits great in-plane rotational freedom and could not be modelled in a specific orientation. In addition to this structural insight into NTPDase inhibition, the observation of the putative membrane interaction loop (MIL) in two different conformations related by a 10° rotation identifies the MIL as a dynamic section of NTPDases that is potentially involved in regulation of catalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.