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Sample records for molecular modelling approach

  1. MULTI: a shared memory approach to cooperative molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darden, T; Johnson, P; Smith, H

    1991-03-01

    A general purpose molecular modeling system, MULTI, based on the UNIX shared memory and semaphore facilities for interprocess communication is described. In addition to the normal querying or monitoring of geometric data, MULTI also provides processes for manipulating conformations, and for displaying peptide or nucleic acid ribbons, Connolly surfaces, close nonbonded contacts, crystal-symmetry related images, least-squares superpositions, and so forth. This paper outlines the basic techniques used in MULTI to ensure cooperation among these specialized processes, and then describes how they can work together to provide a flexible modeling environment.

  2. A combined reaction class approach with integrated molecular orbital+molecular orbital (IMOMO) methodology: A practical tool for kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Thanh N.; Maity, Dilip K.; Truong, Thanh-Thai T.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new practical computational methodology for predicting thermal rate constants of reactions involving large molecules or a large number of elementary reactions in the same class. This methodology combines the integrated molecular orbital+molecular orbital (IMOMO) approach with our recently proposed reaction class models for tunneling. With the new methodology, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the computational cost by several orders of magnitude while compromising the accuracy in the predicted rate constants by less than 40% over a wide range of temperatures. Another important result is that the computational cost increases only slightly as the system size increases. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. Molecular Modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular Docking. Rama Rao Nadendla. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 51-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  5. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  6. Multilevel Molecular Modeling Approach for a Rational Design of Ionic Current Sensors for Nanofluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Alexsandro; de Almeida, James M; Miranda, Caetano R

    2018-05-10

    The complexity displayed by nanofluidic-based systems involves electronic and dynamic aspects occurring across different size and time scales. To properly model such kind of system, we introduced a top-down multilevel approach, combining molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with first-principles electronic transport calculations. The potential of this technique was demonstrated by investigating how the water and ionic flow through a (6,6) carbon nanotube (CNT) influences its electronic transport properties. We showed that the confinement on the CNT favors the partially hydrated Na, Cl, and Li ions to exchange charge with the nanotube. This leads to a change in the electronic transmittance, allowing for the distinguishing of cations from anions. Such an ionic trace may handle an indirect measurement of the ionic current that is recorded as a sensing output. With this case study, we are able to show the potential of this top-down multilevel approach, to be applied on the design of novel nanofluidic devices.

  7. A restraint molecular dynamics and simulated annealing approach for protein homology modeling utilizing mean angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Till

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed the program PERMOL for semi-automated homology modeling of proteins. It is based on restrained molecular dynamics using a simulated annealing protocol in torsion angle space. As main restraints defining the optimal local geometry of the structure weighted mean dihedral angles and their standard deviations are used which are calculated with an algorithm described earlier by Döker et al. (1999, BBRC, 257, 348–350. The overall long-range contacts are established via a small number of distance restraints between atoms involved in hydrogen bonds and backbone atoms of conserved residues. Employing the restraints generated by PERMOL three-dimensional structures are obtained using standard molecular dynamics programs such as DYANA or CNS. Results To test this modeling approach it has been used for predicting the structure of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein HPr from E. coli and the structure of the human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (Ppar γ. The divergence between the modeled HPr and the previously determined X-ray structure was comparable to the divergence between the X-ray structure and the published NMR structure. The modeled structure of Ppar γ was also very close to the previously solved X-ray structure with an RMSD of 0.262 nm for the backbone atoms. Conclusion In summary, we present a new method for homology modeling capable of producing high-quality structure models. An advantage of the method is that it can be used in combination with incomplete NMR data to obtain reasonable structure models in accordance with the experimental data.

  8. Dissecting the critical factors for thermodynamic stability of modular proteins using molecular modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Lee

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins have recently attracted much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural and biophysical features. In particular, repeat proteins show high stability against temperature and chaotic agents. Despite many studies, structural features for the stability of repeat proteins remain poorly understood. Here we present an interesting result from in silico analyses pursuing the factors which affect the stability of repeat proteins. Previously developed repebody structure based on variable lymphocytes receptors (VLRs which consists of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used as initial structure for the present study. We constructed extra six repebody structures with varying numbers of repeat modules and those structures were used for molecular dynamics simulations. For the structures, the intramolecular interactions including backbone H-bonds, van der Waals energy, and hydrophobicity were investigated and then the radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, ratio of secondary structure, and hydration free energy were also calculated to find out the relationship between the number of LRR modules and stability of the protein. Our results show that the intramolecular interactions lead to more compact structure and smaller surface area of the repebodies, which are critical for the stability of repeat proteins. The other features were also well compatible with the experimental results. Based on our observations, the repebody-5 was proposed as the best structure from the all repebodies in structure optimization process. The present study successfully demonstrated that our computer-based molecular modeling approach can significantly contribute to the experiment-based protein engineering challenge.

  9. Chemical Topic Modeling: Exploring Molecular Data Sets Using a Common Text-Mining Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Fechner, Nikolas; Landrum, Gregory A; Stiefl, Nikolaus

    2017-08-28

    Big data is one of the key transformative factors which increasingly influences all aspects of modern life. Although this transformation brings vast opportunities it also generates novel challenges, not the least of which is organizing and searching this data deluge. The field of medicinal chemistry is not different: more and more data are being generated, for instance, by technologies such as DNA encoded libraries, peptide libraries, text mining of large literature corpora, and new in silico enumeration methods. Handling those huge sets of molecules effectively is quite challenging and requires compromises that often come at the expense of the interpretability of the results. In order to find an intuitive and meaningful approach to organizing large molecular data sets, we adopted a probabilistic framework called "topic modeling" from the text-mining field. Here we present the first chemistry-related implementation of this method, which allows large molecule sets to be assigned to "chemical topics" and investigating the relationships between those. In this first study, we thoroughly evaluate this novel method in different experiments and discuss both its disadvantages and advantages. We show very promising results in reproducing human-assigned concepts using the approach to identify and retrieve chemical series from sets of molecules. We have also created an intuitive visualization of the chemical topics output by the algorithm. This is a huge benefit compared to other unsupervised machine-learning methods, like clustering, which are commonly used to group sets of molecules. Finally, we applied the new method to the 1.6 million molecules of the ChEMBL22 data set to test its robustness and efficiency. In about 1 h we built a 100-topic model of this large data set in which we could identify interesting topics like "proteins", "DNA", or "steroids". Along with this publication we provide our data sets and an open-source implementation of the new method (CheTo) which

  10. A logic-based dynamic modeling approach to explicate the evolution of the central dogma of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohieddin; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Azimzadeh, Sadegh; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    It is nearly half a century past the age of the introduction of the Central Dogma (CD) of molecular biology. This biological axiom has been developed and currently appears to be all the more complex. In this study, we modified CD by adding further species to the CD information flow and mathematically expressed CD within a dynamic framework by using Boolean network based on its present-day and 1965 editions. We show that the enhancement of the Dogma not only now entails a higher level of complexity, but it also shows a higher level of robustness, thus far more consistent with the nature of biological systems. Using this mathematical modeling approach, we put forward a logic-based expression of our conceptual view of molecular biology. Finally, we show that such biological concepts can be converted into dynamic mathematical models using a logic-based approach and thus may be useful as a framework for improving static conceptual models in biology.

  11. Hidden Markov models and other machine learning approaches in computational molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, P. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. Computational tools are increasingly needed to process the massive amounts of data, to organize and classify sequences, to detect weak similarities, to separate coding from non-coding regions, and reconstruct the underlying evolutionary history. The fundamental problem in machine learning is the same as in scientific reasoning in general, as well as statistical modeling: to come up with a good model for the data. In this tutorial four classes of models are reviewed. They are: Hidden Markov models; artificial Neural Networks; Belief Networks; and Stochastic Grammars. When dealing with DNA and protein primary sequences, Hidden Markov models are one of the most flexible and powerful alignments and data base searches. In this tutorial, attention is focused on the theory of Hidden Markov Models, and how to apply them to problems in molecular biology.

  12. DP 71 AND BETA DYSTROGLYCAN INTERACTION: A MOLECULAR MODELING APPROACH TO UNDERSTAND DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simanti Bhattacharya,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dp 71 is the most prevalent and widely expressed non muscle isoform of dystrophin (Dp and its mutations are associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a severe form of muscular disorder. Dp 71 deviates from the canonical Dp by means of its truncated N terminal which also has abolished certain amino acids that comprise WW domain in the canonical form. This WW domain is very crucial for Dp’s interaction with partner proteins to establish a bridge between extra cellular matrices and cellular cytoskeleton. In our current study we have employed molecular modeling technique to understand the structural architecture of the N terminal region of Dp 71 and its deviation from the canonical form. We have further extended our studies to analyze the interaction probabilities between Dp 71 and β-DG applying molecular docking. Our studies for the first time have revealed that in spite of the underlying differences in terms of amino acids and structural organization, Dp 71 can interact with β-DG with its N terminal region which shares the similar molecular surface with the canonical form of Dp. These findings have opened up a platform to investigate the molecular interactions, spatio temporal orientations of the amino acids of Dp 71 and β-DG to understand the onset of DMD in much more greater detail

  13. A hybrid particle–field molecular dynamics approach: a route toward efficient coarse-grained models for biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Antonio; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the coarse-grained models of phospholipids recently developed by the authors in the frame of a hybrid particle–field molecular dynamics technique. This technique employs a special class of coarse-grained models that are gaining popularity because they allow simulations of large scale systems and, at the same time, they provide sufficiently detailed chemistry for the mapping scheme adopted. The comparison of the computational costs of our approach with standard molecular dynamics simulations is a function of the system size and the number of processors employed in the parallel calculations. Due to the low amount of data exchange, the larger the number of processors, the better are the performances of the hybrid particle–field models. This feature makes these models very promising ones in the exploration of several problems in biophysics. (paper)

  14. Modular and Stochastic Approaches to Molecular Pathway Models of ATM, TGF beta, and WNT Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; O'Neill, Peter; Ponomarev, Artem; Carra, Claudio; Whalen, Mary; Pluth, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    Deterministic pathway models that describe the biochemical interactions of a group of related proteins, their complexes, activation through kinase, etc. are often the basis for many systems biology models. Low dose radiation effects present a unique set of challenges to these models including the importance of stochastic effects due to the nature of radiation tracks and small number of molecules activated, and the search for infrequent events that contribute to cancer risks. We have been studying models of the ATM, TGF -Smad and WNT signaling pathways with the goal of applying pathway models to the investigation of low dose radiation cancer risks. Modeling challenges include introduction of stochastic models of radiation tracks, their relationships to more than one substrate species that perturb pathways, and the identification of a representative set of enzymes that act on the dominant substrates. Because several pathways are activated concurrently by radiation the development of modular pathway approach is of interest.

  15. Atomic and Molecular Data Needs for Radiation Damage Modeling: Multiscale Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Surdutovich, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards understanding of the processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is very important, because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain type of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of the DNA damage within cell environment. To achieve this goal one needs a significant amount of data on various atomic and molecular processes involved into the cascade of events starting with the ion entering and propagation in the biological medium and resulting in the DNA damage. The discussion of the follow up biological processes are beyond the scope of this brief overview. We consider different paths of the DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative biodamage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  16. Structural insights into cholinesterases inhibition by harmane β-carbolinium derivatives: a kinetics-molecular modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juliana M; Lira, Aline F; Silva, Daniel R; Guzzo, Lucas M; Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Rumjanek, Victor M

    2012-09-01

    The natural indole alkaloids, the β-carbolines, are often associated with cholinesterase inhibition, especially their quaternary salts, which frequently have higher activity than the free bases. Due to lack of information explaining this fact in the literature, the cholinesterase inhibition by the natural product harmane and its two β-carbolinium synthetic derivative salts (N-methyl and N-ethyl) was explored, together with a combination of kinetics and a molecular modeling approach. The results, mainly for the β-carbolinium salts, demonstrated a noncompetitive inhibition profile, ruling out previous findings which associated cholinesterase inhibition by β-carbolinium salts to a possible mimicking of the choline moiety of the natural substrate, acetylcholine. Molecular modeling studies corroborate this kind of inhibition through analyses of inhibitor/enzyme and inhibitor/substrate/enzyme complexes of both enzymes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a model for the rational design of molecular imprinted polymer: Computational approach for combined molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Cunku; Li Xin; Guo Zechong; Qi Jingyao

    2009-01-01

    A new rational approach for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics (QM) calculations is described in this work. Before performing molecular modeling, a virtual library of functional monomers was created containing forty frequently used monomers. The MD simulations were first conducted to screen the top three monomers from virtual library in each porogen-acetonitrile, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. QM simulations were then performed with an aim to select the optimum monomer and progen solvent in which the QM simulations were carried out; the monomers giving the highest binding energies were chosen as the candidate to prepare MIP in its corresponding solvent. The acetochlor, a widely used herbicide, was chosen as the target analyte. According to the theoretical calculation results, the MIP with acetochlor as template was prepared by emulsion polymerization method using N,N-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAM) as functional monomer and divinylbenzene (DVB) as cross-linker in chloroform. The synthesized MIP was then tested by equilibrium-adsorption method, and the MIP demonstrated high removal efficiency to the acetochlor. Mulliken charge distribution and 1 H NMR spectroscopy of the synthesized MIP provided insight on the nature of recognition during the imprinting process probing the governing interactions for selective binding site formation at a molecular level. We think the computer simulation method first proposed in this paper is a novel and reliable method for the design and synthesis of MIP.

  18. A molecular modeling approach to understand the structure and conformation relationship of (GlcpA)Xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingbin; Kang, Ji; Wu, Yan; Cui, Steve W; Hu, Xinzhong; Yada, Rickey Y

    2015-12-10

    The structure and conformation relationships of a heteropolysaccharide (GlcpA)Xylan in terms of various molecular weights, Xylp/GlcpA ratio and the distribution of GlcpA along xylan chain were investigated using computer modeling. The adiabatic contour maps of xylobiose, XylpXylp(GlcpA) and (GlcpA)XylpXylp(GlcpA) indicated that the insertion of the side group (GlcpA) influenced the accessible conformational space of xylobiose molecule. RIS-Metropolis Monte Carlo method indicated that insertion of GlcpA side chain induced a lowering effect of the calculated chain extension at low GlcpA:Xylp ratio (GlcpA:Xylp = 1:3). The chain, however, became extended when the ratio of GlcpA:Xylp above 2/3. It was also shown that the spatial extension of the polymer chains was dependent on the distribution of side chain: the random distribution demonstrated the most flexible structure compared to block and alternative distribution. The present studies provide a unique insight into the dependence of both side chain ratio and distribution on the stiffness and flexibility of various (GlcpA)Xylan molecules. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A logic-based dynamic modeling approach to explicate the evolution of the central dogma of molecular biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohieddin Jafari

    Full Text Available It is nearly half a century past the age of the introduction of the Central Dogma (CD of molecular biology. This biological axiom has been developed and currently appears to be all the more complex. In this study, we modified CD by adding further species to the CD information flow and mathematically expressed CD within a dynamic framework by using Boolean network based on its present-day and 1965 editions. We show that the enhancement of the Dogma not only now entails a higher level of complexity, but it also shows a higher level of robustness, thus far more consistent with the nature of biological systems. Using this mathematical modeling approach, we put forward a logic-based expression of our conceptual view of molecular biology. Finally, we show that such biological concepts can be converted into dynamic mathematical models using a logic-based approach and thus may be useful as a framework for improving static conceptual models in biology.

  20. Discovery of Novel Inhibitors for Nek6 Protein through Homology Model Assisted Structure Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nek6 is a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis, gene A-related serine/threonine kinase family that plays an important role in the initiation of mitotic cell cycle progression. This work is an attempt to emphasize the structural and functional relationship of Nek6 protein based on homology modeling and binding pocket analysis. The three-dimensional structure of Nek6 was constructed by molecular modeling studies and the best model was further assessed by PROCHECK, ProSA, and ERRAT plot in order to analyze the quality and consistency of generated model. The overall quality of computed model showed 87.4% amino acid residues under the favored region. A 3 ns molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the structure was reliable and stable. Two lead compounds (Binding database ID: 15666, 18602 were retrieved through structure-based virtual screening and induced fit docking approaches as novel Nek6 inhibitors. Hence, we concluded that the potential compounds may act as new leads for Nek6 inhibitors designing.

  1. Tailored approaches in drug development and diagnostics : from molecular design to biological model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahlgren, C.M.; Meinander, A.; Zhang, H.; Cheng, F.; Preis, Maren; Xu, C.; Salminen, T.A.; Toivola, D.M.; Abankwa, D.; Rosling, A.; Karaman, D.Ş.; Salo-Ahen, O.M.H.; Österbacka, R.; Eriksson, J.E.; Willför, S.; Petre, I.; Peltonen, J.; Leino, R.; Johnson, M.; Rosenholm, J.; Sandler, N.

    2017-01-01

    Approaches to increase the efficiency in developing drugs and diagnostics tools, including new drug delivery and diagnostic technologies, are needed for improved diagnosis and treatment of major diseases and health problems such as cancer, inflammatory diseases, chronic wounds, and antibiotic

  2. A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding Alcoholic Liver Disease Molecular Mechanism: The Development of Static and Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghati, Leila; Razaghi-Moghadam, Zahra; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2017-11-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a complex disease characterized by damages to the liver and is the consequence of excessive alcohol consumption over years. Since this disease is associated with several pathway failures, pathway reconstruction and network analysis are likely to explicit the molecular basis of the disease. To this aim, in this paper, a network medicine approach was employed to integrate interactome (protein-protein interaction and signaling pathways) and transcriptome data to reconstruct both a static network of ALD and a dynamic model for it. Several data sources were exploited to assemble a set of ALD-associated genes which further was used for network reconstruction. Moreover, a comprehensive literature mining reveals that there are four signaling pathways with crosstalk (TLR4, NF- [Formula: see text]B, MAPK and Apoptosis) which play a major role in ALD. These four pathways were exploited to reconstruct a dynamic model of ALD. The results assure that these two models are consistent with a number of experimental observations. The static network of ALD and its dynamic model are the first models provided for ALD which offer potentially valuable information for researchers in this field.

  3. A molecular systems approach to modelling human skin pigmentation: identifying underlying pathways and critical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Arathi; Sambarey, Awanti; Sharma, Neha; Mahadevan, Usha; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2015-04-29

    Ultraviolet radiations (UV) serve as an environmental stress for human skin, and result in melanogenesis, with the pigment melanin having protective effects against UV induced damage. This involves a dynamic and complex regulation of various biological processes that results in the expression of melanin in the outer most layers of the epidermis, where it can exert its protective effect. A comprehensive understanding of the underlying cross talk among different signalling molecules and cell types is only possible through a systems perspective. Increasing incidences of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers necessitate the need to better comprehend UV mediated effects on skin pigmentation at a systems level, so as to ultimately evolve knowledge-based strategies for efficient protection and prevention of skin diseases. A network model for UV-mediated skin pigmentation in the epidermis was constructed and subjected to shortest path analysis. Virtual knock-outs were carried out to identify essential signalling components. We describe a network model for UV-mediated skin pigmentation in the epidermis. The model consists of 265 components (nodes) and 429 directed interactions among them, capturing the manner in which one component influences the other and channels information. Through shortest path analysis, we identify novel signalling pathways relevant to pigmentation. Virtual knock-outs or perturbations of specific nodes in the network have led to the identification of alternate modes of signalling as well as enabled determining essential nodes in the process. The model presented provides a comprehensive picture of UV mediated signalling manifesting in human skin pigmentation. A systems perspective helps provide a holistic purview of interconnections and complexity in the processes leading to pigmentation. The model described here is extensive yet amenable to expansion as new data is gathered. Through this study, we provide a list of important proteins essential

  4. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics/Coarse Grained Modeling: A Triple-Resolution Approach for Biomolecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkar, Pandian; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2015-04-14

    We present a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics/coarse-grained (QM/MM/CG) multiresolution approach for solvated biomolecular systems. The chemically important active-site region is treated at the QM level. The biomolecular environment is described by an atomistic MM force field, and the solvent is modeled with the CG Martini force field using standard or polarizable (pol-CG) water. Interactions within the QM, MM, and CG regions, and between the QM and MM regions, are treated in the usual manner, whereas the CG-MM and CG-QM interactions are evaluated using the virtual sites approach. The accuracy and efficiency of our implementation is tested for two enzymes, chorismate mutase (CM) and p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH). In CM, the QM/MM/CG potential energy scans along the reaction coordinate yield reaction energies that are too large, both for the standard and polarizable Martini CG water models, which can be attributed to adverse effects of using large CG water beads. The inclusion of an atomistic MM water layer (10 Å for uncharged CG water and 5 Å for polarizable CG water) around the QM region improves the energy profiles compared to the reference QM/MM calculations. In analogous QM/MM/CG calculations on PHBH, the use of the pol-CG description for the outer water does not affect the stabilization of the highly charged FADHOOH-pOHB transition state compared to the fully atomistic QM/MM calculations. Detailed performance analysis in a glycine-water model system indicates that computation times for QM energy and gradient evaluations at the density functional level are typically reduced by 40-70% for QM/MM/CG relative to fully atomistic QM/MM calculations.

  5. Molecular Approaches to Studying Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    Denitrification is carried out by a diverse array of microbes, mainly as an alternative mode of respiration that allows the organisms to respire using oxidized N compounds instead of oxygen. A common approach in biogeochemistry to the study of the regulation of denitrification is to assess activity by mass balance of substrates and products or direct rate measurements and has intrinsically assumed resource regulation of denitrification. Reported rates can vary significantly even among ecosystems characterized by similar environmental conditions, thus indicating that direct control by abiotic factors often is not sufficient to predict denitrification rates accurately in natural environments. Alternatively, a microbiological approach would proceed with the identification of the organisms responsible and an evaluation of the effect of environmental factors on the biochemical pathways involved. Traditional studies have relied on culturing techniques, such as most probable number enrichments, and have failed to assess the role of the predominately uncultivable members of the microbial community. A combination of biogeochemical measurements and the assessment of the microbial community is necessary and becoming increasingly possible with the development and application of molecular techniques. In order to understand how the composition and physiological behavior of the microbial community affects denitrification rates, we use a suite of molecular techniques developed for phylogenetic and metabolic characterization of denitrifying communities. Molecular tools available for quantifying denitrifying bacteria and assessing their diversity and activity are summarized. Their application is illustrated with examples from marine and freshwater environments. Emerging techniques and their application to ground water studies will be discussed.

  6. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  7. Open source molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PRO_LIGAND: an approach to de novo molecular design. 2. Design of novel molecules from molecular field analysis (MFA) models and pharmacophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkowycz, B; Clark, D E; Frenkel, D; Li, J; Murray, C W; Robson, B; Westhead, D R

    1994-11-11

    A computational approach for molecular design, PRO_LIGAND, has been developed within the PROMETHEUS molecular design and simulation system in order to provide a unified framework for the de novo generation of diverse molecules which are either similar or complementary to a specified target. In this instance, the target is a pharmacophore derived from a series of active structures either by a novel interpretation of molecular field analysis data or by a pharmacophore-mapping procedure based on clique detection. After a brief introduction to PRO_LIGAND, a detailed description is given of the two pharmacophore generation procedures and their abilities are demonstrated by the elucidation of pharmacophores for steroid binding and ACE inhibition, respectively. As a further indication of its efficacy in aiding the rational drug design process, PRO_LIGAND is then employed to build novel organic molecules to satisfy the physicochemical constraints implied by the pharmacophores.

  9. Molecular modeling-driven approach for identification of Janus kinase 1 inhibitors through 3D-QSAR, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itteboina, Ramesh; Ballu, Srilata; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2017-10-01

    Janus kinase 1 (JAK 1) belongs to the JAK family of intracellular nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. JAK-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway mediate signaling by cytokines, which control survival, proliferation and differentiation of a variety of cells. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3 D-QSAR), molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) methods was carried out on a dataset of Janus kinase 1(JAK 1) inhibitors. Ligands were constructed and docked into the active site of protein using GLIDE 5.6. Best docked poses were selected after analysis for further 3 D-QSAR analysis using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methodology. Employing 60 molecules in the training set, 3 D-QSAR models were generate that showed good statistical reliability, which is clearly observed in terms of r 2 ncv and q 2 loo values. The predictive ability of these models was determined using a test set of 25 molecules that gave acceptable predictive correlation (r 2 Pred ) values. The key amino acid residues were identified by means of molecular docking, and the stability and rationality of the derived molecular conformations were also validated by MD simulation. The good consonance between the docking results and CoMFA/CoMSIA contour maps provides helpful clues about the reasonable modification of molecules in order to design more efficient JAK 1 inhibitors. The developed models are expected to provide some directives for further synthesis of highly effective JAK 1 inhibitors.

  10. Molecular approaches to child psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobrook, J P; Pauls, D L

    1998-04-01

    Basic research into the genetics of childhood psychiatric disorders has substantially increased during the last two decades. Specific genetic mutations have been characterized in some developmental disorders (e.g., fragile X syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome), but thus far identification of etiological gene mutations in psychiatric illnesses has been unsuccessful. Several psychiatric disorders serve as examples of the current state of molecular approaches in child psychopathology. Investigations to date of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) have not resulted in the discovery of a gene of major effect. Some studies have implicated the D2 and D4 dopamine receptors as having a direct role in the etiology of GTS, but other studies have disputed those findings. However, the dopamine D2 receptor may modulate the severity of GTS. Obsessive-compulsive disorder has a reported association with a low-activity allele of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase; however, the low-activity genotype is also seen in a significant proportion of unaffected individuals. For reading disability two distinct phenotypes (phonological awareness and single-word reading) have been linked to separate loci on chromosomes 6 and 15. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a reported association with the dopamine transporter. Findings of a genetic locus for the personality trait of novelty seeking remain controversial.

  11. Exploring the site-selective binding of jatrorrhizine to human serum albumin: spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Ran; Hu, Yan-Jun; Fan, Xiao-Yang; Ouyang, Yu; Bai, Ai-Min

    2014-01-03

    This paper exploring the site-selective binding of jatrorrhizine to human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The investigation was carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and molecular modeling. The results of fluorescence quenching and UV-vis absorption spectra experiments indicated the formation of the complex of HSA-jatrorrhizine. Binding parameters calculating from Stern-Volmer method and Scatchard method were calculated at 298, 304 and 310 K, with the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS as well. Binding parameters calculating from Stern-Volmer method and Scatchard method showed that jatrorrhizine bind to HSA with the binding affinities of the order 10(4) L mol(-1). The thermodynamic parameters studies revealed that the binding was characterized by negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes and the electrostatic interactions play a major role for jatrorrhizine-HSA association. Site marker competitive displacement experiments and molecular modeling calculation demonstrating that jatrorrhizine is mainly located within the hydrophobic pocket of the subdomain IIIA of HSA. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra suggested that the association between jatrorrhizine and HSA changed molecular conformation of HSA. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Effects of Organics on the Adsorption and Mobility of Metal Cations in Clay Systems: Computational Molecular Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Ngouana Wakou, Brice F.; Loganathan, Narasimhan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of many natural and anthropogenic environmental processes ultimately depend on a fundamental understanding of the chemistry occurring at the mineral-fluid inter-faces. Clay-related minerals and natural organic matter (NOM) are ubiquitous in the environment, and metal-NOM complexation induces strong correlations between the NOM concentration in water and the capacity of clay particles to bind metals, thus affecting their speciation, solubility and toxicity in the environment. Despite significant geochemical, environmental and technological interest, the molecular-level mechanisms and dynamics of the physical and chemical processes involving NOM are not yet well understood. In this presentation we compare three different molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of metal-NOM complexation in aqueous solutions. The simulation results indicate that despite some obvious quantitative variations in the computed values depending on the size of the simulated system and on the parameters of the force field models used, all three simulations are quite robust and consistent. In particular, approximately 35-50% of Ca 2+ ions in all simulations are associated with the carboxylic groups of NOM at near-neutral pH. The stability of bidentate-coordinated contact ion pair complexes is also always strongly preferred. Easy association of metal cations with negatively charged NOM functional groups and negatively charged clay surfaces allows us to predict that cationic bridging could be the most probable mechanism of NOM association with clays in natural environments. New MD simulations are currently in progress to quantitatively assess these predictions on a molecular scale for nuclear waste disposal applications. New larger-scale clay models incorporate a more realistic representation of the structural and compositional disorder of natural illites and smectites and employ CLAYFF - a fully flexible general force field suitable for the molecular simulations

  13. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  14. A Bayesian approach to estimating hidden variables as well as missing and wrong molecular interactions in ordinary differential equation-based mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Benjamin; Kschischo, Maik; Fröhlich, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are a popular approach to quantitatively model molecular networks based on biological knowledge. However, such knowledge is typically restricted. Wrongly modelled biological mechanisms as well as relevant external influence factors that are not included into the model are likely to manifest in major discrepancies between model predictions and experimental data. Finding the exact reasons for such observed discrepancies can be quite challenging in practice. In order to address this issue, we suggest a Bayesian approach to estimate hidden influences in ODE-based models. The method can distinguish between exogenous and endogenous hidden influences. Thus, we can detect wrongly specified as well as missed molecular interactions in the model. We demonstrate the performance of our Bayesian dynamic elastic-net with several ordinary differential equation models from the literature, such as human JAK-STAT signalling, information processing at the erythropoietin receptor, isomerization of liquid α -Pinene, G protein cycling in yeast and UV-B triggered signalling in plants. Moreover, we investigate a set of commonly known network motifs and a gene-regulatory network. Altogether our method supports the modeller in an algorithmic manner to identify possible sources of errors in ODE-based models on the basis of experimental data. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Multispectroscopic and molecular modeling approach to investigate the interaction of diclofop-methyl enantiomers with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping; Liu, Donghui; Li, Zhe; Shen, Zhigang; Wang, Peng [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhou, Meng [Business School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Zhou, Zhiqiang [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhu, Wentao, E-mail: wentaozhu@cau.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Pesticides and related environmental contaminants have always been threated to human health due to their intrinsic toxicity. In the context of this contribution, the interaction between diclofop-methyl (DM) enantiomers and human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by steady state and three-dimensional fluorescence, molecular modeling, circular dichroism (CD) and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The binding constants significantly showed the binding was enantioselective and HSA had higher affinity for S-DM. The thermodynamic parameters of the binding reaction (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) clearly signified that hydrophobic effects and H-bonds contribute to the formation of DM-HSA complex. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of DM enantiomers were confirmed by CD spectroscopy, UV–vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, both fluorescence probe study and molecular modeling simulation evidenced the binding of DM enantiomers to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II). This investigation highlights the binding mechanism, specific binding sites and binding region of DM enantiomers on human serum albumin at the first time. Besides, such task can provide important insight to the interaction of the physiological protein HSA with chiral aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides and give support to the human health risk assessment. - Highlights: • The binding of DM enantiomers to HSA was enantioselective. • HSA had higher affinity for S-DM than R-DM. • Hydrophobic effects and hydrogen bonds were involved in the DM-HSA interaction. • The binding of DM enantiomers to HSA primarily took place in Sudlow's site II. • DM enantiomers could alter the second structure of HSA.

  16. Multispectroscopic and molecular modeling approach to investigate the interaction of diclofop-methyl enantiomers with human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Liu, Donghui; Li, Zhe; Shen, Zhigang; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Meng; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and related environmental contaminants have always been threated to human health due to their intrinsic toxicity. In the context of this contribution, the interaction between diclofop-methyl (DM) enantiomers and human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by steady state and three-dimensional fluorescence, molecular modeling, circular dichroism (CD) and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The binding constants significantly showed the binding was enantioselective and HSA had higher affinity for S-DM. The thermodynamic parameters of the binding reaction (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) clearly signified that hydrophobic effects and H-bonds contribute to the formation of DM-HSA complex. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of DM enantiomers were confirmed by CD spectroscopy, UV–vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, both fluorescence probe study and molecular modeling simulation evidenced the binding of DM enantiomers to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II). This investigation highlights the binding mechanism, specific binding sites and binding region of DM enantiomers on human serum albumin at the first time. Besides, such task can provide important insight to the interaction of the physiological protein HSA with chiral aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides and give support to the human health risk assessment. - Highlights: • The binding of DM enantiomers to HSA was enantioselective. • HSA had higher affinity for S-DM than R-DM. • Hydrophobic effects and hydrogen bonds were involved in the DM-HSA interaction. • The binding of DM enantiomers to HSA primarily took place in Sudlow's site II. • DM enantiomers could alter the second structure of HSA

  17. Molecular approaches to Taenia asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Eom, Keeseon S

    2013-02-01

    Taenia solium, T. saginata, and T. asiatica are taeniid tapeworms that cause taeniasis in humans and cysticercosis in intermediate host animals. Taeniases remain an important public health concerns in the world. Molecular diagnostic methods using PCR assays have been developed for rapid and accurate detection of human infecting taeniid tapeworms, including the use of sequence-specific DNA probes, PCR-RFLP, and multiplex PCR. More recently, DNA diagnosis using PCR based on histopathological specimens such as 10% formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and stained sections mounted on slides has been applied to cestode infections. The mitochondrial gene sequence is believed to be a very useful molecular marker for not only studying evolutionary relationships among distantly related taxa, but also for investigating the phylo-biogeography of closely related species. The complete sequence of the human Taenia tapeworms mitochondrial genomes were determined, and its organization and structure were compared to other human-tropic Taenia tapeworms for which complete mitochondrial sequence data were available. The multiplex PCR assay with the Ta4978F, Ts5058F, Tso7421F, and Rev7915 primers will be useful for differential diagnosis, molecular characterization, and epidemiological surveys of human Taenia tapeworms.

  18. Molecular Approaches to Taenia asiatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Taenia solium, T. saginata, and T. asiatica are taeniid tapeworms that cause taeniasis in humans and cysticercosis in intermediate host animals. Taeniases remain an important public health concerns in the world. Molecular diagnostic methods using PCR assays have been developed for rapid and accurate detection of human infecting taeniid tapeworms, including the use of sequence-specific DNA probes, PCR-RFLP, and multiplex PCR. More recently, DNA diagnosis using PCR based on histopathological specimens such as 10% formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and stained sections mounted on slides has been applied to cestode infections. The mitochondrial gene sequence is believed to be a very useful molecular marker for not only studying evolutionary relationships among distantly related taxa, but also for investigating the phylo-biogeography of closely related species. The complete sequence of the human Taenia tapeworms mitochondrial genomes were determined, and its organization and structure were compared to other human-tropic Taenia tapeworms for which complete mitochondrial sequence data were available. The multiplex PCR assay with the Ta4978F, Ts5058F, Tso7421F, and Rev7915 primers will be useful for differential diagnosis, molecular characterization, and epidemiological surveys of human Taenia tapeworms. PMID:23467738

  19. A reactive, scalable, and transferable model for molecular energies from a neural network approach based on local information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unke, Oliver T.; Meuwly, Markus

    2018-06-01

    Despite the ever-increasing computer power, accurate ab initio calculations for large systems (thousands to millions of atoms) remain infeasible. Instead, approximate empirical energy functions are used. Most current approaches are either transferable between different chemical systems, but not particularly accurate, or they are fine-tuned to a specific application. In this work, a data-driven method to construct a potential energy surface based on neural networks is presented. Since the total energy is decomposed into local atomic contributions, the evaluation is easily parallelizable and scales linearly with system size. With prediction errors below 0.5 kcal mol-1 for both unknown molecules and configurations, the method is accurate across chemical and configurational space, which is demonstrated by applying it to datasets from nonreactive and reactive molecular dynamics simulations and a diverse database of equilibrium structures. The possibility to use small molecules as reference data to predict larger structures is also explored. Since the descriptor only uses local information, high-level ab initio methods, which are computationally too expensive for large molecules, become feasible for generating the necessary reference data used to train the neural network.

  20. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  1. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal-phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials.

  2. A classical approach in simple nuclear fusion reaction 1H2+1H3 using two-dimension granular molecular dynamics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Perkasa, Y. S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics in 2-D accompanied by granular model provides an opportunity to investigate binding between nuclei particles and its properties that arises during collision in a fusion reaction. A fully classical approach is used to observe the influence of initial angle of nucleus orientation to the product yielded by the reaction. As an example, a simplest fusion reaction between 1 H 2 and 1 H 3 is observed. Several products of the fusion reaction have been obtained, even the unreported ones, including temporary 2 He 4 nucleus.

  3. Identification of Deleterious Mutations in Myostatin Gene of Rohu Carp (Labeo rohita Using Modeling and Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Dashrath Rasal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The myostatin (MSTN is a known negative growth regulator of skeletal muscle. The mutated myostatin showed a double-muscular phenotype having a positive significance for the farmed animals. Consequently, adequate information is not available in the teleosts, including farmed rohu carp, Labeo rohita. In the absence of experimental evidence, computational algorithms were utilized in predicting the impact of point mutation of rohu myostatin, especially its structural and functional relationships. The four mutations were generated at different positions (p.D76A, p.Q204P, p.C312Y, and p.D313A of MSTN protein of rohu. The impacts of each mutant were analyzed using SIFT, I-Mutant 2.0, PANTHER, and PROVEAN, wherein two substitutions (p.D76A and p.Q204P were predicted as deleterious. The comparative structural analysis of each mutant protein with the native was explored using 3D modeling as well as molecular-dynamic simulation techniques. The simulation showed altered dynamic behaviors concerning RMSD and RMSF, for either p.D76A or p.Q204P substitution, when compared with the native counterpart. Interestingly, incorporated two mutations imposed a significant negative impact on protein structure and stability. The present study provided the first-hand information in identifying possible amino acids, where mutations could be incorporated into MSTN gene of rohu carp including other carps for undertaking further in vivo studies.

  4. The Effect of Molecular Structure and Environment on the Miscibility and Diffusivity in Polythiophene-Methanofullerene Bulk Heterojunctions: Theory and Modeling with the RISM Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Kobryn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although better means to model the properties of bulk heterojunction molecular blends are much needed in the field of organic optoelectronics, only a small subset of methods based on molecular dynamics- and Monte Carlo-based approaches have been hitherto employed to guide or replace empirical characterization and testing. Here, we present the first use of the integral equation theory of molecular liquids in modelling the structural properties of blends of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM with poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and a carboxylated poly(3-butylthiophene (P3BT, respectively. For this, we use the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM with the Universal Force Field (UFF to compute the microscopic structure of blends and obtain insight into the miscibility of its components. Input parameters for RISM, such as optimized molecular geometries and charge distribution of interaction sites, are derived by the Density Functional Theory (DFT methods. We also run Molecular Dynamics (MD simulation to compare the diffusivity of the PCBM in binary blends with P3HT and P3BT, respectively. A remarkably good agreement with available experimental data and results of alternative modelling/simulation is observed for PCBM in the P3HT system. We interpret this as a step in the validation of the use of our approach for organic photovoltaics and support of its results for new systems that do not have reference data for comparison or calibration. In particular, for the less-studied P3BT, our results show that expectations about its performance in binary blends with PCBM may be overestimated, as it does not demonstrate the required level of miscibility and short-range structural organization. In addition, the simulated mobility of PCBM in P3BT is somewhat higher than what is expected for polymer blends and falls into a range typical for fluids. The significance of our predictive multi-scale modelling lies in the insights it offers into nanoscale

  5. Molecular tailoring approach for exploring structures, energetics and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Keywords. Molecular clusters; linear scaling methods; molecular tailoring approach (MTA); Hartree– ..... energy decomposition analysis also performed and which clearly ... through molecular dynamics simulation furnished by. Takeguchi,. 46.

  6. Molecular approach of auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Magali Aparecida Orate Menezes da; Piatto, Vânia Belintani; Maniglia, Jose Victor

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the otoferlin gene are responsible for auditory neuropathy. To investigate the prevalence of mutations in the mutations in the otoferlin gene in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. This original cross-sectional case study evaluated 16 index cases with auditory neuropathy, 13 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, and 20 normal-hearing subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the mutations in the otoferlin gene sites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The 16 index cases included nine (56%) females and seven (44%) males. The 13 deaf patients comprised seven (54%) males and six (46%) females. Among the 20 normal-hearing subjects, 13 (65%) were males and seven were (35%) females. Thirteen (81%) index cases had wild-type genotype (AA) and three (19%) had the heterozygous AG genotype for IVS8-2A-G (intron 8) mutation. The 5473C-G (exon 44) mutation was found in a heterozygous state (CG) in seven (44%) index cases and nine (56%) had the wild-type allele (CC). Of these mutants, two (25%) were compound heterozygotes for the mutations found in intron 8 and exon 44. All patients with sensorineural hearing loss and normal-hearing individuals did not have mutations (100%). There are differences at the molecular level in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of EPR Spectra of Lyotropic Liquid Crystals using a Combination of Molecular Dynamics Simulations and the Model-Free Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Christopher; Oganesyan, Vasily S

    2017-09-21

    We report the first application of fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to the prediction of the motional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of lyotropic liquid crystals in different aggregation states doped with a paramagnetic spin probe. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, given that EPR spectra are highly sensitive to the motions and order of the spin probes doped within lyotropic aggregates, simulation of EPR line shapes from the results of MD modelling provides an ultimate test bed for the force fields currently employed to model such systems. Second, the EPR line shapes are simulated using the motional parameters extracted from MD trajectories using the Model-Free (MF) approach. Thus a combined MD-EPR methodology allowed us to test directly the validity of the application of the MF approach to systems with multi-component molecular motions. All-atom MD simulations using the General AMBER Force Field (GAFF) have been performed on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) liquid crystals. The resulting MD trajectories were used to predict and interpret the EPR spectra of pre-micellar, micellar, rod and lamellar aggregates. The predicted EPR spectra demonstrate good agreement with most of experimental line shapes thus confirming the validity of both the force fields employed and the MF approach for the studied systems. At the same time simulation results confirm that GAFF tends to overestimate the packing and the order of the carbonyl chains of the surfactant molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evaluation of molecular brain changes associated with environmental stress in rodent models compared to human major depressive disorder: A proteomic systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David Alan; Gottschalk, Michael Gerd; Stelzhammer, Viktoria; Wesseling, Hendrik; Cooper, Jason David; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-11-25

    Rodent models of major depressive disorder (MDD) are indispensable when screening for novel treatments, but assessing their translational relevance with human brain pathology has proved difficult. Using a novel systems approach, proteomics data obtained from post-mortem MDD anterior prefrontal cortex tissue (n = 12) and matched controls (n = 23) were compared with equivalent data from three commonly used preclinical models exposed to environmental stressors (chronic mild stress, prenatal stress and social defeat). Functional pathophysiological features associated with depression-like behaviour were identified in these models through enrichment of protein-protein interaction networks. A cross-species comparison evaluated which model(s) represent human MDD pathology most closely. Seven functional domains associated with MDD and represented across at least two models such as "carbohydrate metabolism and cellular respiration" were identified. Through statistical evaluation using kernel-based machine learning techniques, the social defeat model was found to represent MDD brain changes most closely for four of the seven domains. This is the first study to apply a method for directly evaluating the relevance of the molecular pathology of multiple animal models to human MDD on the functional level. The methodology and findings outlined here could help to overcome translational obstacles of preclinical psychiatric research.

  9. Molecular modelling and radiopharmaceutical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.; Gano, L.; Costa, M.C.; Raminhos, H.; Rosado, M.; Fausto, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Among several headings for radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) design, molecular modelling (MM) could be used for the prediction of ligands and metal-complexes structures. Using MM it is also possible to simulate molecular interactions between predicted structures and specific biomolecules. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are ligands that are able to coordinate radioactive metals, such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 186 Re, etc., but they are all polymeric complexes difficult to characterize. It is reported that the bone uptake does not depend on the nature of metal center, but is primarily driven by the nature of the ligand, as in the case of HEDP-M (M= 99m Tc, 186 Re, 113 Sn). So, it would be interesting to estimate the relevant molecular properties of BPs by MM, simulate their interaction with hydroxyapatite (HAP) the main bone component, and then correlate the predicted molecular parameters with experimental data obtained from HAP binding and biodistribution studies of BPs carrying radioactive metals. Materials and Methods: The molecular structures and preferred conformations of BPs differing in the length of the aliphatic chain attached to their substituted amine groups (pami-dronate, olpadronate and ibandronate) were obtained using the second-generation CVFF 950 (version 1.01) force field of Hwang et al. Simulation of the interactions between the studied BPs and HAP were performed using a Cerius-2 system of programs running on a Silicon Graphics O2 workstation. BPs- 153 Sm complexes were synthesized and characterized by ITLC. Their binding to HAP and in vivo biodistribution studies were carried out as usual described in literature. Results: A direct correlation could be established between in vitro BPs affinity towards HAP and their corresponding energies from the Coulomb interactions involving the N and P atoms of the studied BPs bound to the HAP (0,0,1) surface and the nearest Ca atoms of HAP. The BPs- 153 Sm showing the highest binding to HAP and skeletal uptake are those which

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Molecular Tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kelvin; Fiege, Jason D.

    2017-07-01

    Recent observations near the Galactic Center (GC) have found several molecular filaments displaying striking helically wound morphology that are collectively known as molecular tornadoes. We investigate the equilibrium structure of these molecular tornadoes by formulating a magnetohydrodynamic model of a rotating, helically magnetized filament. A special analytical solution is derived where centrifugal forces balance exactly with toroidal magnetic stress. From the physics of torsional Alfvén waves we derive a constraint that links the toroidal flux-to-mass ratio and the pitch angle of the helical field to the rotation laws, which we find to be an important component in describing the molecular tornado structure. The models are compared to the Ostriker solution for isothermal, nonmagnetic, nonrotating filaments. We find that neither the analytic model nor the Alfvén wave model suffer from the unphysical density inversions noted by other authors. A Monte Carlo exploration of our parameter space is constrained by observational measurements of the Pigtail Molecular Cloud, the Double Helix Nebula, and the GC Molecular Tornado. Observable properties such as the velocity dispersion, filament radius, linear mass, and surface pressure can be used to derive three dimensionless constraints for our dimensionless models of these three objects. A virial analysis of these constrained models is studied for these three molecular tornadoes. We find that self-gravity is relatively unimportant, whereas magnetic fields and external pressure play a dominant role in the confinement and equilibrium radial structure of these objects.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Molecular Tornadoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, Kelvin; Fiege, Jason D., E-mail: fiege@physics.umanitoba.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2017-07-10

    Recent observations near the Galactic Center (GC) have found several molecular filaments displaying striking helically wound morphology that are collectively known as molecular tornadoes. We investigate the equilibrium structure of these molecular tornadoes by formulating a magnetohydrodynamic model of a rotating, helically magnetized filament. A special analytical solution is derived where centrifugal forces balance exactly with toroidal magnetic stress. From the physics of torsional Alfvén waves we derive a constraint that links the toroidal flux-to-mass ratio and the pitch angle of the helical field to the rotation laws, which we find to be an important component in describing the molecular tornado structure. The models are compared to the Ostriker solution for isothermal, nonmagnetic, nonrotating filaments. We find that neither the analytic model nor the Alfvén wave model suffer from the unphysical density inversions noted by other authors. A Monte Carlo exploration of our parameter space is constrained by observational measurements of the Pigtail Molecular Cloud, the Double Helix Nebula, and the GC Molecular Tornado. Observable properties such as the velocity dispersion, filament radius, linear mass, and surface pressure can be used to derive three dimensionless constraints for our dimensionless models of these three objects. A virial analysis of these constrained models is studied for these three molecular tornadoes. We find that self-gravity is relatively unimportant, whereas magnetic fields and external pressure play a dominant role in the confinement and equilibrium radial structure of these objects.

  12. Molecular approaches to understand the regulation of N2O emission from denitrifying bacteria - model strains and soil communities (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostegard, A.; Bakken, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of N2O from agricultural soils are largely caused by denitrifying bacteria. Field measurements of N2O fluxes show large variations and depend on several environmental factors, and possibly also on the composition of the denitrifying microbial community. The temporal and spatial variation of fluxes are not adequately captured by biogeochemical models, and few options for mitigations have been invented, which underscores the need to understand the mechanisms underlying the emissions of N2O. Analyses of denitrification genes and transcripts extracted from soils are important for describing the system, but may have limited value for prediction of N2O emissions. In contrast, phenotypic analyses are direct measures of the organisms’ responses to changing environmental conditions. Our approach is to combine phenotypic characterizations using high-resolution gas kinetics, with gene transcription analyses to study denitrification regulatory phenotypes (DRP) of bacterial strains or complex microbial communities. The rich data sets obtained provide a basis for refinement of biochemical and physiological research on this key process in the nitrogen cycle. The strength of this combined approach is illustrated by a series of experiments investigating effects of soil pH on denitrification. Soil pH emerges as a master variable determining the microbial community composition as well as its denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2), with higher ratio in acid than in alkaline soil. It is therefore likely that emissions of N2O from agro-ecosystems will increase in large parts of the world where soil pH is decreasing due to intensified management and increased use of chemical fertilizers. Considering its immense implications, surprisingly few attempts have been made to unravel the mechanisms involved in the pH-control of the product stoichiometry of denitrification. We investigated the kinetics of gas transformations (O2, NO, N2O and N2) and transcription of functional genes

  13. Electro-spray ionization - mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and molecular modelling, two complementary approaches. Application to calixarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, F.; Virelizier, H.; Moulin, Ch.; Lamare, V.; Dozol, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation and the experimental results obtained by the ESI/MS technique have shown that the stability of the calixarene - alkaline cation complexes is dependent of the medium. Indeed, in solution, the calixarene presents a strong affinity for cesium whereas in gaseous phase, the strong affinity is for sodium. The stability of the [calixarene+Na] + complexes depends of the nature of the medium too; these two techniques having shown that the presence of a small quantity of water in the dilution solvent stabilizes the complex. At last, calixarenes with benzo groups on their crown have an affinity for sodium which is weak in solution but strong in gaseous phase. These different results show the excellent complementarity between the two techniques. (O.M.)

  14. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to investigate the interaction of bisphenol A, bisphenol F and their diglycidyl ethers with PPARα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Tiehua; Guan, Tianzhu; Ruan, Ping; Ren, Dayong; Dai, Weichang; Yu, Hansong; Li, Tiezhu

    2017-08-01

    A fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for the simultaneous determination of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) and bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) was developed. The method was based on the competition between bisphenols (BPs) and fluorescein-labeled dexamethasone derivative (Dex-fl) for mouse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α ligand binding domain (mPPARα-LBD). A recombinant soluble protein derivative mPPARα-LBD* was prepared, then in vitro binding of 4 BPs to mPPARα-LBD* was investigated. Fluorescence polarization assay showed that these compounds exhibited different binding potencies with mPPARα-LBD*. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to further understand the mechanism of BPs binding affinity for mPPARα-LBD*. Docking results elucidated that the driving forces for the binding of BPs to mPPARα-LBD* were predominantly dependent on hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Comparison of the calculated binding energies vs. experimental binding affinities yielded a good correlation (R 2  = 0.7258). The proposed method has potential for multi-residue detection of BPA, BPF, BADGE, and BFDGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of norfloxacin with bovine serum albumin studied by different spectrometric methods; displacement studies, molecular modeling and chemometrics approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, Abdolhossein, E-mail: a_naseri@tabrizu.ac.ir [Departments of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666-16471 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Soheila [Departments of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666-16471 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zakery, Maryam; Khayamian, Taghi [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Serum albumins as major target proteins can bind to other ligands leading to alteration of their pharmacological properties. The mechanism of interaction between norfloxacin (NFLX) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated. Fuorescence quenching of serum albumin by this drug was found to be a static quenching process. The binding sites number, n, apparent binding constant, K, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures. The distance, r, between donor, BSA, and acceptor, NFLX, was calculated according to the Forster theory of non-radiation energy transfer. Also binding characteristics of NFLX with BSA together with its displacement from its binding site by kanamycin and effect of common metal ions on binding constant were investigated by the spectroscopic methods. The conformational change in the secondary structure of BSA upon interaction with NFLX was investigated qualitatively from synchronous fluorescence spectra, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometric methods. Molecular docking studies were performed to obtain information on the possible residues involved in the interaction process and changes in accessible surface area of the interacting residues. The results showed that the conformation of BSA changed in the presence of NFLX. For the first time, displacement studies were used for this interaction; displacement studies showed that NFLX was displaced by phenylbutazon and ketoprofen but was not displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of NFLX on albumin was site I. In addition a powerful chemometrics method, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least square, was used for resolution of spectroscopic augmented data obtained in two different titration modes in order to extract spectral information regardless of spectral overlapping of components. - Highlights: • Interaction between norfloxacin and BSA is studied by spectral methods. • Chemometrics methods are used to

  16. Individual Biomarkers Using Molecular Personalized Medicine Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Molecular personalized medicine tries to generate individual predictive biomarkers to assist doctors in their decision making. These are thought to improve the efficacy and lower the toxicity of a treatment. The molecular basis of the desired high-precision prediction is modern "omex" technologies providing high-throughput bioanalytical methods. These include genomics and epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, microbiomics, imaging, and functional analyses. In most cases, producing big data also requires a complex biomathematical analysis. Using molecular personalized medicine, the conventional physician's check of biomarker results may no longer be sufficient. By contrast, the physician may need to cooperate with the biomathematician to achieve the desired prediction on the basis of the analysis of individual big data typically produced by omex technologies. Identification of individual biomarkers using molecular personalized medicine approaches is thought to allow a decision-making for the precise use of a targeted therapy, selecting the successful therapeutic tool from a panel of preexisting drugs or medical products. This should avoid the treatment of nonresponders and responders that produces intolerable unwanted effects. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Modeling of molecular interaction between apoptin, BCR-Abl and CrkL--an alternative approach to conventional rational drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Panigrahi

    Full Text Available In this study we have calculated a 3D structure of apoptin and through modeling and docking approaches, we show its interaction with Bcr-Abl oncoprotein and its downstream signaling components, following which we confirm some of the newly-found interactions by biochemical methods. Bcr-Abl oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML. It has several distinct functional domains in addition to the Abl kinase domain. The SH3 and SH2 domains cooperatively play important roles in autoinhibiting its kinase activity. Adapter molecules such as Grb2 and CrkL interact with proline-rich region and activate multiple Bcr-Abl downstream signaling pathways that contribute to growth and survival. Therefore, the oncogenic effect of Bcr-Abl could be inhibited by the interaction of small molecules with these domains. Apoptin is a viral protein with well-documented cancer-selective cytotoxicity. Apoptin attributes such as SH2-like sequence similarity with CrkL SH2 domain, unique SH3 domain binding sequence, presence of proline-rich segments, and its nuclear affinity render the molecule capable of interaction with Bcr-Abl. Despite almost two decades of research, the mode of apoptin's action remains elusive because 3D structure of apoptin is unavailable. We performed in silico three-dimensional modeling of apoptin, molecular docking experiments between apoptin model and the known structure of Bcr-Abl, and the 3D structures of SH2 domains of CrkL and Bcr-Abl. We also biochemically validated some of the interactions that were first predicted in silico. This structure-property relationship of apoptin may help in unlocking its cancer-selective toxic properties. Moreover, such models will guide us in developing of a new class of potent apoptin-like molecules with greater selectivity and potency.

  18. Molecular modeling of inorganic compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comba, Peter; Hambley, Trevor W; Martin, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    ... mechanics to inorganic and coordination compounds. Initially, simple metal complexes were modeled, but recently the field has been extended to include organometallic compounds, catalysis and the interaction of metal ions with biological macromolecules. The application of molecular mechanics to coordination compounds is complicated by the numbe...

  19. The independent molecular interaction sites model. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, K.H.; Lippert, E.

    1981-01-01

    A new reference system for the treatment of molecular fluids within the framework of thermodynamic perturbation theory is presented. The basic ingredient of our approach is a potential transformation which allows us to view molecular liquids and gases as mixtures of formally independent molecular interaction sites (IMIS model). Some relations between out method and the RAM theory are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular biology tools in the field of bioadhesion is still in its infancy. For new research groups who are considering taking a molecular approach, the techniques presented here are essential to unravelling the sequence of a gene, its expression and its biological function. Here we provide an outline for addressing adhesion-related genes in diverse organisms. We show how to gradually narrow down the number of candidate transcripts that are involved in adhesion by (1 generating a transcriptome and a differentially expressed cDNA list enriched for adhesion-related transcripts, (2 setting up a BLAST search facility, (3 perform an in situ hybridization screen, and (4 functional analyses of selected genes by using RNA interference knock-down. Furthermore, latest developments in genome-editing are presented as new tools to study gene function. By using this iterative multi-technologies approach, the identification, isolation, expression and function of adhesion-related genes can be studied in most organisms. These tools will improve our understanding of the diversity of molecules used for adhesion in different organisms and these findings will help to develop innovative bio-inspired adhesives.

  1. Effects of Maternal Obesity on Fetal Programming: Molecular Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Caterina; Edlow, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. Obesity and a high-fat diet have been shown to have deleterious effects on fetal programming, predisposing offspring to adverse cardiometabolic and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Although large epidemiological studies have shown an association between maternal obesity and adverse outcomes for offspring, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Molecular approaches have played a key role in elucidating the mechanistic underpinnings of fetal malprogramming in the setting of maternal obesity. These approaches include, among others, characterization of epigenetic modifications, microRNA expression, the gut microbiome, the transcriptome, and evaluation of specific mRNA expression via quantitative reverse transcription polmerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in fetuses and offspring of obese females. This work will review the data from animal models and human fluids/cells regarding the effects of maternal obesity on fetal and offspring neurodevelopment and cardiometabolic outcomes, with a particular focus on molecular approaches. PMID:26337113

  2. Molecular approach of uranyl/mineral surfaces: theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roques, J.

    2009-01-01

    As migration of radio-toxic elements through the geosphere is one of the processes which may affect the safety of a radioactive waste storage site, the author shows that numerical modelling is a support to experimental result exploitation, and allows the development of new interpretation and prediction codes. He shows that molecular modelling can be used to study processes of interaction between an actinide ion (notably a uranyl ion) and a mineral surface (a TiO 2 substrate). He also reports the predictive theoretical study of the interaction between an uranyl ion and a gibbsite substrate

  3. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis

  4. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-01-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites

  5. Variational methods in molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents tutorial overviews for many applications of variational methods to molecular modeling. Topics discussed include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov-Feynman variational principle, square-gradient models, classical density functional theories, self-consistent-field theories, phase-field methods, Ginzburg-Landau and Helfrich-type phenomenological models, dynamical density functional theory, and variational Monte Carlo methods. Illustrative examples are given to facilitate understanding of the basic concepts and quantitative prediction of the properties and rich behavior of diverse many-body systems ranging from inhomogeneous fluids, electrolytes and ionic liquids in micropores, colloidal dispersions, liquid crystals, polymer blends, lipid membranes, microemulsions, magnetic materials and high-temperature superconductors. All chapters are written by leading experts in the field and illustrated with tutorial examples for their practical applications to specific subjects. With emphasis placed on physical unders...

  6. Molecular modeling of fentanyl analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA DOSEN-MICOVIC

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Fentanyl is a highly potent and clinically widely used narcotic analgesic. A large number of its analogs have been synthesized, some of which (sufentanil and alfentanyl are also in clinical use. Theoretical studies, in recent years, afforded a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships of this class of opiates and allowed insight into the molecular mechanism of the interactions of fentanyl analogs with their receptors. An overview of the current computational techniques for modeling fentanyl analogs, their receptors and ligand-receptor interactions is presented in this paper.

  7. Application and evaluation of a molecular approach for detection of the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® (myrrh in the murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. Lotfy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional PCR technique was used for studying the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® in the murine model. Results of the molecular study were compared with the parasitological results (ova and worm count. The used PCR technique was more sensitive than the Kato-Katz thick smears. Mirazid® showed some schistosomicidal effects against murine Schistosoma mansoni. However, it was not efficient enough to cure any of the studied mice.

  8. Molecular concepts of water splitting. Nature's approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Nicholas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies of natural systems, much has also been learned concerning the design principles required for biomimetic catalysis of water splitting and hydrogen evolution. In summary, these include use of abundant and inexpensive metals, the effective protection of the active sites in functional environments, repair/replacement of active components in case of damage, and the optimization of reaction rates. Biomimetic chemistry aims to mimic all these features; many labs are working toward this goal by developing new approaches in the design and synthesis of such systems, encompassing not only the catalytic center, but also smart matrices and assembly via self-organization. More stable catalysts that do not require self-repair may be obtained from fully artificial (inorganic) catalytic systems that are totally different from the biological ones and only apply some basic principles learned from nature. Metals other than Mn/Ca, Fe, and Ni could be used (e.g. Co) in new ligand spheres and other matrices. For light harvesting, charge separation/stabilization, and the effective coupling of the oxidizing/reducing equivalents to the redox catalysts, different methods have been proposed - for example, covalently linked molecular donor-acceptor systems, photo-voltaic devices, semiconductor-based systems, and photoactive metal complexes. The aim of all these approaches is to develop catalytic systems that split water with sunlight into hydrogen and oxygen while displaying high efficiency and long-term stability. Such a system - either biological, biomimetic, or bioinspired - has the potential to be used on a large scale to produce 'solar fuels' (e.g. hydrogen or secondary products thereof). (orig.)

  9. Approaches to USJ Formation Beyond Molecular Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatem, C.; Renau, A.; Godet, L.; Kontos, A.; Papasouliotis, G.; England, J.; Arevalo, E.

    2008-01-01

    As junction depth requirements approach sub 10 nm and the sensitivity to residual implant damage continues to increase, the capability to produce abrupt, shallow profiles while maintaining low residual damage becomes a difficult challenge. Implantation induced amorphization has been widely applied to reduce channeling tails of implanted dopant profiles for integrated circuit manufacturing. This has been required to meet aggressive junction depth targets. The problem, however, is that pre-amorphization creates high defect densities that remain near the former amorphous-crystalline interface post anneal. These end of range (EOR) defects become of greater concern as the industry begins to move towards millisecond anneal technologies. Millisecond anneal, while capable of close to diffusionless activation and abrupt junctions, has caused concern for its inability to fully repair these EOR defects. There has been a recent focus on removing traditional PAI through molecular implantation with limited success. Towards this end we have investigated alternative techniques to reduce EOR damage while maintaining the junction depth, sheet resistance and abruptness. Here we describe the results of two of these techniques. The subsequent reduction in EOR through the use of each process and the resultant Rs, junction depth and abruptness are detailed.

  10. Sex determination in Medfly: A molecular approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccone, G.; Pane, A.; Testa, G.; Santoro, M.; De Martino, G.; Di Paola, F.; Polito, L.C.; Louis, C.

    2000-01-01

    With the aim of developing new strategies of control to limit the damages inflicted on fruit crops by Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) (Medfly), a biotechnological approach is undertaken whereby female viability would be impaired or male viability would be improved following the introduction of specific genes into the genome of C. capitata. Only males will then be mass produced and released in the infested areas after sterilisation (Louis et al. 1987). Such conditional lethal or 'advantageous' genes could be expressed in transgenic flies either female-specifically or male-specifically by using cis regulative sequences obtained from previously isolated endogenous Ceratitis genes (Saccone et al. 1996, 1998). By using molecular strategies based on a subtractive technique, we have recently isolated male-specifically expressed genes in the Medfly. Furthermore, we present the current status of the research on the Ceratitis dsx gene, showing sex-specific alternative splicing as in Drosophila, and on the tra-inaZ strategy to induce in Drosophila flies female-specific conditional lethality

  11. Quantifying and Visualizing Uncertainties in Molecular Models

    OpenAIRE

    Rasheed, Muhibur; Clement, Nathan; Bhowmick, Abhishek; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-01-01

    Computational molecular modeling and visualization has seen significant progress in recent years with sev- eral molecular modeling and visualization software systems in use today. Nevertheless the molecular biology community lacks techniques and tools for the rigorous analysis, quantification and visualization of the associated errors in molecular structure and its associated properties. This paper attempts at filling this vacuum with the introduction of a systematic statistical framework whe...

  12. A molecular dynamics approach to barrodiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James; Marciante, Mathieu; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Unexpected phenomena in the reaction rates for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules have led to a renewed interest in the thermo-dynamically driven diffusion process for the past 10 years, often described collectively as barodiffusion. In the current context, barodiffusion would manifest as a process that separates ions of differing mass and charge ratios due to pressure and temperature gradients set-up through shock structures in the capsule core. Barrodiffusion includes additional mass transfer terms that account for the irreversible transport of species due to gradients in the system, both thermodynamic and electric e.g, i = - ρD [ ∇c +kp ∇ln(pi) +kT(i) ∇ln(Ti) +kt(e) ∇ln(Te) +eke/Ti ∇ϕ ] . Several groups have attacked this phenomena using continuum scale models and supplemented with kinetic theory to derive coefficients for the different diffusion terms based on assumptions about the collisional processes. In contrast, we have applied a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to this system to gain a first-principle understanding of the rate kinetics and to assess the accuracy of the differin

  13. HEDR modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-07-01

    This report details the conceptual approaches to be used in calculating radiation doses to individuals throughout the various periods of operations at the Hanford Site. The report considers the major environmental transport pathways--atmospheric, surface water, and ground water--and projects and appropriate modeling technique for each. The modeling sequence chosen for each pathway depends on the available data on doses, the degree of confidence justified by such existing data, and the level of sophistication deemed appropriate for the particular pathway and time period being considered

  14. Exploring pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) inhibitors: a predictive approach combining comparative validated multiple molecular modelling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Bhargava, Sonam; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2018-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) is a potential target for a number of neurodegenerative disorders such as Schizophrenia, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. A number of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine PDE1 inhibitors were subjected to different molecular modelling techniques [such as regression-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR): multiple linear regression, support vector machine and artificial neural network; classification-based QSAR: Bayesian modelling and Recursive partitioning; Monte Carlo based QSAR; Open3DQSAR; pharmacophore mapping and molecular docking analyses] to get a detailed knowledge about the physicochemical and structural requirements for higher inhibitory activity. The planarity of the pyrimidinone ring plays an important role for PDE1 inhibition. The N-methylated function at the 5th position of the pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine core is required for interacting with the PDE1 enzyme. The cyclopentyl ring fused with the parent scaffold is necessary for PDE1 binding potency. The phenylamino substitution at 3rd position is crucial for PDE1 inhibition. The N2-substitution at the pyrazole moiety is important for PDE1 inhibition compared to the N1-substituted analogues. Moreover, the p-substituted benzyl side chain at N2-position helps to enhance the PDE1 inhibitory profile. Depending on these observations, some new molecules are predicted that may possess better PDE1 inhibition.

  15. New approaches in mathematical biology: Information theory and molecular machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.

    1995-01-01

    My research uses classical information theory to study genetic systems. Information theory was founded by Claude Shannon in the 1940's and has had an enormous impact on communications engineering and computer sciences. Shannon found a way to measure information. This measure can be used to precisely characterize the sequence conservation at nucleic-acid binding sites. The resulting methods, by completely replacing the use of ''consensus sequences'', provide better models for molecular biologists. An excess of conservation led us to do experimental work on bacteriophage T7 promoters and the F plasmid IncD repeats. The wonderful fidelity of telephone communications and compact disk (CD) music can be traced directly to Shannon's channel capacity theorem. When rederived for molecular biology, this theorem explains the surprising precision of many molecular events. Through connections with the Second Law of Thermodyanmics and Maxwell's Demon, this approach also has implications for the development of technology at the molecular level. Discussions of these topics are held on the internet news group bionet.info-theo. (author). (Abstract only)

  16. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  17. Human butyrylcholinesterase polymorphism: Molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchekina, S; Delacour, H; Lockridge, O; Masson, P

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged apnoea following injection of ester-containing myoralaxants was first described in 1953. Because a large part of administered succinylcholine is shortly hydrolyzed by plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) under normal conditions, prolonged apnoea was attributed to deficiency in BChE. It was found that BChE deficiency was due to genetic variations. Human BChE gene shows a large polyallelism. About 75 natural mutations of the BCHE gene have been documented so far [1]. Most of them cause alteration in BChE activity through point mutation effect on catalytic activity. Frame shifts and stop codons may also affect expression, or cause truncations in the sequence. Recently, two novel BChE "silent" variants, Val204Asp [2] and Ala34Val [3], causing prolonged neuromuscular block after administration of mivacurium, were discovered. Mutations were genetically and kinetically characterized. The aim of the current study was to understand how these mutations determine "silent" phenotype. Molecular dynamics studies were carried out with NAMD 2.9 software at the Lomonosov supercomputer. Charmm 36 force field was used, periodical boundary conditions, 1 atm pressure, 298 K. 100 ns molecular dynamics runs were performed for the wild-type BChE and its mutants Val204Asp and Ala34Val. Unlike wild-type BChE, which retained its operative catalytic triad through the whole MD simulation, the catalytic triad of mutants was disrupted, making chemical step impossible. Val204Asp mutation leads to reorganization of hydrogen bonding network around the catalytic triad, which in turn increases the distance between catalytic residue main chains. Mutation Ala34Val, located on the protein surface, leads to increased fluctuations in the Ω-loop and subsequent disruption of the gorge structure, including disruption of the catalytic triad and formation of new hydrogen bonds involving catalytic center residues. Comparative study of the "silent" Ala328Asp mutant and the catalytically active mutant

  18. Machine Learning Approaches Toward Building Predictive Models for Small Molecule Modulators of miRNA and Its Utility in Virtual Screening of Molecular Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a number of pathological processes has suggested that they could act as potential drug targets. RNA-binding small molecules offer an attractive means for modulating miRNA function. The availability of bioassay data sets for a variety of biological assays and molecules in public domain provides a new opportunity toward utilizing them to create models and further utilize them for in silico virtual screening approaches to prioritize or assign potential functions for small molecules. Here, we describe a computational strategy based on machine learning for creation of predictive models from high-throughput biological screens for virtual screening of small molecules with the potential to inhibit microRNAs. Such models could be potentially used for computational prioritization of small molecules before performing high-throughput biological assay.

  19. Recent molecular approaches to understanding astrocyte function in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are a predominant glial cell type in the nervous systems, and are becoming recognized as important mediators of normal brain function as well as neurodevelopmental, neurological, and neurodegenerative brain diseases. Although numerous potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of astrocytes in the normal and diseased brain, research into the physiological relevance of these mechanisms in vivo is just beginning. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in innovative and powerful molecular approaches, including knockout mouse models, transgenic mouse models, and astrocyte-targeted gene transfer/expression, which have led to advances in understanding astrocyte biology in vivo that were heretofore inaccessible to experimentation. We will examine the recently improved understanding of the roles of astrocytes - with an emphasis on astrocyte signaling - in the context of both the healthy and diseased brain, discuss areas where the role of astrocytes remains debated, and suggest new research directions.

  20. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H + ), alkali metal cations (M + ), calcium ions (Ca 2+ ), and hydronium ions (H 3 O + ) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C 9 H 7 NS 2 ), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M + + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M + = H + , Li + , Na + , or K + . Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry

  1. Combinatorial chemistry approach to development of molecular plastic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godovsky, Dmitri; Inganäs, Olle; Brabec, Christoph J.; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.; Janssen, Rene A.J.; Prato, M.; Maggini, M.; Segura, Jose; Martin, Nazario

    1999-01-01

    We used a combinatorial chemistry approach to develop the molecular plastic solar cells based on soluble fullerene derivatives or solubilized TCNQ molecules in combination with conjugated polymers. Profiles, formed by the diffusion of low molecular weight component in the spin-cast polymer host were

  2. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV), a second-generation HIV protease inhibitor, is widely used across the world as an important component of HIV therapy. The interaction of DRV with bovine serum albumin (BSA), a major carrier protein, has been studied under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular modeling. Fluorescence data revealed that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by DRV in terms of a static quenching procedure due to the formation of the DRV-BSA complex. The results indicated the presence of single weak affinity binding site ( 103 M- 1, 310 K) on protein. The thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy change (ΔH0), entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG0) were calculated, which signified that the binding reaction was spontaneous, the main binding forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Importantly, competitive binding experiments with three site probes, phenylbutazone (in sub-domain IIA, site I), ibuprofen (in sub-domain IIIA, site II) and artemether (in the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB, site II'), suggested that DRV was preferentially bound to the hydrophobic cavity in site II' of BSA, and this finding was validated by the docking results. Additionally, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and Resonance Rayleigh Scattering (RRS) spectroscopy gave qualitative information on the conformational changes of BSA upon adding DRV, while quantitative data were obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  3. Exploring the Interactions of the Dietary Plant Flavonoids Fisetin and Naringenin with G-Quadruplex and Duplex DNA, Showing Contrasting Binding Behavior: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Snehasish; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K; Bhowmik, Sudipta

    2016-09-01

    Guanine-rich sequences have the propensity to fold into a four-stranded DNA structure known as a G-quadruplex (G4). G4 forming sequences are abundant in the promoter region of several oncogenes and become a key target for anticancer drug binding. Here we have studied the interactions of two structurally similar dietary plant flavonoids fisetin and naringenin with G4 as well as double stranded (duplex) DNA by using different spectroscopic and modeling techniques. Our study demonstrates the differential binding ability of the two flavonoids with G4 and duplex DNA. Fisetin more strongly interacts with parallel G4 structure than duplex DNA, whereas naringenin shows stronger binding affinity to duplex rather than G4 DNA. Molecular docking results also corroborate our spectroscopic results, and it was found that both of the ligands are stacked externally in the G4 DNA structure. C-ring planarity of the flavonoid structure appears to be a crucial factor for preferential G4 DNA recognition of flavonoids. The goal of this study is to explore the critical effects of small differences in the structure of closely similar chemical classes of such small molecules (flavonoids) which lead to the contrasting binding properties with the two different forms of DNA. The resulting insights may be expected to facilitate the designing of the highly selective G4 DNA binders based on flavonoid scaffolds.

  4. The cognitive life of mechanical molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical models of molecular structures as research tools has been central to the development of biochemistry and molecular biology. Intriguingly, it has received little attention from scholars of science. In this paper, I argue that these physical models are not mere three-dimensional representations but that they are in fact very special research tools: they are cognitive augmentations. Despite the fact that they are external props, these models serve as cognitive tools that augment and extend the modeler's cognitive capacities and performance in molecular modeling tasks. This cognitive enhancement is obtained because of the way the modeler interacts with these models, the models' materiality contributing to the solving of the molecule's structure. Furthermore, I argue that these material models and their component parts were designed, built and used specifically to serve as cognitive facilitators and cognitive augmentations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal force approach to molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Dieter; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-06-01

    Recent experiments are discussed where temperature gradients across mesoscopic pores are shown to provide essential mechanisms for autonomous molecular evolution. On the one hand, laminar thermal convection can drive DNA replication as the molecules are continuously cycled between hot and cold regions of a chamber. On the other hand, thermophoresis can accumulate charged biopolymers in similar convection settings. The experiments show that temperature differences analogous to those across porous rocks present a robust nonequilibrium boundary condition to feed the replication and accumulation of evolving molecules. It is speculated that similar nonequilibrium conditions near porous submarine hydrothermal mounds could have triggered the origin of life. In such a scenario, the encapsulation of cells with membranes would be a later development. It is expected that detailed studies of mesoscopic boundary conditions under nonequilibrium conditions will reveal new connecting pieces in the fascinating puzzle of the origins of life.

  6. Deep Generative Models for Molecular Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Winther, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Generative deep machine learning models now rival traditional quantum-mechanical computations in predicting properties of new structures, and they come with a significantly lower computational cost, opening new avenues in computational molecular science. In the last few years, a variety of deep...... generative models have been proposed for modeling molecules, which differ in both their model structure and choice of input features. We review these recent advances within deep generative models for predicting molecular properties, with particular focus on models based on the probabilistic autoencoder (or...

  7. Molecular approach of uranyl/mineral surfaces: experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drot, R.

    2009-01-01

    The author reports an experimental approach in which different spectroscopic approaches are coupled (laser spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy) to investigate the mechanisms controlling actinide sorption processes by different substrates, in order to assess radioactive waste storage site safety. Different substrates have been considered: monocrystalline or powdered TiO 2 , montmorillonite, and gibbsite

  8. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao; Ryno, Sean; Zhong, Cheng; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Sun, Zhenrong; Kö rzdö rfer, Thomas; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range

  9. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-01-05

    Darunavir (DRV), a second-generation HIV protease inhibitor, is widely used across the world as an important component of HIV therapy. The interaction of DRV with bovine serum albumin (BSA), a major carrier protein, has been studied under simulated physiological conditions (pH7.4) by multi-spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular modeling. Fluorescence data revealed that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by DRV in terms of a static quenching procedure due to the formation of the DRV-BSA complex. The results indicated the presence of single weak affinity binding site (~10 3 M -1 , 310K) on protein. The thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ), entropy change (ΔS 0 ) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG 0 ) were calculated, which signified that the binding reaction was spontaneous, the main binding forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Importantly, competitive binding experiments with three site probes, phenylbutazone (in sub-domain IIA, site I), ibuprofen (in sub-domain IIIA, site II) and artemether (in the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB, site II'), suggested that DRV was preferentially bound to the hydrophobic cavity in site II' of BSA, and this finding was validated by the docking results. Additionally, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and Resonance Rayleigh Scattering (RRS) spectroscopy gave qualitative information on the conformational changes of BSA upon adding DRV, while quantitative data were obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mathematical modeling of molecular motors

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the many complex processes taking place in living cells, transport of cargoes across the cytosceleton is fundamental to cell viability and activity. To move cargoes between the different cell parts, cells employ Molecular Motors. The motors operate by transporting cargoes along the so-called cellular micro-tubules, namely rope-like structures that connect, for instance, the cell-nucleus and outer membrane. We introduce a new Markov Chain, the killed Quasi-Random-Walk, for such transpo...

  11. Molecular targets in cancer therapy: the Ron approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Germano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase Ron and its ligand, Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP, mediate multiple processes involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration and protection from apoptosis. Dysregulated signaling of Ron, due to hyperactivation or loss of negative regulation, is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Growing evidence indicates that Ron is abnormally expressed and activated in certain types of primary epithelial cancers (i.e. breast, colon, lung, pancreas, bladder and thyroid, where it critically contributes to the maintenance of tumorigenic and invasive phenotype. Furthermore, a positive association between aberrant Ron expression and aggressive biological indicators as well as a worse clinical outcome have been reported in breast, bladder and thyroid carcinomas. Different approaches have proved effective in targeting receptor activation/expression both in vitro and in animal models, leading to reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype. Altogether these results show that Ron is an attractive molecular target for clinical intervention.

  12. Cinnamon in Anticancer Armamentarium: A Molecular Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindita Dutta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, natural bioactive components draw a major attention for their potent anticarcinogenic activity. Cinnamon, one of the traditional spices, most frequently used in almost every household of tropical countries has got enormous efficacy to combat cancer. Cinnamon as a whole and/or its active components exhibited significant antineoplastic activity in different types of cancer. This review has been carried out to elicit the molecular mechanisms of action of cinnamon and its components on oncogenic regulators and related pathways. Web sites of Google Scholar, Medline, and PubMed were searched for articles written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals from 2003 to 2017. The anticarcinogenic potential of cinnamon varies with the type of cancer and also depends on the administered active compound individually or in combination with some chemicals or even extract of cinnamon as a whole. Some of its active components exert chemosensitization of well-known anticancer drugs. These outstanding properties of this spice necessitate its incorporation in both pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals to explore possibilities of formulation of novel drug from this spice for treatment and prevention strategy of cancer.

  13. The emerging role of cloud computing in molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebejer, Jean-Paul; Fulle, Simone; Morris, Garrett M; Finn, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of cloud computing for large-scale and data-intensive applications. The distinguishing features of cloud computing and their relationship to other distributed computing paradigms are described, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. We review the use made to date of cloud computing for molecular modelling projects and the availability of front ends for molecular modelling applications. Although the use of cloud computing technologies for molecular modelling is still in its infancy, we demonstrate its potential by presenting several case studies. Rapid growth can be expected as more applications become available and costs continue to fall; cloud computing can make a major contribution not just in terms of the availability of on-demand computing power, but could also spur innovation in the development of novel approaches that utilize that capacity in more effective ways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular genetic approaches to the study of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, T J; Smith, J R; Pereira-Smith, O M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an inability of cells to synthesize DNA and divide, which results in a terminal loss of proliferation despite the maintenance of basic metabolic processes. Senescence has been proposed as a model for the study of aging at the cellular level, and the basis for this model system and its features have been summarized. Although strong experimental evidence exists to support the hypothesis that cellular senescence is a dominant active process, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain a mystery. Investigators have taken several approaches to gain a better understanding of senescence. Several groups have documented the differences between young and senescent cells, and others have identified changes that occur during the course of a cell's in vitro life span. Using molecular and biochemical approaches, important changes in gene expression and function of cell-cycle-associated products have been identified. The active production of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis has been demonstrated. This may represent the final step in a cascade of events governing senescence. The study of immortal cells which have escaped senescence has also provided useful information, particularly with regard to the genes governing the senescence program. These studies have identified four complementation groups for indefinite division, which suggests that there are at least four genes or gene pathways in the senescence program. Through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, chromosomes encoding senescence genes have been identified; efforts to clone these genes are ongoing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Agent-Based Modeling in Molecular Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2018-06-08

    Molecular systems orchestrating the biology of the cell typically involve a complex web of interactions among various components and span a vast range of spatial and temporal scales. Computational methods have advanced our understanding of the behavior of molecular systems by enabling us to test assumptions and hypotheses, explore the effect of different parameters on the outcome, and eventually guide experiments. While several different mathematical and computational methods are developed to study molecular systems at different spatiotemporal scales, there is still a need for methods that bridge the gap between spatially-detailed and computationally-efficient approaches. In this review, we summarize the capabilities of agent-based modeling (ABM) as an emerging molecular systems biology technique that provides researchers with a new tool in exploring the dynamics of molecular systems/pathways in health and disease. © 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Statistical Approach to Exoplanetary Molecular Spectroscopy Using Spitzer Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Garhart, Emily; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Todorov, Kamen

    2018-01-01

    Secondary eclipses of exoplanets observed using the Spitzer Space Telescope measure the total emission emergent from exoplanetary atmospheres integrated over broad photometric bands. Spitzer photometry is excellent for measuring day side temperatures, but is less well suited to the detection of molecular absorption or emission features. Even for very hot exoplanets, it can be difficult to attain the accuracy on eclipse depth that is needed to unambiguously interpret the Spitzer results in terms of molecular absorption or emission. However, a statistical approach, wherein we seek deviations from a simple blackbody planet as a function of the planet's equilibrium temperature, shows promise for defining the nature and strength of molecular absorption in ensembles of planets. In this paper, we explore such an approach using secondary eclipses observed for tens of hot exoplanets during Spitzer's Cycles 10, 12, and 13. We focus on the possibility that the hottest planets exhibit molecular features in emission, due to temperature inversions.

  17. Testing the molecular clock using mechanistic models of fossil preservation and molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Rachel C M; Yang, Ziheng; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2017-06-28

    Molecular sequence data provide information about relative times only, and fossil-based age constraints are the ultimate source of information about absolute times in molecular clock dating analyses. Thus, fossil calibrations are critical to molecular clock dating, but competing methods are difficult to evaluate empirically because the true evolutionary time scale is never known. Here, we combine mechanistic models of fossil preservation and sequence evolution in simulations to evaluate different approaches to constructing fossil calibrations and their impact on Bayesian molecular clock dating, and the relative impact of fossil versus molecular sampling. We show that divergence time estimation is impacted by the model of fossil preservation, sampling intensity and tree shape. The addition of sequence data may improve molecular clock estimates, but accuracy and precision is dominated by the quality of the fossil calibrations. Posterior means and medians are poor representatives of true divergence times; posterior intervals provide a much more accurate estimate of divergence times, though they may be wide and often do not have high coverage probability. Our results highlight the importance of increased fossil sampling and improved statistical approaches to generating calibrations, which should incorporate the non-uniform nature of ecological and temporal fossil species distributions. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Metal cluster fission: jellium model and Molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2004-01-01

    Fission of doubly charged sodium clusters is studied using the open-shell two-center deformed jellium model approximation and it ab initio molecular dynamic approach accounting for all electrons in the system. Results of calculations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ + Na_3^+ and Na_18...

  19. Molecular models of zinc phthalocyanines: semi-empirical molecular orbital computations and physicochemical properties studied by molecular mechanics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantchev, Tsvetan G.; van Lier, Johan E.; Hunting, Darel J.

    2005-01-01

    To build 3D-molecular models of Zinc-phthalocyanines (ZnPc) and to study their diverse chemical and photosensitization properties, we performed quantum mechanical molecular orbital (MO) semi-empirical (AM1) computations of the ground, excited singlet and triplet states as well as free radical (ionic) species. RHF and UHF (open shell) geometry optimizations led to near-perfect symmetrical ZnPc. Predicted ionization potentials (IP), electron affinities (EA) and lowest electronic transitions of ZnPc are in good agreement with the published experimental and theoretical data. The computation-derived D 4h /D 2h -symmetry 3D-structures of ground and excited states and free radicals of ZnPc, together with the frontier orbital energies and Mulliken electron population analysis enabled us to build robust molecular models. These models were used to predict important chemical-reactivity entities such as global electronegativity (χ), hardness (η) and local softness based on Fukui-functions analysis. Examples of molecular mechanics (MM) applications of the 3D-molecular models are presented as approaches to evaluate solvation free energy (ΔG 0 ) solv and to estimate ground- and excited- state oxidation/reduction potentials as well as intermolecular interactions and stability of ground and excited state dimers (exciplexes) and radical ion-pairs

  20. Integrated multiscale modeling of molecular computing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, Peter T; Leng Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Molecular electronics, in which single organic molecules are designed to perform the functions of transistors, diodes, switches and other circuit elements used in current siliconbased microelecronics, is drawing wide interest as a potential replacement technology for conventional silicon-based lithographically etched microelectronic devices. In addition to their nanoscopic scale, the additional advantage of molecular electronics devices compared to silicon-based lithographically etched devices is the promise of being able to produce them cheaply on an industrial scale using wet chemistry methods (i.e., self-assembly from solution). The design of molecular electronics devices, and the processes to make them on an industrial scale, will require a thorough theoretical understanding of the molecular and higher level processes involved. Hence, the development of modeling techniques for molecular electronics devices is a high priority from both a basic science point of view (to understand the experimental studies in this field) and from an applied nanotechnology (manufacturing) point of view. Modeling molecular electronics devices requires computational methods at all length scales - electronic structure methods for calculating electron transport through organic molecules bonded to inorganic surfaces, molecular simulation methods for determining the structure of self-assembled films of organic molecules on inorganic surfaces, mesoscale methods to understand and predict the formation of mesoscale patterns on surfaces (including interconnect architecture), and macroscopic scale methods (including finite element methods) for simulating the behavior of molecular electronic circuit elements in a larger integrated device. Here we describe a large Department of Energy project involving six universities and one national laboratory aimed at developing integrated multiscale methods for modeling molecular electronics devices. The project is funded equally by the Office of Basic

  1. Limiting assumptions in molecular modeling: electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Garland R

    2013-02-01

    Molecular mechanics attempts to represent intermolecular interactions in terms of classical physics. Initial efforts assumed a point charge located at the atom center and coulombic interactions. It is been recognized over multiple decades that simply representing electrostatics with a charge on each atom failed to reproduce the electrostatic potential surrounding a molecule as estimated by quantum mechanics. Molecular orbitals are not spherically symmetrical, an implicit assumption of monopole electrostatics. This perspective reviews recent evidence that requires use of multipole electrostatics and polarizability in molecular modeling.

  2. Molecular dynamics modeling of polymer flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyden, M.R.; Brown, J.E.; Lomakin, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were used to identify factors which promote char formation during the thermal degradation of polymers. Computer movies based on these simulations, indicate that cross-linked model polymers tend to undergo further cross-linking when burned, eventually forming a high molecular weight, thermally stable char. This paper reports that the prediction was confirmed by char yield measurements made on γ and e - -irradiated polyethylene and chemically cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate)

  3. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...

  4. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C W; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C

    2016-01-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma–biomolecule interactions. (paper)

  5. Modeling Complex Workflow in Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomah, Mohamed E.; Turley, James P.; Lu, Huimin; Jones, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One of the hurdles to achieving personalized medicine has been implementing the laboratory processes for performing and reporting complex molecular tests. The rapidly changing test rosters and complex analysis platforms in molecular diagnostics have meant that many clinical laboratories still use labor-intensive manual processing and testing without the level of automation seen in high-volume chemistry and hematology testing. We provide here a discussion of design requirements and the results of implementation of a suite of lab management tools that incorporate the many elements required for use of molecular diagnostics in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer. These applications provide the functionality required for sample accessioning and tracking, material generation, and testing that are particular to the evolving needs of individualized molecular diagnostics. On implementation, the applications described here resulted in improvements in the turn-around time for reporting of more complex molecular test sets, and significant changes in the workflow. Therefore, careful mapping of workflow can permit design of software applications that simplify even the complex demands of specialized molecular testing. By incorporating design features for order review, software tools can permit a more personalized approach to sample handling and test selection without compromising efficiency. PMID:20007844

  6. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  7. Molecular approaches to detect and study the organisms causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review will summarise the molecular approaches used to detect and analyse the genomes of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale which cause bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. These tick borne diseases are widely distributed in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America and for ...

  8. Material Modelling - Composite Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    is successfully justified comparing predicted results with experimental data obtained in the HETEK-project on creep, relaxation, and shrinkage of very young concretes cured at a temperature of T = 20^o C and a relative humidity of RH = 100%. The model is also justified comparing predicted creep, shrinkage......, and internal stresses caused by drying shrinkage with experimental results reported in the literature on the mechanical behavior of mature concretes. It is then concluded that the model presented applied in general with respect to age at loading.From a stress analysis point of view the most important finding...... in this report is that cement paste and concrete behave practically as linear-viscoelastic materials from an age of approximately 10 hours. This is a significant age extension relative to earlier studies in the literature where linear-viscoelastic behavior is only demonstrated from ages of a few days. Thus...

  9. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials. (topical review)

  10. Molecular modeling: An open invitation for applied mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2013-10-01

    Molecular modeling methods provide a very wide range of challenges for innovative mathematical and computational techniques, where often high dimensionality, large sets of data, and complicated interrelations imply a multitude of iterative approximations. The physical and chemical basis of these methodologies involves quantum mechanics with several non-intuitive aspects, where classical interpretation and classical analogies are often misleading or outright wrong. Hence, instead of the everyday, common sense approaches which work so well in engineering, in molecular modeling one often needs to rely on rather abstract mathematical constraints and conditions, again emphasizing the high level of reliance on applied mathematics. Yet, the interdisciplinary aspects of the field of molecular modeling also generates some inertia and perhaps too conservative reliance on tried and tested methodologies, that is at least partially caused by the less than up-to-date involvement in the newest developments in applied mathematics. It is expected that as more applied mathematicians take up the challenge of employing the latest advances of their field in molecular modeling, important breakthroughs may follow. In this presentation some of the current challenges of molecular modeling are discussed.

  11. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  12. Molecular level in silico studies for oncology. Direct models review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psakhie, S. G.; Tsukanov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The combination of therapy and diagnostics in one process "theranostics" is a trend in a modern medicine, especially in oncology. Such an approach requires development and usage of multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles with a hierarchical structure. Numerical methods and mathematical models play a significant role in the design of the hierarchical nanoparticles and allow looking inside the nanoscale mechanisms of agent-cell interactions. The current position of in silico approach in biomedicine and oncology is discussed. The review of the molecular level in silico studies in oncology, which are using the direct models, is presented.

  13. Grid computing in large pharmaceutical molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Brian L; Johnson, Stephen R

    2008-07-01

    Most major pharmaceutical companies have employed grid computing to expand their compute resources with the intention of minimizing additional financial expenditure. Historically, one of the issues restricting widespread utilization of the grid resources in molecular modeling is the limited set of suitable applications amenable to coarse-grained parallelization. Recent advances in grid infrastructure technology coupled with advances in application research and redesign will enable fine-grained parallel problems, such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, which were previously inaccessible to the grid environment. This will enable new science as well as increase resource flexibility to load balance and schedule existing workloads.

  14. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  15. Adult soft tissue sarcomas: conventional therapies and molecularly targeted approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo R; Brandes, Alba; Nitti, Donato

    2006-02-01

    The therapeutic approach to soft tissue sarcomas (STS) has evolved over the past two decades based on the results from randomized controlled trials, which are guiding physicians in the treatment decision-making process. Despite significant improvements in the control of local disease, a significant number of patients ultimately die of recurrent/metastatic disease following radical surgery due to a lack of effective adjuvant treatments. In addition, the characteristic chemoresistance of STS has compromised the therapeutic value of conventional antineoplastic agents in cases of unresectable advanced/metastatic disease. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the prognosis of patients with STS. Recent advances in STS biology are paving the way to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic strategies, the efficacy of which relies not only on the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development/progression but also on the personalization of the therapeutic regimen according to the molecular features of individual tumours. In this work, we review the state-of-the-art of conventional treatments for STS and summarize the most promising findings in the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches.

  16. Molecular Simulation towards Efficient and Representative Subsurface Reservoirs Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the application of Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Molecular Dynamics (MD) in modeling thermodynamics and flow of subsurface reservoir fluids. At first, MC molecular simulation is proposed as a promising method

  17. molecular biology approach to the search for novel hiv proteases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... which could be tested in the animal models of HIV infection before subjection to clinical trials. Optimistically, the magic HIV therapeutics may be hidden in such insects and may require the application of molecular biology techniques to unravel. KEY WORDS: Antiretroviral drugs, malaria, proteases, restriction enzymes, ...

  18. Stability of nanofluids: Molecular dynamic approach and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, H.; Behzadmehr, A.; Yaghoubi, M.; Samimi, A.; Sarvari, S.M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanofluid stability is investigated and discussed. • A molecular dynamic approach, considering different forces on the nanoparticles, is adopted. • Stability diagrams are presented for different thermo-fluid conditions. • An experimental investigation is carried out to confirm the theoretical approach. - Abstract: Nanofluids as volumetric absorbent in solar energy conversion devices or as working fluid in different heat exchangers have been proposed by various researchers. However, dispersion stability of nanofluids is an important issue that must be well addressed before any industrial applications. Conditions such as severe temperature gradient, high temperature of heat transfer fluid, nanoparticle mean diameters and types of nanoparticles and base fluid are among the most effective parameters on the stability of nanofluid. A molecular dynamic approach, considering kinetic energy of nanoparticles and DLVO potential energy between nanoparticles, is adopted to study the nanofluid stability for different nanofluids at different working conditions. Different forces such as Brownian, thermophoresis, drag and DLVO are considered to introduce the stability diagrams. The latter presents the conditions for which a nanofluid can be stable. In addition an experimental investigation is carried out to find a stable nanofluid and to show the validity of the theoretical approach. There is a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results that confirms the validity of our theoretical approach.

  19. Homology modeling, docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations using graphical processing unit architecture to probe the type-11 phosphodiesterase catalytic site: a computational approach for the rational design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichero, Elena; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Moscatelli, Marco; Bruno, Olga; Orro, Alessandro; Rotolo, Chiara; Milanesi, Luciano; Fossa, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11 (PDE11) is the latest isoform of the PDEs family to be identified, acting on both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The initial reports of PDE11 found evidence for PDE11 expression in skeletal muscle, prostate, testis, and salivary glands; however, the tissue distribution of PDE11 still remains a topic of active study and some controversy. Given the sequence similarity between PDE11 and PDE5, several PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to cross-react with PDE11. Accordingly, many non-selective inhibitors, such as IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, and dipyridamole, have been documented to inhibit PDE11. Only recently, a series of dihydrothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one derivatives proved to be selective toward the PDE11 isoform. In the absence of experimental data about PDE11 X-ray structures, we found interesting to gain a better understanding of the enzyme-inhibitor interactions using in silico simulations. In this work, we describe a computational approach based on homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to derive a predictive 3D model of PDE11. Using a Graphical Processing Unit architecture, it is possible to perform long simulations, find stable interactions involved in the complex, and finally to suggest guideline for the identification and synthesis of potent and selective inhibitors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Interfacial Behaviors of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    potential was originally designed for the modeling of mixed covalent- ionic bonding and was successfully used to describe oxides in crystalline, glassy, and...is separates from the bulk liquid polymer, i.e., the structure of this layer, as influenced by that of the meatal surface, is significantly more...Striolo, J. Kieffer, and P. Cummings, ’Evaluation of Force- fields for molecular simulation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes,’ J. Phys. Chem

  1. Applications of Molecular and Materials Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Chimica Industriale Molecular modeling of solvation Prof. Jacopo Tomasi http://www.dcci.unipi.it/attivita /attivita.html; http://www.dcci.unipi.it...solutions/ cases/notes/scale.html BNFL Sorption of gases in zeolites Dr. Scott L. Owens http://www.bnfl.co.uk/ BAE (British Aerospace Engineering) Rare...permeation of gases ; adhesion and interfacial interactions of siloxane networks; chemical reactivity and catalysis; environmental and cosmetics

  2. Modeling of nanotoxicity molecular interactions of nanomaterials with bionanomachines

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling and its implications for the development of novel nanomedicines. It lays out the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling for an array of nanomaterial systems, ranging from carbon-based nanoparticles to noble metals, metal oxides, and quantum dots. The author illustrates how molecular (classical mechanics) and atomic (quantum mechanics) modeling approaches can be applied to bolster our understanding of many important aspects of this critical nanotoxicity issue. Each chapter is organized by types of nanomaterials for practicality, making this an ideal book for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers in nanotechnology, chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and computer science. It is also of interest to academic and industry professionals who work on nanodrug delivery and related biomedical applications, and aids readers in their biocompatibility assessment efforts in the coming age of nanotechnology...

  3. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttikonda, Satish K; Marri, Pradeep; Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish K Guttikonda

    Full Text Available Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions.

  5. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun Ki; Herbst, Roy

    2006-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  6. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2008-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  7. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  8. A molecular prognostic model predicts esophageal squamous cell carcinoma prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hui Cao

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC has the highest mortality rates in China. The 5-year survival rate of ESCC remains dismal despite improvements in treatments such as surgical resection and adjuvant chemoradiation, and current clinical staging approaches are limited in their ability to effectively stratify patients for treatment options. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to develop an immunohistochemistry-based prognostic model to improve clinical risk assessment for patients with ESCC.We developed a molecular prognostic model based on the combined expression of axis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphorylated Specificity protein 1 (p-Sp1, and Fascin proteins. The presence of this prognostic model and associated clinical outcomes were analyzed for 130 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded esophageal curative resection specimens (generation dataset and validated using an independent cohort of 185 specimens (validation dataset.The expression of these three genes at the protein level was used to build a molecular prognostic model that was highly predictive of ESCC survival in both generation and validation datasets (P = 0.001. Regression analysis showed that this molecular prognostic model was strongly and independently predictive of overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.358 [95% CI, 1.391-3.996], P = 0.001 in generation dataset; hazard ratio = 1.990 [95% CI, 1.256-3.154], P = 0.003 in validation dataset. Furthermore, the predictive ability of these 3 biomarkers in combination was more robust than that of each individual biomarker.This technically simple immunohistochemistry-based molecular model accurately predicts ESCC patient survival and thus could serve as a complement to current clinical risk stratification approaches.

  9. Observational Constraints for Modeling Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, S. R.

    2014-02-01

    Ground-based and space-borne observations of diffuse molecular clouds suggest a number of areas where further improvements to modeling efforts is warranted. I will highlight those that have the widest applicability. The range in CO fractionation caused by selective isotope photodissociation, in particular the large 12C16O/13C16O ratios observed toward stars in Ophiuchus, is not reproduced well by current models. Our ongoing laboratory measurements of oscillator strengths and predissociation rates for Rydberg transitions in CO isotopologues may help clarify the situtation. The CH+ abundance continues to draw attention. Small scale structure seen toward ζ Per may provide additional constraints on the possible synthesis routes. The connection between results from optical transitions and those from radio and sub-millimeter wave transitions requires further effort. A study of OH+ and OH toward background stars reveals that these species favor different environments. This brings to focus the need to model each cloud along the line of sight separately, and to allow the physical conditions to vary within an individual cloud, in order to gain further insight into the chemistry. Now that an extensive set of data on molecular excitation is available, the models should seek to reproduce these data to place further constraints on the modeling results.

  10. Evaluation of the molecular level visualisation approach for teaching and learning chemistry in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenglengdi, Butsari

    . Pre-test and post-test scores were compared across the three classes. The results from the multiple choice and calculation tests showed that the Class C - molecular level visualisation approach group demonstrated a deeper understanding of chemistry concepts than students in Classes A and B. However, the results showed that all the students were unable to perform satisfactorily on the calculation tests because the students had insufficient prior knowledge about stoichiometry to connect with the new knowledge. In the drawing tests the students exposed to the molecular level visualisation approach had a better mental model than the other classes, albeit with some remaining misconceptions. The findings highlight the intersecting nature of the teacher, student, and modelling in chemistry teaching. Use of a multi-step molecular level visualisation approach that encourages observation, reflection of prior understanding, and multiple opportunities at viewing (and using various visualisation elements), are key elements leading to a deeper understanding of chemistry. Presentation of the multi-step molecular level visualisation approach must be coupled with careful consideration of student prior knowledge, and with adequate guidance from a teacher who understands the topics at a deep level.

  11. A multiscale modeling approach for biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowling, Alan, E-mail: bowling@uta.edu; Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi.haghshenasjaryani@mavs.uta.edu [The University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (United States)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new multiscale molecular dynamic model for investigating the effects of external interactions, such as contact and impact, during stepping and docking of motor proteins and other biomolecular systems. The model retains the mass properties ensuring that the result satisfies Newton’s second law. This idea is presented using a simple particle model to facilitate discussion of the rigid body model; however, the particle model does provide insights into particle dynamics at the nanoscale. The resulting three-dimensional model predicts a significant decrease in the effect of the random forces associated with Brownian motion. This conclusion runs contrary to the widely accepted notion that the motor protein’s movements are primarily the result of thermal effects. This work focuses on the mechanical aspects of protein locomotion; the effect ATP hydrolysis is estimated as internal forces acting on the mechanical model. In addition, the proposed model can be numerically integrated in a reasonable amount of time. Herein, the differences between the motion predicted by the old and new modeling approaches are compared using a simplified model of myosin V.

  12. Gradient Models in Molecular Biophysics: Progress, Challenges, Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2013-12-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g. molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding features such as nonlocal dielectric response, and nonlinearities resulting from dielectric saturation. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost forty years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The paper concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics.

  13. Gradient Models in Molecular Biophysics: Progress, Challenges, Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g. molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding features such as nonlocal dielectric response, and nonlinearities resulting from dielectric saturation. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost forty years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The paper concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics. PMID:25505358

  14. Gradient models in molecular biophysics: progress, challenges, opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2013-12-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding nonlocal dielectric response. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain, and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost 40 years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The review concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics.

  15. Percolation approach for atomic and molecular cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knospe, O.; Seifert, G.

    1987-12-01

    We apply a percolation approach for the theoretical analysis of mass spectra of molecular microclusters obtained by adiabatic expansion technique. The evolution of the shape of the experimental size distributions as function of stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature are theoretically reproduced by varying the percolation parameter. Remaining discrepancies between theory and experiment are discussed. In addition, the even-odd alternation as well as the 'magic' shell structure within metallic, secondary ion mass spectra are investigated by introducing statistical weights for the cluster formation probabilities. Shell correction energies of atomic clusters as function of cluster-size are deduced from the experimental data. (orig.)

  16. Hybrid Metaheuristic Approach for Nonlocal Optimization of Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Yang, Jack; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Waller, Mark P

    2013-04-09

    Accurate modeling of molecular systems requires a good knowledge of the structure; therefore, conformation searching/optimization is a routine necessity in computational chemistry. Here we present a hybrid metaheuristic optimization (HMO) algorithm, which combines ant colony optimization (ACO) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) for the optimization of molecular systems. The HMO implementation meta-optimizes the parameters of the ACO algorithm on-the-fly by the coupled PSO algorithm. The ACO parameters were optimized on a set of small difluorinated polyenes where the parameters exhibited small variance as the size of the molecule increased. The HMO algorithm was validated by searching for the closed form of around 100 molecular balances. Compared to the gradient-based optimized molecular balance structures, the HMO algorithm was able to find low-energy conformations with a 87% success rate. Finally, the computational effort for generating low-energy conformation(s) for the phenylalanyl-glycyl-glycine tripeptide was approximately 60 CPU hours with the ACO algorithm, in comparison to 4 CPU years required for an exhaustive brute-force calculation.

  17. Evaporator modeling - A hybrid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xudong; Cai Wenjian; Jia Lei; Wen Changyun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid modeling approach is proposed to model two-phase flow evaporators. The main procedures for hybrid modeling includes: (1) Based on the energy and material balance, and thermodynamic principles to formulate the process fundamental governing equations; (2) Select input/output (I/O) variables responsible to the system performance which can be measured and controlled; (3) Represent those variables existing in the original equations but are not measurable as simple functions of selected I/Os or constants; (4) Obtaining a single equation which can correlate system inputs and outputs; and (5) Identify unknown parameters by linear or nonlinear least-squares methods. The method takes advantages of both physical and empirical modeling approaches and can accurately predict performance in wide operating range and in real-time, which can significantly reduce the computational burden and increase the prediction accuracy. The model is verified with the experimental data taken from a testing system. The testing results show that the proposed model can predict accurately the performance of the real-time operating evaporator with the maximum error of ±8%. The developed models will have wide applications in operational optimization, performance assessment, fault detection and diagnosis

  18. Molecular structure based property modeling: Development/ improvement of property models through a systematic property-data-model analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao; Sarup, Bent; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    models. To make the property-data-model analysis fast and efficient, an approach based on the “molecular structure similarity criteria” to identify molecules (mono-functional, bi-functional, etc.) containing specified set of structural parameters (that is, groups) is employed. The method has been applied...

  19. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for [ 3 H]NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections

  20. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  1. An approach towards understanding the structure of complex molecular systems: the case of lower aliphatic alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrhovsek, Aleksander; Gereben, Orsolya; Pothoczki, Szilvia; Pusztai, Laszlo [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Tomsic, Matija; Jamnik, Andrej [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 5, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kohara, Shinji, E-mail: aleksander.vrhovsek@gmail.co [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2010-10-13

    An extensive study of liquid aliphatic alcohols methanol, ethanol, and propanol, applying reverse Monte Carlo modelling as a method of interpretation of diffraction data, is presented. The emphasis is on the evaluation of several computational strategies in view of their suitability to obtain high quality molecular models via the reverse Monte Carlo procedure. A consistent set of distances of closest approach and fixed neighbour constraints applicable to all three investigated systems was developed. An all-atom description is compared with a united-atom approach. The potentialities of employment of neutron diffraction data of completely deuterated and isotopically substituted samples, x-ray diffraction data, and results of either molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo calculations were investigated. Results show that parallel application of x-ray and neutron diffraction data, the latter being from completely deuterated samples, within an all-atom reverse Monte Carlo procedure is the most successful strategy towards attaining reliable, detailed, and well-structured molecular models, especially if the models are subsequently refined with the results of molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  3. Proteomic-Biostatistic Integrated Approach for Finding the Underlying Molecular Determinants of Hypertension in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjala, Prathibha R; Jankowski, Vera; Heinze, Georg; Bilo, Grzegorz; Zanchetti, Alberto; Noels, Heidi; Liehn, Elisa; Perco, Paul; Schulz, Anna; Delles, Christian; Kork, Felix; Biessen, Erik; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Floege, Juergen; Soranna, Davide; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Despite advancements in lowering blood pressure, the best approach to lower it remains controversial because of the lack of information on the molecular basis of hypertension. We, therefore, performed plasma proteomics of plasma from patients with hypertension to identify molecular determinants detectable in these subjects but not in controls and vice versa. Plasma samples from hypertensive subjects (cases; n=118) and controls (n=85) from the InGenious HyperCare cohort were used for this study and performed mass spectrometric analysis. Using biostatistical methods, plasma peptides specific for hypertension were identified, and a model was developed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression. The underlying peptides were identified and sequenced off-line using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization orbitrap mass spectrometry. By comparison of the molecular composition of the plasma samples, 27 molecular determinants were identified differently expressed in cases from controls. Seventy percent of the molecular determinants selected were found to occur less likely in hypertensive patients. In cross-validation, the overall R 2 was 0.434, and the area under the curve was 0.891 with 95% confidence interval 0.8482 to 0.9349, P hypertensive patients were found to be -2.007±0.3568 and 3.383±0.2643, respectively, P hypertensives and normotensives. The identified molecular determinants may be the starting point for further studies to clarify the molecular causes of hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eling studies is generally a two-dimensional drawing of a re- quired molecule. ... The most active area of theoretical research using molecular orbi tal theory has been in ... minimum energy structure for example, by using conjugated gradient algorithm .... QSARwas applied to understand how the structure might be modified ...

  5. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we

  6. Advances in molecular modeling of human cytochrome P450 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Virginie Y; Miteva, Maria A

    2013-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a supergene family of metabolizing enzymes involved in the phase I metabolism of drugs and endogenous compounds. CYP oxidation often leads to inactive drug metabolites or to highly toxic or carcinogenic metabolites involved in adverse drug reactions (ADR). During the last decade, the impact of CYP polymorphism in various drug responses and ADR has been demonstrated. Of the drugs involved in ADR, 56% are metabolized by polymorphic phase I metabolizing enzymes, 86% among them being CYP. Here, we review the major CYP polymorphic forms, their impact for drug response and current advances in molecular modeling of CYP polymorphism. We focus on recent studies exploring CYP polymorphism performed by the use of sequence-based and/or protein-structure-based computational approaches. The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms related to CYP polymorphism and drug response at the atomic level is outlined. © 2013.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Approach in Designing Thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau, N. D.; Sianturi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics methods we have applied as a tool in designing thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase, by examining Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and The Stability of the Secondary Structure of enzymes structure at its optimum temperature and compare with its high temperature behavior. As RMSD represents structural fluctuation at a particular temperature, a better understanding of this factor will suggest approaches to bioengineer these enzymes to enhance their thermostability. In this work molecular dynamic simulations of Aspergillus niger xylanase (ANX) have been carried at 400K (optimum catalytic temperature) for 2.5 ns and 500K (ANX reported inactive temperature) for 2.5 ns. Analysis have shown that the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) significant increase at higher temperatures compared at optimum temperature and some of the secondary structures of ANX that have been damaged at high temperature. Structural analysis revealed that the fluctuations of the α-helix and β-sheet regions are larger at higher temperatures compared to the fluctuations at optimum temperature.

  8. Rapid Molecular Identification of Human Taeniid Cestodes by Pyrosequencing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  9. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongjit Thanchomnang

    Full Text Available Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1 gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse.

  10. Computing the blood brain barrier (BBB) diffusion coefficient: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamloo, Amir, E-mail: shamloo@sharif.edu; Pedram, Maysam Z.; Heidari, Hossein; Alasty, Aria, E-mail: aalasti@sharif.edu

    2016-07-15

    Various physical and biological aspects of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) structure still remain unfolded. Therefore, among the several mechanisms of drug delivery, only a few have succeeded in breaching this barrier, one of which is the use of Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs). However, a quantitative characterization of the BBB permeability is desirable to find an optimal magnetic force-field. In the present study, a molecular model of the BBB is introduced that precisely represents the interactions between MNPs and the membranes of Endothelial Cells (ECs) that form the BBB. Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) simulations of the BBB crossing phenomenon have been carried out. Mathematical modeling of the BBB as an input-output system has been considered from a system dynamics modeling viewpoint, enabling us to analyze the BBB behavior based on a robust model. From this model, the force profile required to overcome the barrier has been extracted for a single NP from the SMD simulations at a range of velocities. Using this data a transfer function model has been obtained and the diffusion coefficient is evaluated. This study is a novel approach to bridge the gap between nanoscale models and microscale models of the BBB. The characteristic diffusion coefficient has the nano-scale molecular effects inherent, furthermore reducing the computational costs of a nano-scale simulation model and enabling much more complex studies to be conducted. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulation of crossing nano-particles through the BBB membrane at different velocities. • Recording the position of nano-particle and the membrane-NP interaction force profile. • Identification of a frequency domain model for the membrane. • Calculating the diffusion coefficient based on MD simulation and identified model. • Obtaining a relation between continuum medium and discrete medium.

  11. Molecular genetics and livestock selection. Approaches, opportunities and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Following domestication, livestock were selected both naturally through adaptation to their environments and by man so that they would fulfil a particular use. As selection methods have become more sophisticated, rapid progress has been made in improving those traits that are easily measured. However, selection has also resulted in decreased diversity. In some cases, improved breeds have replaced local breeds, risking the loss of important survival traits. The advent of molecular genetics provides the opportunity to identify the genes that control particular traits by a gene mapping approach. However, as with selection, the early mapping studies focused on traits that are easy to measure. Where molecular genetics can play a valuable role in livestock production is by providing the means to select effectively for traits that are difficult to measure. Identifying the genes underpinning particular traits requires a population in which these traits are segregating. Fortunately, several experimental populations have been created that have allowed a wide range of traits to be studied. Gene mapping work in these populations has shown that the role of particular genes in controlling variation in a given trait can depend on the genetic background. A second finding is that the most favourable alleles for a trait may in fact. be present in animals that perform poorly for the trait. In the long term, knowledge of -the genes controlling particular traits, and the way they interact with the genetic background, will allow introgression between breeds and the assembly of genotypes that are best suited to particular environments, producing animals with the desired characteristics. If used wisely, this approach will maintain genetic diversity while improving performance over a wide range of desired traits. (author)

  12. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  13. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies

  14. Complement Involvement in Periodontitis: Molecular Mechanisms and Rational Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis.

  15. Bayesian semiparametric regression models to characterize molecular evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta Saheli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical models and methods that associate changes in the physicochemical properties of amino acids with natural selection at the molecular level typically do not take into account the correlations between such properties. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical regression model with a generalization of the Dirichlet process prior on the distribution of the regression coefficients that describes the relationship between the changes in amino acid distances and natural selection in protein-coding DNA sequence alignments. Results The Bayesian semiparametric approach is illustrated with simulated data and the abalone lysin sperm data. Our method identifies groups of properties which, for this particular dataset, have a similar effect on evolution. The model also provides nonparametric site-specific estimates for the strength of conservation of these properties. Conclusions The model described here is distinguished by its ability to handle a large number of amino acid properties simultaneously, while taking into account that such data can be correlated. The multi-level clustering ability of the model allows for appealing interpretations of the results in terms of properties that are roughly equivalent from the standpoint of molecular evolution.

  16. Towards high-throughput molecular detection of Plasmodium: new approaches and molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Christophe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several strategies are currently deployed in many countries in the tropics to strengthen malaria control toward malaria elimination. To measure the impact of any intervention, there is a need to detect malaria properly. Mostly, decisions still rely on microscopy diagnosis. But sensitive diagnosis tools enabling to deal with a large number of samples are needed. The molecular detection approach offers a much higher sensitivity, and the flexibility to be automated and upgraded. Methods Two new molecular methods were developed: dot18S, a Plasmodium-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene followed by dot-blot detection of species by using species-specific probes and CYTB, a Plasmodium-specific nested PCR based on cytochrome b gene followed by species detection using SNP analysis. The results were compared to those obtained with microscopic examination and the "standard" 18S rRNA gene based nested PCR using species specific primers. 337 samples were diagnosed. Results Compared to the microscopy the three molecular methods were more sensitive, greatly increasing the estimated prevalence of Plasmodium infection, including P. malariae and P. ovale. A high rate of mixed infections was uncovered with about one third of the villagers infected with more than one malaria parasite species. Dot18S and CYTB sensitivity outranged the "standard" nested PCR method, CYTB being the most sensitive. As a consequence, compared to the "standard" nested PCR method for the detection of Plasmodium spp., the sensitivity of dot18S and CYTB was respectively 95.3% and 97.3%. Consistent detection of Plasmodium spp. by the three molecular methods was obtained for 83% of tested isolates. Contradictory results were mostly related to detection of Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale in mixed infections, due to an "all-or-none" detection effect at low-level parasitaemia. Conclusion A large reservoir of asymptomatic infections was uncovered using the

  17. Quantum chemical approaches: semiempirical molecular orbital and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard A; Hillier, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    The use of computational quantum chemical methods to aid drug discovery is surveyed. An overview of the various computational models spanning ab initio, density function theory, semiempirical molecular orbital (MO), and hybrid quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) methods is given and their strengths and weaknesses are highlighted, focussing on the challenge of obtaining the accuracy essential for them to make a meaningful contribution to drug discovery. Particular attention is given to hybrid QM/MM and semiempirical MO methods which have the potential to yield the necessary accurate predictions of macromolecular structure and reactivity. These methods are shown to have advanced the study of many aspects of substrate-ligand interactions relevant to drug discovery. Thus, the successful parametrization of semiempirical MO methods and QM/MM methods can be used to model noncovalent substrate-protein interactions, and to lead to improved scoring functions. QM/MM methods can be used in crystal structure refinement and are particularly valuable for modelling covalent protein-ligand interactions and can thus aid the design of transition state analogues. An extensive collection of examples from the areas of metalloenzyme structure, enzyme inhibition, and ligand binding affinities and scoring functions are used to illustrate the power of these techniques.

  18. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Anastacio Alves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors.

  19. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huuskonen, Hannele

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds

  20. Molecular scale modeling of polymer imprint nanolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandross, Michael; Grest, Gary S

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of two different nanolithographic processes, step-flash imprint lithography (SFIL), and hot embossing. We insert rigid stamps into an entangled bead-spring polymer melt above the glass transition temperature. After equilibration, the polymer is then hardened in one of two ways, depending on the specific process to be modeled. For SFIL, we cross-link the polymer chains by introducing bonds between neighboring beads. To model hot embossing, we instead cool the melt to below the glass transition temperature. We then study the ability of these methods to retain features by removing the stamps, both with a zero-stress removal process in which stamp atoms are instantaneously deleted from the system as well as a more physical process in which the stamp is pulled from the hardened polymer at fixed velocity. We find that it is necessary to coat the stamp with an antifriction coating to achieve clean removal of the stamp. We further find that a high density of cross-links is necessary for good feature retention in the SFIL process. The hot embossing process results in good feature retention at all length scales studied as long as coated, low surface energy stamps are used.

  1. Computer modeling of properties of complex molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkova, E.Yu. [Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per., 1, Moscow 101472 (Russian Federation); Khrenova, M.G.; Polyakov, I.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nemukhin, A.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.M. Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygina 4, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Large molecular aggregates present important examples of strongly nonhomogeneous systems. We apply combined quantum mechanics / molecular mechanics approaches that assume treatment of a part of the system by quantum-based methods and the rest of the system with conventional force fields. Herein we illustrate these computational approaches by two different examples: (1) large-scale molecular systems mimicking natural photosynthetic centers, and (2) components of prospective solar cells containing titan dioxide and organic dye molecules. We demonstrate that modern computational tools are capable to predict structures and spectra of such complex molecular aggregates.

  2. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Model for Heterogeneous Charged Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, L. G.; Glosli, J. N.; Murillo, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    Modeling matter across large length scales and timescales using molecular dynamics simulations poses significant challenges. These challenges are typically addressed through the use of precomputed pair potentials that depend on thermodynamic properties like temperature and density; however, many scenarios of interest involve spatiotemporal variations in these properties, and such variations can violate assumptions made in constructing these potentials, thus precluding their use. In particular, when a system is strongly heterogeneous, most of the usual simplifying assumptions (e.g., spherical potentials) do not apply. Here, we present a multiscale approach to orbital-free density functional theory molecular dynamics (OFDFT-MD) simulations that bridges atomic, interionic, and continuum length scales to allow for variations in hydrodynamic quantities in a consistent way. Our multiscale approach enables simulations on the order of micron length scales and 10's of picosecond timescales, which exceeds current OFDFT-MD simulations by many orders of magnitude. This new capability is then used to study the heterogeneous, nonequilibrium dynamics of a heated interface characteristic of an inertial-confinement-fusion capsule containing a plastic ablator near a fuel layer composed of deuterium-tritium ice. At these scales, fundamental assumptions of continuum models are explored; features such as the separation of the momentum fields among the species and strong hydrogen jetting from the plastic into the fuel region are observed, which had previously not been seen in hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Fusarium diversity in soil using a specific molecular approach and a cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Mounier, Arnaud; Steinberg, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in soil. They cause plant and human diseases and can produce mycotoxins. Surveys of Fusarium species diversity in environmental samples usually rely on laborious culture-based methods. In the present study, we have developed a molecular method to analyze Fusarium diversity directly from soil DNA. We designed primers targeting the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α) gene and demonstrated their specificity toward Fusarium using a large collection of fungi. We used the specific primers to construct a clone library from three contrasting soils. Sequence analysis confirmed the specificity of the assay, with 750 clones identified as Fusarium and distributed among eight species or species complexes. The Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) was the most abundant one in the three soils, followed by the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). We then compared our molecular approach results with those obtained by isolating Fusarium colonies on two culture media and identifying species by sequencing part of the EF-1α gene. The 750 isolates were distributed into eight species or species complexes, with the same dominant species as with the cloning method. Sequence diversity was much higher in the clone library than in the isolate collection. The molecular approach proved to be a valuable tool to assess Fusarium diversity in environmental samples. Combined with high throughput sequencing, it will allow for in-depth analysis of large numbers of samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of PEEK Using Reactive Molecular Dynamics Modeling and Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, William A.; Radue, Matthew; Chinkanjanarot, Sorayot; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julia A.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2018-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a high-performance, semi-crystalline thermoplastic that is used in a wide range of engineering applications, including some structural components of aircraft. The design of new PEEK-based materials requires a precise understanding of the multiscale structure and behavior of semi-crystalline PEEK. Molecular Dynamics (MD) modeling can efficiently predict bulk-level properties of single phase polymers, and micromechanics can be used to homogenize those phases based on the overall polymer microstructure. In this study, MD modeling was used to predict the mechanical properties of the amorphous and crystalline phases of PEEK. The hierarchical microstructure of PEEK, which combines the aforementioned phases, was modeled using a multiscale modeling approach facilitated by NASA's MSGMC. The bulk mechanical properties of semi-crystalline PEEK predicted using MD modeling and MSGMC agree well with vendor data, thus validating the multiscale modeling approach.

  5. Molecular modeling and multiscaling issues for electronic material applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Nancy; Yuen, Matthew; Fan, Haibo

    Volume 1 : Molecular Modeling and Multiscaling Issues for Electronic Material Applications provides a snapshot on the progression of molecular modeling in the electronics industry and how molecular modeling is currently being used to understand material performance to solve relevant issues in this field. This book is intended to introduce the reader to the evolving role of molecular modeling, especially seen through the eyes of the IEEE community involved in material modeling for electronic applications.  Part I presents  the role that quantum mechanics can play in performance prediction, such as properties dependent upon electronic structure, but also shows examples how molecular models may be used in performance diagnostics, especially when chemistry is part of the performance issue.  Part II gives examples of large-scale atomistic methods in material failure and shows several examples of transitioning between grain boundary simulations (on the atomistic level)and large-scale models including an example ...

  6. FROM ATOMISTIC TO SYSTEMATIC COARSE-GRAINED MODELS FOR MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

    KAUST Repository

    Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2017-10-03

    The development of systematic (rigorous) coarse-grained mesoscopic models for complex molecular systems is an intense research area. Here we first give an overview of methods for obtaining optimal parametrized coarse-grained models, starting from detailed atomistic representation for high dimensional molecular systems. Different methods are described based on (a) structural properties (inverse Boltzmann approaches), (b) forces (force matching), and (c) path-space information (relative entropy). Next, we present a detailed investigation concerning the application of these methods in systems under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Finally, we present results from the application of these methods to model molecular systems.

  7. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A 1 symmetry on the 9a 1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing

  8. Molecular concepts of water splitting. Nature's approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Nicholas; Lubitz, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Energiekonversion, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Based on studies of natural systems, much has also been learned concerning the design principles required for biomimetic catalysis of water splitting and hydrogen evolution. In summary, these include use of abundant and inexpensive metals, the effective protection of the active sites in functional environments, repair/replacement of active components in case of damage, and the optimization of reaction rates. Biomimetic chemistry aims to mimic all these features; many labs are working toward this goal by developing new approaches in the design and synthesis of such systems, encompassing not only the catalytic center, but also smart matrices and assembly via self-organization. More stable catalysts that do not require self-repair may be obtained from fully artificial (inorganic) catalytic systems that are totally different from the biological ones and only apply some basic principles learned from nature. Metals other than Mn/Ca, Fe, and Ni could be used (e.g. Co) in new ligand spheres and other matrices. For light harvesting, charge separation/stabilization, and the effective coupling of the oxidizing/reducing equivalents to the redox catalysts, different methods have been proposed - for example, covalently linked molecular donor-acceptor systems, photo-voltaic devices, semiconductor-based systems, and photoactive metal complexes. The aim of all these approaches is to develop catalytic systems that split water with sunlight into hydrogen and oxygen while displaying high efficiency and long-term stability. Such a system - either biological, biomimetic, or bioinspired - has the potential to be used on a large scale to produce 'solar fuels' (e.g. hydrogen or secondary products thereof). (orig.)

  9. Substrate channel in nitrogenase revealed by a molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2014-04-15

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to two NH3 molecules at FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized submicrosecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel. The viability of this observed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, resulting in the discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment and that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  10. Modeling shockwave deformation via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD), where the equations of motion of up to thousands of interacting atoms are solved on the computer, has proven to be a powerful tool for investigating a wide variety of nonequilibrium processes from the atomistic viewpoint. Simulations of shock waves in three-dimensional (3D) solids and fluids have shown conclusively that shear-stress relaxation is achieved through atomic rearrangement. In the case of fluids, the transverse motion is viscous, and the constitutive model of Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics has been shown to be accurate - even on the time and distance scales of MD experiments. For strong shocks in solids, the plastic flow that leads to shear-stress relaxation in MD is highly localized near the shock front, involving a slippage along close-packed planes. For shocks of intermediate strength, MD calculations exhibit an elastic precursor running out in front of the steady plastic wave, where slippage similar in character to that in the very strong shocks leads to shear-stress relaxation. An interesting correlation between the maximum shear stress and the Hugoniot pressure jump is observed for both 3D and fluid shockwave calculations, which may have some utility in modeling applications. At low shock strengths, the MD simulations show only elastic compression, with no permanent transverse atomic strains. The result for perfect 3D crystals is also seen in calculations for 1D chains. It is speculated that, if it were practical, a very large MD system containing dislocations could be expected to exhibit more realistic plastic flow for weak shock waves, too

  11. A consistent transported PDF model for treating differential molecular diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Pei

    2016-11-01

    Differential molecular diffusion is a fundamentally significant phenomenon in all multi-component turbulent reacting or non-reacting flows caused by the different rates of molecular diffusion of energy and species concentrations. In the transported probability density function (PDF) method, the differential molecular diffusion can be treated by using a mean drift model developed by McDermott and Pope. This model correctly accounts for the differential molecular diffusion in the scalar mean transport and yields a correct DNS limit of the scalar variance production. The model, however, misses the molecular diffusion term in the scalar variance transport equation, which yields an inconsistent prediction of the scalar variance in the transported PDF method. In this work, a new model is introduced to remedy this problem that can yield a consistent scalar variance prediction. The model formulation along with its numerical implementation is discussed, and the model validation is conducted in a turbulent mixing layer problem.

  12. Molecular Dynamic Modeling and Simulation for Polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    ... the mechanical properties of polymers. In particular, the goal was to develop insights as to how a molecular level structure is connected to the bulk properties of materials assuming homogeneity...

  13. Viscoelasticity in Polymers: Phenomenological to Molecular Mathematical Modelling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, H. T; Luke, N. S

    2006-01-01

    We report on two recent advances in the modelling of viscoelastic polymers: (i) a new constitutive model which combines the virtual stick-slip continuum "molecular-based" ideas of Johnson and Stacer with the Rouse bead chain ideas; (ii...

  14. Organically bound sulphur in coal: A molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1992-01-01

    A critical review of literature concerning the molecular characterization of low and high molecular weight organosulphur constitutents present in coal as well as a detailed analysis of organic sulphur compounds present in flash evaporates and pyrolysates of a suite of coals ranging in sulphur

  15. Fundamental Approaches in Molecular Biology for Communication Sciences and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rebecca S.; Jette, Marie E.; King, Suzanne N.; Schaser, Allison; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This contemporary tutorial will introduce general principles of molecular biology, common deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein assays and their relevance in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Method: Over the past 2 decades, knowledge of the molecular pathophysiology of human disease has…

  16. A simplified approach for the molecular classification of glioblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Le Mercier

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit striking aggressiveness. Although GBM constitute a single histological entity, they exhibit considerable variability in biological behavior, resulting in significant differences in terms of prognosis and response to treatment. In an attempt to better understand the biology of GBM, many groups have performed high-scale profiling studies based on gene or protein expression. These studies have revealed the existence of several GBM subtypes. Although there remains to be a clear consensus, two to four major subtypes have been identified. Interestingly, these different subtypes are associated with both differential prognoses and responses to therapy. In the present study, we investigated an alternative immunohistochemistry (IHC-based approach to achieve a molecular classification for GBM. For this purpose, a cohort of 100 surgical GBM samples was retrospectively evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of EGFR, PDGFRA and p53. The quantitative analysis of these immunostainings allowed us to identify the following two GBM subtypes: the "Classical-like" (CL subtype, characterized by EGFR-positive and p53- and PDGFRA-negative staining and the "Proneural-like" (PNL subtype, characterized by p53- and/or PDGFRA-positive staining. This classification represents an independent prognostic factor in terms of overall survival compared to age, extent of resection and adjuvant treatment, with a significantly longer survival associated with the PNL subtype. Moreover, these two GBM subtypes exhibited different responses to chemotherapy. The addition of temozolomide to conventional radiotherapy significantly improved the survival of patients belonging to the CL subtype, but it did not affect the survival of patients belonging to the PNL subtype. We have thus shown that it is possible to differentiate between different clinically relevant subtypes of GBM by using IHC

  17. A Bayesian approach to model uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buslik, A.

    1994-01-01

    A Bayesian approach to model uncertainty is taken. For the case of a finite number of alternative models, the model uncertainty is equivalent to parameter uncertainty. A derivation based on Savage's partition problem is given

  18. Usher syndrome (sensorineural deafness and retinitis pigmentosa): pathogenesis, molecular diagnosis and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Crystel; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2012-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness in humans. In this review, we pinpoint new insights regarding the molecular mechanisms defective in this syndrome, its molecular diagnosis and prospective therapies. Animal models wherein USH proteins were targeted at different maturation stages of the auditory hair cells have been engineered, shedding new light on the development and functioning of the hair bundle, the sound receptive structure. Improved protocols and guidelines for early molecular diagnosis of USH (USH genotyping microarrays, otochips and complete Sanger sequencing of the 366 coding exons of identified USH genes) have been developed. Approaches to alleviate or cure hearing and visual impairments have been initiated, leading to various degrees of functional rescuing. Whereas the mechanisms underlying hearing impairment in USH patients are being unraveled, showing in particular that USH1 proteins are involved in the shaping of the hair bundle and the functioning of the mechanoelectrical transduction machinery, the mechanisms underlying the retinal defects are still unclear. Efforts to improve clinical diagnosis have been successful. Yet, despite some encouraging results, further development of therapeutic approaches is necessary to ultimately treat this dual sensory defect.

  19. A simplified tether model for molecular motor transporting cargo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang-Zhen, Li; Li-Chun, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins or protein complexes which function as transporting engines in biological cells. This paper models the tether between motor and its cargo as a symmetric linear potential. Different from Elston and Peskin's work for which performance of the system was discussed only in some limiting cases, this study produces analytic solutions of the problem for general cases by simplifying the transport system into two physical states, which makes it possible to discuss the dynamics of the motor–cargo system in detail. It turns out that the tether strength between motor and cargo should be greater than a threshold or the motor will fail to transport the cargo, which was not discussed by former researchers yet. Value of the threshold depends on the diffusion coefficients of cargo and motor and also on the strength of the Brownian ratchets dragging the system. The threshold approaches a finite constant when the strength of the ratchet tends to infinity. (general)

  20. On Atomistic Models for Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Monticelli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is key to all life on earth, as it is constantly cycled via photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Substantial scientific effort has been devoted to understanding every part of this cycle. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study some of the key...... processes involved in cellular respiration: O2 permeation through alveolar monolayers and cellular membranes, its binding to hemoglobin during transport in the bloodstream, as well as its transport along optimal pathways toward its reduction sites in proteins. Moreover, MD simulations can help interpret...

  1. The VSEPR model of molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, Ronald J

    2012-01-01

    Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) theory is a simple technique for predicting the geometry of atomic centers in small molecules and molecular ions. This authoritative reference was written by Istvan Hartiggai and the developer of VSEPR theory, Ronald J. Gillespie. In addition to its value as a text for courses in molecular geometry and chemistry, it constitutes a classic reference for professionals.Starting with coverage of the broader aspects of VSEPR, this volume narrows its focus to a succinct survey of the methods of structural determination. Additional topics include the appli

  2. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl- + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl-) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  3. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike self-consistent field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple S N 2 reaction (Cl − + CH 3 Cl → ClCH 3 + Cl − ) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF

  4. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-07

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl(-) + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl(-)) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  5. System Behavior Models: A Survey of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    OF FIGURES Spiral Model .................................................................................................3 Figure 1. Approaches in... spiral model was chosen for researching and structuring this thesis, shown in Figure 1. This approach allowed multiple iterations of source material...applications and refining through iteration. 3 Spiral Model Figure 1. D. SCOPE The research is limited to a literature review, limited

  6. Integrating survey and molecular approaches to better understand wildlife disease ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan D Cowled

    Full Text Available Infectious wildlife diseases have enormous global impacts, leading to human pandemics, global biodiversity declines and socio-economic hardship. Understanding how infection persists and is transmitted in wildlife is critical for managing diseases, but our understanding is limited. Our study aim was to better understand how infectious disease persists in wildlife populations by integrating genetics, ecology and epidemiology approaches. Specifically, we aimed to determine whether environmental or host factors were stronger drivers of Salmonella persistence or transmission within a remote and isolated wild pig (Sus scrofa population. We determined the Salmonella infection status of wild pigs. Salmonella isolates were genotyped and a range of data was collected on putative risk factors for Salmonella transmission. We a priori identified several plausible biological hypotheses for Salmonella prevalence (cross sectional study design versus transmission (molecular case series study design and fit the data to these models. There were 543 wild pig Salmonella observations, sampled at 93 unique locations. Salmonella prevalence was 41% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37-45%. The median Salmonella DICE coefficient (or Salmonella genetic similarity was 52% (interquartile range [IQR]: 42-62%. Using the traditional cross sectional prevalence study design, the only supported model was based on the hypothesis that abundance of available ecological resources determines Salmonella prevalence in wild pigs. In the molecular study design, spatial proximity and herd membership as well as some individual risk factors (sex, condition score and relative density determined transmission between pigs. Traditional cross sectional surveys and molecular epidemiological approaches are complementary and together can enhance understanding of disease ecology: abundance of ecological resources critical for wildlife influences Salmonella prevalence, whereas Salmonella transmission is

  7. Integrating Survey and Molecular Approaches to Better Understand Wildlife Disease Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowled, Brendan D.; Ward, Michael P.; Laffan, Shawn W.; Galea, Francesca; Garner, M. Graeme; MacDonald, Anna J.; Marsh, Ian; Muellner, Petra; Negus, Katherine; Quasim, Sumaiya; Woolnough, Andrew P.; Sarre, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious wildlife diseases have enormous global impacts, leading to human pandemics, global biodiversity declines and socio-economic hardship. Understanding how infection persists and is transmitted in wildlife is critical for managing diseases, but our understanding is limited. Our study aim was to better understand how infectious disease persists in wildlife populations by integrating genetics, ecology and epidemiology approaches. Specifically, we aimed to determine whether environmental or host factors were stronger drivers of Salmonella persistence or transmission within a remote and isolated wild pig (Sus scrofa) population. We determined the Salmonella infection status of wild pigs. Salmonella isolates were genotyped and a range of data was collected on putative risk factors for Salmonella transmission. We a priori identified several plausible biological hypotheses for Salmonella prevalence (cross sectional study design) versus transmission (molecular case series study design) and fit the data to these models. There were 543 wild pig Salmonella observations, sampled at 93 unique locations. Salmonella prevalence was 41% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37–45%). The median Salmonella DICE coefficient (or Salmonella genetic similarity) was 52% (interquartile range [IQR]: 42–62%). Using the traditional cross sectional prevalence study design, the only supported model was based on the hypothesis that abundance of available ecological resources determines Salmonella prevalence in wild pigs. In the molecular study design, spatial proximity and herd membership as well as some individual risk factors (sex, condition score and relative density) determined transmission between pigs. Traditional cross sectional surveys and molecular epidemiological approaches are complementary and together can enhance understanding of disease ecology: abundance of ecological resources critical for wildlife influences Salmonella prevalence, whereas Salmonella transmission is driven by

  8. Idiosyncratic recognition of UUG/UUA codons by modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine, τm5U present at 'wobble' position in anticodon loop of tRNALeu: A molecular modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita S Kamble

    Full Text Available Lack of naturally occurring modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U at the 'wobble' 34th position in tRNALeu causes mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS. The τm5U34 specifically recognizes UUG and UUA codons. Structural consequences of τm5U34 to read cognate codons have not been studied so far in detail at the atomic level. Hence, 50ns multiple molecular dynamics (MD simulations of various anticodon stem loop (ASL models of tRNALeu in presence and absence of τm5U34 along with UUG and UUA codons were performed to explore the dynamic behaviour of τm5U34 during codon recognition process. The MD simulation results revealed that τm5U34 recognizes G/A ending codons by 'wobble' as well as a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interactions. RMSD and RMSF values indicate the comparative stability of the ASL models containing τm5U34 modification over the other models, lacking τm5U34. Another MD simulation study of 55S mammalian mitochondrial rRNA with tRNALeu showed crucial interactions between the A-site residues, A918, A919, G256 and codon-anticodon bases. Thus, these results could improve our understanding about the decoding efficiency of human mt tRNALeu with τm5U34 to recognize UUG and UUA codons.

  9. Offsetting the difficulties of the molecular model of atomic collisions in the intermediate velocity range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1991-01-01

    To offset the defective behavior of the molecular method of atomic collisions at intermediate energies, we propose a method to approximate the probability flux towards continuum and discrete states not included in the molecular basis. We check the degree of accuracy and limitations of the method for a model case where transition probabilities can be calculated exactly. An application to the benchmark case of He + +H + collisions is also presented, and yields complementary information on the properties of this approach

  10. An analytic approach to 2D electronic PE spectra of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoecs, V.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems using direct calculation from electronic Hamiltonians allows peak classification from 3P-PE spectra dynamics. Display Omitted Highlights: → RWA approach to electronic photon echo. → A straightforward calculation of 2D electronic spectrograms in finite molecular systems. → Importance of population time dynamics in relation to inter-site coherent coupling. - Abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems and simplified line broadening models is presented. The Fourier picture of a heterodyne detected three-pulse rephasing PE signal in the δ-pulse limit of the external field is derived in analytic form. The method includes contributions of one and two-excitonic states and allows direct calculation of Fourier PE spectrogram from corresponding Hamiltonian. As an illustration, the proposed treatment is applied to simple systems, e.g. 2-site two-level system (TLS) and n-site TLS model of photosynthetic unit. The importance of relation between Fourier picture of 3P-PE dynamics (corresponding to nonzero population time, T) and coherent inter-state coupling is emphasized.

  11. Learning Actions Models: Qualitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Gierasimczuk, Nina

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic epistemic logic, actions are described using action models. In this paper we introduce a framework for studying learnability of action models from observations. We present first results concerning propositional action models. First we check two basic learnability criteria: finite ident...

  12. Insights into channel dysfunction from modelling and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgaard, Maria; Paramo, Teresa; Domicevica, Laura; Andersen, Ole Juul; Biggin, Philip C

    2018-04-01

    Developments in structural biology mean that the number of different ion channel structures has increased significantly in recent years. Structures of ion channels enable us to rationalize how mutations may lead to channelopathies. However, determining the structures of ion channels is still not trivial, especially as they necessarily exist in many distinct functional states. Therefore, the use of computational modelling can provide complementary information that can refine working hypotheses of both wild type and mutant ion channels. The simplest but still powerful tool is homology modelling. Many structures are available now that can provide suitable templates for many different types of ion channels, allowing a full three-dimensional interpretation of mutational effects. These structural models, and indeed the structures themselves obtained by X-ray crystallography, and more recently cryo-electron microscopy, can be subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, either as a tool to help explore the conformational dynamics in detail or simply as a means to refine the models further. Here we review how these approaches have been used to improve our understanding of how diseases might be linked to specific mutations in ion channel proteins. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Channelopathies.' Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening of photosynthetic pigments for herbicidal activity with a new computational molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Chandran, Saravanan; Pal, Parimal; Berchmans, Sheela

    2013-12-01

    There is an immense interest among the researchers to identify new herbicides which are effective against the herbs without affecting the environment. In this work, photosynthetic pigments are used as the ligands to predict their herbicidal activity. The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase is a good target for the herbicides. Homology modeling of the target enzyme is done using Modeler 9.11 and the model is validated. Docking studies were performed with AutoDock Vina algorithm to predict the binding of the natural pigments such as β-carotene, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin to the target. β-carotene, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin have higher binding energies indicating the herbicidal activity of the pigments. This work reports a procedure to screen herbicides with computational molecular approach. These pigments will serve as potential bioherbicides in the future.

  14. Cellular and Molecular Biological Approaches to Interpreting Ancient Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dianne K.; Neubauer, Cajetan; Ricci, Jessica N.; Wu, Chia-Hung; Pearson, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to read the molecular fossil record has advanced significantly in the past decade. Improvements in biomarker sampling and quantification methods, expansion of molecular sequence databases, and the application of genetic and cellular biological tools to problems in biomarker research have enabled much of this progress. By way of example, we review how attempts to understand the biological function of 2-methylhopanoids in modern bacteria have changed our interpretation of what their molecular fossils tell us about the early history of life. They were once thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria and hence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but we now believe that 2-methylhopanoid biosynthetic capacity originated in the Alphaproteobacteria, that 2-methylhopanoids are regulated in response to stress, and that hopanoid 2-methylation enhances membrane rigidity. We present a new interpretation of 2-methylhopanes that bridges the gap between studies of the functions of 2-methylhopanoids and their patterns of occurrence in the rock record.

  15. Kinetic Modeling of Vacuum Gas Oil Hydrotreatment using a Molecular Reconstruction Approach Modélisation cinétique de l’hydrotraitement de distillats sous vide utilisant une approche de reconstruction moléculaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charon-Revellin N.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum Gas Oils (VGO are heavy petroleum cuts (boiling points ranging from 350 to 550 ˚C that can be transformed into valuable fuels (gasolines, diesels by fluid catalytic cracking or hydrocracking. Prior to these conversion processes, hydrotreating is required in order to eliminate the impurities in VGOs. The hydrotreatment process enables to meet the environmental specifications (total sulfur contents and to prevent nitrogen poisoning of conversion catalysts. In order to develop a kinetic model based on an accurate VGOs molecular description, innovative analytical tools and molecular reconstruction techniques were used in this work. A lumped model using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood representation was developed for hydrodearomatization, hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation of the VGO. This lumped model was successfully applied to the experimental feed pretreatment data and was able to predict evolution of concentration of the aromatics, nitrogen and sulfur species. Les Distillats Sous Vide (DSV sont des coupes pétrolières lourdes (gamme de températures d'ébullition 350 à 550 °C qui peuvent être valorisées en carburants (essence, gazole par craquage catalytique ou par hydrocraquage. Un hydrotraitement est requis avant ces procédés de conversion afin d'éliminer les impuretés du DSV. De cette manière, le procédé d'hydrotraitement permet d'attendre les spécifications environnementales (teneur en soufre ainsi que de prévenir l'empoisonnement par les composés azotés des catalyseurs de conversion. De manière à pouvoir développer un modèle cinétique basé sur une description moléculaire précise des DSV, des outils analytiques innovant et des techniques de reconstruction moléculaire ont été utilisés dans ce travail. Un modèle cinétique de regroupement utilisant une représentation de type Langmuir-Hinshelwood a été développé pour l'hydrodésaromatisation, l'hydrodésulfuration et l'hydrodésazotation des DSV. Ce

  16. Molecular profiles to biology and pathways: a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laere, Steven; Dirix, Luc; Vermeulen, Peter

    2016-06-16

    Interpreting molecular profiles in a biological context requires specialized analysis strategies. Initially, lists of relevant genes were screened to identify enriched concepts associated with pathways or specific molecular processes. However, the shortcoming of interpreting gene lists by using predefined sets of genes has resulted in the development of novel methods that heavily rely on network-based concepts. These algorithms have the advantage that they allow a more holistic view of the signaling properties of the condition under study as well as that they are suitable for integrating different data types like gene expression, gene mutation, and even histological parameters.

  17. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  18. Molecular modelling of a chemodosimeter for the selective detection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Molecular modelling of a chemodosimeter for the selective detection of. As(III) ion in water. † ... high levels of arsenic cause severe skin diseases in- cluding skin cancer ..... Special Attention to Groundwater in SE Asia (eds) D. Chakraborti, A ...

  19. An update on conventional and molecular breeding approaches for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2014-03-05

    Mar 5, 2014 ... review summarizes the updated results of conventional and molecular breeding ... for the development of favorable fibre quality traits in cotton. ... length is the length of fibre with attached seed, and it can be measured with the ...

  20. A graph-clustering approach to search important molecular markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we performed a comprehensive gene level assessment of Parkinson's disease using 16 colorectal cancer samples and nine normal samples. The results show that SLC6A3, SLC18A2, and EN1, etc., are related to Parkinson's disease. Besides, we further mined the underlying molecular mechanism within these ...

  1. Global energy modeling - A biophysical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Michael

    2010-09-15

    This paper contrasts the standard economic approach to energy modelling with energy models using a biophysical approach. Neither of these approaches includes changing energy-returns-on-investment (EROI) due to declining resource quality or the capital intensive nature of renewable energy sources. Both of these factors will become increasingly important in the future. An extension to the biophysical approach is outlined which encompasses a dynamic EROI function that explicitly incorporates technological learning. The model is used to explore several scenarios of long-term future energy supply especially concerning the global transition to renewable energy sources in the quest for a sustainable energy system.

  2. Constructing Molecular Models with Low-Cost Toy Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2012-01-01

    In teaching the science of the nano world, ball-and-stick molecular models are frequently used as 3D representations of molecules. Unlike a chemical formula, a molecular model allows us to visualise the 3D shape of the molecule and the relative positions of its atoms, the bonds between atoms and why a pair of mirror isomers with the same atoms,…

  3. Understanding valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory using origami molecular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswati, Teguh Endah; Saputro, Sulistyo; Ramli, Murni; Praseptiangga, Danar; Khasanah, Nurul; Marwati, Sri

    2017-01-01

    Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory is conventionally used to predict molecular geometry. However, it is difficult to explore the full implications of this theory by simply drawing chemical structures. Here, we introduce origami modelling as a more accessible approach for exploration of the VSEPR theory. Our technique is simple, readily accessible and inexpensive compared with other sophisticated methods such as computer simulation or commercial three-dimensional modelling kits. This method can be implemented in chemistry education at both the high school and university levels. We discuss the example of a simple molecular structure prediction for ammonia (NH 3 ). Using the origami model, both molecular shape and the scientific justification can be visualized easily. This ‘hands-on’ approach to building molecules will help promote understanding of VSEPR theory. (paper)

  4. Understanding valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory using origami molecular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Saputro, Sulistyo; Ramli, Murni; Praseptiangga, Danar; Khasanah, Nurul; Marwati, Sri

    2017-01-01

    Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory is conventionally used to predict molecular geometry. However, it is difficult to explore the full implications of this theory by simply drawing chemical structures. Here, we introduce origami modelling as a more accessible approach for exploration of the VSEPR theory. Our technique is simple, readily accessible and inexpensive compared with other sophisticated methods such as computer simulation or commercial three-dimensional modelling kits. This method can be implemented in chemistry education at both the high school and university levels. We discuss the example of a simple molecular structure prediction for ammonia (NH3). Using the origami model, both molecular shape and the scientific justification can be visualized easily. This ‘hands-on’ approach to building molecules will help promote understanding of VSEPR theory.

  5. Developmental psychopathology in an era of molecular genetics and neuroimaging: A developmental neurogenetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Luke W

    2015-05-01

    The emerging field of neurogenetics seeks to model the complex pathways from gene to brain to behavior. This field has focused on imaging genetics techniques that examine how variability in common genetic polymorphisms predict differences in brain structure and function. These studies are informed by other complimentary techniques (e.g., animal models and multimodal imaging) and have recently begun to incorporate the environment through examination of Imaging Gene × Environment interactions. Though neurogenetics has the potential to inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology, there has been little integration between principles of neurogenetics and developmental psychopathology. The paper describes a neurogenetics and Imaging Gene × Environment approach and how these approaches have been usefully applied to the study of psychopathology. Six tenets of developmental psychopathology (the structure of phenotypes, the importance of exploring mechanisms, the conditional nature of risk, the complexity of multilevel pathways, the role of development, and the importance of who is studied) are identified, and how these principles can further neurogenetics applications to understanding the development of psychopathology is discussed. A major issue of this piece is how neurogenetics and current imaging and molecular genetics approaches can be incorporated into developmental psychopathology perspectives with a goal of providing models for better understanding pathways from among genes, environments, the brain, and behavior.

  6. Identification of bioflavonoid as fusion inhibitor of dengue virus using molecular docking approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Mir

    Full Text Available Dengue virus with four distinct serotypes belongs to Flavivirus, poses a significant threat to human health and becomes an emerging global problem. Membrane fusion is a central molecular event during viral entry into host cell. To prevent viral infection it is necessary to interrupt the virus replication at an early stage of attachment. Dengue Virus (DENV envelope protein experiences conformational changes and it causes the virus to fuse with host cell. Hinge region movement of domain I and II in envelope protein facilitates the fusion process. Small molecules that bind in this pocket may have the ability to interrupt the conformational changes that trigger fusion process. We chose different flavonoids (baicalein, fisetin, hesperetin, naringenin/ naringin, quercetin and rutin that possess anti dengue activity. Molecular docking analysis was done to examine the inhibitory effect of flavonoids against envelope protein of DENV-2. Results manifest quercetin (flavonoid found in Carica papaya, apple and even in lemon as the only flavone that can interrupt the fusion process of virus by inhibiting the hinge region movement and by blocking the conformational rearrangement in envelope protein. These novel findings using computational approach are worthwhile and will be a bridge to check the efficacy of compounds using appropriate animal model under In vivo studies. This information can be used by new techniques and provides a way to control dengue virus infection. Keywords: Dengue virus, Inhibitor identification, Molecular docking, Interaction analysis

  7. A Unified Approach to Modeling and Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    of this paper is to go back to the future and get inspiration from SIMULA and propose a unied approach. In addition to reintroducing the contributions of SIMULA and the Scandinavian approach to object-oriented programming, we do this by discussing a number of issues in modeling and programming and argue3 why we......SIMULA was a language for modeling and programming and provided a unied approach to modeling and programming in contrast to methodologies based on structured analysis and design. The current development seems to be going in the direction of separation of modeling and programming. The goal...

  8. Plant genotoxicity: a molecular cytogenetic approach in plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluszynska, Jolanta; Juchimiuk, Jolanta

    2005-06-01

    It is important for the prevention of DNA changes caused by environment to understand the biological consequences of DNA damages and their molecular modes of action that lead to repair or alterations of the genetic material. Numerous genotoxicity assay systems have been developed to identify DNA reactive compounds. The available data show that plant bioassays are important tests in the detection of genotoxic contamination in the environment and the establishment of controlling systems. Plant system can detect a wide range of genetic damage, including gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. Recently introduced molecular cytogenetic methods allow analysis of genotoxicity, both at the chromosomal and DNA level. FISH gives a new possibility of the detection and analysis of chromosomal rearrangements in a great detail. DNA fragmentation can be estimated using the TUNEL test and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay).

  9. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and density functional theory approaches to identify potential inhibitors of SIRT4 protein from Homo sapiens : a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay K; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayshree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges in the world and WHO projects it to be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030. It is a chronic condition affecting the way our body metabolizes sugar. Insulin resistance is high risk factor marked by expression of Lipoprotein Lipases and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor that predisposes to type 2 diabetes. AMP-dependent protein kinase in AMPK signaling pathway is a central sensor of energy status. Deregulation of AMPK signaling leads to inflammation, oxidative stress, and deactivation of autophagy which are implicated in pathogenesis of insulin resistance. SIRT4 protein deactivates AMPK as well as directly inhibits insulin secretion. SIRT4 overexpression leads to dyslipidimeia, decreased fatty acid oxidation, and lipogenesis which are the characteristic features of insulin resistance promoting type 2 diabetes. This makes SIRT4 a novel therapeutic target to control type 2 diabetes. Virtual screening and molecular docking studies were performed to obtain potential ligands. To further optimize the geometry of protein-ligand complexes Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking was performed. Binding Free Energy was calculated for the top three ligand molecules. In view of exploring the stereoelectronic features of the ligand, density functional theory approach was implemented at B3LYP/6-31G* level. 30 ns MD simulation studies of the protein-ligand complexes were done. The present research work proposes ZINC12421989 as potential inhibitor of SIRT4 with docking score (-7.54 kcal/mol), docking energy (-51.34 kcal/mol), binding free energy (-70.21 kcal/mol), and comparatively low energy gap (-0.1786 eV) for HOMO and LUMO indicating reactivity of the lead molecule.

  10. Bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry an engineering and molecular approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The field of bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry stands at the intersection of the power and generality of classical and quantum physics with the minute molecular complexity of chemistry and biology. This book provides an application of physical principles in explaining and rationalizing chemical and biological phenomena. It does not stick to the classical topics that are conventionally considered as part of physical chemistry; instead it presents principles deciphered from a modern point of view, which is the strength of this book.

  11. Invariant molecular-dynamics approach to structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzcovitch, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Two fictitious Lagrangians to be used in molecular-dynamics simulations with variable cell shape and suitable to study problems like structural phase transitions are introduced. Because they are invariant with respect to the choice of the simulation cell edges and eliminate symmetry breaking associated with the fictitious part of the dynamics, they improve the physical content of numerical simulations that up to now have been done by using Parrinello-Rahman dynamics

  12. A Complex Approach for Unravelling Musaceae Phylogeny at Molecular Level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Pavla; Hřibová, Eva; Valárik, Miroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 897, SEP 14 (2011), s. 139-142 ISSN 0567-7572. [INTERNATIONAL ISHS-PROMUSA SYMPOSIUM ON GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON ASIAN CHALLENGES. Guangzhou, 14.08.2009-16.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600380703 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : DArT * low-copy genes * molecular phylogenetics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics http://www.actahort.org/books/897/897_14.htm

  13. Quest: A New Approach to Molecular Staging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    nerve sheath tumors. Cancer Investigation 21:901-918, 2003. "* Book Chapter. Stephens K. Neurofibromatosis. In Molecular Pathology in Clinical Practice...sheath tumors. Cancer Investigation 21:901-918, 2003. (a preprint is provided for your review). 2. Book Chapter. Stephens K. Neurofibromatosis. In...neurofibromatosis. Cancer Res 2002, 62, 1573-1577. 49. Molenaar , W.M., Dijkhuizen, T., van Echten, J., Hoekstra, H.J., van den Berg, E. Cytogenetic support

  14. Toward an integrative molecular approach to wildlife disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCandia, Alexandra L; Dobson, Andrew P; vonHoldt, Bridgett M

    2018-01-29

    Pathogens pose serious threats to human health, agricultural investment, and biodiversity conservation through the emergence of zoonoses, spillover to domestic livestock, and epizootic outbreaks. As such, wildlife managers are often tasked with mitigating the negative effects of disease. Yet, parasites form a major component of biodiversity that often persist. This is due to logistical challenges of implementing management strategies and to insufficient understanding of host-parasite dynamics. We advocate for an inclusive understanding of molecular diversity in driving parasite infection and variable host disease states in wildlife systems. More specifically, we examine the roles of genetic, epigenetic, and commensal microbial variation in disease pathogenesis. These include mechanisms underlying parasite virulence and host resistance and tolerance, and the development, regulation, and parasite subversion of immune pathways, among other processes. Case studies of devil facial tumor disease in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and chytridiomycosis in globally distributed amphibians exemplify the broad range of questions that can be addressed by examining different facets of molecular diversity. For particularly complex systems, integrative molecular analyses present a promising frontier that can provide critical insights necessary to elucidate disease dynamics operating across scales. These insights enable more accurate risk assessment, reconstruction of transmission pathways, discernment of optimal intervention strategies, and development of more effective and ecologically sound treatments that minimize damage to the host population and environment. Such measures are crucial when mitigating threats posed by wildlife disease to humans, domestic animals, and species of conservation concern. © 2018 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. Generalized kinetic model of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to kinetics of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox. Constructed generalized kinetic model of redox process in the system solid redox - reagent solution allows to perform the general theoretical approach to research and to obtain new results on kinetics and mechanism of interaction of redox with oxidants.

  16. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  17. Elucidating Mechanisms of Molecular Recognition Between Human Argonaute and miRNA Using Computational Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun

    2016-12-06

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and Argonaute (AGO) protein together form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression. Elucidating the underlying mechanism of AGO-miRNA recognition is thus of great importance not only for the in-depth understanding of miRNA function but also for inspiring new drugs targeting miRNAs. In this chapter we introduce a combined computational approach of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and protein-RNA docking to investigate AGO-miRNA recognition. Constructed from MD simulations, MSMs can elucidate the conformational dynamics of AGO at biologically relevant timescales. Protein-RNA docking can then efficiently identify the AGO conformations that are geometrically accessible to miRNA. Using our recent work on human AGO2 as an example, we explain the rationale and the workflow of our method in details. This combined approach holds great promise to complement experiments in unraveling the mechanisms of molecular recognition between large, flexible, and complex biomolecules.

  18. Elucidating Mechanisms of Molecular Recognition Between Human Argonaute and miRNA Using Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hanlun; Zhu, Lizhe; Héliou, Amélie; Gao, Xin; Bernauer, Julie; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and Argonaute (AGO) protein together form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression. Elucidating the underlying mechanism of AGO-miRNA recognition is thus of great importance not only for the in-depth understanding of miRNA function but also for inspiring new drugs targeting miRNAs. In this chapter we introduce a combined computational approach of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and protein-RNA docking to investigate AGO-miRNA recognition. Constructed from MD simulations, MSMs can elucidate the conformational dynamics of AGO at biologically relevant timescales. Protein-RNA docking can then efficiently identify the AGO conformations that are geometrically accessible to miRNA. Using our recent work on human AGO2 as an example, we explain the rationale and the workflow of our method in details. This combined approach holds great promise to complement experiments in unraveling the mechanisms of molecular recognition between large, flexible, and complex biomolecules.

  19. Diamond-like nanoparticles influence on flavonoids transport: molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastun, Inna L.; Agandeeva, Ksenia E.; Bokarev, Andrey N.; Zenkin, Nikita S.

    2017-03-01

    Intermolecular interaction of diamond-like nanoparticles and flavonoids is investigated by numerical simulation. Using molecular modelling by the density functional theory method, we analyze hydrogen bonds formation and their influence on IR - spectra and structure of molecular complex which is formed due to interaction between flavonoids and nanodiamonds surrounded with carboxylic groups. Enriched adamantane (1,3,5,7 - adamantanetetracarboxylic acid) is used as an example of diamond-like nanoparticles. Intermolecular forces and structure of hydrogen bonds are investigated. IR - spectra and structure parameters of quercetin - adamantanetetracarboxylic acid molecular complex are obtained by numerical simulation using the Gaussian software complex. Received data coincide well with experimental results. Intermolecular interactions and hydrogen bonding structure in the obtained molecular complex are examined. Possibilities of flavonoids interaction with DNA at the molecular level are also considered.

  20. Multiple Model Approaches to Modelling and Control,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on the ease with which prior knowledge can be incorporated. It is interesting to note that researchers in Control Theory, Neural Networks,Statistics, Artificial Intelligence and Fuzzy Logic have more or less independently developed very similar modelling methods, calling them Local ModelNetworks, Operating......, and allows direct incorporation of high-level and qualitative plant knowledge into themodel. These advantages have proven to be very appealing for industrial applications, and the practical, intuitively appealing nature of the framework isdemonstrated in chapters describing applications of local methods...... to problems in the process industries, biomedical applications and autonomoussystems. The successful application of the ideas to demanding problems is already encouraging, but creative development of the basic framework isneeded to better allow the integration of human knowledge with automated learning...

  1. Catecholaminergic systems in stress: structural and molecular genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L; Palkovits, Miklos

    2009-04-01

    Stressful stimuli evoke complex endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses that are extremely variable and specific depending on the type and nature of the stressors. We first provide a short overview of physiology, biochemistry, and molecular genetics of sympatho-adrenomedullary, sympatho-neural, and brain catecholaminergic systems. Important processes of catecholamine biosynthesis, storage, release, secretion, uptake, reuptake, degradation, and transporters in acutely or chronically stressed organisms are described. We emphasize the structural variability of catecholamine systems and the molecular genetics of enzymes involved in biosynthesis and degradation of catecholamines and transporters. Characterization of enzyme gene promoters, transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, transcription factors, gene expression and protein translation, as well as different phases of stress-activated transcription and quantitative determination of mRNA levels in stressed organisms are discussed. Data from catecholamine enzyme gene knockout mice are shown. Interaction of catecholaminergic systems with other neurotransmitter and hormonal systems are discussed. We describe the effects of homotypic and heterotypic stressors, adaptation and maladaptation of the organism, and the specificity of stressors (physical, emotional, metabolic, etc.) on activation of catecholaminergic systems at all levels from plasma catecholamines to gene expression of catecholamine enzymes. We also discuss cross-adaptation and the effect of novel heterotypic stressors on organisms adapted to long-term monotypic stressors. The extra-adrenal nonneuronal adrenergic system is described. Stress-related central neuronal regulatory circuits and central organization of responses to various stressors are presented with selected examples of regulatory molecular mechanisms. Data summarized here indicate that catecholaminergic systems are activated in different ways following exposure to distinct

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  3. Geometrical approach to fluid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Schep, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Differential geometry based upon the Cartan calculus of differential forms is applied to investigate invariant properties of equations that describe the motion of continuous media. The main feature of this approach is that physical quantities are treated as geometrical objects. The geometrical notion of invariance is introduced in terms of Lie derivatives and a general procedure for the construction of local and integral fluid invariants is presented. The solutions of the equations for invariant fields can be written in terms of Lagrange variables. A generalization of the Hamiltonian formalism for finite-dimensional systems to continuous media is proposed. Analogously to finite-dimensional systems, Hamiltonian fluids are introduced as systems that annihilate an exact two-form. It is shown that Euler and ideal, charged fluids satisfy this local definition of a Hamiltonian structure. A new class of scalar invariants of Hamiltonian fluids is constructed that generalizes the invariants that are related with gauge transformations and with symmetries (Noether). copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Molecular hydrodynamic approach to dynamical correlations in quantum liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabani, Eran; Reichman, David R.

    2002-01-01

    A quantum molecular hydrodynamic formalism is developed for the study of dynamics in quantum liquids. The method combines exact static input, generated by path-integral Monte Carlo, and an approximate form of the quantum memory function for the solution of the exact quantum generalized Langevin equation under consideration. This methodology is applied to the study of the spectrum of density fluctuations in liquid para-H 2 . Using a physically motivated approximation for the memory function, semiquantitative agreement is obtained for S(k,ω) in comparison to the recent experiments of Bermejo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5359 (2000)]. Improvement of the methodology and future applications are discussed

  5. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Grimm, Jan; F Donati, Olivio; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. • Advanced imaging techniques allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions in prostate cancer. • MRI/PET, optical and Cerenkov imaging facilitate the translation of molecular biology. • Multiple compounds targeting PSMA expression are currently undergoing clinical translation. • Other targets (e.g., PSA, prostate-stem cell antigen, GRPR) are in development.

  6. First approach to molecular epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Jojoa-Jojoa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the presence of Mycobacterium bovis and other Mycobacterium species in samples of cattle and buffalo in Colombia, to start the molecular characterization of M. bovis in the country. Material and methods. 492 samples were collected from herds identified with the presence of infected animals through the PPD, by the Group of Bovine Tuberculosis ICA Colombian Agricultural Institute in eight departments of Colombia. Lymph nodes of head, thorax and abdomen, gross lesions of tissues with tuberculosis, nasal swabs, milk, blood and fresh cheeses were included. Samples were subjected to detection of Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria by conventional microbiological analysis and PCR-6110 and spoligotyping molecular assays. Results. In the samples analyzed especially in lymph nodes, Mycobacterium bovis was demonstrated with genotypes reported and not previously reported in the world, as well as M. tuberculosis in Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá and Magdalena departments. Conclusions. In Colombia there are at least 7 genotypes of M. bovis that are infected and sick cattle and buffalo from four different departments becoming serious threat to public health.

  7. Modeling of ultrafast THz interactions in molecular crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Clark, Stewart J.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study of terahertz pulses interacting with crystals of cesium iodide. We model the molecular dynamics of the cesium iodide crystals with the Density Functional Theory software CASTEP, where ultrafast terahertz pulses are implemented to the CASTEP software...... to interact with molecular crystals. We investigate the molecular dynamics of cesium iodide crystals when interacting with realistic terahertz pulses of field strengths from 0 to 50 MV/cm. We find nonlinearities in the response of the CsI crystals at field strengths higher than 10 MV/cm....

  8. Current approaches to gene regulatory network modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazma Alvis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many different approaches have been developed to model and simulate gene regulatory networks. We proposed the following categories for gene regulatory network models: network parts lists, network topology models, network control logic models, and dynamic models. Here we will describe some examples for each of these categories. We will study the topology of gene regulatory networks in yeast in more detail, comparing a direct network derived from transcription factor binding data and an indirect network derived from genome-wide expression data in mutants. Regarding the network dynamics we briefly describe discrete and continuous approaches to network modelling, then describe a hybrid model called Finite State Linear Model and demonstrate that some simple network dynamics can be simulated in this model.

  9. Two-Dimensional Model of Scrolled Packings of Molecular Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, A. V.; Mazo, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    A simplified model of the in-plane molecular chain, allowing the description of folded and scrolled packings of molecular nanoribbons of different structures, is proposed. Using this model, possible steady states of single-layer nanoribbons scrolls of graphene, graphane, fluorographene, and fluorographane (graphene hydrogenated on the one side and fluorinated on the other side) are obtained. Their stability is demonstrated and their energy is calculated as a function of the nanoribbon length. It is shown that the scrolled packing is the most energetically favorable nanoribbon conformation at long lengths. The existences of scrolled packings for fluorographene nanoribbons and the existence of two different scroll types corresponding to left- and right-hand Archimedean spirals for fluorographane nanoribbons in the chain model are shown for the first time. The simplicity of the proposed model makes it possible to consider the dynamics of scrolls of rather long molecular nanoribbons at long enough time intervals.

  10. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells

  11. Toluene model for molecular dynamics simulations in the ranges 298

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fioroni, M.; Vogt, D.

    2004-01-01

    An all-atom model for toluene is presented in the framework of classical molecular dynamics (MD). The model has been parametrized under the GROMOS96 force field to reproduce the physicochemical properties of the neat liquid. Four new atom types have been introduced, distinguishing between carbons

  12. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  13. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Direct calculation of ice homogeneous nucleation rate for a molecular model of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2015-01-01

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure, and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g., by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform, to our knowledge, the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over because the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation for the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature. PMID:26240318

  15. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  16. Estimation of flow stress of radiation induced F/M steels using molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Ameya; Dutta, B.K.; Durgaprasad, P.V.; Arya, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Fe-Cr based Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels are the candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors. In this work, a multi-scale approach comprising atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations are used to model the effect of irradiation dose on the flow stress of F/M steels. At the atomic scale, molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dislocation interaction with irradiation induced defects, i.e. voids and He bubbles. Whereas, the DDD simulations are used to estimate the change in flow stress of the material as a result of irradiation hardening. (author)

  17. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  18. Service creation: a model-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quartel, Dick; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach to support service creation. In this approach, services are assumed to be created from (available) software components. The creation process may involve multiple design steps in which the requested service is repeatedly decomposed into more detailed

  19. Modeling molecular acidity with electronic properties and Hammett constants for substituted benzoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Lianghong; Liu, Wanhui; Liu, Shaogang; Liu, Shubin

    2011-12-29

    Molecular acidity is an important physiochemical property essential in many fields of molecular studies, but an efficient and reliable computational approach to make accurate predictions is still missing. In this work, based on our previous studies to use gas phase electronic properties such as molecular electrostatic potential and valence natural atomic orbitals of the acidic atom and leaving proton, we demonstrate here that different approaches can be employed to tackle this problem. To that end, we employ 196 singly, doubly, and triply substituted benzoic acids for the study. We show that two different approaches are possible, one focusing on the carboxyl group through its localized electronic properties and the other on the substituting groups via Hammett constants and their additivity rule. Our present results clearly exhibit that with the linear models built from the singly substituted species, one can accurately predict the pK(a) values for the doubly and triply substituted species with both of these two approaches. The predictions from these approaches are consistent with each other and agree well with the experimental data. These intrinsically different approaches are the two manifestations of the same molecular acidity property, both valid and complementary to each other. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. An approach to spin-resolved molecular gas microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Jacob P.; De Marco, Luigi; Acevedo, Óscar L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are an ideal platform for studying many-body physics with long-range dipolar interactions. Experiments in this field have progressed enormously, and several groups are pursuing advanced apparatus for manipulation of molecules with electric fields as well as single-atom-resolved in situ detection. Such detection has become ubiquitous for atoms in optical lattices and tweezer arrays, but has yet to be demonstrated for ultracold polar molecules. Here we present a proposal for the implementation of site-resolved microscopy for polar molecules, and specifically discuss a technique for spin-resolved molecular detection. We use numerical simulation of spin dynamics of lattice-confined polar molecules to show how such a scheme would be of utility in a spin-diffusion experiment.

  1. Dust and gas distribution in molecular clouds: an observational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campeggio, Loretta; Elia, Davide; Maiolo, Berlinda M T; Strafella, Francesco; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare

    2005-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM), gas and dust, appears to be arranged in clouds, whose dimensions, masses and densities span a large range of scales: from giant molecular clouds to small isolated globules. The structure of these objects show a high degree of complexity appearing, in the range of the observed scales, as a non-homogeneous ('clumpy') distribution of matter. The arrangement of the ISM is clearly relevant for the study of the fragmentation of the clouds and then of the star formation processes. To quantify observationally the ISM structure, many methods have been developed and our study is focused on some of them, exploiting multiwavelength observations of IS objects. The investigations presented here have been carried out by considering both the dust absorption (in optical and near IR wavelengths) and the gas emission (in the submm-radio spectral range). We present the maps obtained from the reduction of raw data and a first tentative analysis by means of methods as the structure function, the autocorrelation, and the Δ-variance. These are appropriate tools to highlight the complex structure of the ISM with reference to the paradigm given by the supersonic turbulence. Three observational cases are briefly discussed. In order to analyse the structure of objects characterized by different sizes, we applied the above-mentioned algorithms to the extinction map of the dark globule CB 107 and to the CO(J = 1-0) integrated intensity map of Vela Molecular Ridge, D Cloud. Finally we compare the results obtained with synthetic fractal maps known as 'fractional Brownian motion' fBm images

  2. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a “first-principles” DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  3. Models of galaxies - The modal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Lowe, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The general viability of the modal approach to the spiral structure in normal spirals and the barlike structure in certain barred spirals is discussed. The usefulness of the modal approach in the construction of models of such galaxies is examined, emphasizing the adoption of a model appropriate to observational data for both the spiral structure of a galaxy and its basic mass distribution. 44 refs

  4. Kinetics approach to modeling of polymer additive degradation in lubricants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    llyaI.KUDISH; RubenG.AIRAPETYAN; Michael; J.; COVITCH

    2001-01-01

    A kinetics problem for a degrading polymer additive dissolved in a base stock is studied.The polymer degradation may be caused by the combination of such lubricant flow parameters aspressure, elongational strain rate, and temperature as well as lubricant viscosity and the polymercharacteristics (dissociation energy, bead radius, bond length, etc.). A fundamental approach tothe problem of modeling mechanically induced polymer degradation is proposed. The polymerdegradation is modeled on the basis of a kinetic equation for the density of the statistical distribu-tion of polymer molecules as a function of their molecular weight. The integrodifferential kineticequation for polymer degradation is solved numerically. The effects of pressure, elongational strainrate, temperature, and lubricant viscosity on the process of lubricant degradation are considered.The increase of pressure promotes fast degradation while the increase of temperature delaysdegradation. A comparison of a numerically calculated molecular weight distribution with an ex-perimental one obtained in bench tests showed that they are in excellent agreement with eachother.

  5. A fermionic molecular dynamics technique to model nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vantournhout, K.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At sub-nuclear densities of about 10 14 g/cm 3 , nuclear matter arranges itself in a variety of complex shapes. This can be the case in the crust of neutron stars and in core-collapse supernovae. These slab like and rod like structures, designated as nuclear pasta, have been modelled with classical molecular dynamics techniques. We present a technique, based on fermionic molecular dynamics, to model nuclear matter at sub-nuclear densities in a semi classical framework. The dynamical evolution of an antisymmetric ground state is described making the assumption of periodic boundary conditions. Adding the concepts of antisymmetry, spin and probability distributions to classical molecular dynamics, brings the dynamical description of nuclear matter to a quantum mechanical level. Applications of this model vary from investigation of macroscopic observables and the equation of state to the study of fundamental interactions on the microscopic structure of the matter. (author)

  6. Geometrical approach to central molecular chirality: a chirality selection rule

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Lattanzi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Chirality is of primary importance in many areas of chemistry and has been extensively investigated since its discovery. We introduce here the description of central chirality for tetrahedral molecules using a geometrical approach based on complex numbers. According to this representation, for a molecule having n chiral centres, it is possible to define an index of chirality. Consequently a chirality selection rule has been derived which allows the characterization of a molecule as achiral, e...

  7. Thumbs down: a molecular-morphogenetic approach to avian digit homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Daniel; Metscher, Brian D; Müller, Gerd B

    2014-01-01

    Avian forelimb digit homology remains one of the standard themes in comparative biology and EvoDevo research. In order to resolve the apparent contradictions between embryological and paleontological evidence a variety of hypotheses have been presented in recent years. The proposals range from excluding birds from the dinosaur clade, to assignments of homology by different criteria, or even assuming a hexadactyl tetrapod limb ground state. At present two approaches prevail: the frame shift hypothesis and the pyramid reduction hypothesis. While the former postulates a homeotic shift of digit identities, the latter argues for a gradual bilateral reduction of phalanges and digits. Here we present a new model that integrates elements from both hypotheses with the existing experimental and fossil evidence. We start from the main feature common to both earlier concepts, the initiating ontogenetic event: reduction and loss of the anterior-most digit. It is proposed that a concerted mechanism of molecular regulation and developmental mechanics is capable of shifting the boundaries of hoxD expression in embryonic forelimb buds as well as changing the digit phenotypes. Based on a distinction between positional (topological) and compositional (phenotypic) homology criteria, we argue that the identity of the avian digits is II, III, IV, despite a partially altered phenotype. Finally, we introduce an alternative digit reduction scheme that reconciles the current fossil evidence with the presented molecular-morphogenetic model. Our approach identifies specific experiments that allow to test whether gene expression can be shifted and digit phenotypes can be altered by induced digit loss or digit gain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Molecular approaches to the modification of insect pest populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampton, J.M.; Stowell, S.; Parkes, R.; Karras, M.; Sinden, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    After considerable research effort over the last decade or more, the ability to routinely introduce specific genes and other DNA constructs (such as linked promoter:gene cassettes) into a range of pest insect genomes at high efficiency using transgenic approaches is fast becoming a reality. The critical issue that now needs to be addressed is how best to incorporate these techniques into SIT in order to improve its effectiveness or efficiency. Manipulation of insect pest genomes using transgenic approaches may be used in two ways. It may be used as an analytical tool, or to introduce or modify either endogenous or heterologous genes and their expression in the pest insect of choice. In this way, new strains may be generated with a set of desired characteristics beneficial to SIT. In order to realise the full potential of the technology, a number of issues and research areas is being explored and progress to date is reviewed below. Specific examples are drawn from work on mosquito systems in order to illustrate the approaches available to identify genes and promoters of interest and the potential applications to SIT

  9. Theoretical modeling of electronic transport in molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinin, Simone

    In this thesis a novel approach for simulating electronic transport in nanoscale structures is introduced. We consider an open quantum system (the electrons of structure) accelerated by an external electromotive force and dissipating energy through inelastic scattering with a heat bath (phonons) acting on the electrons. This method can be regarded as a quantum-mechanical extension of the semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation. We use periodic boundary conditions and employ Density Functional Theory to recast the many-particle problem in an effective single-particle mean-field problem. By explicitly treating the dissipation in the electrodes, the behavior of the potential is an outcome of our method, at variance with the scattering approaches based on the Landauer formalism. We study the self-consistent steady-state solution, analyzing the out-of-equilibrium electron distribution, the electrical characteristics, the behavior of the self-consistent potential and the density of states of the system. We apply the method to the study of electronic transport in several molecular devices, consisting of small organic molecules or atomic wires sandwiched between gold surfaces. For gold wires we recover the experimental evidence that transport in short wires is ballistic, independent of the length of the wire and with conductance of one quantum. In benzene-1,4-dithiol we find that the delocalization of the frontier orbitals of the molecule is responsible for the high value of conductance and that, by inserting methylene groups to decouple the sulfur atoms from the carbon ring, the current is reduced, in agreement with the experimental measurements. We study the effect a geometrical distortion in a molecular device, namely the relative rotation of the carbon rings in a biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol molecule. We find that the reduced coupling between pi orbitals of the rings induced by the rotation leads to a reduction of the conductance and that this behavior is captured by a

  10. Cleaning graphene: A first quantum/classical molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfour, L.; Magaud, L., E-mail: emilie.despiau-pujo@cea.fr, E-mail: laurence.magaud@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Néel, CNRS/Université Grenoble Alpes, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Davydova, A.; Despiau-Pujo, E., E-mail: emilie.despiau-pujo@cea.fr, E-mail: laurence.magaud@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Cunge, G. [LTM, CNRS/Université Grenoble Alpes/CEA, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Graves, D. B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Graphene outstanding properties created a huge interest in the condensed matter community and unprecedented fundings at the international scale in the hope of application developments. Recently, there have been several reports of incomplete removal of the polymer resists used to transfer as-grown graphene from one substrate to another, resulting in altered graphene transport properties. Finding a large-scale solution to clean graphene from adsorbed residues is highly desirable and one promising possibility would be to use hydrogen plasmas. In this spirit, we couple here quantum and classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the kinetic energy ranges required by atomic hydrogen to selectively etch a simple residue—a CH{sub 3} group—without irreversibly damaging the graphene. For incident energies in the 2–15 eV range, the CH{sub 3} radical can be etched by forming a volatile CH{sub 4} compound which leaves the surface, either in the CH{sub 4} form or breaking into CH{sub 3} + H fragments, without further defect formation. At this energy, adsorption of H atoms on graphene is possible and further annealing will be required to recover pristine graphene.

  11. A Motion Planning Approach to Studying Molecular Motions

    KAUST Repository

    Amato, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    While structurally very different, protein and RNA molecules share an important attribute. The motions they undergo are strongly related to the function they perform. For example, many diseases such as Mad Cow disease or Alzheimer\\'s disease are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation. Similarly, RNA folding velocity may regulate the plasmid copy number, and RNA folding kinetics can regulate gene expression at the translational level. Knowledge of the stability, folding, kinetics and detailed mechanics of the folding process may help provide insight into how proteins and RNAs fold. In this paper, we present an overview of our work with a computational method we have adapted from robotic motion planning to study molecular motions. We have validated against experimental data and have demonstrated that our method can capture biological results such as stochastic folding pathways, population kinetics of various conformations, and relative folding rates. Thus, our method provides both a detailed view (e.g., individual pathways) and a global view (e.g., population kinetics, relative folding rates, and reaction coordinates) of energy landscapes of both proteins and RNAs. We have validated these techniques by showing that we observe the same relative folding rates as shown in experiments for structurally similar protein molecules that exhibit different folding behaviors. Our analysis has also been able to predict the same relative gene expression rate for wild-type MS2 phage RNA and three of its mutants.

  12. Fracture of Polymers and Interfaces: A Universal Molecular Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Fracture of polymers, linear or crosslinked, can be viewed as a breaking of molecular connectivity via disentanglement or bond rupture. When treated as a vector percolation phenomenon, we find that it captures the essential physics of fracture and makes broad accurate predictions for strength S, and fracture energy G, of polymers and their interfaces. In the bulk, we find that G ˜ [p-pc], and S ˜ [p-pc]^1/2, where p is the local normalized entanglement density and pc is the percolation threshold. For interfaces, p = nL/w, where n is the areal density of chains of length L ˜M (mol wt) in an interface of width w. For incompatible interfaces of width w, G ˜ [w-wc]; when reinforced with n compatibilizers, G ˜ (n - nc]. For welding, p ˜ L, the welding time tw ˜ L. For adhesion with sticker group X on the polymer and receptor groups Y on the solid, the strength first increases with X, Y and X-Y strength and then decreases after a predictable maximum. For thermosets, the modulus E ˜ [p-pc]^3 and the strength S ˜ [p-pc]^2. Numerous experimental examples are given to support the above universal relations for fracture.

  13. Models and algorithms for biomolecules and molecular networks

    CERN Document Server

    DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    By providing expositions to modeling principles, theories, computational solutions, and open problems, this reference presents a full scope on relevant biological phenomena, modeling frameworks, technical challenges, and algorithms. * Up-to-date developments of structures of biomolecules, systems biology, advanced models, and algorithms * Sampling techniques for estimating evolutionary rates and generating molecular structures * Accurate computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks, solving discrete chemical master equations * End-of-chapter exercises

  14. Free Energy Calculations using a Swarm-Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burusco, Kepa K; Bruce, Neil J; Alibay, Irfan; Bryce, Richard A

    2015-10-26

    Free energy simulations are an established computational tool in modelling chemical change in the condensed phase. However, sampling of kinetically distinct substates remains a challenge to these approaches. As a route to addressing this, we link the methods of thermodynamic integration (TI) and swarm-enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (sesMD), where simulation replicas interact cooperatively to aid transitions over energy barriers. We illustrate the approach by using alchemical alkane transformations in solution, comparing them with the multiple independent trajectory TI (IT-TI) method. Free energy changes for transitions computed by using IT-TI grew increasingly inaccurate as the intramolecular barrier was heightened. By contrast, swarm-enhanced sampling TI (sesTI) calculations showed clear improvements in sampling efficiency, leading to more accurate computed free energy differences, even in the case of the highest barrier height. The sesTI approach, therefore, has potential in addressing chemical change in systems where conformations exist in slow exchange. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular Modeling of Prion Transmission to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Levavasseur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using different prion strains, such as the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent and the atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents, and using transgenic mice expressing human or bovine prion protein, we assessed the reliability of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA to model interspecies and genetic barriers to prion transmission. We compared our PMCA results with in vivo transmission data characterized by attack rates, i.e., the percentage of inoculated mice that developed the disease. Using 19 seed/substrate combinations, we observed that a significant PMCA amplification was only obtained when the mouse line used as substrate is susceptible to the corresponding strain. Our results suggest that PMCA provides a useful tool to study genetic barriers to transmission and to study the zoonotic potential of emerging prion strains.

  16. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-01

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  17. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  18. Application of various FLD modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banabic, D.; Aretz, H.; Paraianu, L.; Jurco, P.

    2005-07-01

    This paper focuses on a comparison between different modelling approaches to predict the forming limit diagram (FLD) for sheet metal forming under a linear strain path using the recently introduced orthotropic yield criterion BBC2003 (Banabic D et al 2005 Int. J. Plasticity 21 493-512). The FLD models considered here are a finite element based approach, the well known Marciniak-Kuczynski model, the modified maximum force criterion according to Hora et al (1996 Proc. Numisheet'96 Conf. (Dearborn/Michigan) pp 252-6), Swift's diffuse (Swift H W 1952 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 1 1-18) and Hill's classical localized necking approach (Hill R 1952 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 1 19-30). The FLD of an AA5182-O aluminium sheet alloy has been determined experimentally in order to quantify the predictive capabilities of the models mentioned above.

  19. Intracellular antibody capture: A molecular biology approach to inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Rabbitts, Terence H

    2014-11-01

    Many proteins of interest in basic biology, translational research studies and for clinical targeting in diseases reside inside the cell and function by interacting with other macromolecules. Protein complexes control basic processes such as development and cell division but also abnormal cell growth when mutations occur such as found in cancer. Interfering with protein-protein interactions is an important aspiration in both basic and disease biology but small molecule inhibitors have been difficult and expensive to isolate. Recently, we have adapted molecular biology techniques to develop a simple set of protocols for isolation of high affinity antibody fragments (in the form of single VH domains) that function within the reducing environment of higher organism cells and can bind to their target molecules. The method called Intracellular Antibody Capture (IAC) has been used to develop inhibitory anti-RAS and anti-LMO2 single domains that have been used for target validation of these antigens in pre-clinical cancer models and illustrate the efficacy of the IAC approach to generation of drug surrogates. Future use of inhibitory VH antibody fragments as drugs in their own right (we term these macrodrugs to distinguish them from small molecule drugs) requires their delivery to target cells in vivo but they can also be templates for small molecule drug development that emulate the binding sites of the antibody fragments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass Spectrometry-based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Henriques Pontes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS have enable the identification and quantification of thousand of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  1. Risk Modelling for Passages in Approach Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Smolarek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of multivariate statistics, stochastic processes, and simulation methods are used to identify and assess the risk measures. This paper presents the use of generalized linear models and Markov models to study risks to ships along the approach channel. These models combined with simulation testing are used to determine the time required for continuous monitoring of endangered objects or period at which the level of risk should be verified.

  2. Biotechnological and molecular approaches for vanillin production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar

    2013-02-01

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavoring agents in the world. As the annual world market demand of vanillin could not be met by natural extraction, chemical synthesis, or tissue culture technology, thus biotechnological approaches may be replacement routes to make production of bio-vanillin economically viable. This review's main focus is to highlight significant aspects of biotechnology with emphasis on the production of vanillin from eugenol, isoeugenol, lignin, ferulic acid, sugars, phenolic stilbenes, vanillic acid, aromatic amino acids, and waste residues by applying fungi, bacteria, and plant cells. Production of biovanillin using GRAS lactic acid bacteria and metabolically engineered microorganisms, genetic organization of vanillin biosynthesis operons/gene cassettes and finally the stability of biovanillin generated through various biotechnological procedures are also critically reviewed in the later sections of the review.

  3. A simple approach to CO cooling in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, A. P.; Jaffa, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon monoxide plays an important role in interstellar molecular clouds, both as a coolant, and as a diagnostic molecule. However, a proper evaluation of the cooling rate due to CO requires a determination of the populations of many levels, the spontaneous and stimulated radiative de-excitation rates between these levels, and the transfer of the emitted multi-line radiation; additionally, this must be done for three isotopologues. It would be useful to have a simple analytic formulation that avoided these complications and the associated computational overhead; this could then be used in situations where CO plays an important role as a coolant, but the details of this role are not the main concern. We derive such a formulation here, by first considering the two asymptotic forms that obtain in the limits of (a) low volume-density and optical depth, and (b) high volume-density and optical depth. These forms are then combined in such a way as to fit the detailed numerical results from Goldsmith & Langer (1978, ApJ, 222, 881; hereafter GL78). The GL78 results cover low temperatures, and a range of physical conditions where the interplay of thermal and sub-thermal excitation, optical-depth effects, and the contributions from rare isotopologues, are all important. The fit is obtained using the Metropolis-Hastings method, and reproduces the results of GL78 well. It is a purely local and analytic function of state — specifically a function of the density, ρ, isothermal sound speed, a, CO abundance, XCO, and velocity divergence, ∇ṡυ. As an illustration of its use, we consider the cooling layer following a slow steady non-magnetic planar J-shock. We show that, in this idealised configuration, if the post-shock cooling is dominated by CO and its isotopologues, the thickness of the post-shock cooling layer is very small and approximately independent of the pre-shock velocity, υo, or pre-shock isothermal sound speed, ao.

  4. Molecular complexity from polyunsaturated substrates: the gold catalysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensterbank, Louis; Malacria, Max

    2014-03-18

    Over the last two decades, electrophilic catalysis relying on platinum(II), gold(I), and gold(III) salts has emerged as a remarkable synthetic methodology. Chemists have discovered a large variety of organic transformations that convert a great assortment of highly functionalized precursors into valuable final products. In many cases, these methodologies offer unique features, allowing access to unprecedented molecular architectures. Due to the mild reaction conditions and high function compatibility, scientists have successfully developed applications in total synthesis of natural products, as well as in asymmetric catalysis. In addition, all these developments have been accompanied by the invention of well-tailored catalysts, so that a palette of different electrophilic agents is now commercially available or readily synthesized at the bench. In some respects, researchers' interests in developing homogeneous gold catalysis can be compared with the Californian gold rush of the 19th century. It has attracted into its fervor thousands of scientists, providing a huge number of versatile and important reports. More notably, it is clear that the contribution to the art of organic synthesis is very valuable, though the quest is not over yet. Because they rely on the intervention of previously unknown types of intermediates, new retrosynthetic disconnections are now possible. In this Account, we discuss our efforts on the use of readily available polyunsaturated precursors, such as enynes, dienynes, allenynes, and allenenes to give access to highly original polycyclic structures in a single operation. These transformations transit via previously undescribed intermediates A, B, D, F, and H that will be encountered later on. All these intermediates have been determined by both ourselves and others by DFT calculations and in some cases have been confirmed on the basis of experimental data. In addition, dual gold activation can be at work in some of these transformations

  5. Decarboxylation of Δ 9-tetrahydrocannabinol: Kinetics and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotin-Brunel, Helene; Buijs, Wim; van Spronsen, Jaap; van Roosmalen, Maaike J. E.; Peters, Cor J.; Verpoorte, Rob; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2011-02-01

    Efficient tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9-THC) production from cannabis is important for its medical application and as basis for the development of production routes of other drugs from plants. This work presents one of the steps of Δ 9-THC production from cannabis plant material, the decarboxylation reaction, transforming the Δ 9-THC-acid naturally present in the plant into the psychoactive Δ 9-THC. Results of experiments showed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, with an activation barrier of 85 kJ mol -1 and a pre-exponential factor of 3.7 × 10 8 s -1. Using molecular modeling, two options were identified for an acid catalyzed β-keto acid type mechanism for the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Each of these mechanisms might play a role, depending on the actual process conditions. Formic acid proved to be a good model for a catalyst of such a reaction. Also, the computational idea of catalysis by water to catalysis by an acid, put forward by Li and Brill, and Churchev and Belbruno was extended, and a new direct keto-enol route was found. A direct keto-enol mechanism catalyzed by formic acid seems to be the best explanation for the observed activation barrier and the pre-exponential factor of the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Evidence for this was found by performing an extraction experiment with Cannabis Flos. It revealed the presence of short chain carboxylic acids supporting this hypothesis. The presented approach is important for the development of a sustainable production of Δ 9-THC from the plant.

  6. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.; Sevila, I.; Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.

    2002-01-01

    We complement a previous article [Harel et al., Phys. Rev. A 55, 287 (1997)] that studied the characteristics of the description of ionization by the molecular approach to atomic collisions, by comparing the wave functions with accurate counterparts. We show how the failure of the basis to describe the phase of the ionizing wave function results in a trapping of the corresponding population in some molecular channels. The time evolution of the molecular wave function then departs from the exact one and the ionization and capture mechanisms appear as interlocked. We thus elucidate the question of the 'natural' boundary of the molecular approach and draw further consequences as to the choice of pseudostates and the use of translation factors

  7. Mathematical modeling of the crack growth in linear elastic isotropic materials by conventional fracture mechanics approaches and by molecular dynamics method: crack propagation direction angle under mixed mode loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Larisa; Bronnikov, Sergej

    2018-03-01

    The crack growth directional angles in the isotropic linear elastic plane with the central crack under mixed-mode loading conditions for the full range of the mixity parameter are found. Two fracture criteria of traditional linear fracture mechanics (maximum tangential stress and minimum strain energy density criteria) are used. Atomistic simulations of the central crack growth process in an infinite plane medium under mixed-mode loading using Large-scale Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), a classical molecular dynamics code, are performed. The inter-atomic potential used in this investigation is Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. The plane specimens with initial central crack were subjected to Mixed-Mode loadings. The simulation cell contains 400000 atoms. The crack propagation direction angles under different values of the mixity parameter in a wide range of values from pure tensile loading to pure shear loading in a wide diapason of temperatures (from 0.1 К to 800 К) are obtained and analyzed. It is shown that the crack propagation direction angles obtained by molecular dynamics method coincide with the crack propagation direction angles given by the multi-parameter fracture criteria based on the strain energy density and the multi-parameter description of the crack-tip fields.

  8. Molecular Approaches to Understanding C & N Dynamics in MArine Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arturo Massol; James Tiedje; Jizhong Zhou; Allan Devol

    2007-05-16

    Continental margin sediments constitute only about 10% of the total sediment surface area in the world’s oceans, nevertheless they are the dominant sites of nitrogen (N) cycling. Recent studies suggest that the oceanic nitrogen budget is unbalanced, primarily due to a higher nitrogen removal rate in contrast to the fixation rate, and it has been suggested that denitrification activity contributes significantly to this imbalance. Although denitrification in marine environments has been studied intensively at the process level, little is known about the species abundance, composition, distribution, and functional differences of the denitrifying population. Understanding the diversity of microbial populations in marine environments, their responses to various environmental factors such as NO3-, and how this impact the rate of denitrification is critical to predict global N dynamics. Environmental Microbiology has the prompt to study the influence of each microbial population on a biogeochemical process within a given ecosystem. Culture-dependent and –independent techniques using nucleic acid probes can access the identity and activity of cultured and uncultured microorganisms. Nucleic acid probes can target distintict genes which set phylogenetic relationships, such as rDNA 16S, DNA gyrase (gyrB) and RNA polymerase sigma 70 factor (rpoD). In the other hand, the genetic capabilities and their expression could be tracked using probes that target several functional genes, such as nirS, nirK, nosZ, and nifH, which are genes involved in denitrification. Selective detection of cells actively expressing functional genes within a community using In Situ Reverse Transcription-PCR (ISRT-PCR) could become a powerful culture-independent technique in microbial ecology. Here we describe an approach to study the expression of nirS genes in denitrifying bacteria. Pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans, as well as co-cultures with non

  9. Molecular Phytopathology: Current Approaches and Main Directions in Diagnostics of Woody Plant Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Baranov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors describe the prospects for diagnosis of woody plants diseases based on the use of modern methods of molecular plant pathology. The metagenomic approach based on the analysis of complex pathogens, including non-pathogenic microflora is described. The use the multicopy universal loci characterized by a number of advantages in determining taxonomic affiliation of infectious agents during phytopathological molecular analysis is proposed.

  10. Molecular interaction of PCB153 to human serum albumin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chao; Fang, Senbiao; Cao, Huiming; Lu, Yan; Ma, Yaqiong [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wei, Dongfeng [Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700 (China); Xie, Xiaoyun [College of Earth and Environmental Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Xiaohua [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Xin [College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China); Fei, Dongqing [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, Chunyan, E-mail: zhaochy07@lzu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We identify the binding mode of PCB153 to human serum albumin (HSA). ► Spectroscopic and molecular modeling results reveal that PCB153 binds at the site II. ► The interaction is mainly governed by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. ► The work helps to probe transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs. -- Abstract: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) possessed much potential hazard to environment because of its chemical stability and biological toxicity. Here, we identified the binding mode of a representative compound, PCB153, to human serum albumin (HSA) using fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence study showed that the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was quenched by addition of PCB153 through a static quenching mechanism. The thermodynamic analysis proved the binding behavior was mainly governed by hydrophobic force. Furthermore, as evidenced by site marker displacement experiments using two probe compounds, it revealed that PCB153 acted exactly on subdomain IIIA (site II) of HSA. On the other hand, the molecular dynamics studies as well as free energy calculations made another important contribution to understand the conformational changes of HSA and the stability of HSA-PCB153 system. Molecular docking revealed PCB153 can bind in a large hydrophobic activity of subdomain IIIA by the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond interactions between chlorine atoms and residue ASN391. The present work provided reasonable models helping us further understand the transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs when it spread into human blood serum.

  11. The Use of Molecular Modeling Programs in Medicinal Chemistry Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Marc W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of a molecular modeling computer program (Alchemy II) in a pharmaceutical education program. Provided are the hardware requirements and basic program features as well as several examples of how this program and its features have been applied in the classroom. (GLR)

  12. Modeling the Thiophene HDS reaction on a molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemann, E.; Weber, T.; Müller, A.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of MoS2/Al2O3 catalyst and the initial step of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction using an experimental model have been studied by in situ Raman-, infrared emission (IRE)-, inelastic electron tunneling (IET)-spectroscopy and thermal desorption measurements accompanied by molecular

  13. Dating Antarctic ice sheet collapse: Proposing a molecular genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugnell, Jan M.; Pedro, Joel B.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2018-01-01

    Sea levels at the end of this century are projected to be 0.26-0.98 m higher than today. The upper end of this range, and even higher estimates, cannot be ruled out because of major uncertainties in the dynamic response of polar ice sheets to a warming climate. Here, we propose an ecological genetics approach that can provide insight into the past stability and configuration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). We propose independent testing of the hypothesis that a trans-Antarctic seaway occurred at the last interglacial. Examination of the genomic signatures of bottom-dwelling marine species using the latest methods can provide an independent window into the integrity of the WAIS more than 100,000 years ago. Periods of connectivity facilitated by trans-Antarctic seaways could be revealed by dating coalescent events recorded in DNA. These methods allow alternative scenarios to be tested against a fit to genomic data. Ideal candidate taxa for this work would need to possess a circumpolar distribution, a benthic habitat, and some level of genetic structure indicated by phylogeographical investigation. The purpose of this perspective piece is to set out an ecological genetics method to help resolve when the West Antarctic Ice Shelf last collapsed.

  14. Set-Theoretic Approach to Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan

    Despite being widely accepted and applied, maturity models in Information Systems (IS) have been criticized for the lack of theoretical grounding, methodological rigor, empirical validations, and ignorance of multiple and non-linear paths to maturity. This PhD thesis focuses on addressing...... these criticisms by incorporating recent developments in configuration theory, in particular application of set-theoretic approaches. The aim is to show the potential of employing a set-theoretic approach for maturity model research and empirically demonstrating equifinal paths to maturity. Specifically...... methodological guidelines consisting of detailed procedures to systematically apply set theoretic approaches for maturity model research and provides demonstrations of it application on three datasets. The thesis is a collection of six research papers that are written in a sequential manner. The first paper...

  15. Reconstruction and validation of RefRec: a global model for the yeast molecular interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommi Aho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interaction networks establish all cell biological processes. The networks are under intensive research that is facilitated by new high-throughput measurement techniques for the detection, quantification, and characterization of molecules and their physical interactions. For the common model organism yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, public databases store a significant part of the accumulated information and, on the way to better understanding of the cellular processes, there is a need to integrate this information into a consistent reconstruction of the molecular interaction network. This work presents and validates RefRec, the most comprehensive molecular interaction network reconstruction currently available for yeast. The reconstruction integrates protein synthesis pathways, a metabolic network, and a protein-protein interaction network from major biological databases. The core of the reconstruction is based on a reference object approach in which genes, transcripts, and proteins are identified using their primary sequences. This enables their unambiguous identification and non-redundant integration. The obtained total number of different molecular species and their connecting interactions is approximately 67,000. In order to demonstrate the capacity of RefRec for functional predictions, it was used for simulating the gene knockout damage propagation in the molecular interaction network in approximately 590,000 experimentally validated mutant strains. Based on the simulation results, a statistical classifier was subsequently able to correctly predict the viability of most of the strains. The results also showed that the usage of different types of molecular species in the reconstruction is important for accurate phenotype prediction. In general, the findings demonstrate the benefits of global reconstructions of molecular interaction networks. With all the molecular species and their physical interactions explicitly modeled, our

  16. Molecular Approaches to Understanding Transmission and Source Attribution in Nontyphoidal Salmonella and Their Application in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Alison E; Vaughan, Timothy G; French, Nigel P

    2015-11-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) is a frequent cause of diarrhea around the world, yet in many African countries it is more commonly associated with invasive bacterial disease. Various source attribution models have been developed that utilize microbial subtyping data to assign cases of human NTS infection to different animal populations and foods of animal origin. Advances in molecular microbial subtyping approaches, in particular whole-genome sequencing, provide higher resolution data with which to investigate these sources. In this review, we provide updates on the source attribution models developed for Salmonella, and examine the application of whole-genome sequencing data combined with evolutionary modeling to investigate the putative sources and transmission pathways of NTS, with a focus on the epidemiology of NTS in Africa. This is essential information to decide where, what, and how control strategies might be applied most effectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Energetics and efficiency of a molecular motor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Fogedby, Hans; Svane, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The energetics and efficiency of a linear molecular motor model proposed by Mogilner et al. (Phys. Lett. 237, 297 (1998)) is analyzed from an analytical point of view. The model which is based on protein friction with a track is described by coupled Langevin equations for the motion in combination...... when incorporating the full motor dynamics, owing to the strong dissipation associated with the motor action....

  18. Development and validation of risk models and molecular diagnostics to permit personalized management of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances made in cancer management over the past few decades, improvements in cancer diagnosis and prognosis are still poor, highlighting the need for individualized strategies. Toward this goal, risk prediction models and molecular diagnostic tools have been developed, tailoring each step of risk assessment from diagnosis to treatment and clinical outcomes based on the individual's clinical, epidemiological, and molecular profiles. These approaches hold increasing promise for delivering a new paradigm to maximize the efficiency of cancer surveillance and efficacy of treatment. However, they require stringent study design, methodology development, comprehensive assessment of biomarkers and risk factors, and extensive validation to ensure their overall usefulness for clinical translation. In the current study, the authors conducted a systematic review using breast cancer as an example and provide general guidelines for risk prediction models and molecular diagnostic tools, including development, assessment, and validation. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  19. Mathematical Modeling Approaches in Plant Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Nägele, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The experimental analysis of a plant metabolome typically results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data set. To interpret metabolomics data in the context of biochemical regulation and environmental fluctuation, various approaches of mathematical modeling have been developed and have proven useful. In this chapter, a general introduction to mathematical modeling is presented and discussed in context of plant metabolism. A particular focus is laid on the suitability of mathematical approaches to functionally integrate plant metabolomics data in a metabolic network and combine it with other biochemical or physiological parameters.

  20. Engineering nanomaterials with a combined electrochemical and molecular biomimetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haixia

    Biocomposite materials, such as bones, teeth, and shells, are created using mild aqueous solution-based processes near room temperature. Proteins add flexibility to these processes by facilitating the nucleation, growth, and ordering of specific inorganic materials into hierarchical structures. We aim to develop a biomimetic strategy for engineering technologically relevant inorganic materials with controlled compositions and structures, as Nature does, using proteins to orchestrate material formation and assembly. This approach involves three basic steps: (i) preparation of inorganic substrates compatible with combinatorial polypeptide screening; (ii) identification of inorganic-binding polypeptides and their engineering into inorganic-binding proteins; and (iii) protein-mediated inorganic nucleation and organization. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O), a p-type semiconductor, has been used to demonstrate all three steps. Zinc oxide (ZnO), an n-type semiconductor, has been used to show the generality of selected steps. Step (i), preparation of high quality inorganic substrates to select inorganic-binding polypeptides, was accomplished using electrochemical microfabrication to grow and pattern Cu2O and ZnO. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to verify phase purity and compositional stability of these surfaces during polypeptide screening. Step (ii), accomplished in collaboration with personnel in Prof Baneyx' lab at the University of Washington, involved incubating the inorganic substrates with the FliTrx(TM) random peptide library to identify cysteine-constrained dodecapeptides that bind the targeted inorganic. Insertion of a Cu2O-binding dodecapeptide into the DNA-binding protein TraI endowed the engineered TraI with strong affinity for Cu2O (Kd ≈ 10 -8 M). Finally, step (iii) involved nonequilibrium synthesis and organization of Cu2O nanoparticles, taking advantage of the inorganic and DNA recognition properties of the engineered TraI. The

  1. Hydrophobic ampersand hydrophilic: Theoretical models of solvation for molecular biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Tawa, G.J.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Corcelli, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Molecular statistical thermodynamic models of hydration for chemistry and biophysics have advanced abruptly in recent years. With liquid water as solvent, salvation phenomena are classified as either hydrophobic or hydrophilic effects. Recent progress in treatment of hydrophilic effects have been motivated by continuum dielectric models interpreted as a modelistic implementation of second order perturbation theory. New results testing that perturbation theory of hydrophilic effects are presented and discussed. Recent progress in treatment of hydrophobic effects has been achieved by applying information theory to discover models of packing effects in dense liquids. The simplest models to which those ideas lead are presented and discussed

  2. SLS Navigation Model-Based Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, T. Emerson; Anzalone, Evan; Geohagan, Kevin; Bernard, Bill; Park, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The SLS Program chose to implement a Model-based Design and Model-based Requirements approach for managing component design information and system requirements. This approach differs from previous large-scale design efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center where design documentation alone conveyed information required for vehicle design and analysis and where extensive requirements sets were used to scope and constrain the design. The SLS Navigation Team has been responsible for the Program-controlled Design Math Models (DMMs) which describe and represent the performance of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGAs) used by Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C). The SLS Navigation Team is also responsible for the navigation algorithms. The navigation algorithms are delivered for implementation on the flight hardware as a DMM. For the SLS Block 1-B design, the additional GPS Receiver hardware is managed as a DMM at the vehicle design level. This paper provides a discussion of the processes and methods used to engineer, design, and coordinate engineering trades and performance assessments using SLS practices as applied to the GN&C system, with a particular focus on the Navigation components. These include composing system requirements, requirements verification, model development, model verification and validation, and modeling and analysis approaches. The Model-based Design and Requirements approach does not reduce the effort associated with the design process versus previous processes used at Marshall Space Flight Center. Instead, the approach takes advantage of overlap between the requirements development and management process, and the design and analysis process by efficiently combining the control (i.e. the requirement) and the design mechanisms. The design mechanism is the representation of the component behavior and performance in design and analysis tools. The focus in the early design process shifts from the development and

  3. Modeling molecular boiling points using computed interaction energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterangelo, Stephen C; Seybold, Paul G

    2017-12-20

    The noncovalent van der Waals interactions between molecules in liquids are typically described in textbooks as occurring between the total molecular dipoles (permanent, induced, or transient) of the molecules. This notion was tested by examining the boiling points of 67 halogenated hydrocarbon liquids using quantum chemically calculated molecular dipole moments, ionization potentials, and polarizabilities obtained from semi-empirical (AM1 and PM3) and ab initio Hartree-Fock [HF 6-31G(d), HF 6-311G(d,p)], and density functional theory [B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)] methods. The calculated interaction energies and an empirical measure of hydrogen bonding were employed to model the boiling points of the halocarbons. It was found that only terms related to London dispersion energies and hydrogen bonding proved significant in the regression analyses, and the performances of the models generally improved at higher levels of quantum chemical computation. An empirical estimate for the molecular polarizabilities was also tested, and the best models for the boiling points were obtained using either this empirical polarizability itself or the polarizabilities calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, along with the hydrogen-bonding parameter. The results suggest that the cohesive forces are more appropriately described as resulting from highly localized interactions rather than interactions between the global molecular dipoles.

  4. Stochastic approaches to inflation model building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Erandy; Liddle, Andrew R.

    2005-01-01

    While inflation gives an appealing explanation of observed cosmological data, there are a wide range of different inflation models, providing differing predictions for the initial perturbations. Typically models are motivated either by fundamental physics considerations or by simplicity. An alternative is to generate large numbers of models via a random generation process, such as the flow equations approach. The flow equations approach is known to predict a definite structure to the observational predictions. In this paper, we first demonstrate a more efficient implementation of the flow equations exploiting an analytic solution found by Liddle (2003). We then consider alternative stochastic methods of generating large numbers of inflation models, with the aim of testing whether the structures generated by the flow equations are robust. We find that while typically there remains some concentration of points in the observable plane under the different methods, there is significant variation in the predictions amongst the methods considered

  5. Model validation: a systemic and systematic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, G.; Elzas, M.S.; Cronhjort, B.T.

    1993-01-01

    The term 'validation' is used ubiquitously in association with the modelling activities of numerous disciplines including social, political natural, physical sciences, and engineering. There is however, a wide range of definitions which give rise to very different interpretations of what activities the process involves. Analyses of results from the present large international effort in modelling radioactive waste disposal systems illustrate the urgent need to develop a common approach to model validation. Some possible explanations are offered to account for the present state of affairs. The methodology developed treats model validation and code verification in a systematic fashion. In fact, this approach may be regarded as a comprehensive framework to assess the adequacy of any simulation study. (author)

  6. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A., E-mail: jolson@fit.edu; Baum, J. Clayton, E-mail: cbaum@fit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901 (United States); Novak, Mark J. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ{sub ap}) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  7. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A.; Baum, J. Clayton; Novak, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ_a_p) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  8. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    )-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers......The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R...... indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site...

  9. MOLECULAR VALIDATED MODEL FOR ADSORPTION OF PROTONATED DYE ON LDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Braga

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrotalcite-like compounds are anionic clays of scientific and technological interest for their use as ion exchange materials, catalysts and modified electrodes. Surface phenomenon are important for all these applications. Although conventional analytical methods have enabled progress in understanding the behavior of anionic clays in solution, an evaluation at the atomic scale of the dynamics of their ionic interactions has never been performed. Molecular simulation has become an extremely useful tool to provide this perspective. Our purpose is to validate a simplified model for the adsorption of 5-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-2-methoxy-benzenesulfonic acid (MBSA, a prototype molecule of anionic dyes, onto a hydrotalcite surface. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in the canonical ensemble with MBSA ions and a pore model of hydrotalcite using UFF and ClayFF force fields. The proposed molecular model has allowed us to reproduce experimental data of atomic force microscopy. Influences of protonation during the adsorption process are also presented.

  10. Hierarchical modeling of molecular energies using a deep neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Nicholas; Smith, Justin S.; Barros, Kipton

    2018-06-01

    We introduce the Hierarchically Interacting Particle Neural Network (HIP-NN) to model molecular properties from datasets of quantum calculations. Inspired by a many-body expansion, HIP-NN decomposes properties, such as energy, as a sum over hierarchical terms. These terms are generated from a neural network—a composition of many nonlinear transformations—acting on a representation of the molecule. HIP-NN achieves the state-of-the-art performance on a dataset of 131k ground state organic molecules and predicts energies with 0.26 kcal/mol mean absolute error. With minimal tuning, our model is also competitive on a dataset of molecular dynamics trajectories. In addition to enabling accurate energy predictions, the hierarchical structure of HIP-NN helps to identify regions of model uncertainty.

  11. Spherical convolutions and their application in molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Frellsen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks are increasingly used outside the domain of image analysis, in particular in various areas of the natural sciences concerned with spatial data. Such networks often work out-of-the box, and in some cases entire model architectures from image analysis can be carried over...... to other problem domains almost unaltered. Unfortunately, this convenience does not trivially extend to data in non-euclidean spaces, such as spherical data. In this paper, we introduce two strategies for conducting convolutions on the sphere, using either a spherical-polar grid or a grid based...... of spherical convolutions in the context of molecular modelling, by considering structural environments within proteins. We show that the models are capable of learning non-trivial functions in these molecular environments, and that our spherical convolutions generally outperform standard 3D convolutions...

  12. A classical Master equation approach to modeling an artificial protein motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwada, Nathan J.; Blab, Gerhard A.; Linke, Heiner

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by biomolecular motors, as well as by theoretical concepts for chemically driven nanomotors, there is significant interest in constructing artificial molecular motors. One driving force is the opportunity to create well-controlled model systems that are simple enough to be modeled in detail. A remaining challenge is the fact that such models need to take into account processes on many different time scales. Here we describe use of a classical Master equation approach, integrated with input from Langevin and molecular dynamics modeling, to stochastically model an existing artificial molecular motor concept, the Tumbleweed, across many time scales. This enables us to study how interdependencies between motor processes, such as center-of-mass diffusion and track binding/unbinding, affect motor performance. Results from our model help guide the experimental realization of the proposed motor, and potentially lead to insights that apply to a wider class of molecular motors.

  13. A Conceptual Modeling Approach for OLAP Personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigós, Irene; Pardillo, Jesús; Mazón, Jose-Norberto; Trujillo, Juan

    Data warehouses rely on multidimensional models in order to provide decision makers with appropriate structures to intuitively analyze data with OLAP technologies. However, data warehouses may be potentially large and multidimensional structures become increasingly complex to be understood at a glance. Even if a departmental data warehouse (also known as data mart) is used, these structures would be also too complex. As a consequence, acquiring the required information is more costly than expected and decision makers using OLAP tools may get frustrated. In this context, current approaches for data warehouse design are focused on deriving a unique OLAP schema for all analysts from their previously stated information requirements, which is not enough to lighten the complexity of the decision making process. To overcome this drawback, we argue for personalizing multidimensional models for OLAP technologies according to the continuously changing user characteristics, context, requirements and behaviour. In this paper, we present a novel approach to personalizing OLAP systems at the conceptual level based on the underlying multidimensional model of the data warehouse, a user model and a set of personalization rules. The great advantage of our approach is that a personalized OLAP schema is provided for each decision maker contributing to better satisfy their specific analysis needs. Finally, we show the applicability of our approach through a sample scenario based on our CASE tool for data warehouse development.

  14. Variational approach to chiral quark models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futami, Yasuhiko; Odajima, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Akira

    1987-03-01

    A variational approach is applied to a chiral quark model to test the validity of the perturbative treatment of the pion-quark interaction based on the chiral symmetry principle. It is indispensably related to the chiral symmetry breaking radius if the pion-quark interaction can be regarded as a perturbation.

  15. A variational approach to chiral quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futami, Yasuhiko; Odajima, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Akira.

    1987-01-01

    A variational approach is applied to a chiral quark model to test the validity of the perturbative treatment of the pion-quark interaction based on the chiral symmetry principle. It is indispensably related to the chiral symmetry breaking radius if the pion-quark interaction can be regarded as a perturbation. (author)

  16. Electro-spray ionization - mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and molecular modelling, two complementary approaches. Application to calixarenes; Electrospray - spectrometrie de masse (ESI/MS) et modelisation moleculaire, deux approches complementaires. Application aux calixarenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, F.; Virelizier, H.; Moulin, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Procedes d' Enrichissement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lamare, V.; Dozol, J.F. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation and the experimental results obtained by the ESI/MS technique have shown that the stability of the calixarene - alkaline cation complexes is dependent of the medium. Indeed, in solution, the calixarene presents a strong affinity for cesium whereas in gaseous phase, the strong affinity is for sodium. The stability of the [calixarene+Na]{sup +} complexes depends of the nature of the medium too; these two techniques having shown that the presence of a small quantity of water in the dilution solvent stabilizes the complex. At last, calixarenes with benzo groups on their crown have an affinity for sodium which is weak in solution but strong in gaseous phase. These different results show the excellent complementarity between the two techniques. (O.M.)

  17. A Set Theoretical Approach to Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2016-01-01

    characterized by equifinality, multiple conjunctural causation, and case diversity. We prescribe methodological guidelines consisting of a six-step procedure to systematically apply set theoretic methods to conceptualize, develop, and empirically derive maturity models and provide a demonstration......Maturity Model research in IS has been criticized for the lack of theoretical grounding, methodological rigor, empirical validations, and ignorance of multiple and non-linear paths to maturity. To address these criticisms, this paper proposes a novel set-theoretical approach to maturity models...

  18. Molecular Models for DSMC Simulations of Metal Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Venkattraman, A; Alexeenko, Alina A

    2010-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied here to model the electron‐beam (e‐beam) physical vapor deposition of copper thin films. A suitable molecular model for copper‐copper interactions have been determined based on comparisons with experiments for a 2D slit source. The model for atomic copper vapor is then used in axi‐symmetric DSMC simulations for analysis of a typical e‐beam metal deposition system with a cup crucible. The dimensional and non‐dimensional mass fluxes obt...

  19. A hybrid modeling approach for option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Ehsan; Seifi, Abbas

    2011-11-01

    The complexity of option pricing has led many researchers to develop sophisticated models for such purposes. The commonly used Black-Scholes model suffers from a number of limitations. One of these limitations is the assumption that the underlying probability distribution is lognormal and this is so controversial. We propose a couple of hybrid models to reduce these limitations and enhance the ability of option pricing. The key input to option pricing model is volatility. In this paper, we use three popular GARCH type model for estimating volatility. Then, we develop two non-parametric models based on neural networks and neuro-fuzzy networks to price call options for S&P 500 index. We compare the results with those of Black-Scholes model and show that both neural network and neuro-fuzzy network models outperform Black-Scholes model. Furthermore, comparing the neural network and neuro-fuzzy approaches, we observe that for at-the-money options, neural network model performs better and for both in-the-money and an out-of-the money option, neuro-fuzzy model provides better results.

  20. Heat transfer modeling an inductive approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sidebotham, George

    2015-01-01

    This innovative text emphasizes a "less-is-more" approach to modeling complicated systems such as heat transfer by treating them first as "1-node lumped models" that yield simple closed-form solutions. The author develops numerical techniques for students to obtain more detail, but also trains them to use the techniques only when simpler approaches fail. Covering all essential methods offered in traditional texts, but with a different order, Professor Sidebotham stresses inductive thinking and problem solving as well as a constructive understanding of modern, computer-based practice. Readers learn to develop their own code in the context of the material, rather than just how to use packaged software, offering a deeper, intrinsic grasp behind models of heat transfer. Developed from over twenty-five years of lecture notes to teach students of mechanical and chemical engineering at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, the book is ideal for students and practitioners across engineering discipl...

  1. Synthetic model for Doppler broadening of neutron absorption resonances in molecular fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, Alejandro J., E-mail: villanueva@cab.cnea.gov.a [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (RN) (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Granada, J.R. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (RN) (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina)

    2010-08-15

    A general and systematic approach expressed in modern language, accounting for molecular motion effects on Doppler Broadening of Neutron Absorption Resonances (DBNAR) is given the form of a new model. It relies on well validated hypothesis: The separability of atomic from nuclear degrees of freedom, the use of the Van Hove scattering formalism and the fact that a conceptually identical approach produced experimentally proved predictions when applied to DBNAR in solid systems. We treat the molecular internal degrees of freedom approximately as harmonic oscillators. As a second contribution of this work, a synthetic model is presented in order to make the more complete model mentioned above suitable for neutron calculation codes. This second synthetic model reduces to the exact expressions of the complete model in the low and high neutron energy regimes and provides a plausible transition in between. Numerical results are presented for a general hypothetical case to show its strengths and limitations. Also, both models are applied to a real case of the {sup 238}U 6.674 eV resonant effective broadened absorption cross-section in UF6 (uranium hexafluoride). A direct experimental validation of our models is still necessary for which a special high resolution neutron transmission experiment ought to be devised at low temperatures and pressures on a gaseous system. It is showed how the synthetic model can be used to make thermometric predictions in an improved fashion in comparison to the effective temperature gas model at low temperatures.

  2. Modeling of molecular weight and molecular weight distribution in slurry polymerization of propylene by Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasani, R.; Pourmahdian, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Precise prediction of polypropylene synthesized by heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalysts needs good knowledge of parameters affecting on polymerization. molecular weight and molecular weight distribution are among important characteristics of a polymer determining physical-mechanical properties. broadening of molecular weight distribution is an important and well known characteristic of polypropylene synthesized by heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalysts, So it is important to understand the origin of broad molecular weight. Two main factors in broadening molecular weight, namely mass transfer resistances and multiplicity of active sites, are discussed in this paper and a model including these factors is presented. Then we calculate molecular weight and molecular weight distribution by the model and compare our results with

  3. Molecular Modeling of Enzyme Dynamics Towards Understanding Solvent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar

    This thesis describes the development of a molecular simulation methodology to study properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media at fixed thermodynamic water activities. The methodology is applied in a molecular dynamics study of the industrially important enzyme Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB...... of enzyme kinetics in non-aqueous media, it has been a fruitful approach to fix the enzyme hydration level by controlling the water activity of the medium. In this work, a protocol is therefore developed for determining the water activity in non-aqueous protein simulations. The method relies on determining...... integration, while for small systems, it seems to be even better. The method is applied to compute the excess Gibbs energy of the mixtures of water and organic solvents used in the simulations of CALB. This allows to determine the water activity of the simulated systems and thus to compare protein properties...

  4. Molecular features related to HIV integrase inhibition obtained from structure- and ligand-based approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana L de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Among several biological targets to treat AIDS, HIV integrase is a promising enzyme that can be employed to develop new anti-HIV agents. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanistic interpretation of HIV-1 integrase inhibition and to rationalize the molecular features related to the binding affinity of studied ligands. A set of 79 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and its relationship with biological activity are investigated employing 2D and 3D QSAR models, docking analysis and DFT studies. Analyses of docking poses and frontier molecular orbitals revealed important features on the main ligand-receptor interactions. 2D and 3D models presenting good internal consistency, predictive power and stability were obtained in all cases. Significant correlation coefficients (r(2 = 0.908 and q(2= 0.643 for 2D model; r(2= 0.904 and q(2= 0.719 for 3D model were obtained, indicating the potential of these models for untested compounds. The generated holograms and contribution maps revealed important molecular requirements to HIV-1 IN inhibition and several evidences for molecular modifications. The final models along with information resulting from molecular orbitals, 2D contribution and 3D contour maps should be useful in the design of new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity within the chemical diversity of the data.

  5. Nonperturbative approach to the attractive Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2001-01-01

    A nonperturbative approach to the single-band attractive Hubbard model is presented in the general context of functional-derivative approaches to many-body theories. As in previous work on the repulsive model, the first step is based on a local-field-type ansatz, on enforcement of the Pauli principle and a number of crucial sumrules. The Mermin-Wagner theorem in two dimensions is automatically satisfied. At this level, two-particle self-consistency has been achieved. In the second step of the approximation, an improved expression for the self-energy is obtained by using the results of the first step in an exact expression for the self-energy, where the high- and low-frequency behaviors appear separately. The result is a cooperon-like formula. The required vertex corrections are included in this self-energy expression, as required by the absence of a Migdal theorem for this problem. Other approaches to the attractive Hubbard model are critically compared. Physical consequences of the present approach and agreement with Monte Carlo simulations are demonstrated in the accompanying paper (following this one)

  6. Quasirelativistic quark model in quasipotential approach

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, V A; Savrin, V I; Sissakian, A N

    2002-01-01

    The relativistic particles interaction is described within the frames of quasipotential approach. The presentation is based on the so called covariant simultaneous formulation of the quantum field theory, where by the theory is considered on the spatial-like three-dimensional hypersurface in the Minkowski space. Special attention is paid to the methods of plotting various quasipotentials as well as to the applications of the quasipotential approach to describing the characteristics of the relativistic particles interaction in the quark models, namely: the hadrons elastic scattering amplitudes, the mass spectra and widths mesons decays, the cross sections of the deep inelastic leptons scattering on the hadrons

  7. Molecular modeling of polycarbonate materials: Glass transition and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczynski, Karol; Wilke, Andreas; Paeschke, Manfred; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Linking the experimentally accessible macroscopic properties of thermoplastic polymers to their microscopic static and dynamic properties is a key requirement for targeted material design. Classical molecular dynamics simulations enable us to study the structural and dynamic behavior of molecules on microscopic scales, and statistical physics provides a framework for relating these properties to the macroscopic properties. We take a first step toward creating an automated workflow for the theoretical prediction of thermoplastic material properties by developing an expeditious method for parameterizing a simple yet surprisingly powerful coarse-grained bisphenol-A polycarbonate model which goes beyond previous coarse-grained models and successfully reproduces the thermal expansion behavior, the glass transition temperature as a function of the molecular weight, and several elastic properties.

  8. Toward an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barnacle larval settlement: A comparative transcriptomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2011-07-29

    Background: The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed biofouler and a model species in intertidal ecology and larval settlement studies. However, a lack of genomic information has hindered the comprehensive elucidation of the molecular mechanisms coordinating its larval settlement. The pyrosequencing-based transcriptomic approach is thought to be useful to identify key molecular changes during larval settlement. Methodology and Principal Findings: Using 454 pyrosequencing, we collected totally 630,845 reads including 215,308 from the larval stages and 415,537 from the adults; 23,451 contigs were generated while 77,785 remained as singletons. We annotated 31,720 of the 92,322 predicted open reading frames, which matched hits in the NCBI NR database, and identified 7,954 putative genes that were differentially expressed between the larval and adult stages. Of these, several genes were further characterized with quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, revealing some key findings: 1) vitellogenin was uniquely expressed in late nauplius stage, suggesting it may be an energy source for the subsequent non-feeding cyprid stage; 2) the locations of mannose receptors suggested they may be involved in the sensory system of cyprids; 3) 20 kDa-cement protein homologues were expressed in the cyprid cement gland and probably function during attachment; and 4) receptor tyrosine kinases were expressed higher in cyprid stage and may be involved in signal perception during larval settlement. Conclusions: Our results provide not only the basis of several new hypotheses about gene functions during larval settlement, but also the availability of this large transcriptome dataset in B. amphitrite for further exploration of larval settlement and developmental pathways in this important marine species. © 2011 Chen et al.

  9. Molecular and morphological approaches for species delimitation and hybridization investigations of two Cichla species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. F. Mourão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The hybridization is a widely-discussed issue in several studies with fish species. For some authors, hybridization may be related with diversification and speciation of several groups, or also with the extinction of populations or species. Difficulties to differentiate species and hybrids may be a problem to correctly apply a management of wild species, because hybrid lineages, especially the advanced ones, may resemble the parental species. The genus Cichla Bloch & Schneider, 1801 constitutes an interesting experimental model, considering that hybridization and taxonomic uncertainties hinder a correct identification. Considering these problems, in this study, we developed genetic methodologies and applied meristic and morphometric approaches in wild samples in order to identify species and for test a possible hybridization between Cichla kelberi Kullander & Ferreira, 2006 and Cichla piquiti Kullander & Ferreira, 2006. For this, C. kelberi, C. piquiti and potential hybrid ( carijó individuals were collected in Paraná and Tietê rivers (SP, Brazil. For meristic and morphometric methods, the individuals were analyzed using the statistical software Pcord 5:31, while for molecular methods, primers for PCR-multiplex were designed and enzyme for PCR-RFLP were selected, under the species-specific nucleotide. All results indicated that the carijó is not an interspecific hybrid, because it presented identical genetic pattern and morphology closed to C. piquiti. Thus, we propose that carijó is a C. piquiti morphotype. In addition, this study promotes a new molecular tool that could be used in future research, monitoring and management programs of the genus Cichla.

  10. A new approach for developing adjoint models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many data assimilation algorithms rely on the availability of gradients of misfit functionals, which can be efficiently computed with adjoint models. However, the development of an adjoint model for a complex geophysical code is generally very difficult. Algorithmic differentiation (AD, also called automatic differentiation) offers one strategy for simplifying this task: it takes the abstraction that a model is a sequence of primitive instructions, each of which may be differentiated in turn. While extremely successful, this low-level abstraction runs into time-consuming difficulties when applied to the whole codebase of a model, such as differentiating through linear solves, model I/O, calls to external libraries, language features that are unsupported by the AD tool, and the use of multiple programming languages. While these difficulties can be overcome, it requires a large amount of technical expertise and an intimate familiarity with both the AD tool and the model. An alternative to applying the AD tool to the whole codebase is to assemble the discrete adjoint equations and use these to compute the necessary gradients. With this approach, the AD tool must be applied to the nonlinear assembly operators, which are typically small, self-contained units of the codebase. The disadvantage of this approach is that the assembly of the discrete adjoint equations is still very difficult to perform correctly, especially for complex multiphysics models that perform temporal integration; as it stands, this approach is as difficult and time-consuming as applying AD to the whole model. In this work, we have developed a library which greatly simplifies and automates the alternate approach of assembling the discrete adjoint equations. We propose a complementary, higher-level abstraction to that of AD: that a model is a sequence of linear solves. The developer annotates model source code with library calls that build a 'tape' of the operators involved and their dependencies, and

  11. Jacobian elliptic wave solutions in an anharmonic molecular crystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, C.G.R.; Lee, B.S.; Koo, W.K.

    1997-07-01

    Explicit Jacobian elliptic wave solutions are found in the anharmonic molecular crystal model for both the continuum limit and discrete modes. This class of wave solutions include the famous pulse-like and kink-like solitary modes. We would also like to report on the existence of some highly discrete staggered solitary wave modes not found in the continuum limit. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  12. Eutrophication Modeling Using Variable Chlorophyll Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolabadi, H.; Sarang, A.; Ardestani, M.; Mahjoobi, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, eutrophication was investigated in Lake Ontario to identify the interactions among effective drivers. The complexity of such phenomenon was modeled using a system dynamics approach based on a consideration of constant and variable stoichiometric ratios. The system dynamics approach is a powerful tool for developing object-oriented models to simulate complex phenomena that involve feedback effects. Utilizing stoichiometric ratios is a method for converting the concentrations of state variables. During the physical segmentation of the model, Lake Ontario was divided into two layers, i.e., the epilimnion and hypolimnion, and differential equations were developed for each layer. The model structure included 16 state variables related to phytoplankton, herbivorous zooplankton, carnivorous zooplankton, ammonium, nitrate, dissolved phosphorus, and particulate and dissolved carbon in the epilimnion and hypolimnion during a time horizon of one year. The results of several tests to verify the model, close to 1 Nash-Sutcliff coefficient (0.98), the data correlation coefficient (0.98), and lower standard errors (0.96), have indicated well-suited model’s efficiency. The results revealed that there were significant differences in the concentrations of the state variables in constant and variable stoichiometry simulations. Consequently, the consideration of variable stoichiometric ratios in algae and nutrient concentration simulations may be applied in future modeling studies to enhance the accuracy of the results and reduce the likelihood of inefficient control policies.

  13. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  14. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik; Szepessy, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  15. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  16. Molecular modeling in the development of metal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    We began this project with a compilation of a structural library to serve as a data base containing descriptions of the molecular features of metal-labeled radiopharmaceuticals known to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Such a data base is needed in order to identify structural features (size, shape, molecular surface areas and volumes) that are critical in allowing blood-brain barrier penetration. Nine metal complexes have been added to this structural library. We have completed a detailed comparison of four molecular mechanics computer programs QUANTA, SYBYL, BOYD, and MM2DREW to assess their applicability to modeling the structures of low molecular weight metal complexes. We tested the ability of each program to reproduce the crystallographic structures of 38 complexes between nickel(II) and saturated N-donor ligands. The programs were evaluated in terns of their ability to reproduce structural features such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles. Recently, we investigated the synthesis and characterization of lipophilic cationic gallium complexes with hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands. This work identified the first gallium-68 radiopharrnaceuticals that can be injected intravenously and that subsequently exhibit significant myocardial uptake followed by prolonged myocardial retention of 68 Ga radioactivity. Tracers of this type remain under investigation as agents for evaluation of myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography

  17. Comparisons of Multilevel Modeling and Structural Equation Modeling Approaches to Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sehee; Kim, Soyoung

    2018-01-01

    There are basically two modeling approaches applicable to analyzing an actor-partner interdependence model: the multilevel modeling (hierarchical linear model) and the structural equation modeling. This article explains how to use these two models in analyzing an actor-partner interdependence model and how these two approaches work differently. As an empirical example, marital conflict data were used to analyze an actor-partner interdependence model. The multilevel modeling and the structural equation modeling produced virtually identical estimates for a basic model. However, the structural equation modeling approach allowed more realistic assumptions on measurement errors and factor loadings, rendering better model fit indices.

  18. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-01-01

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested

  19. Molecular model for solubility of gases in flexible polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Ole; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    We propose a model for a priori prediction of the solubility of gases in flexible polymers. The model is based on the concept of ideal solubility of gases in liquids. According to this concept, the mole fraction of gases in liquids is given by Raoult's law with the total pressure and the vapor...... pressure of the gas, where the latter may have to be extrapolated. However, instead of considering each polymer molecule as a rigid structure, we estimate the effective number of degrees of freedom from an equivalent freely jointed bead-rod model for the flexible polymer. In this model, we associate...... the length of the rods with the molecular weight corresponding to a Kuhn step. The model provides a tool for crude estimation of the gas solubility on the basis of only the monomer unit of the polymer and properties of the gas. A comparison with the solubility data for several gases in poly...

  20. Evolutionary modeling-based approach for model errors correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Q. Wan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inverse problem of using the information of historical data to estimate model errors is one of the science frontier research topics. In this study, we investigate such a problem using the classic Lorenz (1963 equation as a prediction model and the Lorenz equation with a periodic evolutionary function as an accurate representation of reality to generate "observational data."

    On the basis of the intelligent features of evolutionary modeling (EM, including self-organization, self-adaptive and self-learning, the dynamic information contained in the historical data can be identified and extracted by computer automatically. Thereby, a new approach is proposed to estimate model errors based on EM in the present paper. Numerical tests demonstrate the ability of the new approach to correct model structural errors. In fact, it can actualize the combination of the statistics and dynamics to certain extent.

  1. MODELS OF TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION: AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei OGREZEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary study of information technology adoption has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. Various theoretical models have been developed and applied such as: the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB, etc. The result of these many years of research is thousands of contributions to the field, which, however, remain highly fragmented. This paper develops a theoretical model of technology adoption by integrating major theories in the field: primarily IDT, TAM, and TPB. To do so while avoiding mess, an approach that goes back to basics in independent variable type’s development is proposed; emphasizing: 1 the logic of classification, and 2 psychological mechanisms behind variable types. Once developed these types are then populated with variables originating in empirical research. Conclusions are developed on which types are underpopulated and present potential for future research. I end with a set of methodological recommendations for future application of the model.

  2. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  3. A new modelling approach for zooplankton behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiyu, A. Y.; Yamazaki, H.; Strickler, J. R.

    We have developed a new simulation technique to model zooplankton behaviour. The approach utilizes neither the conventional artificial intelligence nor neural network methods. We have designed an adaptive behaviour network, which is similar to BEER [(1990) Intelligence as an adaptive behaviour: an experiment in computational neuroethology, Academic Press], based on observational studies of zooplankton behaviour. The proposed method is compared with non- "intelligent" models—random walk and correlated walk models—as well as observed behaviour in a laboratory tank. Although the network is simple, the model exhibits rich behavioural patterns similar to live copepods.

  4. Continuum modeling an approach through practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    This book develops continuum modeling skills and approaches the topic from three sides: (1) derivation of global integral laws together with the associated local differential equations, (2) design of constitutive laws and (3) modeling boundary processes. The focus of this presentation lies on many practical examples covering aspects such as coupled flow, diffusion and reaction in porous media or microwave heating of a pizza, as well as traffic issues in bacterial colonies and energy harvesting from geothermal wells. The target audience comprises primarily graduate students in pure and applied mathematics as well as working practitioners in engineering who are faced by nonstandard rheological topics like those typically arising in the food industry.

  5. Global Environmental Change: An integrated modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Elzen, M.

    1993-01-01

    Two major global environmental problems are dealt with: climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion (and their mutual interactions), briefly surveyed in part 1. In Part 2 a brief description of the integrated modelling framework IMAGE 1.6 is given. Some specific parts of the model are described in more detail in other Chapters, e.g. the carbon cycle model, the atmospheric chemistry model, the halocarbon model, and the UV-B impact model. In Part 3 an uncertainty analysis of climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion is presented (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 briefly reviews the social and economic uncertainties implied by future greenhouse gas emissions. Chapters 6 and 7 describe a model and sensitivity analysis pertaining to the scientific uncertainties and/or lacunae in the sources and sinks of methane and carbon dioxide, and their biogeochemical feedback processes. Chapter 8 presents an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the carbon cycle model, the halocarbon model, and the IMAGE model 1.6 as a whole. Part 4 presents the risk assessment methodology as applied to the problems of climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion more specifically. In Chapter 10, this methodology is used as a means with which to asses current ozone policy and a wide range of halocarbon policies. Chapter 11 presents and evaluates the simulated globally-averaged temperature and sea level rise (indicators) for the IPCC-1990 and 1992 scenarios, concluding with a Low Risk scenario, which would meet the climate targets. Chapter 12 discusses the impact of sea level rise on the frequency of the Dutch coastal defence system (indicator) for the IPCC-1990 scenarios. Chapter 13 presents projections of mortality rates due to stratospheric ozone depletion based on model simulations employing the UV-B chain model for a number of halocarbon policies. Chapter 14 presents an approach for allocating future emissions of CO 2 among regions. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. A Systems Approach to Refine Disease Taxonomy by Integrating Phenotypic and Molecular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The International Classification of Diseases (ICD relies on clinical features and lags behind the current understanding of the molecular specificity of disease pathobiology, necessitating approaches that incorporate growing biomedical data for classifying diseases to meet the needs of precision medicine. Our analysis revealed that the heterogeneous molecular diversity of disease chapters and the blurred boundary between disease categories in ICD should be further investigated. Here, we propose a new classification of diseases (NCD by developing an algorithm that predicts the additional categories of a disease by integrating multiple networks consisting of disease phenotypes and their molecular profiles. With statistical validations from phenotype-genotype associations and interactome networks, we demonstrate that NCD improves disease specificity owing to its overlapping categories and polyhierarchical structure. Furthermore, NCD captures the molecular diversity of diseases and defines clearer boundaries in terms of both phenotypic similarity and molecular associations, establishing a rational strategy to reform disease taxonomy. Keywords: Disease taxonomy, Network medicine, Disease phenotypes, Molecular profiles, Precision medicine

  7. Precision medicine and molecular imaging: new targeted approaches toward cancer therapeutic and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mojtaba; Nabipour, Iraj; Omrani, Abdolmajid; Alipour, Zeinab; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the importance and role of precision medicine and molecular imaging technologies in cancer diagnosis with therapeutics and diagnostics purposes. Precision medicine is progressively becoming a hot topic in all disciplines related to biomedical investigation and has the capacity to become the paradigm for clinical practice. The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually appropriate treatments, a concept that has been named precision medicine, i.e. delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Molecular imaging is quickly being recognized as a tool with the potential to ameliorate every aspect of cancer treatment. On the other hand, emerging high-throughput technologies such as omics techniques and systems approaches have generated a paradigm shift for biological systems in advanced life science research. In this review, we describe the precision medicine, difference between precision medicine and personalized medicine, precision medicine initiative, systems biology/medicine approaches (such as genomics, radiogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), P4 medicine, relationship between systems biology/medicine approaches and precision medicine, and molecular imaging modalities and their utility in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Accordingly, the precision medicine and molecular imaging will enable us to accelerate and improve cancer management in future medicine. PMID:28078184

  8. Precision medicine and molecular imaging: new targeted approaches toward cancer therapeutic and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mojtaba; Nabipour, Iraj; Omrani, Abdolmajid; Alipour, Zeinab; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the importance and role of precision medicine and molecular imaging technologies in cancer diagnosis with therapeutics and diagnostics purposes. Precision medicine is progressively becoming a hot topic in all disciplines related to biomedical investigation and has the capacity to become the paradigm for clinical practice. The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually appropriate treatments, a concept that has been named precision medicine, i.e. delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Molecular imaging is quickly being recognized as a tool with the potential to ameliorate every aspect of cancer treatment. On the other hand, emerging high-throughput technologies such as omics techniques and systems approaches have generated a paradigm shift for biological systems in advanced life science research. In this review, we describe the precision medicine, difference between precision medicine and personalized medicine, precision medicine initiative, systems biology/medicine approaches (such as genomics, radiogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), P4 medicine, relationship between systems biology/medicine approaches and precision medicine, and molecular imaging modalities and their utility in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Accordingly, the precision medicine and molecular imaging will enable us to accelerate and improve cancer management in future medicine.

  9. Systems biological approach of molecular descriptors connectivity: optimal descriptors for oral bioavailability prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shiek S S J; Ramakrishnan, V

    2012-01-01

    Poor oral bioavailability is an important parameter accounting for the failure of the drug candidates. Approximately, 50% of developing drugs fail because of unfavorable oral bioavailability. In silico prediction of oral bioavailability (%F) based on physiochemical properties are highly needed. Although many computational models have been developed to predict oral bioavailability, their accuracy remains low with a significant number of false positives. In this study, we present an oral bioavailability model based on systems biological approach, using a machine learning algorithm coupled with an optimal discriminative set of physiochemical properties. The models were developed based on computationally derived 247 physicochemical descriptors from 2279 molecules, among which 969, 605 and 705 molecules were corresponds to oral bioavailability, intestinal absorption (HIA) and caco-2 permeability data set, respectively. The partial least squares discriminate analysis showed 49 descriptors of HIA and 50 descriptors of caco-2 are the major contributing descriptors in classifying into groups. Of these descriptors, 47 descriptors were commonly associated to HIA and caco-2, which suggests to play a vital role in classifying oral bioavailability. To determine the best machine learning algorithm, 21 classifiers were compared using a bioavailability data set of 969 molecules with 47 descriptors. Each molecule in the data set was represented by a set of 47 physiochemical properties with the functional relevance labeled as (+bioavailability/-bioavailability) to indicate good-bioavailability/poor-bioavailability molecules. The best-performing algorithm was the logistic algorithm. The correlation based feature selection (CFS) algorithm was implemented, which confirms that these 47 descriptors are the fundamental descriptors for oral bioavailability prediction. The logistic algorithm with 47 selected descriptors correctly predicted the oral bioavailability, with a predictive accuracy

  10. Mitochondrial Molecular Pathophysiology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Proteomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Nuño-Lámbarri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a chronic liver condition that can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and cancer. It is considered an emerging health problem due to malnourishment or a high-fat diet (HFD intake, which is observed worldwide. It is well known that the hepatocytes’ apoptosis phenomenon is one of the most important features of NAFLD. Thus, this review focuses on revealing, through a proteomics approach, the complex network of protein interactions that promote fibrosis, liver cell stress, and apoptosis. According to different types of in vitro and murine models, it has been found that oxidative/nitrative protein stress leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, which plays a major role in stimulating NAFLD damage. Human studies have revealed the importance of novel biomarkers, such as retinol-binding protein 4, lumican, transgelin 2 and hemoglobin, which have a significant role in the disease. The post-genome era has brought proteomics technology, which allows the determination of molecular pathogenesis in NAFLD. This has led to the search for biomarkers which improve early diagnosis and optimal treatment and which may effectively prevent fatal consequences such as cirrhosis or cancer.

  11. Continuum multiple-scattering approach to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dill, D.

    1979-01-01

    The multiple-scattering approach to the electronic continuum of molecules is described. The continuum multiple-scattering model (CMSM) was developed as a survey tool and, as such was required to satisfy two requirements. First, it had to have a very broad scope, which means (i) molecules of arbitrary geometry and complexity containing any atom in the periodic system, (ii) continuum electron energies from 0-1000 eV, and (iii) capability to treat a large range of processes involving both photoionization and electron scattering. Second, the structure of the theory was required to lend itself to transparent, physical interpretation of major spectral features such as shape resonances. A comprehensive theoretical framework for the continuum multiple scattering method is presented, as well as its applications to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization. Highlights of recent applications in these two areas are reviewed. The major impact of the resulting studies over the last few years has been to establish the importance of shape resonances in electron collisions and photoionization of practically all (non-hydride) molecules

  12. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  13. Theoretical model for calculation of molecular stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.J.

    1984-01-01

    A modified local plasma model based on the work of Linhard-Winther, Bethe, Brown, and Walske is established. The Gordon-Kim's molecular charged density model is employed to obtain a formula to evaluate the stopping power of many useful molecular systems. The stopping power of H 2 and He gas was calculated for incident proton energy ranging from 100 KeV to 2.5 MeV. The stopping power of O 2 , N 2 , and water vapor was also calculated for incident proton energy ranging from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV. Good agreement with experimental data was obtained. A discussion of molecular effects leading to departure from Bragg's rule is presented. The equipartition rule and the effect of nuclear momentum recoiling in stopping power are also discussed in the appendix. The calculation procedure presented hopefully can easily be extended to include the most useful organic systems such as the molecules composed of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen which are useful in radiation protection field

  14. Molecular modeling of the microstructure evolution during carbon fiber processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saaketh; Li, Chunyu; Shen, Tongtong; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    The rational design of carbon fibers with desired properties requires quantitative relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and resulting properties. We developed a molecular model that combines kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques to predict the microstructure evolution during the processes of carbonization and graphitization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. The model accurately predicts the cross-sectional microstructure of the fibers with the molecular structure of the stabilized PAN fibers and physics-based chemical reaction rates as the only inputs. The resulting structures exhibit key features observed in electron microcopy studies such as curved graphitic sheets and hairpin structures. In addition, computed X-ray diffraction patterns are in good agreement with experiments. We predict the transverse moduli of the resulting fibers between 1 GPa and 5 GPa, in good agreement with experimental results for high modulus fibers and slightly lower than those of high-strength fibers. The transverse modulus is governed by sliding between graphitic sheets, and the relatively low value for the predicted microstructures can be attributed to their perfect longitudinal texture. Finally, the simulations provide insight into the relationships between chemical kinetics and the final microstructure; we observe that high reaction rates result in porous structures with lower moduli.

  15. Naumovozyma castellii: an alternative model for budding yeast molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Cohn, Marita

    2017-03-01

    Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii) is a member of the budding yeast family Saccharomycetaceae. It has been extensively used as a model organism for telomere biology research and has gained increasing interest as a budding yeast model for functional analyses owing to its amenability to genetic modifications. Owing to the suitable phylogenetic distance to S. cerevisiae, the whole genome sequence of N. castellii has provided unique data for comparative genomic studies, and it played a key role in the establishment of the timing of the whole genome duplication and the evolutionary events that took place in the subsequent genomic evolution of the Saccharomyces lineage. Here we summarize the historical background of its establishment as a laboratory yeast species, and the development of genetic and molecular tools and strains. We review the research performed on N. castellii, focusing on areas where it has significantly contributed to the discovery of new features of molecular biology and to the advancement of our understanding of molecular evolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Towards structural models of molecular recognition in olfactory receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, M; Hubbard, R E; Demaille, J

    1998-02-01

    The G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) are an important class of proteins that act as signal transducers through the cytoplasmic membrane. Understanding the structure and activation mechanism of these proteins is crucial for understanding many different aspects of cellular signalling. The olfactory receptors correspond to the largest family of GPCRs. Very little is known about how the structures of the receptors govern the specificity of interaction which enables identification of particular odorant molecules. In this paper, we review recent developments in two areas of molecular modelling: methods for modelling the configuration of trans-membrane helices and methods for automatic docking of ligands into receptor structures. We then show how a subset of these methods can be combined to construct a model of a rat odorant receptor interacting with lyral for which experimental data are available. This modelling can help us make progress towards elucidating the specificity of interactions between receptors and odorant molecules.

  17. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibby, Jaclyn [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Keegan, Ronan M. [Research Complex at Harwell, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Mayans, Olga [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rigden, Daniel J., E-mail: drigden@liv.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Processing of NMR structures for molecular replacement by AMPLE works well. AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided.

  18. Water models based on a single potential energy surface and different molecular degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martin, Humberto; Hernández-Cobos, Jorge; Ortega-Blake, Iván

    2005-06-01

    Up to now it has not been possible to neatly assess whether a deficient performance of a model is due to poor parametrization of the force field or the lack of inclusion of enough molecular properties. This work compares several molecular models in the framework of the same force field, which was designed to include many-body nonadditive effects: (a) a polarizable and flexible molecule with constraints that account for the quantal nature of the vibration [B. Hess, H. Saint-Martin, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9602 (2002), H. Saint-Martin, B. Hess, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 11133 (2004)], (b) a polarizable and classically flexible molecule [H. Saint-Martin, J. Hernández-Cobos, M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, I. Ortega-Blake, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 10899 (2000)], (c) a polarizable and rigid molecule, and finally (d) a nonpolarizable and rigid molecule. The goal is to determine how significant the different molecular properties are. The results indicate that all factors—nonadditivity, polarizability, and intramolecular flexibility—are important. Still, approximations can be made in order to diminish the computational cost of the simulations with a small decrease in the accuracy of the predictions, provided that those approximations are counterbalanced by the proper inclusion of an effective molecular property, that is, an average molecular geometry or an average dipole. Hence instead of building an effective force field by parametrizing it in order to reproduce the properties of a specific phase, a building approach is proposed that is based on adequately restricting the molecular flexibility and/or polarizability of a model potential fitted to unimolecular properties, pair interactions, and many-body nonadditive contributions. In this manner, the same parental model can be used to simulate the same substance under a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. An additional advantage of this approach is that, as the force

  19. Learning reduced kinetic Monte Carlo models of complex chemistry from molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Sing-Long, Carlos A; Reed, Evan J

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel statistical learning framework for automatically and efficiently building reduced kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models of large-scale elementary reaction networks from data generated by a single or few molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Existing approaches for identifying species and reactions from molecular dynamics typically use bond length and duration criteria, where bond duration is a fixed parameter motivated by an understanding of bond vibrational frequencies. In contrast, we show that for highly reactive systems, bond duration should be a model parameter that is chosen to maximize the predictive power of the resulting statistical model. We demonstrate our method on a high temperature, high pressure system of reacting liquid methane, and show that the learned KMC model is able to extrapolate more than an order of magnitude in time for key molecules. Additionally, our KMC model of elementary reactions enables us to isolate the most important set of reactions governing the behavior of key molecules found in the MD simulation. We develop a new data-driven algorithm to reduce the chemical reaction network which can be solved either as an integer program or efficiently using L1 regularization, and compare our results with simple count-based reduction. For our liquid methane system, we discover that rare reactions do not play a significant role in the system, and find that less than 7% of the approximately 2000 reactions observed from molecular dynamics are necessary to reproduce the molecular concentration over time of methane. The framework described in this work paves the way towards a genomic approach to studying complex chemical systems, where expensive MD simulation data can be reused to contribute to an increasingly large and accurate genome of elementary reactions and rates.

  20. Crime Modeling using Spatial Regression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh Ahmar, Ansari; Adiatma; Kasim Aidid, M.

    2018-01-01

    Act of criminality in Indonesia increased both variety and quantity every year. As murder, rape, assault, vandalism, theft, fraud, fencing, and other cases that make people feel unsafe. Risk of society exposed to crime is the number of reported cases in the police institution. The higher of the number of reporter to the police institution then the number of crime in the region is increasing. In this research, modeling criminality in South Sulawesi, Indonesia with the dependent variable used is the society exposed to the risk of crime. Modelling done by area approach is the using Spatial Autoregressive (SAR) and Spatial Error Model (SEM) methods. The independent variable used is the population density, the number of poor population, GDP per capita, unemployment and the human development index (HDI). Based on the analysis using spatial regression can be shown that there are no dependencies spatial both lag or errors in South Sulawesi.

  1. Designing of phenol-based β-carbonic anhydrase1 inhibitors through QSAR, molecular docking, and MD simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Shahzaib; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Dwivedi, Neeraja

    2018-05-01

    Tuberculosis (Tb) is an airborne infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Beta-carbonic anhydrase 1 ( β-CA1 ) has emerged as one of the potential targets for new antitubercular drug development. In this work, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR), molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches were performed on a series of natural and synthetic phenol-based β-CA1 inhibitors. The developed 3D-QSAR model ( r 2  = 0.94, q 2  = 0.86, and pred_r 2  = 0.74) indicated that the steric and electrostatic factors are important parameters to modulate the bioactivity of phenolic compounds. Based on this indication, we designed 72 new phenolic inhibitors, out of which two compounds (D25 and D50) effectively stabilized β-CA1 receptor and, thus, are potential candidates for new generation antitubercular drug discovery program.

  2. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach of tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method to the design of the automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuki; Jung, Changho; Luo, Yi; Koyama, Michihisa; Endou, Akira; Kubo, Momoji; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a new tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics program 'Colors' for combinatorial computational chemistry approach. This methodology is based on our original tight-binding approximation and realized over 5000 times acceleration compared to the conventional first-principles molecular dynamics method. In the present study, we applied our new program to the simulations on various realistic large-scale models of the automotive three-way catalysts, ultrafine Pt particle/CeO 2 (111) support. Significant electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 (111) surface was observed and it was found to strongly depend on the size of the Pt particle. Furthermore, our simulation results suggest that the reduction of the Ce atom due to the electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 surface is a main reason for the strong interaction of the Pt particle and CeO 2 (111) support

  3. Merging Digital Surface Models Implementing Bayesian Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeq, H.; Drummond, J.; Li, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this research different DSMs from different sources have been merged. The merging is based on a probabilistic model using a Bayesian Approach. The implemented data have been sourced from very high resolution satellite imagery sensors (e.g. WorldView-1 and Pleiades). It is deemed preferable to use a Bayesian Approach when the data obtained from the sensors are limited and it is difficult to obtain many measurements or it would be very costly, thus the problem of the lack of data can be solved by introducing a priori estimations of data. To infer the prior data, it is assumed that the roofs of the buildings are specified as smooth, and for that purpose local entropy has been implemented. In addition to the a priori estimations, GNSS RTK measurements have been collected in the field which are used as check points to assess the quality of the DSMs and to validate the merging result. The model has been applied in the West-End of Glasgow containing different kinds of buildings, such as flat roofed and hipped roofed buildings. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed to validate the merged DSM. The validation results have shown that the model was successfully able to improve the quality of the DSMs and improving some characteristics such as the roof surfaces, which consequently led to better representations. In addition to that, the developed model has been compared with the well established Maximum Likelihood model and showed similar quantitative statistical results and better qualitative results. Although the proposed model has been applied on DSMs that were derived from satellite imagery, it can be applied to any other sourced DSMs.

  4. MERGING DIGITAL SURFACE MODELS IMPLEMENTING BAYESIAN APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sadeq

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research different DSMs from different sources have been merged. The merging is based on a probabilistic model using a Bayesian Approach. The implemented data have been sourced from very high resolution satellite imagery sensors (e.g. WorldView-1 and Pleiades. It is deemed preferable to use a Bayesian Approach when the data obtained from the sensors are limited and it is difficult to obtain many measurements or it would be very costly, thus the problem of the lack of data can be solved by introducing a priori estimations of data. To infer the prior data, it is assumed that the roofs of the buildings are specified as smooth, and for that purpose local entropy has been implemented. In addition to the a priori estimations, GNSS RTK measurements have been collected in the field which are used as check points to assess the quality of the DSMs and to validate the merging result. The model has been applied in the West-End of Glasgow containing different kinds of buildings, such as flat roofed and hipped roofed buildings. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed to validate the merged DSM. The validation results have shown that the model was successfully able to improve the quality of the DSMs and improving some characteristics such as the roof surfaces, which consequently led to better representations. In addition to that, the developed model has been compared with the well established Maximum Likelihood model and showed similar quantitative statistical results and better qualitative results. Although the proposed model has been applied on DSMs that were derived from satellite imagery, it can be applied to any other sourced DSMs.

  5. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated

  6. Automated chemical kinetic modeling via hybrid reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döntgen, Malte; Schmalz, Felix; Kopp, Wassja A; Kröger, Leif C; Leonhard, Kai

    2018-06-13

    An automated scheme for obtaining chemical kinetic models from scratch using reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations is presented. This methodology combines the phase space sampling of reactive molecular dynamics with the thermochemistry and kinetics prediction capabilities of quantum mechanics. This scheme provides the NASA polynomial and modified Arrhenius equation parameters for all species and reactions that are observed during the simulation and supplies them in the ChemKin format. The ab initio level of theory for predictions is easily exchangeable and the presently used G3MP2 level of theory is found to reliably reproduce hydrogen and methane oxidation thermochemistry and kinetics data. Chemical kinetic models obtained with this approach are ready-to-use for, e.g., ignition delay time simulations, as shown for hydrogen combustion. The presented extension of the ChemTraYzer approach can be used as a basis for methodologically advancing chemical kinetic modeling schemes and as a black-box approach to generate chemical kinetic models.

  7. Venom Resistance as a Model for Understanding the Molecular Basis of Complex Coevolutionary Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, Matthew L; Drabeck, Danielle H; Jansa, Sharon A; Gibbs, H Lisle

    2016-11-01

    SynopsisVenom and venom resistance are molecular phenotypes widely considered to have diversified through coevolution between predators and prey. However, while evolutionary and functional studies on venom have been extensive, little is known about the molecular basis, variation, and complexity of venom resistance. We review known mechanisms of venom resistance and relate these mechanisms to their predicted impact on coevolutionary dynamics with venomous enemies. We then describe two conceptual approaches which can be used to examine venom/resistance systems. At the intraspecific level, tests of local adaptation in venom and resistance phenotypes can identify the functional mechanisms governing the outcomes of coevolution. At deeper evolutionary timescales, the combination of phylogenetically informed analyses of protein evolution coupled with studies of protein function promise to elucidate the mode and tempo of evolutionary change on potentially coevolving genes. We highlight case studies that use each approach to extend our knowledge of these systems as well as address larger questions about coevolutionary dynamics. We argue that resistance and venom are phenotypic traits which hold exceptional promise for investigating the mechanisms, dynamics, and outcomes of coevolution at the molecular level. Furthermore, extending the understanding of single gene-for-gene interactions to the whole resistance and venom phenotypes may provide a model system for examining the molecular and evolutionary dynamics of complex multi-gene interactions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Joshua L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our

  9. Stability of nuclei in peripheral collisions in the JAERI quantum molecular dynamics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancusi, Davide; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Sihver, Lembit

    2009-01-01

    The JAERI quantum molecular dynamics (JQMD) model has been successfully used for a long time now to describe many different aspects of nuclear reactions in a unified way. In some cases, however, the JQMD model cannot produce consistent results: First, it lacks a fully relativistically covariant approach to the problem of molecular dynamics; second, the quantum-mechanical ground state of nuclei cannot be faithfully reproduced in a semiclassical framework. Therefore, we introduce R-JQMD, an improved version of JQMD that also features a new ground-state initialization algorithm for nuclei. We compare the structure of the two codes and discuss whether R-JQMD can be adjusted to improve JQMD's agreement with measured heavy-ion fragmentation cross sections

  10. A nationwide modelling approach to decommissioning - 16182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Bernard; Lowe, Andy; Mort, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe a proposed UK national approach to modelling decommissioning. For the first time, we shall have an insight into optimizing the safety and efficiency of a national decommissioning strategy. To do this we use the General Case Integrated Waste Algorithm (GIA), a universal model of decommissioning nuclear plant, power plant, waste arisings and the associated knowledge capture. The model scales from individual items of plant through cells, groups of cells, buildings, whole sites and then on up to a national scale. We describe the national vision for GIA which can be broken down into three levels: 1) the capture of the chronological order of activities that an experienced decommissioner would use to decommission any nuclear facility anywhere in the world - this is Level 1 of GIA; 2) the construction of an Operational Research (OR) model based on Level 1 to allow rapid what if scenarios to be tested quickly (Level 2); 3) the construction of a state of the art knowledge capture capability that allows future generations to learn from our current decommissioning experience (Level 3). We show the progress to date in developing GIA in levels 1 and 2. As part of level 1, GIA has assisted in the development of an IMechE professional decommissioning qualification. Furthermore, we describe GIA as the basis of a UK-Owned database of decommissioning norms for such things as costs, productivity, durations etc. From level 2, we report on a pilot study that has successfully tested the basic principles for the OR numerical simulation of the algorithm. We then highlight the advantages of applying the OR modelling approach nationally. In essence, a series of 'what if...' scenarios can be tested that will improve the safety and efficiency of decommissioning. (authors)

  11. A molecular-thermodynamic model for polyelectrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y. [Thermodynamics Research Laboratory, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Prausnitz, J.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte solutions are modeled as freely tangent-jointed, charged hard-sphere chains and corresponding counterions in a continuum medium with permitivity {var_epsilon}. By adopting the sticky-point model, the Helmholtz function for polyelectrolyte solutions is derived through the r-particle cavity-correlation function (CCF) for chains of sticky, charged hard spheres. The r-CCF is approximated by a product of effective nearest-neighbor two-particle CCFs; these are determined from the hypernetted-chain and mean-spherical closures (HNC/MSA) inside and outside the hard core, respectively, for the integral equation theory for electrolytes. The colligative properties are given as explicit functions of a scaling parameter {Gamma} that can be estimated by a simple iteration procedure. Osmotic pressures, osmotic coefficients, and activity coefficients are calculated for model solutions with various chain lengths. They are in good agreement with molecular simulation and experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA V. VELHO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  13. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velho, Renata V; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-08-01

    With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  15. Translating clinical research of Molecular Biology into a personalized, multidisciplinary approach of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambu, V; Garofil, D; Pop, F; Radu, P; Bratucu, M; Popa, F

    2014-03-15

    Although multimodal treatment has brought important benefit, there is still great heterogeneity regarding the indication and response to chemotherapy in Stage II and III, and individual variations related to both overall survival and toxicity of new therapies in metastatic disease or tumor relapse. Recent research in molecular biology led to the development of a large scale of genetic biomarkers, but their clinical use is not concordant with the high expectations. The Aim of this review is to identify and discuss the molecular markers with proven clinical applicability as prognostic and/or predictive factors in CRC and also to establish a feasible algorithm of molecular testing, as routine practice, in the personalized, multidisciplinary approach of colorectal cancer patients in our country. Despite the revolution that occurred in the field of molecular marker research, only Serum CEA, Immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins and PCR testing for KRAS and BRAF mutations have confirmed their clinical utility in the management of colorectal cancer. Their implementation in the current practice should partially resolve some of the controversies related to this heterogenic pathology, in matters of prognosis in different TNM stages, stage II patient risk stratification, diagnosis of hereditary CRC and likelihood of benefit from anti EGFR therapy in metastatic disease. The proposed algorithms of molecular testing are very useful but still imperfect and require further validation and constant optimization.

  16. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sulimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program, postprocessing (DISCORE program, direct generalized docking (FLM program, and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package, search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM.

  17. Cross-link guided molecular modeling with ROSETTA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kahraman

    Full Text Available Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods.

  18. Modeling in transport phenomena a conceptual approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Modeling in Transport Phenomena, Second Edition presents and clearly explains with example problems the basic concepts and their applications to fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, chemical reaction engineering and thermodynamics. A balanced approach is presented between analysis and synthesis, students will understand how to use the solution in engineering analysis. Systematic derivations of the equations and the physical significance of each term are given in detail, for students to easily understand and follow up the material. There is a strong incentive in science and engineering to

  19. Nuclear physics for applications. A model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prussin, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Written by a researcher and teacher with experience at top institutes in the US and Europe, this textbook provides advanced undergraduates minoring in physics with working knowledge of the principles of nuclear physics. Simplifying models and approaches reveal the essence of the principles involved, with the mathematical and quantum mechanical background integrated in the text where it is needed and not relegated to the appendices. The practicality of the book is enhanced by numerous end-of-chapter problems and solutions available on the Wiley homepage. (orig.)

  20. Molecular Simulation towards Efficient and Representative Subsurface Reservoirs Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    This dissertation focuses on the application of Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Molecular Dynamics (MD) in modeling thermodynamics and flow of subsurface reservoir fluids. At first, MC molecular simulation is proposed as a promising method to replace correlations and equations of state in subsurface flow simulators. In order to accelerate MC simulations, a set of early rejection schemes (conservative, hybrid, and non-conservative) in addition to extrapolation methods through reweighting and reconstruction of pre-generated MC Markov chains were developed. Furthermore, an extensive study was conducted to investigate sorption and transport processes of methane, carbon dioxide, water, and their mixtures in the inorganic part of shale using both MC and MD simulations. These simulations covered a wide range of thermodynamic conditions, pore sizes, and fluid compositions shedding light on several interesting findings. For example, the possibility to have more carbon dioxide adsorbed with more preadsorbed water concentrations at relatively large basal spaces. The dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter corresponds to the introductory part where a brief background about molecular simulation and motivations are given. The second chapter is devoted to discuss the theoretical aspects and methodology of the proposed MC speeding up techniques in addition to the corresponding results leading to the successful multi-scale simulation of the compressible single-phase flow scenario. In chapter 3, the results regarding our extensive study on shale gas at laboratory conditions are reported. At the fourth and last chapter, we end the dissertation with few concluding remarks highlighting the key findings and summarizing the future directions.

  1. Current and future molecular approaches to investigate the white pine blister rust pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. A. Richardson; A. K. M. Ekramoddoulah; J.-J. Liu; M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetics is proving to be especially useful for addressing a wide variety of research and management questions on the white pine blister rust pathosystem. White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola, is an ideal model for studying biogeography, genetics, and evolution because: (1) it involves an introduced pathogen; (2) it includes multiple primary...

  2. INVESTIGATIONS INTO MOLECULAR PATHWAYS IN THE POST GENOME ERA: CROSS SPECIES COMPARATIVE GENOMICS APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequencing efforts in the past decade were aimed at generating draft sequences of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic model organisms. Successful completion of unicellular eukaryotes, worm, fly and human genome have opened up the new field of molecular biology and function...

  3. Molecular weight control in emulsion polymerization by catalytic chain transfer : a reaction engineering approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, N.M.B.; Meda, U.S.; Heuts, J.P.A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Herk, van A.M.; Meuldijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    For the application of catalytic chain transfer in (mini)emulsion polymerization, catalyst partitioning and deactivation are key parameters that govern the actual catalyst concentration at the locus of polymerization and consequently the final molecular weight distribution. A global model, based on

  4. Molecular modeling of human neutral sphingomyelinase provides insight into its molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh; Goswami, Angshumala; Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    The neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) is considered a major candidate for mediating the stress-induced production of ceramide, and it plays an important role in cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, inflammation, and eukaryotic stress responses. Recent studies have identified a small region at the very N-terminus of the 55 kDa tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R55), designated the neutral sphingomyelinase activating domain (NSD) that is responsible for the TNF-induced activation of N-SMase. There is no direct association between TNF-R55 NSD and N-SMase; instead, a protein named factor associated with N-SMase activation (FAN) has been reported to couple the TNF-R55 NSD to N-SMase. Since the three-dimensional fold of N-SMase is still unknown, we have modeled the structure using the protein fold recognition and threading method. Moreover, we propose models for the TNF-R55 NSD as well as the FAN protein in order to study the structural basis of N-SMase activation and regulation. Protein-protein interaction studies suggest that FAN is crucially involved in mediating TNF-induced activation of the N-SMase pathway, which in turn regulates mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. Inhibition of N-SMase may lead to reduction of ceramide levels and hence may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to check the stability of the predicted model and protein-protein complex; indeed, stable RMS deviations were obtained throughout the simulation. Furthermore, in silico docking of low molecular mass ligands into the active site of N-SMase suggests that His135, Glu48, Asp177, and Asn179 residues play crucial roles in this interaction. Based on our results, these ligands are proposed to be potent and selective N-SMase inhibitors, which may ultimately prove useful as lead compounds for drug development.

  5. An integrated approach of network-based systems biology, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics approach to unravel the role of existing antiviral molecules against AIDS-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Ankur; Singh, Poonam

    2017-05-01

    A serious challenge in cancer treatment is to reposition the activity of various already known drug candidates against cancer. There is a need to rewrite and systematically analyze the detailed mechanistic aspect of cellular networks to gain insight into the novel role played by various molecules. Most Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection-associated cancers are caused by oncogenic viruses like Human Papilloma Viruses and Epstein-Bar Virus. As the onset of AIDS-associated cancers marks the severity of AIDS, there might be possible interconnections between the targets and mechanism of both the diseases. We have explored the possibility of certain antiviral compounds to act against major AIDS-associated cancers: Kaposi's Sarcoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and Cervical Cancer with the help of systems pharmacology approach that includes screening for targets and molecules through the construction of a series of drug-target and drug-target-diseases network. Two molecules (Calanolide A and Chaetochromin B) and the target "HRAS" were finally screened with the help of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. The results provide novel antiviral molecules against HRAS target to treat AIDS defining cancers and an insight for understanding the pharmacological, therapeutic aspects of similar unexplored molecules against various cancers.

  6. Evaluating fossil calibrations for dating phylogenies in light of rates of molecular evolution: a comparison of three approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi; Scott Keogh, J; Avise, John C

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary and biogeographic studies increasingly rely on calibrated molecular clocks to date key events. Although there has been significant recent progress in development of the techniques used for molecular dating, many issues remain. In particular, controversies abound over the appropriate use and placement of fossils for calibrating molecular clocks. Several methods have been proposed for evaluating candidate fossils; however, few studies have compared the results obtained by different approaches. Moreover, no previous study has incorporated the effects of nucleotide saturation from different data types in the evaluation of candidate fossils. In order to address these issues, we compared three approaches for evaluating fossil calibrations: the single-fossil cross-validation method of Near, Meylan, and Shaffer (2005. Assessing concordance of fossil calibration points in molecular clock studies: an example using turtles. Am. Nat. 165:137-146), the empirical fossil coverage method of Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibration points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742), and the Bayesian multicalibration method of Sanders and Lee (2007. Evaluating molecular clock calibrations using Bayesian analyses with soft and hard bounds. Biol. Lett. 3:275-279) and explicitly incorporate the effects of data type (nuclear vs. mitochondrial DNA) for identifying the most reliable or congruent fossil calibrations. We used advanced (Caenophidian) snakes as a case study; however, our results are applicable to any taxonomic group with multiple candidate fossils, provided appropriate taxon sampling and sufficient molecular sequence data are available. We found that data type strongly influenced which fossil calibrations were identified as outliers, regardless of which method was used. Despite the use of complex partitioned models of sequence evolution and multiple calibrations throughout the tree, saturation

  7. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability in dicates qualitative stages through which the pedagogic phenomenon passes; nonlinearity explains the crisis character of pedagogic processes and reveals inner factors of self-development; situationality requires a selection of pedagogic conditions in accordance with the inner factors, which would enable steering the pedagogic process. Offered are two steps for singling out a particular stage and the algorithm for developing an integrative model for it. The suggested conclusions might be of use for further theoretic research, analyses of educational practices and for realistic predicting of pedagogical phenomena. .

  8. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU is an attractive target for chemotherapeutic intervention in tuberculosis by designing new safe and efficient enzyme inhibitors. A prerequisite for designing such inhibitors is an understanding of urease's three-dimensional (3D structure organization. 3D structure of M. tuberculosis urease is unknown. When experimental three-dimensional structure of a protein is not known, homology modeling, the most commonly used computational structure prediction method, is the technique of choice. This paper aimed to build a 3D-structure of M. tuberculosis urease by homology modeling and to study its stability by molecular dynamics simulations. Materials and methods. To build MTU model, five high-resolution X-ray structures of bacterial ureases with three-subunit composition (2KAU, 5G4H, 4UBP, 4СEU, and 4EPB have been selected as templates. For each template five stochastic alignments were created and for each alignment, a three-dimensional model was built. Then, each model was energy minimized and the models were ranked by quality Z-score. The MTU model with highest quality estimation amongst 25 potential models was selected. To further improve structure quality the model was refined by short molecular dynamics simulation that resulted in 20 snapshots which were rated according to their energy and the quality Z-score. The best scoring model having minimum energy was chosen as a final homology model of 3D structure for M. tuberculosis. The final model of MTU was also validated by using PDBsum and QMEAN servers. These checks confirmed good quality of MTU homology model. Results and discussion. Homology model of MTU is a nonamer (homotrimer of heterotrimers, (αβγ3 consisting of 2349 residues. In MTU heterotrimer, sub-units α, β, and γ tightly interact with each other at a surface of approximately 3000 Å2. Sub-unit α contains the enzyme active site with two Ni atoms coordinated by amino acid residues His347, His

  9. Model morphing and sequence assignment after molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Bldg 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T. [Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Bldg 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    A procedure for model building is described that combines morphing a model to match a density map, trimming the morphed model and aligning the model to a sequence. A procedure termed ‘morphing’ for improving a model after it has been placed in the crystallographic cell by molecular replacement has recently been developed. Morphing consists of applying a smooth deformation to a model to make it match an electron-density map more closely. Morphing does not change the identities of the residues in the chain, only their coordinates. Consequently, if the true structure differs from the working model by containing different residues, these differences cannot be corrected by morphing. Here, a procedure that helps to address this limitation is described. The goal of the procedure is to obtain a relatively complete model that has accurate main-chain atomic positions and residues that are correctly assigned to the sequence. Residues in a morphed model that do not match the electron-density map are removed. Each segment of the resulting trimmed morphed model is then assigned to the sequence of the molecule using information about the connectivity of the chains from the working model and from connections that can be identified from the electron-density map. The procedure was tested by application to a recently determined structure at a resolution of 3.2 Å and was found to increase the number of correctly identified residues in this structure from the 88 obtained using phenix.resolve sequence assignment alone (Terwilliger, 2003 ▶) to 247 of a possible 359. Additionally, the procedure was tested by application to a series of templates with sequence identities to a target structure ranging between 7 and 36%. The mean fraction of correctly identified residues in these cases was increased from 33% using phenix.resolve sequence assignment to 47% using the current procedure. The procedure is simple to apply and is available in the Phenix software package.

  10. Model morphing and sequence assignment after molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Hung, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for model building is described that combines morphing a model to match a density map, trimming the morphed model and aligning the model to a sequence. A procedure termed ‘morphing’ for improving a model after it has been placed in the crystallographic cell by molecular replacement has recently been developed. Morphing consists of applying a smooth deformation to a model to make it match an electron-density map more closely. Morphing does not change the identities of the residues in the chain, only their coordinates. Consequently, if the true structure differs from the working model by containing different residues, these differences cannot be corrected by morphing. Here, a procedure that helps to address this limitation is described. The goal of the procedure is to obtain a relatively complete model that has accurate main-chain atomic positions and residues that are correctly assigned to the sequence. Residues in a morphed model that do not match the electron-density map are removed. Each segment of the resulting trimmed morphed model is then assigned to the sequence of the molecule using information about the connectivity of the chains from the working model and from connections that can be identified from the electron-density map. The procedure was tested by application to a recently determined structure at a resolution of 3.2 Å and was found to increase the number of correctly identified residues in this structure from the 88 obtained using phenix.resolve sequence assignment alone (Terwilliger, 2003 ▶) to 247 of a possible 359. Additionally, the procedure was tested by application to a series of templates with sequence identities to a target structure ranging between 7 and 36%. The mean fraction of correctly identified residues in these cases was increased from 33% using phenix.resolve sequence assignment to 47% using the current procedure. The procedure is simple to apply and is available in the Phenix software package

  11. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  12. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Connell, John P.; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    for densities and gas solubilities, including ionic liquids and complex mixtures such as coal liquids. The approach is especially useful in systems with strong nonidealities. This chapter describes successful application of such modeling to a wide variety of systems treated over several decades and suggests how...

  13. Novel thrombopoietin mimetic peptides bind c-Mpl receptor: Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaquan; Tian, Fang; Zhi, Dejuan; Wang, Haiqing; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Hongyu

    2017-02-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) acts in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and by initiating specific maturation events in megakaryocytes. Now, TPO-mimetic peptides with amino acid sequences unrelated to TPO are of considerable pharmaceutical interest. In the present paper, four new TPO mimetic peptides that bind and activate c-Mpl receptor have been identified, synthesized and tested by Dual-Luciferase reporter gene assay for biological activities. The molecular modeling research was also approached to understand key molecular mechanisms and structural features responsible for peptide binding with c-Mpl receptor. The results presented that three of four mimetic peptides showed significant activities. In addition, the molecular modeling approaches proved hydrophobic interactions were the driven positive forces for binding behavior between peptides and c-Mpl receptor. TPO peptide residues in P7, P13 and P7' positions were identified by the analysis of hydrogen bonds and energy decompositions as the key ones for benefiting better biological activities. Our data suggested the synthesized peptides have considerable potential for the future development of stable and highly active TPO mimetic peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiplicity of Mathematical Modeling Strategies to Search for Molecular and Cellular Insights into Bacteria Lung Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Martina; Santos, Guido; Wentker, Pia; Lai, Xin; Vera, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Even today two bacterial lung infections, namely pneumonia and tuberculosis, are among the 10 most frequent causes of death worldwide. These infections still lack effective treatments in many developing countries and in immunocompromised populations like infants, elderly people and transplanted patients. The interaction between bacteria and the host is a complex system of interlinked intercellular and the intracellular processes, enriched in regulatory structures like positive and negative feedback loops. Severe pathological condition can emerge when the immune system of the host fails to neutralize the infection. This failure can result in systemic spreading of pathogens or overwhelming immune response followed by a systemic inflammatory response. Mathematical modeling is a promising tool to dissect the complexity underlying pathogenesis of bacterial lung infection at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, and also at the interfaces among levels. In this article, we introduce mathematical and computational modeling frameworks that can be used for investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial lung infection. Then, we compile and discuss published results on the modeling of regulatory pathways and cell populations relevant for lung infection and inflammation. Finally, we discuss how to make use of this multiplicity of modeling approaches to open new avenues in the search of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection in the lung.

  15. A combined experimental and mathematical approach for molecular-based optimization of irinotecan circadian delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Ballesta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Circadian timing largely modifies efficacy and toxicity of many anticancer drugs. Recent findings suggest that optimal circadian delivery patterns depend on the patient genetic background. We present here a combined experimental and mathematical approach for the design of chronomodulated administration schedules tailored to the patient molecular profile. As a proof of concept we optimized exposure of Caco-2 colon cancer cells to irinotecan (CPT11, a cytotoxic drug approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer. CPT11 was bioactivated into SN38 and its efflux was mediated by ATP-Binding-Cassette (ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells. After cell synchronization with a serum shock defining Circadian Time (CT 0, circadian rhythms with a period of 26 h 50 (SD 63 min were observed in the mRNA expression of clock genes REV-ERBα, PER2, BMAL1, the drug target topoisomerase 1 (TOP1, the activation enzyme carboxylesterase 2 (CES2, the deactivation enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1, polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1, and efflux transporters ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2 and ABCG2. DNA-bound TOP1 protein amount in presence of CPT11, a marker of the drug PD, also displayed circadian variations. A mathematical model of CPT11 molecular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK-PD was designed and fitted to experimental data. It predicted that CPT11 bioactivation was the main determinant of CPT11 PD circadian rhythm. We then adopted the therapeutics strategy of maximizing efficacy in non-synchronized cells, considered as cancer cells, under a constraint of maximum toxicity in synchronized cells, representing healthy ones. We considered exposure schemes in the form of an initial concentration of CPT11 given at a particular CT, over a duration ranging from 1 to 27 h. For any dose of CPT11, optimal exposure durations varied from 3h40 to 7h10. Optimal schemes started between CT2h10 and CT2h30, a time interval corresponding to 1h30 to 1h50 before the nadir of CPT11 bioactivation rhythm in

  16. A novel approach to pipeline tensioner modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Grady, Robert; Ilie, Daniel; Lane, Michael [MCS Software Division, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-07-01

    As subsea pipeline developments continue to move into deep and ultra-deep water locations, there is an increasing need for the accurate prediction of expected pipeline fatigue life. A significant factor that must be considered as part of this process is the fatigue damage sustained by the pipeline during installation. The magnitude of this installation-related damage is governed by a number of different agents, one of which is the dynamic behavior of the tensioner systems during pipe-laying operations. There are a variety of traditional finite element methods for representing dynamic tensioner behavior. These existing methods, while basic in nature, have been proven to provide adequate forecasts in terms of the dynamic variation in typical installation parameters such as top tension and sagbend/overbend strain. However due to the simplicity of these current approaches, some of them tend to over-estimate the frequency of tensioner pay out/in under dynamic loading. This excessive level of pay out/in motion results in the prediction of additional stress cycles at certain roller beds, which in turn leads to the prediction of unrealistic fatigue damage to the pipeline. This unwarranted fatigue damage then equates to an over-conservative value for the accumulated damage experienced by a pipeline weld during installation, and so leads to a reduction in the estimated fatigue life for the pipeline. This paper describes a novel approach to tensioner modeling which allows for greater control over the velocity of dynamic tensioner pay out/in and so provides a more accurate estimation of fatigue damage experienced by the pipeline during installation. The paper reports on a case study, as outlined in the proceeding section, in which a comparison is made between results from this new tensioner model and from a more conventional approach. The comparison considers typical installation parameters as well as an in-depth look at the predicted fatigue damage for the two methods

  17. Molecular model for annihilation rates in positron complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Walters, H.R. James [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Mohallem, Jose R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rachid@fisica.ufmg.br

    2008-02-15

    The molecular approach for positron interaction with atoms is developed further. Potential energy curves for positron motion are obtained. Two procedures accounting for the nonadiabatic effective positron mass are introduced for calculating annihilation rate constants. The first one takes the bound-state energy eigenvalue as an input parameter. The second is a self-contained and self-consistent procedure. The methods are tested with quite different states of the small complexes HPs, e{sup +}He (electronic triplet) and e{sup +}Be (electronic singlet and triplet). For states yielding the positronium cluster, the annihilation rates are quite stable, irrespective of the accuracy in binding energies. For the e{sup +}Be states, annihilation rates are larger and more consistent with qualitative predictions than previously reported ones.

  18. Molecular model for annihilation rates in positron complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H.R. James; Mohallem, Jose R.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular approach for positron interaction with atoms is developed further. Potential energy curves for positron motion are obtained. Two procedures accounting for the nonadiabatic effective positron mass are introduced for calculating annihilation rate constants. The first one takes the bound-state energy eigenvalue as an input parameter. The second is a self-contained and self-consistent procedure. The methods are tested with quite different states of the small complexes HPs, e + He (electronic triplet) and e + Be (electronic singlet and triplet). For states yielding the positronium cluster, the annihilation rates are quite stable, irrespective of the accuracy in binding energies. For the e + Be states, annihilation rates are larger and more consistent with qualitative predictions than previously reported ones

  19. Systems approaches to computational modeling of the oral microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter V. Dimitrov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Current microbiome research has generated tremendous amounts of data providing snapshots of molecular activity in a variety of organisms, environments, and cell types. However, turning this knowledge into whole system level of understanding on pathways and processes has proven to be a challenging task. In this review we highlight the applicability of bioinformatics and visualization techniques to large collections of data in order to better understand the information that contains related diet – oral microbiome – host mucosal transcriptome interactions. In particular we focus on systems biology of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the context of high throughput computational methods tightly integrated with translational systems medicine. Those approaches have applications for both basic research, where we can direct specific laboratory experiments in model organisms and cell cultures, to human disease, where we can validate new mechanisms and biomarkers for prevention and treatment of chronic disorders

  20. Statistical molecular design of balanced compound libraries for QSAR modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linusson, A; Elofsson, M; Andersson, I E; Dahlgren, M K

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental step in preclinical drug development is the computation of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, i.e. models that link chemical features of compounds with activities towards a target macromolecule associated with the initiation or progression of a disease. QSAR models are computed by combining information on the physicochemical and structural features of a library of congeneric compounds, typically assembled from two or more building blocks, and biological data from one or more in vitro assays. Since the models provide information on features affecting the compounds' biological activity they can be used as guides for further optimization. However, in order for a QSAR model to be relevant to the targeted disease, and drug development in general, the compound library used must contain molecules with balanced variation of the features spanning the chemical space believed to be important for interaction with the biological target. In addition, the assays used must be robust and deliver high quality data that are directly related to the function of the biological target and the associated disease state. In this review, we discuss and exemplify the concept of statistical molecular design (SMD) in the selection of building blocks and final synthetic targets (i.e. compounds to synthesize) to generate information-rich, balanced libraries for biological testing and computation of QSAR models.

  1. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  2. Energetics and efficiency of a molecular motor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogedby, Hans C; Svane, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The energetics and efficiency of a linear molecular motor model proposed by Mogilner et al are analyzed from an analytical point of view. The model, which is based on protein friction with a track, is described by coupled Langevin equations for the motion in combination with coupled master equations for the ATP hydrolysis. Here the energetics and efficiency of the motor are addressed using a many body scheme with focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP). It is found that the EMP is reduced from about 10% in a heuristic description of the motor to about 1 per mille when incorporating the full motor dynamics, owing to the strong dissipation associated with the motor action. (paper)

  3. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  4. A neural network approach to the study of dynamics and structure of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getino, C.; Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    Neural networks are used to study intramolecular energy flow in molecular systems (tetratomics to macromolecules), developing new techniques for efficient analysis of data obtained from molecular-dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations. Neural networks can map phase space points to intramolecular vibrational energies along a classical trajectory (example of complicated coordinate transformation), producing reasonably accurate values for any region of the multidimensional phase space of a tetratomic molecule. Neural network energy flow predictions are found to significantly enhance the molecular-dynamics method to longer time-scales and extensive averaging of trajectories for macromolecular systems. Pattern recognition abilities of neural networks can be used to discern phase space features. Neural networks can also expand model calculations by interpolation of costly quantum mechanical ab initio data, used to develop semiempirical potential energy functions

  5. Vibrational infrared and Raman spectra of polypeptides: Fragments-in-fragments within molecular tailoring approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R., E-mail: gadre@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-03-21

    The present work reports the calculation of vibrational infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of large molecular systems employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). Further, it extends the grafting procedure for the accurate evaluation of IR and Raman spectra of large molecular systems, employing a new methodology termed as Fragments-in-Fragments (FIF), within MTA. Unlike the previous MTA-based studies, the accurate estimation of the requisite molecular properties is achieved without performing any full calculations (FC). The basic idea of the grafting procedure is implemented by invoking the nearly basis-set-independent nature of the MTA-based error vis-à-vis the respective FCs. FIF has been tested out for the estimation of the above molecular properties for three isomers, viz., β-strand, 3{sub 10}- and α-helix of acetyl(alanine){sub n}NH{sub 2} (n = 10, 15) polypeptides, three conformers of doubly protonated gramicidin S decapeptide and trpzip2 protein (PDB id: 1LE1), respectively, employing BP86/TZVP, M06/6-311G**, and M05-2X/6-31G** levels of theory. For most of the cases, a maximum difference of 3 cm{sup −1} is achieved between the grafted-MTA frequencies and the corresponding FC values. Further, a comparison of the BP86/TZVP level IR and Raman spectra of α-helical (alanine){sub 20} and its N-deuterated derivative shows an excellent agreement with the existing experimental spectra. In view of the requirement of only MTA-based calculations and the ability of FIF to work at any level of theory, the current methodology provides a cost-effective solution for obtaining accurate spectra of large molecular systems.

  6. A review of molecular modelling of electric double layer capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Ryan; Birkett, Greg; Zhao, X S

    2014-04-14

    Electric double-layer capacitors are a family of electrochemical energy storage devices that offer a number of advantages, such as high power density and long cyclability. In recent years, research and development of electric double-layer capacitor technology has been growing rapidly, in response to the increasing demand for energy storage devices from emerging industries, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, renewable energy, and smart grid management. The past few years have witnessed a number of significant research breakthroughs in terms of novel electrodes, new electrolytes, and fabrication of devices, thanks to the discovery of innovative materials (e.g. graphene, carbide-derived carbon, and templated carbon) and the availability of advanced experimental and computational tools. However, some experimental observations could not be clearly understood and interpreted due to limitations of traditional theories, some of which were developed more than one hundred years ago. This has led to significant research efforts in computational simulation and modelling, aimed at developing new theories, or improving the existing ones to help interpret experimental results. This review article provides a summary of research progress in molecular modelling of the physical phenomena taking place in electric double-layer capacitors. An introduction to electric double-layer capacitors and their applications, alongside a brief description of electric double layer theories, is presented first. Second, molecular modelling of ion behaviours of various electrolytes interacting with electrodes under different conditions is reviewed. Finally, key conclusions and outlooks are given. Simulations on comparing electric double-layer structure at planar and porous electrode surfaces under equilibrium conditions have revealed significant structural differences between the two electrode types, and porous electrodes have been shown to store charge more efficiently. Accurate electrolyte and

  7. Bleomycin induces molecular changes directly relevant to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a model for "active" disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ruoqi; Sridhar, Sriram; Tyagi, Gaurav; Phillips, Jonathan E; Garrido, Rosario; Harris, Paul; Burns, Lisa; Renteria, Lorena; Woods, John; Chen, Leena; Allard, John; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Bitter, Hans; Liang, Zhenmin; Hogaboam, Cory M; Kitson, Chris; Budd, David C; Fine, Jay S; Bauer, Carla M T; Stevenson, Christopher S

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, used to investigate mechanisms related to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), has incorrectly predicted efficacy for several candidate compounds suggesting that it may be of limited value. As an attempt to improve the predictive nature of this model, integrative bioinformatic approaches were used to compare molecular alterations in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and patients with IPF. Using gene set enrichment analysis we show for the first time that genes differentially expressed during the fibrotic phase of the single challenge bleomycin model were significantly enriched in the expression profiles of IPF patients. The genes that contributed most to the enrichment were largely involved in mitosis, growth factor, and matrix signaling. Interestingly, these same mitotic processes were increased in the expression profiles of fibroblasts isolated from rapidly progressing, but not slowly progressing, IPF patients relative to control subjects. The data also indicated that TGFβ was not the sole mediator responsible for the changes observed in this model since the ALK-5 inhibitor SB525334 effectively attenuated some but not all of the fibrosis associated with this model. Although some would suggest that repetitive bleomycin injuries may more effectively model IPF-like changes, our data do not support this conclusion. Together, these data highlight that a single bleomycin instillation effectively replicates several of the specific pathogenic molecular changes associated with IPF, and may be best used as a model for patients with active disease.

  8. Bleomycin induces molecular changes directly relevant to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a model for "active" disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoqi Peng

    Full Text Available The preclinical model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, used to investigate mechanisms related to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, has incorrectly predicted efficacy for several candidate compounds suggesting that it may be of limited value. As an attempt to improve the predictive nature of this model, integrative bioinformatic approaches were used to compare molecular alterations in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and patients with IPF. Using gene set enrichment analysis we show for the first time that genes differentially expressed during the fibrotic phase of the single challenge bleomycin model were significantly enriched in the expression profiles of IPF patients. The genes that contributed most to the enrichment were largely involved in mitosis, growth factor, and matrix signaling. Interestingly, these same mitotic processes were increased in the expression profiles of fibroblasts isolated from rapidly progressing, but not slowly progressing, IPF patients relative to control subjects. The data also indicated that TGFβ was not the sole mediator responsible for the changes observed in this model since the ALK-5 inhibitor SB525334 effectively attenuated some but not all of the fibrosis associated with this model. Although some would suggest that repetitive bleomycin injuries may more effectively model IPF-like changes, our data do not support this conclusion. Together, these data highlight that a single bleomycin instillation effectively replicates several of the specific pathogenic molecular changes associated with IPF, and may be best used as a model for patients with active disease.

  9. A n-vector model for charge transport in molecular semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-11-28

    We develop a lattice model utilizing coarse-grained molecular sites to study charge transport in molecular semiconducting materials. The model bridges atomistic descriptions and structureless lattice models by mapping molecular structure onto sets of spatial vectors isomorphic with spin vectors in a classical n-vector Heisenberg model. Specifically, this model incorporates molecular topology-dependent orientational and intermolecular coupling preferences, including the direct inclusion of spatially correlated transfer integrals and site energy disorder. This model contains the essential physics required to explicitly simulate the interplay of molecular topology and correlated structural disorder, and their effect on charge transport. As a demonstration of its utility, we apply this model to analyze the effects of long-range orientational correlations, molecular topology, and intermolecular interaction strength on charge motion in bulk molecular semiconductors.

  10. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, J. M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Concepción, POB 160-C Concepción (Chile); Algaba, J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Míguez, J. M. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et Leurs Reservoirs, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, CNRS, TOTAL–UMR 5150, Avenue de l’Université, B.P. 1155, Pau F-64013 (France); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, E36310 Vigo (Spain); Mendiboure, B. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et Leurs Reservoirs, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, CNRS, TOTAL–UMR 5150, Avenue de l’Université, B.P. 1155, Pau F-64013 (France); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Geología, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Piñeiro, M. M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, E36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  11. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Blas, F. J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  12. Molecular and Chemical Genetic Approaches to Developmental Origins of Aging and Disease in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kishi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of diseases increases rapidly with age, accompanied by progressive deteriorations of physiological functions in organisms. Aging-associated diseases are sporadic but mostly inevitable complications arising from senescence. Senescence is often considered the antithesis of early development, but yet there may be factors and mechanisms in common between these two phenomena over the dynamic process of aging. The association between early development and late-onset disease with advancing age is thought to come from a consequence of developmental plasticity, the phenomenon by which one genotype can give rise to a range of physiologically and/or morphologically adaptive states in response to different environmental or genetic perturbations. On the one hand, we hypothesized that the future aging process can be predictive based on adaptivity during the early developmental period. Modulating the thresholds of adaptive plasticity by chemical genetic approaches, we have been investigating whether any relationship exists between the regulatory mechanisms that function in early development and in senescence using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish and a useful model animal for genetic studies. We have successfully conducted experiments to isolate zebrafish mutants expressing apparently altered senescence phenotypes during embryogenesis (“embryonic senescence”), subsequently showing shortened lifespan in adulthoods. We anticipate that previously uncharacterized developmental genes may mediate the aging process and play a pivotal role in senescence. On the other hand, unexpected senescence-related genes might also be involved in the early developmental process and regulation. The ease of manipulation using the zebrafish system allows us to conduct an exhaustive exploration of novel genes and small molecular compounds that can be linked to the senescence phenotype, and thereby facilitates searching for the evolutionary and developmental origins

  13. Combining experimental and simulation data of molecular processes via augmented Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Simon; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Clementi, Cecilia; Noé, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Accurate mechanistic description of structural changes in biomolecules is an increasingly important topic in structural and chemical biology. Markov models have emerged as a powerful way to approximate the molecular kinetics of large biomolecules while keeping full structural resolution in a divide-and-conquer fashion. However, the accuracy of these models is limited by that of the force fields used to generate the underlying molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data. Whereas the quality of classical MD force fields has improved significantly in recent years, remaining errors in the Boltzmann weights are still on the order of a few [Formula: see text], which may lead to significant discrepancies when comparing to experimentally measured rates or state populations. Here we take the view that simulations using a sufficiently good force-field sample conformations that are valid but have inaccurate weights, yet these weights may be made accurate by incorporating experimental data a posteriori. To do so, we propose augmented Markov models (AMMs), an approach that combines concepts from probability theory and information theory to consistently treat systematic force-field error and statistical errors in simulation and experiment. Our results demonstrate that AMMs can reconcile conflicting results for protein mechanisms obtained by different force fields and correct for a wide range of stationary and dynamical observables even when only equilibrium measurements are incorporated into the estimation process. This approach constitutes a unique avenue to combine experiment and computation into integrative models of biomolecular structure and dynamics.

  14. Benchmarking the stochastic time-dependent variational approach for excitation dynamics in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorošajev, Vladimir [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Department of Molecular Compound Physics, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Sauletekio 3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-12-20

    Highlights: • The Davydov ansatze can be used for finite temperature simulations with an extension. • The accuracy is high if the system is strongly coupled to the environmental phonons. • The approach can simulate time-resolved fluorescence spectra. - Abstract: Time dependent variational approach is a convenient method to characterize the excitation dynamics in molecular aggregates for different strengths of system-bath interaction a, which does not require any additional perturbative schemes. Until recently, however, this method was only applicable in zero temperature case. It has become possible to extend this method for finite temperatures with the introduction of stochastic time dependent variational approach. Here we present a comparison between this approach and the exact hierarchical equations of motion approach for describing excitation dynamics in a broad range of temperatures. We calculate electronic population evolution, absorption and auxiliary time resolved fluorescence spectra in different regimes and find that the stochastic approach shows excellent agreement with the exact approach when the system-bath coupling is sufficiently large and temperatures are high. The differences between the two methods are larger, when temperatures are lower or the system-bath coupling is small.

  15. Molecular approaches to improvement of Jatropha curcas Linn. as a sustainable energy crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar Johnson, T; Eswaran, Nalini; Sujatha, M

    2011-09-01

    With the increase in crude oil prices, climate change concerns and limited reserves of fossil fuel, attention has been diverted to alternate renewable energy sources such as biofuel and biomass. Among the potential biofuel crops, Jatropha curcas L, a non-domesticated shrub, has been gaining importance as the most promising oilseed, as it does not compete with the edible oil supplies. Economic relevance of J. curcas for biodiesel production has promoted world-wide prospecting of its germplasm for crop improvement and breeding. However, lack of adequate genetic variation and non-availability of improved varieties limited its prospects of being a successful energy crop. In this review, we present the progress made in molecular breeding approaches with particular reference to tissue culture and genetic transformation, genetic diversity assessment using molecular markers, large-scale transcriptome and proteome studies, identification of candidate genes for trait improvement, whole genome sequencing and the current interest by various public and private sector companies in commercial-scale cultivation, which highlights the revival of Jatropha as a sustainable energy crop. The information generated from molecular markers, transcriptome profiling and whole genome sequencing could accelerate the genetic upgradation of J. curcas through molecular breeding.

  16. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  17. Molecular acidity: An accurate description with information-theoretic approach in density functional reactivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaofang; Rong, Chunying; Zhong, Aiguo; Lu, Tian; Liu, Shubin

    2018-01-15

    Molecular acidity is one of the important physiochemical properties of a molecular system, yet its accurate calculation and prediction are still an unresolved problem in the literature. In this work, we propose to make use of the quantities from the information-theoretic (IT) approach in density functional reactivity theory and provide an accurate description of molecular acidity from a completely new perspective. To illustrate our point, five different categories of acidic series, singly and doubly substituted benzoic acids, singly substituted benzenesulfinic acids, benzeneseleninic acids, phenols, and alkyl carboxylic acids, have been thoroughly examined. We show that using IT quantities such as Shannon entropy, Fisher information, Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, information gain, Onicescu information energy, and relative Rényi entropy, one is able to simultaneously predict experimental pKa values of these different categories of compounds. Because of the universality of the quantities employed in this work, which are all density dependent, our approach should be general and be applicable to other systems as well. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Approaches and models of intercultural education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Manuel Sánchez Fontalvo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Needed to be aware of the need to build an intercultural society, awareness must be assumed in all social spheres, where stands the role play education. A role of transcendental, since it must promote educational spaces to form people with virtues and powers that allow them to live together / as in multicultural contexts and social diversities (sometimes uneven in an increasingly globalized and interconnected world, and foster the development of feelings of civic belonging shared before the neighborhood, city, region and country, allowing them concern and critical judgement to marginalization, poverty, misery and inequitable distribution of wealth, causes of structural violence, but at the same time, wanting to work for the welfare and transformation of these scenarios. Since these budgets, it is important to know the approaches and models of intercultural education that have been developed so far, analysing their impact on the contexts educational where apply.   

  19. Transport modeling: An artificial immune system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an artificial immune system approach (AIS to modeling time-dependent (dynamic, real time transportation phenomenon characterized by uncertainty. The basic idea behind this research is to develop the Artificial Immune System, which generates a set of antibodies (decisions, control actions that altogether can successfully cover a wide range of potential situations. The proposed artificial immune system develops antibodies (the best control strategies for different antigens (different traffic "scenarios". This task is performed using some of the optimization or heuristics techniques. Then a set of antibodies is combined to create Artificial Immune System. The developed Artificial Immune transportation systems are able to generalize, adapt, and learn based on new knowledge and new information. Applications of the systems are considered for airline yield management, the stochastic vehicle routing, and real-time traffic control at the isolated intersection. The preliminary research results are very promising.

  20. System approach to modeling of industrial technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, V. S.; Toropov, E. S.

    2018-03-01

    The authors presented a system of methods for modeling and improving industrial technologies. The system consists of information and software. The information part is structured information about industrial technologies. The structure has its template. The template has several essential categories used to improve the technological process and eliminate weaknesses in the process chain. The base category is the physical effect that takes place when the technical process proceeds. The programming part of the system can apply various methods of creative search to the content stored in the information part of the system. These methods pay particular attention to energy transformations in the technological process. The system application will allow us to systematize the approach to improving technologies and obtaining new technical solutions.

  1. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  2. Molecular modeling used to evaluate CYP2C9-dependent metabolism: homology modeling, molecular dynamics and docking simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica E; Correa-Basurto, José; García-Segovia, Erika M; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2011-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 is the principal isoform of the CYP2C subfamily in the human liver and is involved in the oxidation of several endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including many therapeutic drugs. The metabolism of drugs by CYP2C9 can yield either safe or toxic products, which may be related to the recognition and binding modes of the substrates to this isoform. These interactions can be studied using in silico methods such as quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics and docking simulations, which can also be useful for predicting the structure of metabolites. In these types of studies, the ligand and the protein must be tridimensional models; thus, the protein can be built by homology modeling or retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Therefore, the current review emphasizes the importance of using in silico methods to predict the metabolism of CYP2C9 because these computational tools have allowed the description of the principal characteristics of the active site of this isoform at the molecular level and the chemical properties of its ligands.

  3. XML-based approaches for the integration of heterogeneous bio-molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesiti, Marco; Jiménez-Ruiz, Ernesto; Sanz, Ismael; Berlanga-Llavori, Rafael; Perlasca, Paolo; Valentini, Giorgio; Manset, David

    2009-10-15

    The today's public database infrastructure spans a very large collection of heterogeneous biological data, opening new opportunities for molecular biology, bio-medical and bioinformatics research, but raising also new problems for their integration and computational processing. In this paper we survey the most interesting and novel approaches for the representation, integration and management of different kinds of biological data by exploiting XML and the related recommendations and approaches. Moreover, we present new and interesting cutting edge approaches for the appropriate management of heterogeneous biological data represented through XML. XML has succeeded in the integration of heterogeneous biomolecular information, and has established itself as the syntactic glue for biological data sources. Nevertheless, a large variety of XML-based data formats have been proposed, thus resulting in a difficult effective integration of bioinformatics data schemes. The adoption of a few semantic-rich standard formats is urgent to achieve a seamless integration of the current biological resources.

  4. Nanotubule and Tour Molecule Based Molecular Electronics: Suggestion for a Hybrid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical attempts and results indicate two distinct broad pathways towards future molecular electronic devices and architectures. The first is the approach via Tour type ladder molecules and their junctions which can be fabricated with solution phase chemical approaches. Second are fullerenes or nanotubules and their junctions which may have better conductance, switching and amplifying characteristics but can not be made through well controlled and defined chemical means. A hybrid approach combining the two pathways to take advantage of the characteristics of both is suggested. Dimension and scale of such devices would be somewhere in between isolated molecule and nanotubule based devices but it maybe possible to use self-assembly towards larger functional and logicalunits.

  5. A Hybrid Density Functional Theory/Molecular Mechanics Approach for Linear Response Properties in Heterogeneous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Li, Xin; Sandberg, Jaime A R; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ågren, Hans

    2014-03-11

    We introduce a density functional theory/molecular mechanical approach for computation of linear response properties of molecules in heterogeneous environments, such as metal surfaces or nanoparticles embedded in solvents. The heterogeneous embedding environment, consisting from metallic and nonmetallic parts, is described by combined force fields, where conventional force fields are used for the nonmetallic part and capacitance-polarization-based force fields are used for the metallic part. The presented approach enables studies of properties and spectra of systems embedded in or placed at arbitrary shaped metallic surfaces, clusters, or nanoparticles. The capability and performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by sample calculations of optical absorption spectra of thymidine absorbed on gold surfaces in an aqueous environment, where we study how different organizations of the gold surface and how the combined, nonadditive effect of the two environments is reflected in the optical absorption spectrum.

  6. A theoretical approach to sputtering due to molecular ion bombardment, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karashima, Shosuke; Ootoshi, Tsukuru; Kamiyama, Masahide; Kim, Pil-Hyon; Namba, Susumu.

    1981-01-01

    A shock wave model is proposed to explain theoretically the non-linear effects in sputtering phenomena by molecular ion bombardments. In this theory the sputtering processes are separated into two parts; one is due to linear effects and another is due to non-linear effects. The treatment of the linear parts is based on the statistical model by Schwarz and Helms concerning a broad range of atomic collision cascades. The non-linear parts are treated by the model of shock wave due to overlapping cascades, and useful equations to calculate the sputtering yields and the dynamical quantities in the system are derived. (author)

  7. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  8. Exact ground-state correlation functions of an atomic-molecular Bose–Einstein condensate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Jon; Shen, Yibing

    2018-05-01

    We study the ground-state properties of an atomic-molecular Bose–Einstein condensate model through an exact Bethe Ansatz solution. For a certain range of parameter choices, we prove that the ground-state Bethe roots lie on the positive real-axis. We then use a continuum limit approach to obtain a singular integral equation characterising the distribution of these Bethe roots. Solving this equation leads to an analytic expression for the ground-state energy. The form of the expression is consistent with the existence of a line of quantum phase transitions, which has been identified in earlier studies. This line demarcates a molecular phase from a mixed phase. Certain correlation functions, which characterise these phases, are then obtained through the Hellmann–Feynman theorem.

  9. Exploring the boundaries of molecular modeling : a study of nanochannels and transmembrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, P.

    2009-01-01

    Many interesting physical and biological phenomena can be investigated using molecular modeling techniques, either theoretically or by using computer simulation methods, such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Due to the increasing power of computer processing units, these simulation

  10. Computational modeling on the recognition of the HRE motif by HIF-1: molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkar, Pandian; Sathis, Vani; Ramachandran, Murugesan

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a bHLH-family transcription factor that controls genes involved in glycolysis, angiogenesis, migration, as well as invasion factors that are important for tumor progression and metastasis. HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β, binds to the hypoxia responsive element (HRE) present in the promoter regions of hypoxia responsive genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Neither the structure of free HIF-1 nor that of its complex with HRE is available. Computational modeling of the transcription factor-DNA complex has always been challenging due to their inherent flexibility and large conformational space. The present study aims to model the interaction between the DNA-binding domain of HIF-1 and HRE. Experiments showed that rigid macromolecular docking programs (HEX and GRAMM-X) failed to predict the optimal dimerization of individually modeled HIF-1 subunits. Hence, the HIF-1 heterodimer was modeled based on the phosphate system positive regulatory protein (PHO4) homodimer. The duplex VEGF-DNA segment containing HRE with flanking nucleotides was modeled in the B form and equilibrated via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A rigid docking approach was used to predict the crude binding mode of HIF-1 dimer with HRE, in which the putative contacts were found to be present. An MD simulation (5 ns) of the HIF-1-HRE complex in explicit water was performed to account for its flexibility and to optimize its interactions. All of the conserved amino acid residues were found to play roles in the recognition of HRE. The present work, which sheds light on the recognition of HRE by HIF-1, could be beneficial in the design of peptide or small molecule therapeutics that can mimic HIF-1 and bind with the HRE sequence.

  11. Model morphing and sequence assignment after molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C; Read, Randy J; Adams, Paul D; Brunger, Axel T; Afonine, Pavel V; Hung, Li-Wei

    2013-11-01

    A procedure termed `morphing' for improving a model after it has been placed in the crystallographic cell by molecular replacement has recently been developed. Morphing consists of applying a smooth deformation to a model to make it match an electron-density map more closely. Morphing does not change the identities of the residues in the chain, only their coordinates. Consequently, if the true structure differs from the working model by containing different residues, these differences cannot be corrected by morphing. Here, a procedure that helps to address this limitation is described. The goal of the procedure is to obtain a relatively complete model that has accurate main-chain atomic positions and residues that are correctly assigned to the sequence. Residues in a morphed model that do not match the electron-density map are removed. Each segment of the resulting trimmed morphed model is then assigned to the sequence of the molecule using information about the connectivity of the chains from the working model and from connections that can be identified from the electron-density map. The procedure was tested by application to a recently determined structure at a resolution of 3.2 Å and was found to increase the number of correctly identified residues in this structure from the 88 obtained using phenix.resolve sequence assignment alone (Terwilliger, 2003) to 247 of a possible 359. Additionally, the procedure was tested by application to a series of templates with sequence identities to a target structure ranging between 7 and 36%. The mean fraction of correctly identified residues in these cases was increased from 33% using phenix.resolve sequence assignment to 47% using the current procedure. The procedure is simple to apply and is available in the Phenix software package.

  12. Bayesian molecular design with a chemical language model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Hongo, Kenta; Isomura, Tetsu; Maezono, Ryo; Yoshida, Ryo

    2017-04-01

    The aim of computational molecular design is the identification of promising hypothetical molecules with a predefined set of desired properties. We address the issue of accelerating the material discovery with state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. The method involves two different types of prediction; the forward and backward predictions. The objective of the forward prediction is to create a set of machine learning models on various properties of a given molecule. Inverting the trained forward models through Bayes' law, we derive a posterior distribution for the backward prediction, which is conditioned by a desired property requirement. Exploring high-probability regions of the posterior with a sequential Monte Carlo technique, molecules that exhibit the desired properties can computationally be created. One major difficulty in the computational creation of molecules is the exclusion of the occurrence of chemically unfavorable structures. To circumvent this issue, we derive a chemical language model that acquires commonly occurring patterns of chemical fragments through natural language processing of ASCII strings of existing compounds, which follow the SMILES chemical language notation. In the backward prediction, the trained language model is used to refine chemical strings such that the properties of the resulting structures fall within the desired property region while chemically unfavorable structures are successfully removed. The present method is demonstrated through the design of small organic molecules with the property requirements on HOMO-LUMO gap and internal energy. The R package iqspr is available at the CRAN repository.

  13. Development and Evaluation of Amino Acid Molecular Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of structure and function of proteins has a tight relationshipwith the development of structural biology. However, biochemistry students usuallyfind difficulty to visualize the structures when they use only schematic drawings ofdidactic books. The representation of three-dimensional structures of somebiomolecules with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied tothe students and teachers a successfully experience to better visualize andcorrelate the structures to the real molecules. The present work shows thedeveloped models and the process to produce the representative units of the mainamino acids in industrial scale. The design and applicability of the representativeunits were discussed with many teachers and some suggestions wereimplemented to the models. The preliminary evaluation and perspective ofutilization by researchers show that the work is in the right direction. At the actualstage, the models are defined, prototypes were made and will be presented in thismeeting. The moulds for the units are at the final stage of construction and trial inspecialized tool facilities. The last term will consist of an effective evaluation of thedidactic tool for the teaching/learning process in Structural Molecular Biology. Theevaluation protocol is being elaborated containing simple and objective questions,similar to those used in research on science teaching.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  15. Spin models for the single molecular magnet Mn12-AC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqer, Mohamad A.

    2005-11-01

    The single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn12-AC attracted the attention of scientists since the discovery of its magnetic hystereses which are accompanied by sudden jumps in magnetic moments at low temperature. Unlike conventional bulk magnets, hysteresis in SMMs is of molecular origin. This qualifies them as candidates for next generation of high density storage media where a molecule which is at most few nanometers in size can be used to store a bit of information. However, the jumps in these hystereses, due to spin tunneling, can lead to undesired loss of information. Mn12-AC molecule contains twelve magnetic ions antiferromagnetically coupled by exchanges leading to S = 10 ground state manifold. The magnetic ions are surrounded by ligands which isolate them magnetically from neighboring molecules. The lowest state of S = 9 manifold is believed to lie at about 40 K above the ground state. Therefore, at low temperatures, the molecule is considered as a single uncoupled moment of spin S = 10. Such model has been used widely to understand phenomena exhibited by the molecule at low temperatures including the tunneling of its spin, while a little attention has been paid for the multi-spin nature of the molecule. Using the 8-spin model, we demonstrate that in order to understand the phenomena of tunneling, a full spin description of the molecule is required. We utilized a calculation scheme where a fraction of energy levels are used in the calculations and the influence of levels having higher energy is neglected. From the dependence of tunnel splittings on the number of states include, we conclude that models based on restricting the number of energy levels (single-spin and 8-spin models) lead to unreliable results of tunnel splitting calculations. To attack the full 12-spin model, we employed the Davidson algorithm to calculated lowest energy levels produced by exchange interactions and single ion anisotropies. The model reproduces the anisotropy properties at low

  16. Multi-scale modelling of supercapacitors: From molecular simulations to a transmission line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pean, C.; Rotenberg, B.; Simon, P.; Salanne, M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a typical nanoporous-carbon based supercapacitor. The organic electrolyte consists in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and hexafluorophosphate ions dissolved in acetonitrile. We simulate systems at equilibrium, for various applied voltages. This allows us to determine the relevant thermodynamic (capacitance) and transport (in-pore resistivities) properties. These quantities are then injected in a transmission line model for testing its ability to predict the charging properties of the device. The results from this macroscopic model are in good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which validates its use for interpreting electrochemical impedance experiments.

  17. Multi-Targeted Molecular Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Polyphenols: An Opportunity for a Global Approach to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz-López, María; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Encinar, José Antonio; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente

    2017-08-20

    Improper diet can alter gene expression by breaking the energy balance equation and changing metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers, which can result in the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. The pleiotropic effects of dietary plant polyphenols are capable of counteracting by modulating different key molecular targets at the cell, as well as through epigenetic modifications. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS)-derived polyphenols are known to ameliorate various obesity-related conditions. Recent evidence leads to propose the complex nature of the underlying mechanism of action. This multi-targeted mechanism includes the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, transcription factors, hormones and peptides, digestive enzymes, as well as epigenetic modifications. This article reviews the accumulated evidence on the multiple anti-obesity effects of HS polyphenols in cell and animal models, as well as in humans, and its putative molecular targets. In silico studies reveal the capacity of several HS polyphenols to act as putative ligands for different digestive and metabolic enzymes, which may also deserve further attention. Therefore, a global approach including integrated and networked omics techniques, virtual screening and epigenetic analysis is necessary to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of HS polyphenols and metabolites involved, as well as their possible implications in the design of safe and effective polyphenolic formulations for obesity.

  18. Multi-Targeted Molecular Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Polyphenols: An Opportunity for a Global Approach to Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz-López, María; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Improper diet can alter gene expression by breaking the energy balance equation and changing metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers, which can result in the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. The pleiotropic effects of dietary plant polyphenols are capable of counteracting by modulating different key molecular targets at the cell, as well as through epigenetic modifications. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS)-derived polyphenols are known to ameliorate various obesity-related conditions. Recent evidence leads to propose the complex nature of the underlying mechanism of action. This multi-targeted mechanism includes the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, transcription factors, hormones and peptides, digestive enzymes, as well as epigenetic modifications. This article reviews the accumulated evidence on the multiple anti-obesity effects of HS polyphenols in cell and animal models, as well as in humans, and its putative molecular targets. In silico studies reveal the capacity of several HS polyphenols to act as putative ligands for different digestive and metabolic enzymes, which may also deserve further attention. Therefore, a global approach including integrated and networked omics techniques, virtual screening and epigenetic analysis is necessary to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of HS polyphenols and metabolites involved, as well as their possible implications in the design of safe and effective polyphenolic formulations for obesity. PMID:28825642

  19. ECOMOD - An ecological approach to radioecological modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G.

    2000-01-01

    A unified methodology is proposed to simulate the dynamic processes of radionuclide migration in aquatic food chains in parallel with their stable analogue elements. The distinguishing feature of the unified radioecological/ecological approach is the description of radionuclide migration along with dynamic equations for the ecosystem. The ability of the methodology to predict the results of radioecological experiments is demonstrated by an example of radionuclide (iron group) accumulation by a laboratory culture of the algae Platymonas viridis. Based on the unified methodology, the 'ECOMOD' radioecological model was developed to simulate dynamic radioecological processes in aquatic ecosystems. It comprises three basic modules, which are operated as a set of inter-related programs. The 'ECOSYSTEM' module solves non-linear ecological equations, describing the biomass dynamics of essential ecosystem components. The 'RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION' module calculates the radionuclide distribution in abiotic and biotic components of the aquatic ecosystem. The 'DOSE ASSESSMENT' module calculates doses to aquatic biota and doses to man from aquatic food chains. The application of the ECOMOD model to reconstruct the radionuclide distribution in the Chernobyl Cooling Pond ecosystem in the early period after the accident shows good agreement with observations

  20. Modelling Approach In Islamic Architectural Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaimi Salleh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Architectural designs contribute as one of the main factors that should be considered in minimizing negative impacts in planning and structural development in buildings such as in mosques. In this paper, the ergonomics perspective is revisited which hence focuses on the conditional factors involving organisational, psychological, social and population as a whole. This paper tries to highlight the functional and architectural integration with ecstatic elements in the form of decorative and ornamental outlay as well as incorporating the building structure such as wall, domes and gates. This paper further focuses the mathematical aspects of the architectural designs such as polar equations and the golden ratio. These designs are modelled into mathematical equations of various forms, while the golden ratio in mosque is verified using two techniques namely, the geometric construction and the numerical method. The exemplary designs are taken from theSabah Bandaraya Mosque in Likas, Kota Kinabalu and the Sarawak State Mosque in Kuching,while the Universiti Malaysia Sabah Mosque is used for the Golden Ratio. Results show thatIslamic architectural buildings and designs have long had mathematical concepts and techniques underlying its foundation, hence, a modelling approach is needed to rejuvenate these Islamic designs.

  1. Bounding the electrostatic free energies associated with linear continuum models of molecular solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Knepley, Matthew G; Anitescu, Mihai

    2009-03-14

    The importance of electrostatic interactions in molecular biology has driven extensive research toward the development of accurate and efficient theoretical and computational models. Linear continuum electrostatic theory has been surprisingly successful, but the computational costs associated with solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs) preclude the theory's use in most dynamical simulations. Modern generalized-Born models for electrostatics can reproduce PDE-based calculations to within a few percent and are extremely computationally efficient but do not always faithfully reproduce interactions between chemical groups. Recent work has shown that a boundary-integral-equation formulation of the PDE problem leads naturally to a new approach called boundary-integral-based electrostatics estimation (BIBEE) to approximate electrostatic interactions. In the present paper, we prove that the BIBEE method can be used to rigorously bound the actual continuum-theory electrostatic free energy. The bounds are validated using a set of more than 600 proteins. Detailed numerical results are presented for structures of the peptide met-enkephalin taken from a molecular-dynamics simulation. These bounds, in combination with our demonstration that the BIBEE methods accurately reproduce pairwise interactions, suggest a new approach toward building a highly accurate yet computationally tractable electrostatic model.

  2. Bounding the electrostatic free energies associated with linear continuum models of molecular solvation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, J. P.; Knepley, M. G.; Anitescu, M. (Biosciences Division); ( MCS); (Rush Univ.)

    2009-03-01

    The importance of electrostatic interactions in molecular biology has driven extensive research toward the development of accurate and efficient theoretical and computational models. Linear continuum electrostatic theory has been surprisingly successful, but the computational costs associated with solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs) preclude the theory's use in most dynamical simulations. Modern generalized-Born models for electrostatics can reproduce PDE-based calculations to within a few percent and are extremely computationally efficient but do not always faithfully reproduce interactions between chemical groups. Recent work has shown that a boundary-integral-equation formulation of the PDE problem leads naturally to a new approach called boundary-integral-based electrostatics estimation (BIBEE) to approximate electrostatic interactions. In the present paper, we prove that the BIBEE method can be used to rigorously bound the actual continuum-theory electrostatic free energy. The bounds are validated using a set of more than 600 proteins. Detailed numerical results are presented for structures of the peptide met-enkephalin taken from a molecular-dynamics simulation. These bounds, in combination with our demonstration that the BIBEE methods accurately reproduce pairwise interactions, suggest a new approach toward building a highly accurate yet computationally tractable electrostatic model.

  3. A molecular-mechanics based finite element model for strength prediction of single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, M.; Rossi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a finite element model based on molecular mechanics to predict the ultimate strength and strain of single wallet carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The interactions between atoms was modelled by combining the use of non-linear elastic and torsional elastic spring. In particular, with this approach, it was tried to combine the molecular mechanics approach with finite element method without providing any not-physical data on the interactions between the carbon atoms, i.e. the CC-bond inertia moment or Young's modulus definition. Mechanical properties as Young's modulus, ultimate strength and strain for several CNTs were calculated. Further, a stress-strain curve for large deformation (up to 70%) is reported for a nanotube Zig-Zag (9,0). The results showed that good agreement with the experimental and numerical results of several authors was obtained. A comparison of the mechanical properties of nanotubes with same diameter and different chirality was carried out. Finally, the influence of the presence of defects on the strength and strain of a SWNT was also evaluated. In particular, the stress-strain curve a nanotube with one-vacancy defect was evaluated and compared with the curve of a pristine one, showing a reduction of the ultimate strength and strain for the defected nanotube. The FE model proposed demonstrate to be a reliable tool to simulate mechanical behaviour of carbon nanotubes both in the linear elastic field and the non-linear elastic field

  4. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  5. Thermophysical Properties of Undercooled Alloys: An Overview of the Molecular Simulation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the studies on the thermophysical properties of undercooled metals and alloys by molecular simulations in recent years. The simulation methods of melting temperature, enthalpy, specific heat, surface tension, diffusion coefficient and viscosity are introduced and the simulated results are summarized. By comparing the experimental results and various theoretical models, the temperature and the composition dependences of the thermophysical properties in undercooled regime are discussed.

  6. Thermophysical properties of undercooled alloys: an overview of the molecular simulation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yong J; Chen, Min

    2011-01-10

    We review the studies on the thermophysical properties of undercooled metals and alloys by molecular simulations in recent years. The simulation methods of melting temperature, enthalpy, specific heat, surface tension, diffusion coefficient and viscosity are introduced and the simulated results are summarized. By comparing the experimental results and various theoretical models, the temperature and the composition dependences of the thermophysical properties in undercooled regime are discussed.

  7. Temperature Effect on Micelle Formation: Molecular Thermodynamic Model Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Lukanov, Boris; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-03-08

    Temperature affects the aggregation of macromolecules such as surfactants, polymers, and proteins in aqueous solutions. The effect on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is often nonmonotonic. In this work, the effect of temperature on the micellization of ionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions is studied using a molecular thermodynamic model. Previous studies based on this technique have predicted monotonic behavior for ionic surfactants. Our investigation shows that the choice of tail transfer energy to describe the hydrophobic effect between the surfactant tails and the polar solvent molecules plays a key role in the predicted CMC. We modify the tail transfer energy by taking into account the effect of the surfactant head on the neighboring methylene group. The modification improves the description of the CMC and the predicted micellar size for aqueous solutions of sodium n-alkyl sulfate, dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and n-alkyl polyoxyethylene. The new tail transfer energy describes the nonmonotonic behavior of CMC versus temperature. In the DTAB-water system, we redefine the head size by including the methylene group, next to the nitrogen, in the head. The change in the head size along with our modified tail transfer energy improves the CMC and aggregation size prediction significantly. Tail transfer is a dominant energy contribution in micellar and microemulsion systems. It also promotes the adsorption of surfactants at fluid-fluid interfaces and affects the formation of adsorbed layer at fluid-solid interfaces. Our proposed modifications have direct applications in the thermodynamic modeling of the effect of temperature on molecular aggregation, both in the bulk and at the interfaces.

  8. Computer aided molecular design with combined molecular modeling and group contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, Petr

    1999-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures and on th......Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures...

  9. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  10. Sulfur Deactivation of NOx Storage Catalysts: A Multiscale Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankovic N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lean NOx Trap (LNT catalysts, a promising solution for reducing the noxious nitrogen oxide emissions from the lean burn and Diesel engines, are technologically limited by the presence of sulfur in the exhaust gas stream. Sulfur stemming from both fuels and lubricating oils is oxidized during the combustion event and mainly exists as SOx (SO2 and SO3 in the exhaust. Sulfur oxides interact strongly with the NOx trapping material of a LNT to form thermodynamically favored sulfate species, consequently leading to the blockage of NOx sorption sites and altering the catalyst operation. Molecular and kinetic modeling represent a valuable tool for predicting system behavior and evaluating catalytic performances. The present paper demonstrates how fundamental ab initio calculations can be used as a valuable source for designing kinetic models developed in the IFP Exhaust library, intended for vehicle simulations. The concrete example we chose to illustrate our approach was SO3 adsorption on the model NOx storage material, BaO. SO3 adsorption was described for various sites (terraces, surface steps and kinks and bulk for a closer description of a real storage material. Additional rate and sensitivity analyses provided a deeper understanding of the poisoning phenomena.

  11. Parallel computations of molecular dynamics trajectories using the stochastic path approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloj, Veaceslav; Elber, Ron

    2000-06-01

    A novel protocol to parallelize molecular dynamics trajectories is discussed and tested on a cluster of PCs running the NT operating system. The new technique does not propagate the solution in small time steps, but uses instead a global optimization of a functional of the whole trajectory. The new approach is especially attractive for parallel and distributed computing and its advantages (and disadvantages) are presented. Two numerical examples are discussed: (a) A conformational transition in a solvated dipeptide, and (b) The R→T conformational transition in solvated hemoglobin.

  12. Inhibition of Mycobacterium-RmlA by Molecular Modeling, Dynamics Simulation, and Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Harathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance to anti-tb drugs has enforced strategies for finding new drug targets against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. In recent years enzymes associated with the rhamnose pathway in Mtb have attracted attention as drug targets. The present work is on α-D-glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (RmlA, the first enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of L-rhamnose, of Mtb cell wall. This study aims to derive a 3D structure of RmlA by using a comparative modeling approach. Structural refinement and energy minimization of the built model have been done with molecular dynamics. The reliability assessment of the built model was carried out with various protein checking tools such as Procheck, Whatif, ProsA, Errat, and Verify 3D. The obtained model investigates the relation between the structure and function. Molecular docking interactions of Mtb-RmlA with modified EMB (ethambutol ligands and natural substrate have revealed specific key residues Arg13, Lys23, Asn109, and Thr223 which play an important role in ligand binding and selection. Compared to all EMB ligands, EMB-1 has shown better interaction with Mtb-RmlA model. The information thus discussed above will be useful for the rational design of safe and effective inhibitors specific to RmlA enzyme pertaining to the treatment of tuberculosis.

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  14. A model of early formation of uranium molecular oxides in laser-ablated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finko, Mikhail; Curreli, Davide; Azer, Magdi; Weisz, David; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Rose, Timothy; Koroglu, Batikan; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Mike

    2017-10-01

    An important problem within the field of nuclear forensics is fractionation: the formation of post-detonation nuclear debris whose composition does not reflect that of the source weapon. We are investigating uranium fractionation in rapidly cooling plasma using a combined experimental and modeling approach. In particular, we use laser ablation of uranium metal samples to produce a low-temperature plasma with physical conditions similar to a condensing nuclear fireball. Here we present a first plasma-chemistry model of uranium molecular species formation during the early stage of laser ablated plasma evolution in atmospheric oxygen. The system is simulated using a global kinetic model with rate coefficients calculated according to literature data and the application of reaction rate theory. The model allows for a detailed analysis of the evolution of key uranium molecular species and represents the first step in producing a uranium fireball model that is kinetically validated against spatially and temporally resolved spectroscopy measurements. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16- 1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344.

  15. An integrated approach to permeability modeling using micro-models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, A.H.; Leuangthong, O.; Deutsch, C.V. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    An important factor in predicting the performance of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) well pairs is the spatial distribution of permeability. Complications that make the inference of a reliable porosity-permeability relationship impossible include the presence of short-scale variability in sand/shale sequences; preferential sampling of core data; and uncertainty in upscaling parameters. Micro-modelling is a simple and effective method for overcoming these complications. This paper proposed a micro-modeling approach to account for sampling bias, small laminated features with high permeability contrast, and uncertainty in upscaling parameters. The paper described the steps and challenges of micro-modeling and discussed the construction of binary mixture geo-blocks; flow simulation and upscaling; extended power law formalism (EPLF); and the application of micro-modeling and EPLF. An extended power-law formalism to account for changes in clean sand permeability as a function of macroscopic shale content was also proposed and tested against flow simulation results. There was close agreement between the model and simulation results. The proposed methodology was also applied to build the porosity-permeability relationship for laminated and brecciated facies of McMurray oil sands. Experimental data was in good agreement with the experimental data. 8 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Molecular Physiology of Root System Architecture in Model Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, K.; Ahkami, A. H.; Anderton, C.; Veličković, D.; Myers, G. L.; Chrisler, W.; Lindenmaier, R.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.; Rosnow, J. J.; Farris, Y.; Khan, N. E.; Bernstein, H. C.; Jansson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Unraveling the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in responses of Root System Architecture (RSA) to abiotic stresses and shifts in microbiome structure is critical to understand and engineer plant-microbe-soil interactions in the rhizosphere. In this study, accessions of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21 (C3 model grass) and Setaria viridis A10.1 (C4 model grass) were grown in phytotron chambers under current and elevated CO2 levels. Detailed growth stage-based phenotypic analysis revealed different above- and below-ground morphological and physiological responses in C3 and C4 grasses to enhanced CO2 levels. Based on our preliminary results and by screening values of total biomass, water use efficiency, root to shoot ratio, RSA parameters and net assimilation rates, we postulated a three-phase physiological mechanism, i.e. RootPlus, BiomassPlus and YieldPlus phases, for grass growth under elevated CO2 conditions. Moreover, this comprehensive set of morphological and process-based observations are currently in use to develop, test, and calibrate biophysical whole-plant models and in particular to simulate leaf-level photosynthesis at various developmental stages of C3 and C4 using the model BioCro. To further link the observed phenotypic traits at the organismal level to tissue and molecular levels, and to spatially resolve the origin and fate of key metabolites involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism in different root sections, we complement root phenotypic observations with spatial metabolomics data using mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods. Focusing on plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, six bacterial strains with plant growth promoting features are currently in use in both gel-based and soil systems to screen root growth and development in Brachypodium. Using confocal microscopy, GFP-tagged bacterial systems are utilized to study the initiation of different root types of RSA, including primary root (PR), coleoptile node axile root (CNR

  17. Risk communication: a mental models approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morgan, M. Granger (Millett Granger)

    2002-01-01

    ... information about risks. The procedure uses approaches from risk and decision analysis to identify the most relevant information; it also uses approaches from psychology and communication theory to ensure that its message is understood. This book is written in nontechnical terms, designed to make the approach feasible for anyone willing to try it. It is illustrat...

  18. Classical and quantum analysis of a hetero-triatomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonel, A.P.; Kuhn, C.C.N.; Foerster, A.; Santos, G.; Roditi, I.; Santos, Z.V.T.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate an integrable Hamiltonian modelling a hetero-triatomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. This model describes a mixture of two species of atoms in different proportions, which can combine to form a triatomic molecule. Beginning with a classical analysis, we determine the fixed points of the system. Bifurcations of these points separate the parameter space into different regions. Three distinct scenarios are found, varying with the atomic population imbalance. This result suggests the ground state properties of the quantum model exhibits a sensitivity on the atomic population imbalance, which is confirmed by a quantum analysis using different approaches, such as the ground-state expectation values, the behaviour of the quantum dynamics, the energy gap and the ground state fidelity. (author)

  19. A tight-binding model of the transmission probability through a molecular junction; a single molecule vs. a molecular layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, A.; Nitzan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text: Molecular electronics, one of the major fields of the current effort in nano-science, may be de ed as the study of electronic behaviors, devices and applications that depend on the properties of matter at the molecular scale. If the miniaturization trend of microelectronic devices is to continue, elements such as transistors and contacts will soon shrink to single molecules. The promise of these new technological breakthroughs has been major driving force in this ld. Moreover, the consideration of molecular systems as electronic devices has raised new fundamental questions. In particular, while traditional quantum chemistry deals with electronically closed systems, we now face problems involving molecular systems that are open to their electronic environment, moreover, function in far from equilibrium situations. A generic molecular junction is made of two electrodes connected by a molecular spacer that takes the form of a molecular chain of varying length or a molecular layer of varying thickness. We use a simple nearest-neighbors tight-biding model with the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method to investigate and compare between a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), finite molecular layer (FML), and single molecule (SM) chemisorption to a surface of a metal substrate. In addition, we examine the difference in the transmission probability through a SAM, FML and SM sandwiched between two metallic electrodes. Dramatic differences are observed between the SM, FML and SAM density of electronic states and transmission functions. In addition, we analyze the effects of changing different physical parameters such as molecule-substrate interaction, molecule-molecule interactions, etc; interesting effects that pertain to the conduction properties of single molecules and molecular layers are observed. Intriguing results are attained when we investigate the commensurability of the SAM with the metallic surface

  20. A New Approach for Flexible Molecular Docking Based on Swarm Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular docking methods play an important role in the field of computer-aided drug design. In the work, on the basis of the molecular docking program AutoDock, we present QLDock as a tool for flexible molecular docking. For the energy evaluation, the algorithm uses the binding free energy function that is provided by the AutoDock 4.2 tool. The new search algorithm combines the features of a quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm and local search method of Solis and Wets for solving the highly flexible protein-ligand docking problem. We compute the interaction of 23 protein-ligand complexes and compare the results with those of the QDock and AutoDock programs. The experimental results show that our approach leads to substantially lower docking energy and higher docking precision in comparison to Lamarckian genetic algorithm and QPSO algorithm alone. QPSO-ls algorithm was able to identify the correct binding mode of 74% of the complexes. In comparison, the accuracy of QPSO and LGA is 52% and 61%, respectively. This difference in performance rises with increasing complexity of the ligand. Thus, the novel algorithm QPSO-ls may be used to dock ligand with many rotatable bonds with high accuracy.

  1. A neural network approach to the study of internal energy flow in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumpter, B.G.; Getino, C.; Noid, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks are used to develop a new technique for efficient analysis of data obtained from molecular-dynamics calculations and is applied to the study of mode energy flow in molecular systems. The methodology is based on teaching an appropriate neural network the relationship between phase-space points along a classical trajectory and mode energies for stretch, bend, and torsion vibrations. Results are discussed for reactive and nonreactive classical trajectories of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on a semiempirical potential-energy surface. The neural-network approach is shown to produce reasonably accurate values for the mode energies, with average errors between 1% and 12%, and is applicable to any region within the 24-dimensional phase space of H 2 O 2 . In addition, the generic knowledge learned by the neural network allows calculations to be made for other molecular systems. Results are discussed for a series of tetratomic molecules: H 2 X 2 , X=C, N, O, Si, S, or Se, and preliminary results are given for energy flow predictions in macromolecules

  2. Evolutionary history of genus Macrobrachium inferred from mitochondrial markers: a molecular clock approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Deepak; Harikrishnan, Mahadevan

    2018-04-17

    Caridea, an infraorder of shrimps coming under Pleocyemata was first reported from the oceans before 417 million years followed by their radiation recorded during the Permian period. Hitherto, about 3877 extant caridean species were accounted within which one quarter constitute freshwater species. Freshwater prawns of genus Macrobrachium (Infraorder Caridea; Family Palaemonidae), with more than 240 species are inhabitants of diverse aquatic habitats like coastal lagoons, lakes, tropical streams, ponds and rivers. Previous studies on Macrobrachium relied on the highly variable morphological characters which were insufficient for accurate diagnosis of natural species groups. Present study focuses on the utility of molecular markers (viz. COI and 16S rRNA) for resolving the evolutionary history of genus Macrobrachium using a combination of phylogeny and timescale components. It is for the first time a molecular clock approach had been carried out towards genus Macrobrachium in a broad aspect with the incorporation of congeners inhabiting diverse geographical realms including endemic species M. striatum from South West coast of India. Molecular results obtained revealed the phylogenetic relationships between congeners of genus Macrobrachium at intra/inter-continental level along with the corresponding evolutionary time estimates.

  3. Molecular Modeling and Simulation Tools in the Development of Peptide-Based Biosensors for Mycotoxin Detection: Example of Ochratoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aby A. Thyparambil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxin contamination of food and feed is now ubiquitous. Exposures to mycotoxin via contact or ingestion can potentially induce adverse health outcomes. Affordable mycotoxin-monitoring systems are highly desired but are limited by (a the reliance on technically challenging and costly molecular recognition by immuno-capture technologies; and (b the lack of predictive tools for directing the optimization of alternative molecular recognition modalities. Our group has been exploring the development of ochratoxin detection and monitoring systems using the peptide NFO4 as the molecular recognition receptor in fluorescence, electrochemical and multimodal biosensors. Using ochratoxin as the model mycotoxin, we share our perspective on addressing the technical challenges involved in biosensor fabrication, namely: (a peptide receptor design; and (b performance evaluation. Subsequently, the scope and utility of molecular modeling and simulation (MMS approaches to address the above challenges are described. Informed and enabled by phage display, the subsequent application of MMS approaches can rationally guide subsequent biomolecular engineering of peptide receptors, including bioconjugation and bioimmobilization approaches to be used in the fabrication of peptide biosensors. MMS approaches thus have the potential to reduce biosensor development cost, extend product life cycle, and facilitate multi-analyte detection of mycotoxins, each of which positively contributes to the overall affordability of mycotoxin biosensor monitoring systems.

  4. A Multi-Model Approach for System Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Bækgaard, Mikkel Ask Buur

    2007-01-01

    A multi-model approach for system diagnosis is presented in this paper. The relation with fault diagnosis as well as performance validation is considered. The approach is based on testing a number of pre-described models and find which one is the best. It is based on an active approach......,i.e. an auxiliary input to the system is applied. The multi-model approach is applied on a wind turbine system....

  5. The application of molecular modelling in the safety assessment of chemicals: A case study on ligand-dependent PPARγ dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sharif, Merilin; Tsakovska, Ivanka; Pajeva, Ilza; Alov, Petko; Fioravanzo, Elena; Bassan, Arianna; Kovarich, Simona; Yang, Chihae; Mostrag-Szlichtyng, Aleksandra; Vitcheva, Vessela; Worth, Andrew P; Richarz, Andrea-N; Cronin, Mark T D

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a proof of concept demonstrating that molecular modelling methodologies can be employed as a part of an integrated strategy to support toxicity prediction consistent with the mode of action/adverse outcome pathway (MoA/AOP) framework. To illustrate the role of molecular modelling in predictive toxicology, a case study was undertaken in which molecular modelling methodologies were employed to predict the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor γ (PPARγ) as a potential molecular initiating event (MIE) for liver steatosis. A stepwise procedure combining different in silico approaches (virtual screening based on docking and pharmacophore filtering, and molecular field analysis) was developed to screen for PPARγ full agonists and to predict their transactivation activity (EC 50 ). The performance metrics of the classification model to predict PPARγ full agonists were balanced accuracy=81%, sensitivity=85% and specificity=76%. The 3D QSAR model developed to predict EC 50 of PPARγ full agonists had the following statistical parameters: q 2 cv =0.610, N opt =7, SEP cv =0.505, r 2 pr =0.552. To support the linkage of PPARγ agonism predictions to prosteatotic potential, molecular modelling was combined with independently performed mechanistic mining of available in vivo toxicity data followed by ToxPrint chemotypes analysis. The approaches investigated demonstrated a potential to predict the MIE, to facilitate the process of MoA/AOP elaboration, to increase the scientific confidence in AOP, and to become a basis for 3D chemotype development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EUDIOMETRIC THEORETIC-APPROACH TO MODELLING THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mathematical physics underlying the adsorption and subsequent desorption of dissolved oxygen (DO) in a water body subject to effluent loading had ... of hat matrix and bootstrapping techniques to study the phenomenon of chemical adsorption and desorption of DO at molecular level in a polluted waterbody has not ...

  7. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal, we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection kinetics was formulated using partial and ordinary differential equations in one- and three-dimensional (semi-spherical coordinates. Several key parameters including an injection velocity, a diffusion coefficient, thickness of subcutaneous tissue, and a permeability factor at the tissue-blood boundary were estimated from experimental data in rats. With reference to analytical solutions in a simplified model without convection, numerical solutions revealed that the diffusion coefficient and thickness of subcutaneous tissue determined the timing of the peak concentration in the plasma, and its magnitude was dictated by the permeability factor. Furthermore, the initial velocity, induced by needle injection, elevated an immediate transport of salubrinal at t < 1h. The described analysis with a combination of partial and ordinary differential equations contributes to the prediction of local and systemic effects and the understanding of the transportation mechanism of salubrinal and other agents.

  8. Iterative Calibration: A Novel Approach for Calibrating the Molecular Clock Using Complex Geological Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeza-Quintana, Tzitziki; Adamowicz, Sarah J

    2018-02-01

    During the past 50 years, the molecular clock has become one of the main tools for providing a time scale for the history of life. In the era of robust molecular evolutionary analysis, clock calibration is still one of the most basic steps needing attention. When fossil records are limited, well-dated geological events are the main resource for calibration. However, biogeographic calibrations have often been used in a simplistic manner, for example assuming simultaneous vicariant divergence of multiple sister lineages. Here, we propose a novel iterative calibration approach to define the most appropriate calibration date by seeking congruence between the dates assigned to multiple allopatric divergences and the geological history. Exploring patterns of molecular divergence in 16 trans-Bering sister clades of echinoderms, we demonstrate that the iterative calibration is predominantly advantageous when using complex geological or climatological events-such as the opening/reclosure of the Bering Strait-providing a powerful tool for clock dating that can be applied to other biogeographic calibration systems and further taxa. Using Bayesian analysis, we observed that evolutionary rate variability in the COI-5P gene is generally distributed in a clock-like fashion for Northern echinoderms. The results reveal a large range of genetic divergences, consistent with multiple pulses of trans-Bering migrations. A resulting rate of 2.8% pairwise Kimura-2-parameter sequence divergence per million years is suggested for the COI-5P gene in Northern echinoderms. Given that molecular rates may vary across latitudes and taxa, this study provides a new context for dating the evolutionary history of Arctic marine life.

  9. Molecular self-assembly approaches for supramolecular electronic and organic electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hin-Lap

    Molecular self-assembly represents an efficient bottom-up strategy to generate structurally well-defined aggregates of semiconducting pi-conjugated materials. The capability of tuning the chemical structures, intermolecular interactions and nanostructures through molecular engineering and novel materials processing renders it possible to tailor a large number of unprecedented properties such as charge transport, energy transfer and light harvesting. This approach does not only benefit traditional electronic devices based on bulk materials, but also generate a new research area so called "supramolecular electronics" in which electronic devices are built up with individual supramolecular nanostructures with size in the sub-hundred nanometers range. My work combined molecular self-assembly together with several novel materials processing techniques to control the nucleation and growth of organic semiconducting nanostructures from different type of pi-conjugated materials. By tailoring the interactions between the molecules using hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking, semiconducting nanoplatelets and nanowires with tunable sizes can be fabricated in solution. These supramolecular nanostructures were further patterned and aligned on solid substrates through printing and chemical templating methods. The capability to control the different hierarchies of organization on surface provides an important platform to study their structural-induced electronic properties. In addition to using molecular self-assembly to create different organic nanostructures, functional self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by spontaneous chemisorption on surfaces was used to tune the interfacial property in organic solar cells. Devices showed dramatically improved performance when appropriate SAMs were applied to optimize the contact property for efficiency charge collection.

  10. Challenges to a molecular approach to prey identification in the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bryan; Reed, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular approaches to prey identification are increasingly useful in elucidating predator–prey relationships, and we aimed to investigate the feasibility of these methods to document the species identities of prey consumed by invasive Burmese pythons in Florida. We were particularly interested in the diet of young snakes, because visual identification of prey from this size class has proven difficult. We successfully extracted DNA from the gastrointestinal contents of 43 young pythons, as well as from several control samples, and attempted amplification of DNA mini-barcodes, a 130-bp region of COX1. Using a PNA clamp to exclude python DNA, we found that prey DNA was not present in sufficient quality for amplification of this locus in 86% of our samples. All samples from the GI tracts of young pythons contained only hair, and the six samples we were able to identify to species were hispid cotton rats. This suggests that young Burmese pythons prey predominantly on small mammals and that prey diversity among snakes of this size class is low. We discuss prolonged gastrointestinal transit times and extreme gastric breakdown as possible causes of DNA degradation that limit the success of a molecular approach to prey identification in Burmese pythons

  11. Role of molecular testing in the multidisciplinary diagnostic approach of ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, May; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Giancristoforo, Simona; Genovese, Silvia; Sirleto, Pietro; Boldrini, Renata; Angioni, Adriano

    2016-01-13

    The term ichthyosis describes a generalized disorder of cornification characterized by scaling and/or hyperkeratosis of different skin regions. Mutations in a broad group of genes related to keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal barrier function have been demonstrated to play a causative role in disease development. Ichthyosis may be classified in syndromic or non-syndromic forms based on the occurrence or absence of extracutaneous signs. In this setting, the diagnosis of ichthyosis is an integrated multistep process requiring a multidisciplinary approach in order to formulate the appropriate diagnostic hypothesis and to address the genetic testing. Due to the complex features of the different ichthyoses and the high number of genes involved we have investigated a group of 64 patients, affected by syndromic and non-syndromic diseases, using Next Generation Sequencing as a new tool for the molecular diagnosis. Using this innovative molecular approach we were able to find pathogenic mutations in 53 out of 64 patients resulting in 82.8 % total detection rate. An interesting result from the analysis of the data is the high rate of novel sequence variations found compared to known mutations and the relevant rate of homozygous mutations. The possibility to analyze a large number of genes associated with various diseases allows to study cases with phenotypes not well-determined, giving the opportunity to make new genotype-phenotype correlation. In some cases there were discrepancies between clinical features and histology or electron microscopy and only molecular analysis allowed to definitively resolve the diagnostic dilemma. The genetic diagnosis of ichthyosis leads to a more accurate and effective genetic counseling, allowing correct evaluation of the risk of recurrence, particularly in families with consanguineous background.

  12. SketchBio: a scientist's 3D interface for molecular modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, Shawn M; Thompson, Peter M; Hahn, Patrick J; Taylor, Russell M

    2014-10-30

    Because of the difficulties involved in learning and using 3D modeling and rendering software, many scientists hire programmers or animators to create models and animations. This both slows the discovery process and provides opportunities for miscommunication. Working with multiple collaborators, a tool was developed (based on a set of design goals) to enable them to directly construct models and animations. SketchBio is presented, a tool that incorporates state-of-the-art bimanual interaction and drop shadows to enable rapid construction of molecular structures and animations. It includes three novel features: crystal-by-example, pose-mode physics, and spring-based layout that accelerate operations common in the formation of molecular models. Design decisions and their consequences are presented, including cases where iterative design was required to produce effective approaches. The design decisions, novel features, and inclusion of state-of-the-art techniques enabled SketchBio to meet all of its design goals. These features and decisions can be incorporated into existing and new tools to improve their effectiveness.

  13. Towards refactoring the Molecular Function Ontology with a UML profile for function modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Patryk; Loebe, Frank; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-10-04

    Gene Ontology (GO) is the largest resource for cataloging gene products. This resource grows steadily and, naturally, this growth raises issues regarding the structure of the ontology. Moreover, modeling and refactoring large ontologies such as GO is generally far from being simple, as a whole as well as when focusing on certain aspects or fragments. It seems that human-friendly graphical modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) could be helpful in connection with these tasks. We investigate the use of UML for making the structural organization of the Molecular Function Ontology (MFO), a sub-ontology of GO, more explicit. More precisely, we present a UML dialect, called the Function Modeling Language (FueL), which is suited for capturing functions in an ontologically founded way. FueL is equipped, among other features, with language elements that arise from studying patterns of subsumption between functions. We show how to use this UML dialect for capturing the structure of molecular functions. Furthermore, we propose and discuss some refactoring options concerning fragments of MFO. FueL enables the systematic, graphical representation of functions and their interrelations, including making information explicit that is currently either implicit in MFO or is mainly captured in textual descriptions. Moreover, the considered subsumption patterns lend themselves to the methodical analysis of refactoring options with respect to MFO. On this basis we argue that the approach can increase the comprehensibility of the structure of MFO for humans and can support communication, for example, during revision and further development.

  14. A New Optimization Model for Computer-Aided Molecular Design Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Cignitti, Stefano; Gani, Rafiqul

    Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) is a method to design molecules with desired properties. That is, through CAMD, it is possible to generate molecules that match a specified set of target properties. CAMD has attracted much attention in recent years due to its ability to design novel as well...... with structure information considered due to the increased size of the mathematical problem and number of alternatives. Thus, decomposition-based approach is proposed to solve the problem. In this approach, only first-order groups are considered in the first step to obtain the building block of the designed...... molecule, then the property model is refined with second-order groups based on the results of the first step. However, this may result in the possibility of an optimal solution being excluded. Samudra and Sahinidis [4] used property relaxation method in the first step to avoid this situation...

  15. Tangible Models and Haptic Representations Aid Learning of Molecular Biology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Kristen; Powers, Jacklyn; Couper, Lisa; Silberglitt, Matt; Davenport, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Can novel 3D models help students develop a deeper understanding of core concepts in molecular biology? We adapted 3D molecular models, developed by scientists, for use in high school science classrooms. The models accurately represent the structural and functional properties of complex DNA and Virus molecules, and provide visual and haptic…

  16. Organic molecular paleohypsometry: A new approach to reconstructing the paleoelevation history of an orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoelevation data is critical to understanding the links and feedbacks between rock-uplift and erosion yet few approaches have proved successful in quantifying changes in paleoelevation rapidly eroding, tropical landscapes. In addition, quantitative methods of reconstructing paleoelevation from marine sedimentary archives are lacking. Here we present a new approach to quantifying changes in paleoelevation that is based on the geochemical signature of organic matter exported via the main river networks of an orogen. This new approach builds on fundamentals of stable isotope paleoaltimetry and is akin to the theory behind cosmogenic isotope records of catchment-integrated erosion. Specifically, we utilize predictable patterns of precipitation and organic molecular biomarker stable isotopes to relate the hypsometry of organic matter in a catchment to the geochemical signal in exported organic carbon. We present data from two sites (the cold temperate White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA and the tropical, rapidly eroding landscape of Taiwan) to demonstrate this relationship between exported carbon geochemistry and catchment hypsometry and the validity of this approach.

  17. A Network Biology Approach to Discover the Molecular Biomarker Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, high throughput technologies such as microarray platform have provided a new avenue for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC investigation. Traditionally, gene sets enrichment analysis of survival related genes is commonly used to reveal the underlying functional mechanisms. However, this approach usually produces too many candidate genes and cannot discover detailed signaling transduction cascades, which greatly limits their clinical application such as biomarker development. In this study, we have proposed a network biology approach to discover novel biomarkers from multidimensional omics data. This approach effectively combines clinical survival data with topological characteristics of human protein interaction networks and patients expression profiling data. It can produce novel network based biomarkers together with biological understanding of molecular mechanism. We have analyzed eighty HCC expression profiling arrays and identified that extracellular matrix and programmed cell death are the main themes related to HCC progression. Compared with traditional enrichment analysis, this approach can provide concrete and testable hypothesis on functional mechanism. Furthermore, the identified subnetworks can potentially be used as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in HCC.

  18. Computational and Game-Theoretic Approaches for Modeling Bounded Rationality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Waltman (Ludo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis studies various computational and game-theoretic approaches to economic modeling. Unlike traditional approaches to economic modeling, the approaches studied in this thesis do not rely on the assumption that economic agents behave in a fully rational way. Instead, economic

  19. Medicinal plant phytochemicals and their inhibitory activities against pancreatic lipase: molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Bilal; Ali Ashfaq, Usman; Mirza, Muhammad Usman

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is the worst health risk worldwide, which is linked to a number of diseases. Pancreatic lipase is considered as an affective cause of obesity and can be a major target for controlling the obesity. The present study was designed to find out best phytochemicals against pancreatic lipase through molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. For this purpose, a total of 3770 phytochemicals were docked against pancreatic lipase and ranked them on the basis of binding ...

  20. Membrane re-modelling by BAR domain superfamily proteins via molecular and non-molecular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tamako; Morone, Nobuhiro; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2018-04-17

    Lipid membranes are structural components of cell surfaces and intracellular organelles. Alterations in lipid membrane shape are accompanied by numerous cellular functions, including endocytosis, intracellular transport, and cell migration. Proteins containing Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains (BAR proteins) are unique, because their structures correspond to the membrane curvature, that is, the shape of the lipid membrane. BAR proteins present at high concentration determine the shape of the membrane, because BAR domain oligomers function as scaffolds that mould the membrane. BAR proteins co-operate with various molecular and non-molecular factors. The molecular factors include cytoskeletal proteins such as the regulators of actin filaments and the membrane scission protein dynamin. Lipid composition, including saturated or unsaturated fatty acid tails of phospholipids, also affects the ability of BAR proteins to mould the membrane. Non-molecular factors include the external physical forces applied to the membrane, such as tension and friction. In this mini-review, we will discuss how the BAR proteins orchestrate membrane dynamics together with various molecular and non-molecular factors. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Permeating disciplines: Overcoming barriers between molecular simulations and classical structure-function approaches in biological ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Delemotte, Lucie; Hellmich, Ute A; Rothberg, Brad S

    2018-04-01

    Ion translocation across biological barriers is a fundamental requirement for life. In many cases, controlling this process-for example with neuroactive drugs-demands an understanding of rapid and reversible structural changes in membrane-embedded proteins, including ion channels and transporters. Classical approaches to electrophysiology and structural biology have provided valuable insights into several such proteins over macroscopic, often discontinuous scales of space and time. Integrating these observations into meaningful mechanistic models now relies increasingly on computational methods, particularly molecular dynamics simulations, while surfacing important challenges in data management and conceptual alignment. Here, we seek to provide contemporary context, concrete examples, and a look to the future for bridging disciplinary gaps in biological ion transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of silicon sputtering by argon ions and an approach for comparison with molecular dynamic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, Rene; Frost, Frank; Mayr, Stefan G.; Neumann, Horst; Bundesmann, Carsten [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e.V., Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Ion beam sputter processes deliver some intrinsic features influencing the growing film properties. Utilisation of these features needs to know how primary ion properties and geometrical process conditions influence the energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. Beside complex experiments simulations are helpful to explain the correlation between primary parameters and thin film properties. The paper presents first results of two simulation codes with completely different approaches: Monte Carlo (MC) calculations with help of the well known TRIM.SP code and Molecular Dynamics calculations with an in-house developed code. First results of both simulation principles are compared for Argon ion bombardment on a Silicon target. Furthermore, a special experimental setup is outlined for validation of modelling. The setup allows the variation of ion beam parameters (ion species, ion energy, ion incidence angle on the target) and the measurement of the properties of sputtered and scattered particles.

  3. Discovery of novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MurG: homology modelling, structure based pharmacophore, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shalini; Abdullah, Maaged; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2017-10-17

    MurG (Rv2153c) is a key player in the biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This work is an attempt to highlight the structural and functional relationship of Mtb MurG, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of protein was constructed by homology modelling using Discovery Studio 3.5 software. The quality and consistency of generated model was assessed by PROCHECK, ProSA and ERRAT. Later, the model was optimized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the optimized model complex with substrate Uridine-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UD1) facilitated us to employ structure-based virtual screening approach to obtain new hits from Asinex database using energy-optimized pharmacophore modelling (e-pharmacophore). The pharmacophore model was validated using enrichment calculations, and finally, validated model was employed for high-throughput virtual screening and molecular docking to identify novel Mtb MurG inhibitors. This study led to the identification of 10 potential compounds with good fitness, docking score, which make important interactions with the protein active site. The 25 ns MD simulations of three potential lead compounds with protein confirmed that the structure was stable and make several non-bonding interactions with amino acids, such as Leu290, Met310 and Asn167. Hence, we concluded that the identified compounds may act as new leads for the design of Mtb MurG inhibitors.

  4. A Discrete Monetary Economic Growth Model with the MIU Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an alternative approach to economic growth with money. The production side is the same as the Solow model, the Ramsey model, and the Tobin model. But we deal with behavior of consumers differently from the traditional approaches. The model is influenced by the money-in-the-utility (MIU approach in monetary economics. It provides a mechanism of endogenous saving which the Solow model lacks and avoids the assumption of adding up utility over a period of time upon which the Ramsey approach is based.

  5. Proteomic approach toward molecular backgrounds of drug resistance of osteosarcoma cells in spheroid culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Kubota, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadashi

    2013-08-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the most critical prognostic factors in osteosarcoma, and elucidation of the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance may lead to better clinical outcomes. Spheroid cells resemble in vivo cells and are considered an in vitro model for the drug discovery. We found that spheroid cells displayed more chemoresistance than conventional monolayer cells across 11 osteosarcoma cell lines. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance to chemotherapy, we examined the proteomic differences between the monolayer and spheroid cells by 2D-DIGE. Of the 4762 protein species observed, we further investigated 435 species with annotated mass spectra in the public proteome database, Genome Medicine Database of Japan Proteomics. Among the 435 protein species, we found that 17 species exhibited expression level differences when the cells formed spheroids in more than five cell lines and four species out of these 17 were associated with spheroid-formation associated resistance to doxorubicin. We confirmed the upregulation of cathepsin D in spheroid cells by western blotting. Cathepsin D has been implicated in chemoresistance of various malignancies but has not previously been implemented in osteosarcoma. Our study suggested that the spheroid system may be a useful tool to reveal the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Molecular fingerprinting of principal neurons in the rodent hippocampus: A neuroinformatics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D J; White, C M; Rees, C L; Wheeler, D W; Ascoli, G A

    2017-09-10

    Neurons are often classified by their morphological and molecular properties. The online knowledge base Hippocampome.org primarily defines neuron types from the rodent hippocampal formation based on their main neurotransmitter (glutamate or GABA) and the spatial distributions of their axons and dendrites. For each neuron type, this open-access resource reports any and all published information regarding the presence or absence of known molecular markers, including calcium-binding proteins, neuropeptides, receptors, channels, transcription factors, and other molecules of biomedical relevance. The resulting chemical profile is relatively sparse: even for the best studied neuron types, the expression or lack thereof of fewer than 70 molecules has been firmly established to date. The mouse genome-wide in situ hybridization mapping of the Allen Brain Atlas provides a wealth of data that, when appropriately analyzed, can substantially augment the molecular marker knowledge in Hippocampome.org. Here we focus on the principal cell layers of dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, CA2, and CA1, which together contain approximately 90% of hippocampal neurons. These four anatomical parcels are densely packed with somata of mostly excitatory projection neurons. Thus, gene expression data for those layers can be justifiably linked to the respective principal neuron types: granule cells in DG and pyramidal cells in CA3, CA2, and CA1. In order to enable consistent interpretation across genes and regions, we screened the whole-genome dataset against known molecular markers of those neuron types. The resulting threshold values allow over 6000 very-high confidence (>99.5%) expressed/not-expressed assignments, expanding the biochemical information content of Hippocampome.org more than five-fold. Many of these newly identified molecular markers are potential pharmacological targets for major neurological and psychiatric conditions. Furthermore, our approach yields reasonable expression

  7. Integrating molecular diagnostics into histopathology training: the Belfast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, C; James, J; Maxwell, P; McQuaid, S; Ervine, A; Catherwood, M; Loughrey, M B; McGibben, D; Somerville, J; McManus, D T; Gray, M; Herron, B; Salto-Tellez, M

    2014-07-01

    Molecular medicine is transforming modern clinical practice, from diagnostics to therapeutics. Discoveries in research are being incorporated into the clinical setting with increasing rapidity. This transformation is also deeply changing the way we practise pathology. The great advances in cell and molecular biology which have accelerated our understanding of the pathogenesis of solid tumours have been embraced with variable degrees of enthusiasm by diverse medical professional specialties. While histopathologists have not been prompt to adopt molecular diagnostics to date, the need to incorporate molecular pathology into the training of future histopathologists is imperative. Our goal is to create, within an existing 5-year histopathology training curriculum, the structure for formal substantial teaching of molecular diagnostics. This specialist training has two main goals: (1) to equip future practising histopathologists with basic knowledge of molecular diagnostics and (2) to create the option for those interested in a subspecialty experience in tissue molecular diagnostics to pursue this training. It is our belief that this training will help to maintain in future the role of the pathologist at the centre of patient care as the integrator of clinical, morphological and molecular information. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Diffusion in Liquids : Equilibrium Molecular Simulations and Predictive Engineering Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study multicomponent diffusion in liquids using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Diffusion plays an important role in mass transport processes. In binary systems, mass transfer processes have been studied extensively using both experiments and molecular simulations.

  9. QSAR models based on quantum topological molecular similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelier, P L A; Smith, P J

    2006-07-01

    A new method called quantum topological molecular similarity (QTMS) was fairly recently proposed [J. Chem. Inf. Comp. Sc., 41, 2001, 764] to construct a variety of medicinal, ecological and physical organic QSAR/QSPRs. QTMS method uses quantum chemical topology (QCT) to define electronic descriptors drawn from modern ab initio wave functions of geometry-optimised molecules. It was shown that the current abundance of computing power can be utilised to inject realistic descriptors into QSAR/QSPRs. In this article we study seven datasets of medicinal interest : the dissociation constants (pK(a)) for a set of substituted imidazolines , the pK(a) of imidazoles , the ability of a set of indole derivatives to displace [(3)H] flunitrazepam from binding to bovine cortical membranes , the influenza inhibition constants for a set of benzimidazoles , the interaction constants for a set of amides and the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase , the natriuretic activity of sulphonamide carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the toxicity of a series of benzyl alcohols. A partial least square analysis in conjunction with a genetic algorithm delivered excellent models. They are also able to highlight the active site, of the ligand or the molecule whose structure determines the activity. The advantages and limitations of QTMS are discussed.

  10. Mathematical Modelling Approach in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseven, Ayla

    2015-01-01

    The topic of models and modeling has come to be important for science and mathematics education in recent years. The topic of "Modeling" topic is especially important for examinations such as PISA which is conducted at an international level and measures a student's success in mathematics. Mathematical modeling can be defined as using…

  11. Facilitating Students' Interaction with Real Gas Properties Using a Discovery-Based Approach and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Chelsea; Akinfenwa, Oyewumi; Foley, Jonathan J., IV

    2018-01-01

    We present an interactive discovery-based approach to studying the properties of real gases using simple, yet realistic, molecular dynamics software. Use of this approach opens up a variety of opportunities for students to interact with the behaviors and underlying theories of real gases. Students can visualize gas behavior under a variety of…

  12. A Multivariate Approach to Functional Neuro Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Niels J.S.

    1998-01-01

    by the application of linear and more flexible, nonlinear microscopic regression models to a real-world dataset. The dependency of model performance, as quantified by generalization error, on model flexibility and training set size is demonstrated, leading to the important realization that no uniformly optimal model......, provides the basis for a generalization theoretical framework relating model performance to model complexity and dataset size. Briefly summarized the major topics discussed in the thesis include: - An introduction of the representation of functional datasets by pairs of neuronal activity patterns...... exists. - Model visualization and interpretation techniques. The simplicity of this task for linear models contrasts the difficulties involved when dealing with nonlinear models. Finally, a visualization technique for nonlinear models is proposed. A single observation emerges from the thesis...

  13. The threshold bootstrap clustering: a new approach to find families or transmission clusters within molecular quasispecies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia C F Prosperi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic methods produce hierarchies of molecular species, inferring knowledge about taxonomy and evolution. However, there is not yet a consensus methodology that provides a crisp partition of taxa, desirable when considering the problem of intra/inter-patient quasispecies classification or infection transmission event identification. We introduce the threshold bootstrap clustering (TBC, a new methodology for partitioning molecular sequences, that does not require a phylogenetic tree estimation.The TBC is an incremental partition algorithm, inspired by the stochastic Chinese restaurant process, and takes advantage of resampling techniques and models of sequence evolution. TBC uses as input a multiple alignment of molecular sequences and its output is a crisp partition of the taxa into an automatically determined number of clusters. By varying initial conditions, the algorithm can produce different partitions. We describe a procedure that selects a prime partition among a set of candidate ones and calculates a measure of cluster reliability. TBC was successfully tested for the identification of type-1 human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C virus subtypes, and compared with previously established methodologies. It was also evaluated in the problem of HIV-1 intra-patient quasispecies clustering, and for transmission cluster identification, using a set of sequences from patients with known transmission event histories.TBC has been shown to be effective for the subtyping of HIV and HCV, and for identifying intra-patient quasispecies. To some extent, the algorithm was able also to infer clusters corresponding to events of infection transmission. The computational complexity of TBC is quadratic in the number of taxa, lower than other established methods; in addition, TBC has been enhanced with a measure of cluster reliability. The TBC can be useful to characterise molecular quasipecies in a broad context.

  14. The threshold bootstrap clustering: a new approach to find families or transmission clusters within molecular quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Bracciale, Laura; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Cauda, Roberto; Salemi, Marco

    2010-10-25

    Phylogenetic methods produce hierarchies of molecular species, inferring knowledge about taxonomy and evolution. However, there is not yet a consensus methodology that provides a crisp partition of taxa, desirable when considering the problem of intra/inter-patient quasispecies classification or infection transmission event identification. We introduce the threshold bootstrap clustering (TBC), a new methodology for partitioning molecular sequences, that does not require a phylogenetic tree estimation. The TBC is an incremental partition algorithm, inspired by the stochastic Chinese restaurant process, and takes advantage of resampling techniques and models of sequence evolution. TBC uses as input a multiple alignment of molecular sequences and its output is a crisp partition of the taxa into an automatically determined number of clusters. By varying initial conditions, the algorithm can produce different partitions. We describe a procedure that selects a prime partition among a set of candidate ones and calculates a measure of cluster reliability. TBC was successfully tested for the identification of type-1 human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C virus subtypes, and compared with previously established methodologies. It was also evaluated in the problem of HIV-1 intra-patient quasispecies clustering, and for transmission cluster identification, using a set of sequences from patients with known transmission event histories. TBC has been shown to be effective for the subtyping of HIV and HCV, and for identifying intra-patient quasispecies. To some extent, the algorithm was able also to infer clusters corresponding to events of infection transmission. The computational complexity of TBC is quadratic in the number of taxa, lower than other established methods; in addition, TBC has been enhanced with a measure of cluster reliability. The TBC can be useful to characterise molecular quasipecies in a broad context.

  15. Rival approaches to mathematical modelling in immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Sarah M.; Baker, Christopher T. H.; Bocharov, Gennady A.

    2007-08-01

    In order to formulate quantitatively correct mathematical models of the immune system, one requires an understanding of immune processes and familiarity with a range of mathematical techniques. Selection of an appropriate model requires a number of decisions to be made, including a choice of the modelling objectives, strategies and techniques and the types of model considered as candidate models. The authors adopt a multidisciplinary perspective.

  16. Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

  17. Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Hay, Benjamin; DePaoli, David W.

    2009-01-01

    A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

  18. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  19. A hybrid agent-based approach for modeling microbiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zaiyi; Sloot, Peter M A; Tay, Joc Cing

    2008-11-21

    Models for systems biology commonly adopt Differential Equations or Agent-Based modeling approaches for simulating the processes as a whole. Models based on differential equations presuppose phenomenological intracellular behavioral mechanisms, while models based on Multi-Agent approach often use directly translated, and quantitatively less precise if-then logical rule constructs. We propose an extendible systems model based on a hybrid agent-based approach where biological cells are modeled as individuals (agents) while molecules are represented by quantities. This hybridization in entity representation entails a combined modeling strategy with agent-based behavioral rules and differential equations, thereby balancing the requirements of extendible model granularity with computational tractability. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach with models of chemotaxis involving an assay of 10(3) cells and 1.2x10(6) molecules. The model produces cell migration patterns that are comparable to laboratory observations.

  20. Modern classification of neoplasms: reconciling differences between morphologic and molecular approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Jules

    2005-01-01

    For over 150 years, pathologists have relied on histomorphology to classify and diagnose neoplasms. Their success has been stunning, permitting the accurate diagnosis of thousands of different types of neoplasms using only a microscope and a trained eye. In the past two decades, cancer genomics has challenged the supremacy of histomorphology by identifying genetic alterations shared by morphologically diverse tumors and by finding genetic features that distinguish subgroups of morphologically homogeneous tumors. The Developmental Lineage Classification and Taxonomy of Neoplasms groups neoplasms by their embryologic origin. The putative value of this classification is based on the expectation that tumors of a common developmental lineage will share common metabolic pathways and common responses to drugs that target these pathways. The purpose of this manuscript is to show that grouping tumors according to their developmental lineage can reconcile certain fundamental discrepancies resulting from morphologic and molecular approaches to neoplasm classification. In this study, six issues in tumor classification are described that exemplify the growing rift between morphologic and molecular approaches to tumor classification: 1) the morphologic separation between epithelial and non-epithelial tumors; 2) the grouping of tumors based on shared cellular functions; 3) the distinction between germ cell tumors and pluripotent tumors of non-germ cell origin; 4) the distinction between tumors that have lost their differentiation and tumors that arise from uncommitted stem cells; 5) the molecular properties shared by morphologically disparate tumors that have a common developmental lineage, and 6) the problem of re-classifying morphologically identical but clinically distinct subsets of tumors. The discussion of these issues in the context of describing different methods of tumor classification is intended to underscore the clinical value of a robust tumor classification. A

  1. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of PPTA Crystals in Aramid Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, Brian Scott [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    In this work, molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the mechanical properties of PPTA crystallites, which are the fundamental microstructural building blocks of polymer aramid bers such as Kevlar. Particular focus is given to constant strain rate axial loading simulations of PPTA crystallites, which is motivated by the rate-dependent mechanical properties observed in some experiments with aramid bers. In order to accommodate the covalent bond rupture that occurs in loading a crystallite to failure, the reactive bond order force eld ReaxFF is employed to conduct the simulations. Two major topics are addressed: The rst is the general behavior of PPTA crystallites under strain rate loading. Constant strain rate loading simulations of crystalline PPTA reveal that the crystal failure strain increases with increasing strain rate, while the modulus is not a ected by the strain rate. Increasing temperature lowers both the modulus and the failure strain. The simulations also identify the C N bond connecting the aromatic rings as weakest primary bond along the backbone of the PPTA chain. The e ect of chain-end defects on PPTA micromechanics is explored, and it is found that the presence of a chain-end defect transfers load to the adjacent chains in the hydrogen-bonded sheet in which the defect resides, but does not in uence the behavior of any other chains in the crystal. Chain-end defects are found to lower the strength of the crystal when clustered together, inducing bond failure via stress concentrations arising from the load transfer to bonds in adjacent chains near the defect site. The second topic addressed is the nature of primary and secondary bond failure in crystalline PPTA. Failure of both types of bonds is found to be stochastic in nature and driven by thermal uctuations of the bonds within the crystal. A model is proposed which uses reliability theory to model bonds under constant strain rate loading as components with time-dependent failure rate

  2. A comparison of machine learning and Bayesian modelling for molecular serotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2017-08-11

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen that is a major cause of infant mortality. Identifying the pneumococcal serotype is an important step in monitoring the impact of vaccines used to protect against disease. Genomic microarrays provide an effective method for molecular serotyping. Previously we developed an empirical Bayesian model for the classification of serotypes from a molecular serotyping array. With only few samples available, a model driven approach was the only option. In the meanwhile, several thousand samples have been made available to us, providing an opportunity to investigate serotype classification by machine learning methods, which could complement the Bayesian model. We compare the performance of the original Bayesian model with two machine learning algorithms: Gradient Boosting Machines and Random Forests. We present our results as an example of a generic strategy whereby a preliminary probabilistic model is complemented or replaced by a machine learning classifier once enough data are available. Despite the availability of thousands of serotyping arrays, a problem encountered when applying machine learning methods is the lack of training data containing mixtures of serotypes; due to the large number of possible combinations. Most of the available training data comprises samples with only a single serotype. To overcome the lack of training data we implemented an iterative analysis, creating artificial training data of serotype mixtures by combining raw data from single serotype arrays. With the enhanced training set the machine learning algorithms out perform the original Bayesian model. However, for serotypes currently lacking sufficient training data the best performing implementation was a combination of the results of the Bayesian Model and the Gradient Boosting Machine. As well as being an effective method for classifying biological data, machine learning can also be used as an efficient method for revealing subtle biological

  3. Microbial production of polyhydroxybutyrate with tailor-made properties: an integrated modelling approach and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penloglou, Giannis; Chatzidoukas, Christos; Kiparissides, Costas

    2012-01-01

    The microbial production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a complex process in which the final quantity and quality of the PHB depend on a large number of process operating variables. Consequently, the design and optimal dynamic operation of a microbial process for the efficient production of PHB with tailor-made molecular properties is an extremely interesting problem. The present study investigates how key process operating variables (i.e., nutritional and aeration conditions) affect the biomass production rate and the PHB accumulation in the cells and its associated molecular weight distribution. A combined metabolic/polymerization/macroscopic modelling approach, relating the process performance and product quality with the process variables, was developed and validated using an extensive series of experiments and measurements. The model predicts the dynamic evolution of the biomass growth, the polymer accumulation, the consumption of carbon and nitrogen sources and the average molecular weights of the PHB in a bioreactor, under batch and fed-batch operating conditions. The proposed integrated model was used for the model-based optimization of the production of PHB with tailor-made molecular properties in Azohydromonas lata bacteria. The process optimization led to a high intracellular PHB accumulation (up to 95% g of PHB per g of DCW) and the production of different grades (i.e., different molecular weight distributions) of PHB. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. WE-DE-202-03: Modeling of Biological Processes - What Happens After Early Molecular Damage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  5. WE-DE-202-03: Modeling of Biological Processes - What Happens After Early Molecular Damage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  6. Thermochemical sulfate reduction in deep petroleum reservoirs: a molecular approach; Thermoreduction des sulfates dans les reservoirs petroliers: approche moleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanin, S.

    2002-11-01

    The thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) is a set of chemical reactions leading to hydrocarbon oxidation and production of carbon dioxide and sour gas (H{sub 2}S) which is observed in deep petroleum reservoirs enriched in anhydrites (calcium sulfate). Molecular and isotopic studies have been conducted on several crude oil samples to determine which types of compounds could have been produced during TSR. Actually, we have shown that the main molecules formed by TSR were organo-sulfur compounds. Indeed, sulfur isotopic measurements. of alkyl-di-benzothiophenes, di-aryl-disulfides and thia-diamondoids (identified by NMR or synthesis of standards) shows that they are formed during TSR as their value approach that of the sulfur of the anhydrite. Moreover, thia-diamondoids are apparently exclusively formed during this phenomenon and can thus be considered as true molecular markers of TSR. In a second part, we have investigated with laboratory experiments the formation mechanism of the molecules produced during TSR. A first model has shown that sulfur incorporation into the organic matter occurred with mineral sulfur species of low oxidation degree. The use of {sup 34}S allowed to show that the sulfates reduction occurred during these simulations. At least, some experiments on polycyclic hydrocarbons, sulfurized or not, allowed to establish that thia-diamondoids could be formed by acid-catalysed rearrangements at high temperatures in a similar way as the diamondoids. (author)

  7. Numerical modelling approach for mine backfill

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muhammad Zaka Emad

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... conditions. This paper discusses a numerical modelling strategy for modelling mine backfill material. The .... placed in an ore pass that leads the ore to the ore bin and crusher, from ... 1 year, depending on the mine plan.

  8. Uncertainty in biology a computational modeling approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of biomedical processes is gaining more and more weight in the current research into the etiology of biomedical problems and potential treatment strategies.  Computational modeling allows to reduce, refine and replace animal experimentation as well as to translate findings obtained in these experiments to the human background. However these biomedical problems are inherently complex with a myriad of influencing factors, which strongly complicates the model building and validation process.  This book wants to address four main issues related to the building and validation of computational models of biomedical processes: Modeling establishment under uncertainty Model selection and parameter fitting Sensitivity analysis and model adaptation Model predictions under uncertainty In each of the abovementioned areas, the book discusses a number of key-techniques by means of a general theoretical description followed by one or more practical examples.  This book is intended for graduate stude...

  9. OILMAP: A global approach to spill modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaulding, M.L.; Howlett, E.; Anderson, E.; Jayko, K.

    1992-01-01

    OILMAP is an oil spill model system suitable for use in both rapid response mode and long-range contingency planning. It was developed for a personal computer and employs full-color graphics to enter data, set up spill scenarios, and view model predictions. The major components of OILMAP include environmental data entry and viewing capabilities, the oil spill models, and model prediction display capabilities. Graphic routines are provided for entering wind data, currents, and any type of geographically referenced data. Several modes of the spill model are available. The surface trajectory mode is intended for quick spill response. The weathering model includes the spreading, evaporation, entrainment, emulsification, and shoreline interaction of oil. The stochastic and receptor models simulate a large number of trajectories from a single site for generating probability statistics. Each model and the algorithms they use are described. Several additional capabilities are planned for OILMAP, including simulation of tactical spill response and subsurface oil transport. 8 refs

  10. Generalized Langevin equation: An efficient approach to nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of open systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2014-04-01

    The generalized Langevin equation (GLE) has been recently suggested to simulate the time evolution of classical solid and molecular systems when considering general nonequilibrium processes. In this approach, a part of the whole system (an open system), which interacts and exchanges energy with its dissipative environment, is studied. Because the GLE is derived by projecting out exactly the harmonic environment, the coupling to it is realistic, while the equations of motion are non-Markovian. Although the GLE formalism has already found promising applications, e.g., in nanotribology and as a powerful thermostat for equilibration in classical molecular dynamics simulations, efficient algorithms to solve the GLE for realistic memory kernels are highly nontrivial, especially if the memory kernels decay nonexponentially. This is due to the fact that one has to generate a colored noise and take account of the memory effects in a consistent manner. In this paper, we present a simple, yet efficient, algorithm for solving the GLE for practical memory kernels and we demonstrate its capability for the exactly solvable case of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a Debye bath.

  11. Field theoretic approach to dynamical orbital localization in ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jordan W.; Iftimie, Radu; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques from gauge-field theory are employed to derive an alternative formulation of the Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular-dynamics method that allows maximally localized Wannier orbitals to be generated dynamically as the calculation proceeds. In particular, the Car-Parrinello Lagrangian is mapped onto an SU(n) non-Abelian gauge-field theory and the fictitious kinetic energy in the Car-Parrinello Lagrangian is modified to yield a fully gauge-invariant form. The Dirac gauge-fixing method is then employed to derive a set of equations of motion that automatically maintain orbital locality by restricting the orbitals to remain in the 'Wannier gauge'. An approximate algorithm for integrating the equations of motion that is stable and maintains orbital locality is then developed based on the exact equations of motion. It is shown in a realistic application (64 water molecules plus one hydrogen-chloride molecule in a periodic box) that orbital locality can be maintained with only a modest increase in CPU time. The ability to keep orbitals localized in an ab initio molecular-dynamics calculation is a crucial ingredient in the development of emerging linear scaling approaches

  12. Relaxed memory models: an operational approach

    OpenAIRE

    Boudol , Gérard; Petri , Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Memory models define an interface between programs written in some language and their implementation, determining which behaviour the memory (and thus a program) is allowed to have in a given model. A minimal guarantee memory models should provide to the programmer is that well-synchronized, that is, data-race free code has a standard semantics. Traditionally, memory models are defined axiomatically, setting constraints on the order in which memory operations are allow...

  13. Modeling composting kinetics: A review of approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Composting kinetics modeling is necessary to design and operate composting facilities that comply with strict market demands and tight environmental legislation. Current composting kinetics modeling can be characterized as inductive, i.e. the data are the starting point of the modeling process and

  14. Conformally invariant models: A new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, E.S.; Palchik, M.Ya.; Zaikin, V.N.

    1996-02-01

    A pair of mathematical models of quantum field theory in D dimensions is analyzed, particularly, a model of a charged scalar field defined by two generations of secondary fields in the space of even dimensions D>=4 and a model of a neutral scalar field defined by two generations of secondary fields in two-dimensional space. 6 refs

  15. Molecular nanomagnets and magnetic nanoparticles: the EMR contribution to a common approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, M; Sorace, L; Barra, A-L; Sangregorio, C; Sessoli, R; Gatteschi, D

    2009-08-21

    The current status and future developments of the use of electron magnetic resonance (EMR) for the investigation of magnetic nano-systems is here reviewed. The aim is to stimulate efforts to provide a unified view of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) comprising a few hundred magnetic centres, and molecular nanomagnets which contain up to ca. one hundred magnetic centres (MNM). The size of the systems is becoming the same but the approaches to the interpretation of their properties are still different, being bottom up for the latter and top down for the former. We make the point here of the need for a common viewpoint, highlighting the status of the two fields and giving some hints for the future developments. EMR has been a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic nano-objects and it can provide a tool of fundamental importance for the development of a unified view.

  16. Stepwise Construction of Heterobimetallic Cages by an Extended Molecular Library Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Matthias; Struch, Niklas; Topić, Filip; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Rissanen, Kari; Lützen, Arne

    2018-04-02

    Two novel heterobimetallic complexes, a trigonal-bipyramidal and a cubic one, have been synthesized and characterized using the same C 3 -symmetric metalloligand, prepared by a simple subcomponent self-assembly strategy. Adopting the molecular library approach, we chose a mononuclear, preorganized iron(II) complex as the metalloligand capable of self-assembly into a trigonal-bipyramidal or a cubic aggregate upon coordination to cis-protected C 2 -symmetric palladium(II) or unprotected tetravalent palladium(II) ions, respectively. The trigonal-bipyramidal complex was characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cubic structure was characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS.

  17. Delimiting invasive Myriophyllum aquaticum in Kashmir Himalaya using a molecular phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M A; Ali, M A; Al-Hemaid, F M; Reshi, Z A

    2014-09-12

    Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc. (family Haloragaceae) is one of the most invasive and destructive South American aquatic plant species and is present in a wide range of geographic regions, including the Kashmir Himalaya. Confusion regarding the taxonomic delimitation of M. aquaticum in the Himalayan region impedes effective and targeted management. Hence, our goal was improve the identification of M. aquaticum for exclusive delimitation from other related species in the study region using a molecular phylogenetic approach. A maximum parsimony tree recovered from phylogenetic analyses of the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA was used to authenticate the identification of M. aquaticum. The results of this study can be used for targeted management of this tropical invader into the temperate Kashmir Himalaya.

  18. Synthesis of Norbornene Derived Helical Copolymer by Simple Molecular Marriage Approach to Produce Smart Nanocarrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Shivshankar R; Sathyan, Ashlin; Shunmugam, Raja

    2017-03-22

    A novel library of norbor