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Sample records for molecular force field

  1. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  2. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges and force field parameters is achieved by comparison against a customizable list of chemical fragments. While initially designed to complement the CHARMM simulation package and force fields by generating the necessary input topology and atom-type data files, MATCH can be expanded to any force field and program, and has core functionality that makes it extendable to other applications such as fragment-based property prediction. In the present work, we demonstrate the accurate construction of atomic parameters of molecules within each force field included in CHARMM36 through exhaustive cross validation studies illustrating that bond increment rules derived from one force field can be transferred to another. In addition, using leave-one-out substitution it is shown that it is also possible to substitute missing intra and intermolecular parameters with ones included in a force field to complete the parameterization of novel molecules. Finally, to demonstrate the robustness of MATCH and the coverage of chemical space offered by the recent CHARMM CGENFF force field (Vanommeslaeghe, et al., JCC., 2010, 31, 671–690), one million molecules from the PubChem database of small molecules are typed, parameterized and minimized. PMID:22042689

  3. Machine learning of accurate energy-conserving molecular force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Stefan; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Sauceda, Huziel E.; Poltavsky, Igor; Schütt, Kristof T.; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2017-01-01

    Using conservation of energy—a fundamental property of closed classical and quantum mechanical systems—we develop an efficient gradient-domain machine learning (GDML) approach to construct accurate molecular force fields using a restricted number of samples from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories. The GDML implementation is able to reproduce global potential energy surfaces of intermediate-sized molecules with an accuracy of 0.3 kcal mol−1 for energies and 1 kcal mol−1 Å̊−1 for atomic forces using only 1000 conformational geometries for training. We demonstrate this accuracy for AIMD trajectories of molecules, including benzene, toluene, naphthalene, ethanol, uracil, and aspirin. The challenge of constructing conservative force fields is accomplished in our work by learning in a Hilbert space of vector-valued functions that obey the law of energy conservation. The GDML approach enables quantitative molecular dynamics simulations for molecules at a fraction of cost of explicit AIMD calculations, thereby allowing the construction of efficient force fields with the accuracy and transferability of high-level ab initio methods. PMID:28508076

  4. Quantum mechanical force fields for condensed phase molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular simulations are powerful tools for providing atomic-level details into complex chemical and physical processes that occur in the condensed phase. For strongly interacting systems where quantum many-body effects are known to play an important role, density-functional methods are often used to provide the model with the potential energy used to drive dynamics. These methods, however, suffer from two major drawbacks. First, they are often too computationally intensive to practically apply to large systems over long time scales, limiting their scope of application. Second, there remain challenges for these models to obtain the necessary level of accuracy for weak non-bonded interactions to obtain quantitative accuracy for a wide range of condensed phase properties. Quantum mechanical force fields (QMFFs) provide a potential solution to both of these limitations. In this review, we address recent advances in the development of QMFFs for condensed phase simulations. In particular, we examine the development of QMFF models using both approximate and ab initio density-functional models, the treatment of short-ranged non-bonded and long-ranged electrostatic interactions, and stability issues in molecular dynamics calculations. Example calculations are provided for crystalline systems, liquid water, and ionic liquids. We conclude with a perspective for emerging challenges and future research directions.

  5. How sensitive are nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of proteins to changes in the force field?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Fan, Hao; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Mark, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular dynamics simulations to variations in the force field has been examined in relation to a set of 36 structures corresponding to 31 proteins simulated by using different versions of the GROMOS force field. The three parameter sets used (43a1, 53a5, and 53a6) differ

  6. The Alexandria library, a quantum-chemical database of molecular properties for force field development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M; van Maaren, Paul J; van der Spoel, David

    2018-04-10

    Data quality as well as library size are crucial issues for force field development. In order to predict molecular properties in a large chemical space, the foundation to build force fields on needs to encompass a large variety of chemical compounds. The tabulated molecular physicochemical properties also need to be accurate. Due to the limited transparency in data used for development of existing force fields it is hard to establish data quality and reusability is low. This paper presents the Alexandria library as an open and freely accessible database of optimized molecular geometries, frequencies, electrostatic moments up to the hexadecupole, electrostatic potential, polarizabilities, and thermochemistry, obtained from quantum chemistry calculations for 2704 compounds. Values are tabulated and where available compared to experimental data. This library can assist systematic development and training of empirical force fields for a broad range of molecules.

  7. The Alexandria library, a quantum-chemical database of molecular properties for force field development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M.; van Maaren, Paul J.; van der Spoel, David

    2018-04-01

    Data quality as well as library size are crucial issues for force field development. In order to predict molecular properties in a large chemical space, the foundation to build force fields on needs to encompass a large variety of chemical compounds. The tabulated molecular physicochemical properties also need to be accurate. Due to the limited transparency in data used for development of existing force fields it is hard to establish data quality and reusability is low. This paper presents the Alexandria library as an open and freely accessible database of optimized molecular geometries, frequencies, electrostatic moments up to the hexadecupole, electrostatic potential, polarizabilities, and thermochemistry, obtained from quantum chemistry calculations for 2704 compounds. Values are tabulated and where available compared to experimental data. This library can assist systematic development and training of empirical force fields for a broad range of molecules.

  8. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    An empirically parameterized intermolecular force field is developed for crystal structure modelling and prediction. The model is optimized for use with an atomic multipole description of electrostatic interactions. We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%

  9. Fixed-Charge Atomistic Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Condensed Phase: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina

    2018-03-26

    In molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, the interactions between the particles (atoms) in the system are described by a so-called force field. The empirical functional form of classical fixed-charge force fields dates back to 1969 and remains essentially unchanged. In a fixed-charge force field, the polarization is not modeled explicitly, i.e. the effective partial charges do not change depending on conformation and environment. This simplification allows, however, a dramatic reduction in computational cost compared to polarizable force fields and in particular quantum-chemical modeling. The past decades have shown that simulations employing carefully parametrized fixed-charge force fields can provide useful insights into biological and chemical questions. This overview focuses on the four major force-field families, i.e. AMBER, CHARMM, GROMOS, and OPLS, which are based on the same classical functional form and are continuously improved to the present day. The overview is aimed at readers entering the field of (bio)molecular simulations. More experienced users may find the comparison and historical development of the force-field families interesting.

  10. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  11. ANLIZE: a molecular mechanics force field visualization tool and its application to 18-crown-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolworthy, L D; Shirts, R B

    1997-03-01

    We describe a software tool that allows one to visualize and analyze the importance of each individual steric interaction in a molecular mechanics force field. ANLIZE is presently implemented for the Dreiding force field for use with the Cerius2 software package, but could be implemented in any molecular mechanics package with a graphical user interface. ANLIZE calculates individual interactions in the force field, sorts them by size, and displays them in several ways from a menu of choices. This allows the user to scan through selected interactions to visualize which interactions are the primary determinants of preferred conformations. The features of ANLIZE are illustrated using 18-crown-6 as an example, and the factors governing conformational preference in 18-crown-6 are demonstrated. Users of molecular mechanics packages are encouraged to demand this functionality from commercial software producers.

  12. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  13. A novel proof of the DFT formula for the interatomic force field of Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morante, S.; Rossi, G.C.

    2017-01-01

    We give a novel and simple proof of the DFT expression for the interatomic force field that drives the motion of atoms in classical Molecular Dynamics, based on the observation that the ground state electronic energy, seen as a functional of the external potential, is the Legendre transform of the Hohenberg–Kohn functional, which in turn is a functional of the electronic density. We show in this way that the so-called Hellmann–Feynman analytical formula, currently used in numerical simulations, actually provides the exact expression of the interatomic force.

  14. A novel proof of the DFT formula for the interatomic force field of Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, S., E-mail: morante@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma, “ Tor Vergata ”, INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Via della Ricerca Scientifica - 00133 Roma (Italy); Rossi, G.C., E-mail: rossig@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma, “ Tor Vergata ”, INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Via della Ricerca Scientifica - 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro Fermi-Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Compendio del Viminale, Piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Rome (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    We give a novel and simple proof of the DFT expression for the interatomic force field that drives the motion of atoms in classical Molecular Dynamics, based on the observation that the ground state electronic energy, seen as a functional of the external potential, is the Legendre transform of the Hohenberg–Kohn functional, which in turn is a functional of the electronic density. We show in this way that the so-called Hellmann–Feynman analytical formula, currently used in numerical simulations, actually provides the exact expression of the interatomic force.

  15. Mapping the Protein Fold Universe Using the CamTube Force Field in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukic, Predrag; Kannan, Arvind; Dijkstra, Maurits J J; Abeln, Sanne; Camilloni, Carlo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently shown that the coarse-graining of the structures of polypeptide chains as self-avoiding tubes can provide an effective representation of the conformational space of proteins. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by such a 'tube model' approach, we present here a strategy to combine it with molecular dynamics simulations. This strategy is based on the incorporation of the 'CamTube' force field into the Gromacs molecular dynamics package. By considering the case of a 60-residue polyvaline chain, we show that CamTube molecular dynamics simulations can comprehensively explore the conformational space of proteins. We obtain this result by a 20 μs metadynamics simulation of the polyvaline chain that recapitulates the currently known protein fold universe. We further show that, if residue-specific interaction potentials are added to the CamTube force field, it is possible to fold a protein into a topology close to that of its native state. These results illustrate how the CamTube force field can be used to explore efficiently the universe of protein folds with good accuracy and very limited computational cost.

  16. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  17. A molecular mechanics (MM3(96)) force field for metal-amide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, B.P.; Clement, O.; Sandrone, G.; Dixon, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A molecular mechanics (MM3(96)) force field is reported for modeling metal complexes of amides in which the amide is coordinated through oxygen. This model uses a points-on-a-sphere approach which involves the parameterization of the Msingle bondO stretch, the Msingle bondO double-bond C bend, and the Msingle bondO double-bond Csingle bondX (X = C, H, N) torsion interactions. Relationships between force field parameters and metal ion properties (charge, ionic radius, and electronegativity) are presented that allow the application of this model to a wide range of metal ions. The model satisfactorily reproduces the structures of over fifty amide complexes with the alkaline earths, transition metals, lanthanides, and actinides

  18. ATK-ForceField: a new generation molecular dynamics software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Hamaekers, Jan; Chill, Samuel T.; Smidstrup, Søren; Bulin, Johannes; Thesen, Ralph; Blom, Anders; Stokbro, Kurt

    2017-12-01

    ATK-ForceField is a software package for atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials. It is implemented as a part of the Atomistix ToolKit (ATK), which is a Python programming environment that makes it easy to create and analyze both standard and highly customized simulations. This paper will focus on the atomic interaction potentials, molecular dynamics, and geometry optimization features of the software, however, many more advanced modeling features are available. The implementation details of these algorithms and their computational performance will be shown. We present three illustrative examples of the types of calculations that are possible with ATK-ForceField: modeling thermal transport properties in a silicon germanium crystal, vapor deposition of selenium molecules on a selenium surface, and a simulation of creep in a copper polycrystal.

  19. Calcium ions in aqueous solutions: Accurate force field description aided by ab initio molecular dynamics and neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinek, Tomas; Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Timr, Štěpán; Mason, Philip E.; Baxová, Katarina; Fischer, Henry E.; Schmidt, Burkhard; Pluhařová, Eva; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2018-06-01

    We present a combination of force field and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations together with neutron scattering experiments with isotopic substitution that aim at characterizing ion hydration and pairing in aqueous calcium chloride and formate/acetate solutions. Benchmarking against neutron scattering data on concentrated solutions together with ion pairing free energy profiles from ab initio molecular dynamics allows us to develop an accurate calcium force field which accounts in a mean-field way for electronic polarization effects via charge rescaling. This refined calcium parameterization is directly usable for standard molecular dynamics simulations of processes involving this key biological signaling ion.

  20. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities

  1. Evaluation of carbohydrate molecular mechanical force fields by quantum mechanical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Madsen, D.E.; Esbensen, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    of the (gg, gt and tg) rotamers of methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside and methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside are (0.13, 0.00, 0.15) and (0.64, 0.00, 0.77) kcal/mol. respectively. The results of the quantum mechanical calculations are compared with the results of calculations using the 20 second...... for monosaccharide carbohydrate benchmark systems. Selected results are: (i) The interaction energy of the alpha-D-alucopyranose-H2O heterodimer is estimated to be 4.9 kcal/mol, using a composite method including terms at highly correlated (CCSD(T)) level. Most molecular mechanics force fields are in error...

  2. An atomistic fingerprint algorithm for learning ab initio molecular force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Zhang, Dongkun; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-01-01

    Molecular fingerprints, i.e., feature vectors describing atomistic neighborhood configurations, is an important abstraction and a key ingredient for data-driven modeling of potential energy surface and interatomic force. In this paper, we present the density-encoded canonically aligned fingerprint algorithm, which is robust and efficient, for fitting per-atom scalar and vector quantities. The fingerprint is essentially a continuous density field formed through the superimposition of smoothing kernels centered on the atoms. Rotational invariance of the fingerprint is achieved by aligning, for each fingerprint instance, the neighboring atoms onto a local canonical coordinate frame computed from a kernel minisum optimization procedure. We show that this approach is superior over principal components analysis-based methods especially when the atomistic neighborhood is sparse and/or contains symmetry. We propose that the "distance" between the density fields be measured using a volume integral of their pointwise difference. This can be efficiently computed using optimal quadrature rules, which only require discrete sampling at a small number of grid points. We also experiment on the choice of weight functions for constructing the density fields and characterize their performance for fitting interatomic potentials. The applicability of the fingerprint is demonstrated through a set of benchmark problems.

  3. Optimized molecular dynamics force fields applied to the helix-coil transition of polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Robert B; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-07-02

    Obtaining the correct balance of secondary structure propensities is a central priority in protein force-field development. Given that current force fields differ significantly in their alpha-helical propensities, a correction to match experimental results would be highly desirable. We have determined simple backbone energy corrections for two force fields to reproduce the fraction of helix measured in short peptides at 300 K. As validation, we show that the optimized force fields produce results in excellent agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for folded proteins and short peptides not used in the optimization. However, despite the agreement at ambient conditions, the dependence of the helix content on temperature is too weak, a problem shared with other force fields. A fit of the Lifson-Roig helix-coil theory shows that both the enthalpy and entropy of helix formation are too small: the helix extension parameter w agrees well with experiment, but its entropic and enthalpic components are both only about half the respective experimental estimates. Our structural and thermodynamic analyses point toward the physical origins of these shortcomings in current force fields, and suggest ways to address them in future force-field development.

  4. Algorithms of GPU-enabled reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mo; Li, Xiaoxia; Guo, Li

    2013-04-01

    Reactive force field (ReaxFF), a recent and novel bond order potential, allows for reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulations for modeling larger and more complex molecular systems involving chemical reactions when compared with computation intensive quantum mechanical methods. However, ReaxFF MD can be approximately 10-50 times slower than classical MD due to its explicit modeling of bond forming and breaking, the dynamic charge equilibration at each time-step, and its one order smaller time-step than the classical MD, all of which pose significant computational challenges in simulation capability to reach spatio-temporal scales of nanometers and nanoseconds. The very recent advances of graphics processing unit (GPU) provide not only highly favorable performance for GPU enabled MD programs compared with CPU implementations but also an opportunity to manage with the computing power and memory demanding nature imposed on computer hardware by ReaxFF MD. In this paper, we present the algorithms of GMD-Reax, the first GPU enabled ReaxFF MD program with significantly improved performance surpassing CPU implementations on desktop workstations. The performance of GMD-Reax has been benchmarked on a PC equipped with a NVIDIA C2050 GPU for coal pyrolysis simulation systems with atoms ranging from 1378 to 27,283. GMD-Reax achieved speedups as high as 12 times faster than Duin et al.'s FORTRAN codes in Lammps on 8 CPU cores and 6 times faster than the Lammps' C codes based on PuReMD in terms of the simulation time per time-step averaged over 100 steps. GMD-Reax could be used as a new and efficient computational tool for exploiting very complex molecular reactions via ReaxFF MD simulation on desktop workstations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  6. Combining an Elastic Network With a Coarse-Grained Molecular Force Field : Structure, Dynamics, and Intermolecular Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Cavalli, Marco; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Ceruso, Marco A.

    Structure-based and physics-based coarse-grained molecular force fields have become attractive approaches to gain mechanistic insight into the function of large biomolecular assemblies. Here, we study how both approaches can be combined into a single representation, that we term ELNEDIN. In this

  7. Recent Progress in Molecular Simulation of Aqueous Electrolytes: Force Fields, Chemical Potentials and Solubility.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Moučka, F.; Smith, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 11 (2016), s. 1665-1690 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Grant - others:NSERC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : force fields * chemical potentials * aqueous electrolytes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.870, year: 2016

  8. Force-field parameters from the SAFT-γ equation of state for use in coarse-grained molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2014-01-01

    A description of fluid systems with molecular-based algebraic equations of state (EoSs) and by direct molecular simulation is common practice in chemical engineering and the physical sciences, but the two approaches are rarely closely coupled. The key for an integrated representation is through a well-defined force field and Hamiltonian at the molecular level. In developing coarse-grained intermolecular potential functions for the fluid state, one typically starts with a detailed, bottom-up quantum-mechanical or atomic-level description and then integrates out the unwanted degrees of freedom using a variety of techniques; an iterative heuristic simulation procedure is then used to refine the parameters of the model. By contrast, with a top-down technique, one can use an accurate EoS to link the macroscopic properties of the fluid and the force-field parameters. We discuss the latest developments in a top-down representation of fluids, with a particular focus on a group-contribution formulation of the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-γ). The accurate SAFT-γ EoS is used to estimate the parameters of the Mie force field, which can then be used with confidence in direct molecular simulations to obtain thermodynamic, structural, interfacial, and dynamical properties that are otherwise inaccessible from the EoS. This is exemplified for several prototypical fluids and mixtures, including carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons, perfluorohydrocarbons, and aqueous surfactants.

  9. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations

  10. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters......, and validate the final force field, Alternatives to force field derivation are discussed briefly....

  11. Performance of extended Lagrangian schemes for molecular dynamics simulations with classical polarizable force fields and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Valerio; Dziedzic, Jacek; Albaugh, Alex; Niklasson, Anders M N; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2017-03-28

    Iterative energy minimization with the aim of achieving self-consistency is a common feature of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) and classical molecular dynamics with polarizable force fields. In the former, the electronic degrees of freedom are optimized, while the latter often involves an iterative determination of induced point dipoles. The computational effort of the self-consistency procedure can be reduced by re-using converged solutions from previous time steps. However, this must be done carefully, as not to break time-reversal symmetry, which negatively impacts energy conservation. Self-consistent schemes based on the extended Lagrangian formalism, where the initial guesses for the optimized quantities are treated as auxiliary degrees of freedom, constitute one elegant solution. We report on the performance of two integration schemes with the same underlying extended Lagrangian structure, which we both employ in two radically distinct regimes-in classical molecular dynamics simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and in BOMD simulations with the Onetep linear-scaling density functional theory (LS-DFT) approach. Both integration schemes are found to offer significant improvements over the standard (unpropagated) molecular dynamics formulation in both the classical and LS-DFT regimes.

  12. Communication: Calculation of interatomic forces and optimization of molecular geometry with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Mario; Zhang, Shiwei

    2018-05-01

    We propose an algorithm for accurate, systematic, and scalable computation of interatomic forces within the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method. The algorithm relies on the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and incorporates Pulay corrections in the presence of atomic orbital basis sets. We benchmark the method for small molecules by comparing the computed forces with the derivatives of the AFQMC potential energy surface and by direct comparison with other quantum chemistry methods. We then perform geometry optimizations using the steepest descent algorithm in larger molecules. With realistic basis sets, we obtain equilibrium geometries in agreement, within statistical error bars, with experimental values. The increase in computational cost for computing forces in this approach is only a small prefactor over that of calculating the total energy. This paves the way for a general and efficient approach for geometry optimization and molecular dynamics within AFQMC.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M., E-mail: chris.macdermaid@temple.edu; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.fiorin@temple.edu [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Temple University, 1925 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122-1801 (United States); Kashyap, Hemant K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); DeVane, Russell H. [Modeling and Simulation, Corporate Research and Development, The Procter and Gamble Company, West Chester, Ohio 45069 (United States); Shinoda, Wataru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Klauda, Jeffery B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  14. Data for molecular dynamics simulations of B-type cytochrome c oxidase with the Amber force field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhua Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO is a vital enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and pumps protons across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. This article presents parameters for the cofactors of ba3-type CcO that are compatible with the all-atom Amber ff12SB and ff14SB force fields. Specifically, parameters were developed for the CuA pair, heme b, and the dinuclear center that consists of heme a3 and CuB bridged by a hydroperoxo group. The data includes geometries in XYZ coordinate format for cluster models that were employed to compute proton transfer energies and derive bond parameters and point charges for the force field using density functional theory. Also included are the final parameter files that can be employed with the Amber leap program to generate input files for molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber software package. Based on the high resolution (1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of the ba3-type CcO from Thermus thermophilus (Protein Data Bank ID number PDB: 3S8F, we built a model that is embedded in a POPC lipid bilayer membrane and solvated with TIP3P water molecules and counterions. We provide PDB data files of the initial model and the equilibrated model that can be used for further studies.

  15. The Martini Coarse-Grained Force Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, X.; Marrink, S.J.; Monticelli, Luca; Salonen, Emppu

    2013-01-01

    The Martini force field is a coarse-grained force field suited for molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular systems. The force field has been parameterized in a systematic way, based on the reproduction of partitioning free energies between polar and apolar phases of a large number of chemical

  16. Identification of the cognate peptide-MHC target of T cell receptors using molecular modeling and force field scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanzarotti, Esteban; Marcatili, Paolo; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Interactions of T cell receptors (TCR) to peptides in complex with MHC (p:MHC) are key features that mediate cellular immune responses. While MHC binding is required for a peptide to be presented to T cells, not all MHC binders are immunogenic. The interaction of a TCR to the p:MHC complex holds...... terms. Building a benchmark of TCR:p:MHC complexes where epitopes and non-epitopes are modelled using state-of-the-art molecular modelling tools, scoring p:MHC to a given TCR using force-fields, optimized in a cross-validation setup to evaluate TCR inter atomic interactions involved with each p:MHC, we...... and model the TCR:p:MHC complex structure. In summary, we conclude that it is possible to identify the TCR cognate target among different candidate peptides by using a force-field based model, and believe this works could lay the foundation for future work within prediction of TCR:p:MHC interactions....

  17. An Estimation of Hybrid Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanical Polarization Energies for Small Molecules Using Polarizable Force-Field Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Mei, Ye; König, Gerhard; Simmonett, Andrew C; Pickard, Frank C; Wu, Qin; Wang, Lee-Ping; MacKerell, Alexander D; Brooks, Bernard R; Shao, Yihan

    2017-02-14

    In this work, we report two polarizable molecular mechanics (polMM) force field models for estimating the polarization energy in hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. These two models, named the potential of atomic charges (PAC) and potential of atomic dipoles (PAD), are formulated from the ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) response kernels for the prediction of the QM density response to an external molecular mechanical (MM) environment (as described by external point charges). The PAC model is similar to fluctuating charge (FQ) models because the energy depends on external electrostatic potential values at QM atomic sites; the PAD energy depends on external electrostatic field values at QM atomic sites, resembling induced dipole (ID) models. To demonstrate their uses, we apply the PAC and PAD models to 12 small molecules, which are solvated by TIP3P water. The PAC model reproduces the QM/MM polarization energy with a R 2 value of 0.71 for aniline (in 10,000 TIP3P water configurations) and 0.87 or higher for other 11 solute molecules, while the PAD model has a much better performance with R 2 values of 0.98 or higher. The PAC model reproduces reference QM/MM hydration free energies for 12 solute molecules with a RMSD of 0.59 kcal/mol. The PAD model is even more accurate, with a much smaller RMSD of 0.12 kcal/mol, with respect to the reference. This suggests that polarization effects, including both local charge distortion and intramolecular charge transfer, can be well captured by induced dipole type models with proper parametrization.

  18. Molecular Modeling of Energetic Materials: The Parameterization and Validation of Nitrate Esters in the COMPASS Force Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunte, Steven

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the mechanical and other condensed phase properties of energetic materials using atomistic simulation techniques, the COMPASS force field has been expanded to include high-energy nitro functional groups...

  19. raaSAFT: A framework enabling coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on the SAFT- γ Mie force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervik, Åsmund; Serratos, Guadalupe Jiménez; Müller, Erich A.

    2017-03-01

    We describe here raaSAFT, a Python code that enables the setup and running of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in a systematic and efficient manner. The code is built on top of the popular HOOMD-blue code, and as such harnesses the computational power of GPUs. The methodology makes use of the SAFT- γ Mie force field, so the resulting coarse grained pair potentials are both closely linked to and consistent with the macroscopic thermodynamic properties of the simulated fluid. In raaSAFT both homonuclear and heteronuclear models are implemented for a wide range of compounds spanning from linear alkanes, to more complicated fluids such as water and alcohols, all the way up to nonionic surfactants and models of asphaltenes and resins. Adding new compounds as well as new features is made straightforward by the modularity of the code. To demonstrate the ease-of-use of raaSAFT, we give a detailed walkthrough of how to simulate liquid-liquid equilibrium of a hydrocarbon with water. We describe in detail how both homonuclear and heteronuclear compounds are implemented. To demonstrate the performance and versatility of raaSAFT, we simulate a large polymer-solvent mixture with 300 polystyrene molecules dissolved in 42 700 molecules of heptane, reproducing the experimentally observed temperature-dependent solubility of polystyrene. For this case we obtain a speedup of more than three orders of magnitude as compared to atomistically-detailed simulations.

  20. A molecular dynamic simulation study of mechanical properties of graphene–polythiophene composite with Reax force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayebi, Payman; Zaminpayma, Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we performed molecular dynamic simulations by Reax force field to study the mechanical properties of graphene–polythiophene nanocomposite. By computing elastic constant, breaking stress, breaking strain and Young's modulus from the stress–strain curve for the nanocomposites, we investigated effects of tension orientation, graphene loading to the polymer, temperature of nanocomposite and defect of graphene on these mechanical characters. It is found that mechanical characters of tension along the zigzag orientation are higher than other directions. Also, by increasing the weight concentration of graphene in composite, the Young's modulus and breaking strain increase. Our results showed that the Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature. Finally by applying defect on graphene structure, we found that one atom missing defect has lower Young's modulus. Also, by increasing the defects concentration, elastic modulus decreases gradually. - Highlights: • We studied mechanical properties of graphene–polythiophene nanocomposite. • Mechanical characters of tension along the zigzag are higher than other directions. • By increasing the weight concentration of graphene in composite, the Young's modulus increases. • Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature. • By increasing the defects concentration, elastic modulus decreases gradually.

  1. Geometric Energy Derivatives at the Complete Basis Set Limit: Application to the Equilibrium Structure and Molecular Force Field of Formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W James; Matthews, Devin A; Ringholm, Magnus; Agarwal, Jay; Gong, Justin Z; Ruud, Kenneth; Allen, Wesley D; Stanton, John F; Schaefer, Henry F

    2018-03-13

    Geometric energy derivatives which rely on core-corrected focal-point energies extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit of coupled cluster theory with iterative and noniterative quadruple excitations, CCSDTQ and CCSDT(Q), are used as elements of molecular gradients and, in the case of CCSDT(Q), expansion coefficients of an anharmonic force field. These gradients are used to determine the CCSDTQ/CBS and CCSDT(Q)/CBS equilibrium structure of the S 0 ground state of H 2 CO where excellent agreement is observed with previous work and experimentally derived results. A fourth-order expansion about this CCSDT(Q)/CBS reference geometry using the same level of theory produces an exceptional level of agreement to spectroscopically observed vibrational band origins with a MAE of 0.57 cm -1 . Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) and variational discrete variable representation (DVR) results are contrasted and discussed. Vibration-rotation, anharmonicity, and centrifugal distortion constants from the VPT2 analysis are reported and compared to previous work. Additionally, an initial application of a sum-over-states fourth-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT4) formalism is employed herein, utilizing quintic and sextic derivatives obtained with a recursive algorithmic approach for response theory.

  2. Molecular Force Spectroscopy on Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  3. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in...

  4. Effects of force fields on the conformational and dynamic properties of amyloid β(1-40) dimer explored by replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Charles R; Gregory, Andrew; Frisbie, Cole; Lovas, Sándor

    2018-03-01

    The conformational space and structural ensembles of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides and their oligomers in solution are inherently disordered and proven to be challenging to study. Optimum force field selection for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the biophysical relevance of results are still unknown. We compared the conformational space of the Aβ(1-40) dimers by 300 ns replica exchange MD simulations at physiological temperature (310 K) using: the AMBER-ff99sb-ILDN, AMBER-ff99sb*-ILDN, AMBER-ff99sb-NMR, and CHARMM22* force fields. Statistical comparisons of simulation results to experimental data and previously published simulations utilizing the CHARMM22* and CHARMM36 force fields were performed. All force fields yield sampled ensembles of conformations with collision cross sectional areas for the dimer that are statistically significantly larger than experimental results. All force fields, with the exception of AMBER-ff99sb-ILDN (8.8 ± 6.4%) and CHARMM36 (2.7 ± 4.2%), tend to overestimate the α-helical content compared to experimental CD (5.3 ± 5.2%). Using the AMBER-ff99sb-NMR force field resulted in the greatest degree of variance (41.3 ± 12.9%). Except for the AMBER-ff99sb-NMR force field, the others tended to under estimate the expected amount of β-sheet and over estimate the amount of turn/bend/random coil conformations. All force fields, with the exception AMBER-ff99sb-NMR, reproduce a theoretically expected β-sheet-turn-β-sheet conformational motif, however, only the CHARMM22* and CHARMM36 force fields yield results compatible with collapse of the central and C-terminal hydrophobic cores from residues 17-21 and 30-36. Although analyses of essential subspace sampling showed only minor variations between force fields, secondary structures of lowest energy conformers are different. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Optical Bichromatic Force in Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Leland; Galica, Scott; Eyler, E. E.

    2015-05-01

    The optical bichromatic force has been demonstrated to be useful for slowing atomic beams much more rapidly than radiative forces. Through numerical simulations, we examine several aspects of applying the bichromatic force to molecular beams. One is the unavoidable existence of out-of-system radiative decay, requiring one or more repumping beams. We find that the average deceleration varies strongly with the repumping intensity, but when using optimal parameters, the force approaches the limiting value allowed by population statistics. Another consideration is the effect of fine and hyperfine structure. We examine a simplified multlevel model based on the B X transition in calcium monofluoride. To circumvent optical pumping into coherent dark states, we include two possible schemes: (1) a skewed dc magnetic field, and (2) rapid optical polarization switching. Our results indicate that the bichromatic force remains a viable option for creating large forces in molecular beams, with a reduction in the peak force by approximately an order of magnitude compared to a two-level atom, but little effect on the velocity range over which the force is effective. We also describe our progress towards experimental tests of the bichromatic force on a molecular beam of CaF. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Hydration and Ion Pairing in Aqueous Mg2+ and Zn2+ Solutions: Force-Field Description Aided by Neutron Scattering Experiments and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Mason, Philip E; Fischer, Henry E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2018-04-05

    Magnesium and zinc dications possess the same charge and have an almost identical size, yet they behave very differently in aqueous solutions and play distinct biological roles. It is thus crucial to identify the origins of such different behaviors and to assess to what extent they can be captured by force-field molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we combine neutron scattering experiments in a specific mixture of H 2 O and D 2 O (the so-called null water) with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to probe the difference in the hydration structure and ion-pairing properties of chloride solutions of the two cations. The obtained data are used as a benchmark to develop a scaled-charge force field for Mg 2+ that includes electronic polarization in a mean field way. We show that using this electronic continuum correction we can describe aqueous magnesium chloride solutions well. However, in aqueous zinc chloride specific interaction terms between the ions need to be introduced to capture ion pairing quantitatively.

  7. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of single wall carbon nanotubes by a modified molecular structural mechanics model incorporating an advanced chemical force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) keep attracting the attention of researchers from different fields. CNTs are promising candidates for applications e.g. in lightweight construction but also in electronics, medicine and many more. The basis for the realization of the manifold applications is a detailed knowledge of the material properties of the carbon nanotubes. In particular for applications in lightweight constructions or in composites, the knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the CNTs is of vital interest. Hence, a lot of effort is put into the experimental and theoretical determination of the mechanical material properties of CNTs. Due to their small size, special techniques have to be applied. In this research, a modified molecular structural mechanics model for the numerical determination of the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes is presented. It uses an advanced approach for the geometrical representation of the CNT structure while the covalent bonds in the CNTs are represented by beam elements. Furthermore, the model is specifically designed to overcome major drawbacks in existing molecular structural mechanics models. This includes energetic consistency with the underlying chemical force field. The model is developed further to enable the application of a more advanced chemical force field representation. The developed model is able to predict, inter alia, the lateral and radial stiffness properties of the CNTs. The results for the lateral stiffness are given and discussed in order to emphasize the progress made with the presented approach.

  8. Structural study of Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glasses from molecular simulations using a polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, Fabien; Delaye, Jean-Marc; Charpentier, Thibault; Cormier, Laurent; Salanne, Mathieu

    2017-10-28

    Sodium borosilicate glasses Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 (NBS) are complex systems from a structural point of view. Three main building units are present: tetrahedral SiO 4 and BO 4 (B IV ) and triangular BO 3 (B III ). One of the salient features of these compounds is the change of the B III /B IV ratio with the alkali concentration, which is very difficult to capture in force fields-based molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we develop a polarizable force field that is able to reproduce the boron coordination and more generally the structure of several NBS systems in the glass and in the melt. The parameters of the potential are fitted from density functional theory calculations only, in contrast with the existing empirical potentials for NBS systems. This ensures a strong improvement on the transferability of the parameters from one composition to another. Using this new force field, the structure of NBS systems is validated against neutron diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A special focus is given to the distribution of B III /B IV with respect to the composition and the temperature.

  9. Consistent force fields for saccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld

    1999-01-01

    Consistent force fields for carbohydrates were hitherto developed by extensive optimization ofpotential energy function parameters on experimental data and on ab initio results. A wide range of experimental data is used: internal structures obtained from gas phase electron diffraction and from x......-anomeric effects are accounted for without addition of specific terms. The work is done in the framework of the Consistent Force Field which originatedin Israel and was further developed in Denmark. The actual methods and strategies employed havebeen described previously. Extensive testing of the force field...

  10. Chiral forces and molecular dissymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1992-01-01

    Chiral molecules leading to helical macromolecules seem to preserve information and extend it better. In the biological world RNA is the very paradigm for self-replication, elongation and autocatalytic editing. The nucleic acid itself is not chiral. It acquires its chirality by association with D-sugars. Although the chiral information or selectivity put in by the unit monomer is no longer of much interest to the biologists - they tend to leave it to the Darwinian selection principle to take care of it as illustrated by Frank's model - it is vital to understand the origin of chirality. There are three different approaches for the chiral origin of life: (1) Phenomenological, (2) Electromagnetic molecular and Coriolis forces and (3) Atomic or nuclear force, the neutral weak current. The phenomenological approach involves spontaneous symmetry breaking fluctuations in far for equilibrium systems or nucleation and crystallization. Chance plays a major role in the chiral molecule selected

  11. X-Pol Potential: An Electronic Structure-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Solvated Protein in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wangshen; Orozco, Modesto; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2009-02-17

    A recently proposed electronic structure-based force field called the explicit polarization (X-Pol) potential is used to study many-body electronic polarization effects in a protein, in particular by carrying out a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in water with periodic boundary conditions. The primary unit cell is cubic with dimensions ~54 × 54 × 54 Å(3), and the total number of atoms in this cell is 14281. An approximate electronic wave function, consisting of 29026 basis functions for the entire system, is variationally optimized to give the minimum Born-Oppenheimer energy at every MD step; this allows the efficient evaluation of the required analytic forces for the dynamics. Intramolecular and intermolecular polarization and intramolecular charge transfer effects are examined and are found to be significant; for example, 17 out of 58 backbone carbonyls differ from neutrality on average by more than 0.1 electron, and the average charge on the six alanines varies from -0.05 to +0.09. The instantaneous excess charges vary even more widely; the backbone carbonyls have standard deviations in their fluctuating net charges from 0.03 to 0.05, and more than half of the residues have excess charges whose standard deviation exceeds 0.05. We conclude that the new-generation X-Pol force field permits the inclusion of time-dependent quantum mechanical polarization and charge transfer effects in much larger systems than was previously possible.

  12. Electrostatic frequency maps for amide-I mode of β-peptide: Comparison of molecular mechanics force field and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kaicong; Zheng, Xuan; Du, Fenfen

    2017-08-01

    The spectroscopy of amide-I vibrations has been widely utilized for the understanding of dynamical structure of polypeptides. For the modeling of amide-I spectra, two frequency maps were built for β-peptide analogue (N-ethylpropionamide, NEPA) in a number of solvents within different schemes (molecular mechanics force field based, GM map; DFT calculation based, GD map), respectively. The electrostatic potentials on the amide unit that originated from solvents and peptide backbone were correlated to the amide-I frequency shift from gas phase to solution phase during map parameterization. GM map is easier to construct with negligible computational cost since the frequency calculations for the samples are purely based on force field, while GD map utilizes sophisticated DFT calculations on the representative solute-solvent clusters and brings insight into the electronic structures of solvated NEPA and its chemical environments. The results show that the maps' predicted amide-I frequencies present solvation environmental sensitivities and exhibit their specific characters with respect to the map protocols, and the obtained vibrational parameters are in satisfactory agreement with experimental amide-I spectra of NEPA in solution phase. Although different theoretical schemes based maps have their advantages and disadvantages, the present maps show their potentials in interpreting the amide-I spectra for β-peptides, respectively.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of sodium aluminosilicate glass structures and glass surface-water reactions using the reactive force field (ReaxFF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, R.; Wang, L.; Cormack, A. N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Reactive potentials are increasingly used to study the properties of glasses and glass water reactions in a reactive molecular dynamics (MD) framework. In this study, we have simulated a ternary sodium aluminosilicate glass and investigated the initial stages of the glass surface-water reactions at 300 K using reactive force field (ReaxFF). On comparison of the simulated glass structures generated using ReaxFF and classical Buckingham potentials, our results show that the atomic density profiles calculated for the surface glass structures indicate a bond-angle distribution dependency. The atomic density profiles also show higher concentrations of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) and sodium ions at the glass surface. Additionally, we present our results of formation of silanol species and the diffusion of water molecules at the glass surface using ReaxFF.

  14. Applications of Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo and Metadynamics Simulations Using ReaxFF Reactive Force Fields to Fluid/Solid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Muralikrishna

    The interaction of dense fluids (water, polar organic solvents, room temperature ionic liquids, etc.) with solid substrates controls many chemical processes encountered in nature and industry. The key features of fluid-solid interfaces (FSIs) are the high mobility and often reactivity of the fluid phase, and the structural control provided by the solid phase. In this dissertation we apply molecular modeling methods to study FSIs in the following systems: 1. Dissociation of water on titania surfaces. We studied the adsorption and dissociation of water at 300 K on the following TiO2 surfaces: anatase (101), (100), (112), (001) and rutile (110) at various water coverages, using a recently developed ReaxFF reactive force field. The molecular and dissociative adsorption configurations predicted by ReaxFF for various water coverages agree with previous theoretical studies and experiment. 2. Mechanisms of Oriented Attachment in TiO2 nanocrystals. Oriented attachment (OA) of nanocrystals is now widely recognized as a key process in the solution-phase growth of hierarchical nanostructures. However, the microscopic origins of OA remain unclear. Using the same ReaxFF Ti/O/H reactive force field employed in the previous study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the aggregation of various titanium dioxide (anatase) nanocrystals in vacuum and humid environments. 3. Li interactions in carbon based materials. Graphitic carbon is still the most ubiquitously used anode material in Li-ion batteries. In spite of its ubiquity, there are few theoretical studies that fully capture the energetics and kinetics of Li in graphite and related nanostructures at experimentally relevant length/time-scales and Li-ion concentrations. In this study we describe development and application of a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe Li interactions in perfect and defective carbon based materials using atomistic simulations. We develop force-field parameters for Li-C systems using van

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation for the test of calibrated OPLS-AA force field for binary liquid mixture of tri-iso-amyl phosphate and n-dodecane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arya; Ali, Sk. Musharaf

    2018-02-01

    Tri-isoamyl phosphate (TiAP) has been proposed to be an alternative for tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. Recently, we have successfully calibrated and tested all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations using Mulliken partial charges for pure TiAP, TBP, and dodecane by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is of immense importance to extend this potential for the various molecular properties of TiAP and TiAP/n-dodecane binary mixtures using MD simulation. Earlier, efforts were devoted to find out a suitable force field which can explain both structural and dynamical properties by empirical parameterization. Therefore, the present MD study reports the structural, dynamical, and thermodynamical properties with different mole fractions of TiAP-dodecane mixtures at the entire range of mole fraction of 0-1 employing our calibrated Mulliken embedded optimized potentials for liquid simulation (OPLS) force field. The calculated electric dipole moment of TiAP was seen to be almost unaffected by the TiAP concentration in the dodecane diluent. The calculated liquid densities of the TiAP-dodecane mixture are in good agreement with the experimental data. The mixture densities at different temperatures are also studied which was found to be reduced with temperature as expected. The plot of diffusivities for TiAP and dodecane against mole fraction in the binary mixture intersects at a composition in the range of 25%-30% of TiAP in dodecane, which is very much closer to the TBP/n-dodecane composition used in the PUREX process. The excess volume of mixing was found to be positive for the entire range of mole fraction and the excess enthalpy of mixing was shown to be endothermic for the TBP/n-dodecane mixture as well as TiAP/n-dodecane mixture as reported experimentally. The spatial pair correlation functions are evaluated between TiAP-TiAP and TiAP-dodecane molecules. Further, shear viscosity has been computed by

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation for the test of calibrated OPLS-AA force field for binary liquid mixture of tri-iso-amyl phosphate and n-dodecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arya; Ali, Sk Musharaf

    2018-02-21

    Tri-isoamyl phosphate (TiAP) has been proposed to be an alternative for tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. Recently, we have successfully calibrated and tested all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations using Mulliken partial charges for pure TiAP, TBP, and dodecane by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is of immense importance to extend this potential for the various molecular properties of TiAP and TiAP/n-dodecane binary mixtures using MD simulation. Earlier, efforts were devoted to find out a suitable force field which can explain both structural and dynamical properties by empirical parameterization. Therefore, the present MD study reports the structural, dynamical, and thermodynamical properties with different mole fractions of TiAP-dodecane mixtures at the entire range of mole fraction of 0-1 employing our calibrated Mulliken embedded optimized potentials for liquid simulation (OPLS) force field. The calculated electric dipole moment of TiAP was seen to be almost unaffected by the TiAP concentration in the dodecane diluent. The calculated liquid densities of the TiAP-dodecane mixture are in good agreement with the experimental data. The mixture densities at different temperatures are also studied which was found to be reduced with temperature as expected. The plot of diffusivities for TiAP and dodecane against mole fraction in the binary mixture intersects at a composition in the range of 25%-30% of TiAP in dodecane, which is very much closer to the TBP/n-dodecane composition used in the PUREX process. The excess volume of mixing was found to be positive for the entire range of mole fraction and the excess enthalpy of mixing was shown to be endothermic for the TBP/n-dodecane mixture as well as TiAP/n-dodecane mixture as reported experimentally. The spatial pair correlation functions are evaluated between TiAP-TiAP and TiAP-dodecane molecules. Further, shear viscosity has been computed by

  17. Discrepancies between conformational distributions of a polyalanine peptide in solution obtained from molecular dynamics force fields and amide I' band profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbaro, Daniel; Ghosh, Indrajit; Nau, Werner M; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2010-12-30

    Structural preferences in the unfolded state of peptides determined by molecular dynamics still contradict experimental data. A remedy in this regard has been suggested by MD simulations with an optimized Amber force field ff03* ( Best, R. Hummer, G. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009 , 113 , 9004 - 9015 ). The simulations yielded a statistical coil distribution for alanine which is at variance with recent experimental results. To check the validity of this distribution, we investigated the peptide H-A(5)W-OH, which with the exception of the additional terminal tryptophan is analogous to the peptide used to optimize the force fields ff03*. Electronic circular dichroism, vibrational circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopy as well as J-coupling constants obtained from NMR experiments were used to derive the peptide's conformational ensemble. Additionally, Förster resonance energy transfer between the terminal chromophores of the fluorescently labeled peptide analogue H-Dbo-A(5)W-OH was used to determine its average length, from which the end-to-end distance of the unlabeled peptide was estimated. Qualitatively, the experimental (3)J(H(N),C(α)), VCD, and ECD indicated a preference of alanine for polyproline II-like conformations. The experimental (3)J(H(N),C(α)) for A(5)W closely resembles the constants obtained for A(5). In order to quantitatively relate the conformational distribution of A(5) obtained with the optimized AMBER ff03* force field to experimental data, the former was used to derive a distribution function which expressed the conformational ensemble as a mixture of polyproline II, β-strand, helical, and turn conformations. This model was found to satisfactorily reproduce all experimental J-coupling constants. We employed the model to calculate the amide I' profiles of the IR and vibrational circular dichroism spectrum of A(5)W, as well as the distance between the two terminal peptide carbonyls. This led to an underestimated negative VCD couplet and an

  18. The application of tailor-made force fields and molecular dynamics for NMR crystallography: a case study of free base cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Neumann, Marcus A.; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    of a fully automatically generated tailor-made force field (TMFF) for the dynamic aspects of NMR crystallography is evaluated and compared with existing benchmarks, including static dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations and the COMPASS force field. The crystal structure of free base...

  19. Harmonic force field for nitro compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Edson P; Seminario, Jorge M

    2012-06-01

    Molecular simulations leading to sensors for the detection of explosive compounds require force field parameters that can reproduce the mechanical and vibrational properties of energetic materials. We developed precise harmonic force fields for alanine polypeptides and glycine oligopeptides using the FUERZA procedure that uses the Hessian tensor (obtained from ab initio calculations) to calculate precise parameters. In this work, we used the same procedure to calculate generalized force field parameters of several nitro compounds. We found a linear relationship between force constant and bond distance. The average angle in the nitro compounds was 116°, excluding the 90° angle of the carbon atoms in the octanitrocubane. The calculated parameters permitted the accurate molecular modeling of nitro compounds containing many functional groups. Results were acceptable when compared with others obtained using methods that are specific for one type of molecule, and much better than others obtained using methods that are too general (these ignore the chemical effects of surrounding atoms on the bonding and therefore the bond strength, which affects the mechanical and vibrational properties of the whole molecule).

  20. Tinker-HP: a massively parallel molecular dynamics package for multiscale simulations of large complex systems with advanced point dipole polarizable force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagardère, Louis; Jolly, Luc-Henri; Lipparini, Filippo; Aviat, Félix; Stamm, Benjamin; Jing, Zhifeng F; Harger, Matthew; Torabifard, Hedieh; Cisneros, G Andrés; Schnieders, Michael J; Gresh, Nohad; Maday, Yvon; Ren, Pengyu Y; Ponder, Jay W; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2018-01-28

    We present Tinker-HP, a massively MPI parallel package dedicated to classical molecular dynamics (MD) and to multiscale simulations, using advanced polarizable force fields (PFF) encompassing distributed multipoles electrostatics. Tinker-HP is an evolution of the popular Tinker package code that conserves its simplicity of use and its reference double precision implementation for CPUs. Grounded on interdisciplinary efforts with applied mathematics, Tinker-HP allows for long polarizable MD simulations on large systems up to millions of atoms. We detail in the paper the newly developed extension of massively parallel 3D spatial decomposition to point dipole polarizable models as well as their coupling to efficient Krylov iterative and non-iterative polarization solvers. The design of the code allows the use of various computer systems ranging from laboratory workstations to modern petascale supercomputers with thousands of cores. Tinker-HP proposes therefore the first high-performance scalable CPU computing environment for the development of next generation point dipole PFFs and for production simulations. Strategies linking Tinker-HP to Quantum Mechanics (QM) in the framework of multiscale polarizable self-consistent QM/MD simulations are also provided. The possibilities, performances and scalability of the software are demonstrated via benchmarks calculations using the polarizable AMOEBA force field on systems ranging from large water boxes of increasing size and ionic liquids to (very) large biosystems encompassing several proteins as well as the complete satellite tobacco mosaic virus and ribosome structures. For small systems, Tinker-HP appears to be competitive with the Tinker-OpenMM GPU implementation of Tinker. As the system size grows, Tinker-HP remains operational thanks to its access to distributed memory and takes advantage of its new algorithmic enabling for stable long timescale polarizable simulations. Overall, a several thousand-fold acceleration over

  1. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study. Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO 2 /H 2 O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.

  2. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Lattice Dynamics-Based Force Field for Modeling Hexagonal Boron Nitride in Mechanical and Interfacial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind Rajan, Ananth; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2018-04-05

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is an up-and-coming two-dimensional material, with applications in electronic devices, tribology, and separation membranes. Herein, we utilize density-functional-theory-based ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and lattice dynamics calculations to develop a classical force field (FF) for modeling hBN. The FF predicts the crystal structure, elastic constants, and phonon dispersion relation of hBN with good accuracy and exhibits remarkable agreement with the interlayer binding energy predicted by random phase approximation calculations. We demonstrate the importance of including Coulombic interactions but excluding 1-4 intrasheet interactions to obtain the correct phonon dispersion relation. We find that improper dihedrals do not modify the bulk mechanical properties and the extent of thermal vibrations in hBN, although they impact its flexural rigidity. Combining the FF with the accurate TIP4P/Ice water model yields excellent agreement with interaction energies predicted by quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our FF should enable an accurate description of hBN interfaces in classical MD simulations.

  3. An overview of molecular dynamics simulations of oxidized lipid systems, with a comparison of ELBA and MARTINI force fields for coarse grained lipid simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siani, Pablo; de Souza, R M; Dias, L G

    2016-01-01

    our new data of all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of hydroperoxidized lipid monolayer and bilayer systems and (iii) provide a comparison of the MARTINI and ELBA coarse grained force fields for lipid bilayer systems. We show that the better electrostatic treatment of interactions in ELBA is able...

  4. Preface: Special Topic: From Quantum Mechanics to Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2017-10-01

    This Special Topic issue entitled "From Quantum Mechanics to Force Fields" is dedicated to the ongoing efforts of the theoretical chemistry community to develop a new generation of accurate force fields based on data from high-level electronic structure calculations and to develop faster electronic structure methods for testing and designing force fields as well as for carrying out simulations. This issue includes a collection of 35 original research articles that illustrate recent theoretical advances in the field. It provides a timely snapshot of recent developments in the generation of approaches to enable more accurate molecular simulations of processes important in chemistry, physics, biophysics, and materials science.

  5. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages. (topical review)

  6. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte so...

  7. Ehrenfest force in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisakyan, A.N.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Samojlov, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Ehrenfest force in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is calculated. It is shown that there exist such (very rare) topologically nontrivial physical situations when the Gauss theorem in its classic formulation fails and, as a consequence, apart from the usual Lorentz force an additional, purely imaginary force acts on the charged particle. This force arises only in inhomogeneous magnetic fields of special configurations, has a purely quantum origin, and disappears in the classical limit

  8. Near field plasmon and force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hollander, R.B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Kooyman, R.P.H.

    1995-01-01

    A scanning plasmon near field optical microscope (SPNM) is presented which combines a conventional far field surface plasmon microscope with a stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM). Near field plasmon and force images are recorded simultaneously both with a lateral resolution limited by the

  9. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  10. Forces on nuclei moving on autoionizing molecular potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-01-14

    Autoionization of molecular systems occurs in diatomic molecules and in small biochemical systems. Quantum chemistry packages enable calculation of complex potential energy surfaces (CPESs). The imaginary part of the CPES is associated with the autoionization decay rate, which is a function of the molecular structure. Molecular dynamics simulations, within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, require the definition of a force field. The ability to calculate the forces on the nuclei in bio-systems when autoionization takes place seems to rely on an understanding of radiative damages in RNA and DNA arising from the release of slow moving electrons which have long de Broglie wavelengths. This work addresses calculation of the real forces on the nuclei moving on the CPES. By using the transformation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, previously used by Madelung, we proved that the classical forces on nuclei moving on the CPES correlated with the gradient of the real part of the CPES. It was proved that the force on the nuclei of the metastable molecules is time independent although the probability to detect metastable molecules exponentially decays. The classical force is obtained from the transformed Schrödinger equation when ℏ=0 and the Schrödinger equation is reduced to the classical (Newtonian) equations of motion. The forces on the nuclei regardless on what potential energy surface they move (parent CPES or product real PESs) vary in time due to the autoionization process.

  11. Comparison of Cellulose Iβ Simulations with Three Carbohydrate Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, James F; Beckham, Gregg T; Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin; Brady, John W; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2012-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose have recently become more prevalent due to increased interest in renewable energy applications, and many atomistic and coarse-grained force fields exist that can be applied to cellulose. However, to date no systematic comparison between carbohydrate force fields has been conducted for this important system. To that end, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrated, 36-chain cellulose Iβ microfibrils at room temperature with three carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM35, GLYCAM06, and Gromos 45a4) up to the near-microsecond time scale. Our results indicate that each of these simulated microfibrils diverge from the cellulose Iβ crystal structure to varying degrees under the conditions tested. The CHARMM35 and GLYCAM06 force fields eventually result in structures similar to those observed at 500 K with the same force fields, which are consistent with the experimentally observed high-temperature behavior of cellulose I. The third force field, Gromos 45a4, produces behavior significantly different from experiment, from the other two force fields, and from previously reported simulations with this force field using shorter simulation times and constrained periodic boundary conditions. For the GLYCAM06 force field, initial hydrogen-bond conformations and choice of electrostatic scaling factors significantly affect the rate of structural divergence. Our results suggest dramatically different time scales for convergence of properties of interest, which is important in the design of computational studies and comparisons to experimental data. This study highlights that further experimental and theoretical work is required to understand the structure of small diameter cellulose microfibrils typical of plant cellulose.

  12. Transition States from Empirical Force Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2003-01-01

    This is an overview of the use of empirical force fields in the study of reaction mechanisms. EVB-type methods (including RFF and MCMM) produce full reaction surfaces by mixing, in the simplest case, known force fields describing reactants and products. The SEAM method instead locates approximate...

  13. Near field plasmon and force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Hollander, R.B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Kooyman, R.P.H.

    1995-01-01

    A scanning plasmon near field optical microscope (SPNM) is presented which combines a conventional far field surface plasmon microscope with a stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM). Near field plasmon and force images are recorded simultaneously both with a lateral resolution limited by the probe size to about 20 nm. At variance to previous work, utilizing a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a metallic tip, a dielectric silicon-nitride tip is used in contact mode. This arrangement ...

  14. Software Process Improvement Using Force Field Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An improvement plan is then drawn and implemented. This paper studied the state of Nigerian software development organizations based on selected attributes. Force field analysis is used to partition the factors obtained into driving and restraining forces. An attempt was made to improve the software development process ...

  15. Induced forces in the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voracek, P.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the expression for the magnitude of the so-called induced force, acting on a mass particle, is deduced. The origin of this force is causally connected to the increase of the rest mass of the particle in the gravitational field. (orig.)

  16. Martini Force Field Parameters for Glycolipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Cesar A.; Sovova, Zofie; van Eerden, Floris J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    We present an extension of the Martini coarse-grained force field to glycolipids. The glycolipids considered here are the glycoglycerolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) and its

  17. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte solutions of chemically relevant ions. The optimized ionic parameters are validated against counterion condensation theory and buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements providing quantitative data on the competitive association of different monovalent ions with DNA. Comparison between experimental and MD simulation results demonstrates that, compared to the additive CHARMM36 model, the Drude FF provides an improved description of the general features of the ionic atmosphere around DNA and leads to closer agreement with experiment on the ionic competition within the ion atmosphere. Results indicate the importance of extended simulation systems on the order of 25 Å beyond the DNA surface to obtain proper convergence of ion distributions. PMID:25751286

  18. Evaluating amber force fields using computed NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, David R; Vries, John K

    2017-10-01

    NMR chemical shifts can be computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a template matching approach and a library of conformers containing chemical shifts generated from ab initio quantum calculations. This approach has potential utility for evaluating the force fields that underlie these simulations. Imperfections in force fields generate flawed atomic coordinates. Chemical shifts obtained from flawed coordinates have errors that can be traced back to these imperfections. We use this approach to evaluate a series of AMBER force fields that have been refined over the course of two decades (ff94, ff96, ff99SB, ff14SB, ff14ipq, and ff15ipq). For each force field a series of MD simulations are carried out for eight model proteins. The calculated chemical shifts for the 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C a atoms are compared with experimental values. Initial evaluations are based on root mean squared (RMS) errors at the protein level. These results are further refined based on secondary structure and the types of atoms involved in nonbonded interactions. The best chemical shift for identifying force field differences is the shift associated with peptide protons. Examination of the model proteins on a residue by residue basis reveals that force field performance is highly dependent on residue position. Examination of the time course of nonbonded interactions at these sites provides explanations for chemical shift differences at the atomic coordinate level. Results show that the newer ff14ipq and ff15ipq force fields developed with the implicitly polarized charge method perform better than the older force fields. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Force field refinement from NMR scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Jing [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Meuwly, Markus, E-mail: m.meuwly@unibas.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: We show that two classes of H-bonds are sufficient to quantitatively describe scalar NMR coupling constants in small proteins. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present force field refinements based on explicit MD simulations using scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This leads to {sup h3}J{sub NC{sup }{sup P}{sup r}{sup i}{sup m}{sup e}} couplings to within 0.03 Hz at best compared to experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A classification of H-bonds according to secondary structure is not sufficiently robust. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grouping H-bonds into two classes and reparametrization yields an RMSD of 0.07 Hz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is an improvement of 50. - Abstract: NMR observables contain valuable information about the protein dynamics sampling a high-dimensional potential energy surface. Depending on the observable, the dynamics is sensitive to different time-windows. Scalar coupling constants {sup h3}J{sub NC{sup }{sup P}{sup r}{sup i}{sup m}{sup e}} reflect the pico- to nanosecond motions associated with the intermolecular hydrogen bond network. Including an explicit H-bond in the molecular mechanics with proton transfer (MMPT) potential allows us to reproduce experimentally determined {sup h3}J{sub NC{sup }{sup P}{sup r}{sup i}{sup m}{sup e}} couplings to within 0.02 Hz at best for ubiquitin and protein G. This is based on taking account of the chemically changing environment by grouping the H-bonds into up to seven classes. However, grouping them into two classes already reduces the RMSD between computed and observed {sup h3}J{sub NC{sup }{sup P}{sup r}{sup i}{sup m}{sup e}} couplings by almost 50%. Thus, using ensemble-averaged data with two classes of H-bonds leads to substantially improved scalar couplings from simulations with accurate force fields.

  20. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  1. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  2. Quantum mechanical force field for water with explicit electronic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaebeom; Mazack, Michael J M; Zhang, Peng; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2013-08-07

    A quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) for water is described. Unlike traditional approaches that use quantum mechanical results and experimental data to parameterize empirical potential energy functions, the present QMFF uses a quantum mechanical framework to represent intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in an entire condensed-phase system. In particular, the internal energy terms used in molecular mechanics are replaced by a quantum mechanical formalism that naturally includes electronic polarization due to intermolecular interactions and its effects on the force constants of the intramolecular force field. As a quantum mechanical force field, both intermolecular interactions and the Hamiltonian describing the individual molecular fragments can be parameterized to strive for accuracy and computational efficiency. In this work, we introduce a polarizable molecular orbital model Hamiltonian for water and for oxygen- and hydrogen-containing compounds, whereas the electrostatic potential responsible for intermolecular interactions in the liquid and in solution is modeled by a three-point charge representation that realistically reproduces the total molecular dipole moment and the local hybridization contributions. The present QMFF for water, which is called the XP3P (explicit polarization with three-point-charge potential) model, is suitable for modeling both gas-phase clusters and liquid water. The paper demonstrates the performance of the XP3P model for water and proton clusters and the properties of the pure liquid from about 900 × 10(6) self-consistent-field calculations on a periodic system consisting of 267 water molecules. The unusual dipole derivative behavior of water, which is incorrectly modeled in molecular mechanics, is naturally reproduced as a result of an electronic structural treatment of chemical bonding by XP3P. We anticipate that the XP3P model will be useful for studying proton transport in solution and solid phases as well as across

  3. Exploring the energy landscape of biopolymers using single molecule force spectroscopy and molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hyeon, Changbong

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule force techniques have opened a new avenue to decipher the folding landscapes of biopolymers by allowing us to watch and manipulate the dynamics of individual proteins and nucleic acids. In single molecule force experiments, quantitative analyses of measurements employing sound theoretical models and molecular simulations play central role more than any other field. With a brief description of basic theories for force mechanics and molecular simulation techniqu...

  4. Perspective: Ab initio force field methods derived from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Guidez, Emilie B.; Bertoni, Colleen; Gordon, Mark S.

    2018-03-01

    It is often desirable to accurately and efficiently model the behavior of large molecular systems in the condensed phase (thousands to tens of thousands of atoms) over long time scales (from nanoseconds to milliseconds). In these cases, ab initio methods are difficult due to the increasing computational cost with the number of electrons. A more computationally attractive alternative is to perform the simulations at the atomic level using a parameterized function to model the electronic energy. Many empirical force fields have been developed for this purpose. However, the functions that are used to model interatomic and intermolecular interactions contain many fitted parameters obtained from selected model systems, and such classical force fields cannot properly simulate important electronic effects. Furthermore, while such force fields are computationally affordable, they are not reliable when applied to systems that differ significantly from those used in their parameterization. They also cannot provide the information necessary to analyze the interactions that occur in the system, making the systematic improvement of the functional forms that are used difficult. Ab initio force field methods aim to combine the merits of both types of methods. The ideal ab initio force fields are built on first principles and require no fitted parameters. Ab initio force field methods surveyed in this perspective are based on fragmentation approaches and intermolecular perturbation theory. This perspective summarizes their theoretical foundation, key components in their formulation, and discusses key aspects of these methods such as accuracy and formal computational cost. The ab initio force fields considered here were developed for different targets, and this perspective also aims to provide a balanced presentation of their strengths and shortcomings. Finally, this perspective suggests some future directions for this actively developing area.

  5. Solitons in a random force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, F.G.; Konotop, V.V.; Sinitsyn, Y.A.

    1985-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a soliton of the sine-Gordon equation in a random force field in the adiabatic approximation. We obtain an Einstein-Fokker equation and find the distribution function for the soliton parameters which we use to evaluate its statistical characteristics. We derive an equation for the averaged functions of the soliton parameters. We determine the limits of applicability of the delta-correlated in time random field approximation

  6. Charm production and the confining force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Gustafson, G.

    1983-03-01

    We show that charm production at SPS energies can be understood simply from O(α 2 sub (s)) QCD processes when combined with fragmentation of the colour fields stretched by the final state partons. The tension of the confining force field responsible for particle production is found to pull the charmed particles away from the reaction centre, giving rise to a harder x sub (F)-spectrum than would be expected from the bare QCD matrix elements. (Authors)

  7. Optical Near-field Interactions and Forces for Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, John Michael

    Throughout history, as a particle view of the universe began to take shape, scientists began to realize that these particles were attracted to each other and hence came up with theories, both analytical and empirical in nature, to explain their interaction. The interaction pair potential (empirical) and electromagnetics (analytical) theories, both help to explain not only the interaction between the basic constituents of matter, such as atoms and molecules, but also between macroscopic objects, such as two surfaces in close proximity. The electrostatic force, optical force, and Casimir force can be categorized as such forces. A surface plasmon (SP) is a collective motion of electrons generated by light at the interface between two mediums of opposite signs of dielectric susceptibility (e.g. metal and dielectric). Recently, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been exploited in many areas through the use of tiny antennas that work on similar principles as radio frequency (RF) antennas in optoelectronic devices. These antennas can produce a very high gradient in the electric field thereby leading to an optical force, similar in concept to the surface forces discussed above. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was introduced in the 1980s at IBM. Here we report on its uses in measuring these aforementioned forces and fields, as well as actively modulating and manipulating multiple optoelectronic devices. We have shown that it is possible to change the far field radiation pattern of an optical antenna-integrated device through modification of the near-field of the device. This modification is possible through change of the local refractive index or reflectivity of the "hot spot" of the device, either mechanically or optically. Finally, we have shown how a mechanically active device can be used to detect light with high gain and low noise at room temperature. It is the aim of several of these integrated and future devices to be used for applications in molecular sensing

  8. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B

  9. Rapid parameterization of small molecules using the Force Field Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Christopher G; Saam, Jan; Schulten, Klaus; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gumbart, James C

    2013-12-15

    The inability to rapidly generate accurate and robust parameters for novel chemical matter continues to severely limit the application of molecular dynamics simulations to many biological systems of interest, especially in fields such as drug discovery. Although the release of generalized versions of common classical force fields, for example, General Amber Force Field and CHARMM General Force Field, have posited guidelines for parameterization of small molecules, many technical challenges remain that have hampered their wide-scale extension. The Force Field Toolkit (ffTK), described herein, minimizes common barriers to ligand parameterization through algorithm and method development, automation of tedious and error-prone tasks, and graphical user interface design. Distributed as a VMD plugin, ffTK facilitates the traversal of a clear and organized workflow resulting in a complete set of CHARMM-compatible parameters. A variety of tools are provided to generate quantum mechanical target data, setup multidimensional optimization routines, and analyze parameter performance. Parameters developed for a small test set of molecules using ffTK were comparable to existing CGenFF parameters in their ability to reproduce experimentally measured values for pure-solvent properties (<15% error from experiment) and free energy of solvation (±0.5 kcal/mol from experiment). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nuclear Forces from Effective Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, H.

    2011-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory allows for a systematic and model-independent derivation of the forces between nucleons in harmony with the symmetries of the quantum chromodynamics. After a brief review on the current status in the development of the chiral nuclear forces I will focus on the role of the Δ-resonance contributions in the nuclear dynamics.We find improvement in the convergence of the chiral expansion of the nuclear forces if we explicitly take into account the Δ-resonance degrees of freedom. The overall results for two-nucleon forces with and without explicit Δ-resonance degrees of freedom are remarkably similar. We discussed the long- and shorter-range N 3 LO contributions to chiral three-nucleon forces. No additional free parameters appear at this order. There are five different topology classes which contribute to the forces. Three of them describe long-range contributions which constitute the first systematic corrections to the leading 2π exchange that appear at N 2 LO. Another two contributions are of a shorter range and include, additionally to an exchange of pions, also one short-range contact interaction and all corresponding 1/m corrections. The requirement of renormalizability leads to unique expressions for N 3 LO contributions to the three-nucleon force (except for 1/m-corrections). We presented the complete N 2 LO analysis of the nuclear forces with explicit Δ-isobar degrees of freedom. Although the overall results in the isospin-conserving case are very similar in the Δ-less and Δ-full theories, we found a much better convergence in all peripheral partial waves once Δ-resonance is explicitly taken into account. The leading CSB contributions to nuclear forces are proportional to nucleon- and Δ-mass splittings. There appear strong cancellations between the two contributions which at leading order yield weaker V III potentials. This effect is, however, entirely compensated at subleading order such that the results in the theories

  11. Comparison of gas-solid chromatography and MM2 force field molecular binding energies for greenhouse gases on a carbonaceous surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Bivona, Kevin T; Thomas, Howard E; O'Dell, Casey M

    2009-10-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine B(2s) (gas-solid virial coefficient) values for eight molecular adsorbates interacting with a carbon powder (Carbopack B, Supelco). B(2s) values were determined by multiple size variant injections within the temperature range of 313-553 K. The molecular adsorbates included: carbon dioxide (CO(2)); tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)); hexafluoroethane (C(2)F(6)); 1,1-difluoroethane (C(2)H(4)F(2)); 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (C(2)H(3)ClF(2)); dichlorodifluoromethane (CCl(2)F(2)); trichlorofluoromethane (CCl(3)F); and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (C(2)H(3)Cl(3)). Two of these molecules are of special interest because they are "super greenhouse gases". The global warming potential, GWP, for CF(4) is 6500 and for C(2)F(6) is 9200 relative to the reference value of 1 for CO(2). The GWP index considers both radiative blocking and molecular lifetime. For these and other industrial greenhouse gases, adsorptive trapping on a carbonaceous solid, which depends on molecule-surface binding energy, could avoid atmospheric release. The temperature variations of the gas-solid virial coefficients in conjunction with van't Hoff plots were used to find the experimental adsorption energy or binding energy values (E(*)) for each adsorbate. A molecular mechanics based, rough-surface model was used to calculate the molecule-surface binding energy (Ecal(*)) using augmented MM2 parameters. The surface model consisted of parallel graphene layers with two separated nanostructures each containing 17 benzene rings arranged in linear strips. The separation of the parallel nanostructures had been optimized in a prior study to appropriately represent molecule-surface interactions for Carbopack B. Linear regressions of E(*) versus Ecal(*) for the current data set of eight molecules and the same surface model gave E(*)=0.926 Ecal(*) and r(2)=0.956. A combined set of the current and prior Carbopack B adsorbates studied (linear alkanes, branched alkanes, cyclic alkanes

  12. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  13. Evaluation of reactive force fields for prediction of the thermo-mechanical properties of cellulose Iâ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando L. Dri; Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini; Pablo D. Zavattieri

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is commonly used to study the properties of nanocellulose-based materials at the atomic scale. It is well known that the accuracy of these simulations strongly depends on the force field that describes energetic interactions. However, since there is no force field developed specifically for cellulose, researchers utilize models...

  14. Improved Parameters for the Martini Coarse-Grained Protein Force Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Djurre H.; Singh, Gurpreet; Bennett, W. F. Drew; Arnarez, Clement; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Schafer, Lars V.; Periole, Xavier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Marrink, Siewert J.

    The Martini coarse-grained force field has been successfully used for simulating a wide range of (bio)molecular systems. Recent progress in our ability to test the model against fully atomistic force fields, however, has revealed some shortcomings. Most notable, phenylalanine and proline were too

  15. Building machine learning force fields for nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, Claudio; Rossi, Kevin; Glielmo, Aldo; Fekete, Ádám; Gaston, Nicola; Baletto, Francesca; De Vita, Alessandro

    2018-06-01

    We assess Gaussian process (GP) regression as a technique to model interatomic forces in metal nanoclusters by analyzing the performance of 2-body, 3-body, and many-body kernel functions on a set of 19-atom Ni cluster structures. We find that 2-body GP kernels fail to provide faithful force estimates, despite succeeding in bulk Ni systems. However, both 3- and many-body kernels predict forces within an ˜0.1 eV/Å average error even for small training datasets and achieve high accuracy even on out-of-sample, high temperature structures. While training and testing on the same structure always provide satisfactory accuracy, cross-testing on dissimilar structures leads to higher prediction errors, posing an extrapolation problem. This can be cured using heterogeneous training on databases that contain more than one structure, which results in a good trade-off between versatility and overall accuracy. Starting from a 3-body kernel trained this way, we build an efficient non-parametric 3-body force field that allows accurate prediction of structural properties at finite temperatures, following a newly developed scheme [A. Glielmo et al., Phys. Rev. B 95, 214302 (2017)]. We use this to assess the thermal stability of Ni19 nanoclusters at a fractional cost of full ab initio calculations.

  16. Internal force corrections with machine learning for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingheng; Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2017-10-28

    Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation is a useful tool to calculate thermodynamic properties such as potential of mean force for chemical reactions but intensely time consuming. In this paper, we developed a new method using the internal force correction for low-level semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics samplings with a predefined reaction coordinate. As a correction term, the internal force was predicted with a machine learning scheme, which provides a sophisticated force field, and added to the atomic forces on the reaction coordinate related atoms at each integration step. We applied this method to two reactions in aqueous solution and reproduced potentials of mean force at the ab initio QM/MM level. The saving in computational cost is about 2 orders of magnitude. The present work reveals great potentials for machine learning in QM/MM simulations to study complex chemical processes.

  17. Simplistic Coulomb Forces in Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we compare the Wolf method to the shifted forces (SF) method for efficient computer simulation of bulk systems with Coulomb forces, taking results from the Ewald summation and particle mesh Ewald methods as representing the true behavior. We find that for the Hansen–McDonald molten...

  18. Importance of the CMAP Correction to the CHARMM22 Protein Force Field: Dynamics of Hen Lysozyme

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Matthias; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Pastor, Richard W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2005-01-01

    The recently developed CMAP correction to the CHARMM22 force field (C22) is evaluated from 25 ns molecular dynamics simulations on hen lysozyme. Substantial deviations from experimental backbone root mean-square fluctuations and N-H NMR order parameters obtained in the C22 trajectories (especially in the loops) are eliminated by the CMAP correction. Thus, the C22/CMAP force field yields improved dynamical and structural properties of proteins in molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. On the use of quartic force fields in variational calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Yachmenev, Andrey; Thiel, Walter; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-06-01

    Quartic force fields (QFFs) have been shown to be one of the most effective ways to efficiently compute vibrational frequencies for small molecules. In this letter we discuss how the simple-internal or bond-length bond-angle (BLBA) coordinates can be transformed into Morse-cosine (-sine) coordinates which produce potential energy surfaces from QFFs that possess proper limiting behavior and can describe the vibrational (or rovibrational) energy levels of an arbitrary molecular system to 5 cm-1 or better compared to experiment. We investigate parameter scaling in the Morse coordinate, symmetry considerations, and examples of transformed QFFs making use of the MULTIMODE, TROVE, and VTET variational vibrational methods.

  20. Mapping the force field of a hydrogen-bonded assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, A. M.; Jarvis, S. P.; Sang, Hongqian; Lekkas, I.; Rahe, P.; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo; Champness, N. R.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen bonding underpins the properties of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA to the symmetry of extended supramolecular assemblies, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the hydrogen bond continue to be vigorously debated. Here we use dynamic force microscopy (DFM) to quantitatively map the tip-sample force field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide molecules hydrogen-bonded in two-dimensional assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts shows that intermolecular contrast arises from repulsive tip-sample interactions whose interpretation can be aided via an examination of charge density depletion across the molecular system. Interpreting DFM images of hydrogen-bonded systems therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  1. Inverse Magnus force in free molecular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczynski, A.; Weidman, P.

    2003-11-01

    The sidewise force on a spinning sphere translating in a rarified gas is calculated assuming that the flow can be treated as a stream of free molecules. This approach was first introduced by Newton in his investigation of the drag force. While it is not fruitful at subsonic flows in normal conditions, it gives remarkably accurate results at hypersonic speeds. Here it is applied to the high Knudsen number flow over spinning spheres, cylinders, cubes and more generally any spinning parallelepiped. In all cases, the force is in the opposite direction to that of the classical Magnus effect in continuum flow. The simple calculation for a sphere reproduces the isothermal result obtained recently by Borg, et al. (Phys. Fluids, 15, 2003) using Maxwellian distribution functions. For any parallelepiped, including the cube, just like for the sphere and the cylinder, the force is shown to be steady. In each of these, the magnitude of the inverse Magnus force is proprtional to the product of the angular speed, translational speed, and the mas of the gas displaced by the object.

  2. Rigorous force field optimization principles based on statistical distance minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcek, Lukas, E-mail: vlcekl1@ornl.gov [Chemical Sciences Division, Geochemistry & Interfacial Sciences Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6110 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Chialvo, Ariel A. [Chemical Sciences Division, Geochemistry & Interfacial Sciences Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6110 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We use the concept of statistical distance to define a measure of distinguishability between a pair of statistical mechanical systems, i.e., a model and its target, and show that its minimization leads to general convergence of the model’s static measurable properties to those of the target. We exploit this feature to define a rigorous basis for the development of accurate and robust effective molecular force fields that are inherently compatible with coarse-grained experimental data. The new model optimization principles and their efficient implementation are illustrated through selected examples, whose outcome demonstrates the higher robustness and predictive accuracy of the approach compared to other currently used methods, such as force matching and relative entropy minimization. We also discuss relations between the newly developed principles and established thermodynamic concepts, which include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and the thermodynamic length.

  3. Systematic Parameterization of Lignin for the CHARMM Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Joshua; Petridis, Loukas; Beckham, Gregg; Crowley, Michael

    2017-07-06

    Plant cell walls have three primary components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, the latter of which is a recalcitrant, aromatic heteropolymer that provides structure to plants, water and nutrient transport through plant tissues, and a highly effective defense against pathogens. Overcoming the recalcitrance of lignin is key to effective biomass deconstruction, which would in turn enable the use of biomass as a feedstock for industrial processes. Our understanding of lignin structure in the plant cell wall is hampered by the limitations of the available lignin forcefields, which currently only account for a single linkage between lignins and lack explicit parameterization for emerging lignin structures both from natural variants and engineered lignin structures. Since polymerization of lignin occurs via radical intermediates, multiple C-O and C-C linkages have been isolated , and the current force field only represents a small subset of lignin the diverse lignin structures found in plants. In order to take into account the wide range of lignin polymerization chemistries, monomers and dimer combinations of C-, H-, G-, and S-lignins as well as with hydroxycinnamic acid linkages were subjected to extensive quantum mechanical calculations to establish target data from which to build a complete molecular mechanics force field tuned specifically for diverse lignins. This was carried out in a GPU-accelerated global optimization process, whereby all molecules were parameterized simultaneously using the same internal parameter set. By parameterizing lignin specifically, we are able to more accurately represent the interactions and conformations of lignin monomers and dimers relative to a general force field. This new force field will enables computational researchers to study the effects of different linkages on the structure of lignin, as well as construct more accurate plant cell wall models based on observed statistical distributions of lignin that differ between

  4. Probing the Importance of Charge Flux in Force Field Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedghamiz, Elaheh; Nagy, Balazs; Jensen, Frank

    2017-08-08

    We analyze the conformational dependence of atomic charges and molecular dipole moments for a selection of ∼900 conformations of peptide models of the 20 neutral amino acids. Based on a set of reference density functional theory calculations, we partition the changes into effects due to changes in bond distances, bond angles, and torsional angles and into geometry and charge flux contributions. This allows an assessment of the limitations of fixed charge force fields and indications for how to design improved force fields. The torsional degrees of freedom are the main contribution to conformational changes of atomic charges and molecular dipole moments, but indirect effects due to change in bond distances and angles account for ∼25% of the variation. Charge flux effects dominate for changes in bond distances and are also the main component of the variation in bond angles, while they are ∼25% compared to the geometry variations for torsional degrees of freedom. The geometry and charge flux contributions to some extent produce compensating effects.

  5. Thermodynamic properties for applications in chemical industry via classical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Hasse, Hans; Vrabec, Jadran

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of fluids are of key importance for the chemical industry. Presently, the fluid property models used in process design and optimization are mostly equations of state or G (E) models, which are parameterized using experimental data. Molecular modeling and simulation based on classical force fields is a promising alternative route, which in many cases reasonably complements the well established methods. This chapter gives an introduction to the state-of-the-art in this field regarding molecular models, simulation methods, and tools. Attention is given to the way modeling and simulation on the scale of molecular force fields interact with other scales, which is mainly by parameter inheritance. Parameters for molecular force fields are determined both bottom-up from quantum chemistry and top-down from experimental data. Commonly used functional forms for describing the intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented. Several approaches for ab initio to empirical force field parameterization are discussed. Some transferable force field families, which are frequently used in chemical engineering applications, are described. Furthermore, some examples of force fields that were parameterized for specific molecules are given. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods for the calculation of transport properties and vapor-liquid equilibria are introduced. Two case studies are presented. First, using liquid ammonia as an example, the capabilities of semi-empirical force fields, parameterized on the basis of quantum chemical information and experimental data, are discussed with respect to thermodynamic properties that are relevant for the chemical industry. Second, the ability of molecular simulation methods to describe accurately vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of binary mixtures containing CO(2) is shown.

  6. Thermal force approach to molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Dieter; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-06-01

    Recent experiments are discussed where temperature gradients across mesoscopic pores are shown to provide essential mechanisms for autonomous molecular evolution. On the one hand, laminar thermal convection can drive DNA replication as the molecules are continuously cycled between hot and cold regions of a chamber. On the other hand, thermophoresis can accumulate charged biopolymers in similar convection settings. The experiments show that temperature differences analogous to those across porous rocks present a robust nonequilibrium boundary condition to feed the replication and accumulation of evolving molecules. It is speculated that similar nonequilibrium conditions near porous submarine hydrothermal mounds could have triggered the origin of life. In such a scenario, the encapsulation of cells with membranes would be a later development. It is expected that detailed studies of mesoscopic boundary conditions under nonequilibrium conditions will reveal new connecting pieces in the fascinating puzzle of the origins of life.

  7. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O TMAO ) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O TMAO to mimic the O TMAO lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O TMAO to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  8. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Sulpizi, Marialore, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-14

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O{sub TMAO}) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O{sub TMAO} to mimic the O{sub TMAO} lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O{sub TMAO} to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  9. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France); Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  10. Understrength Air Force Officer Career Fields. A Force Management Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    LtCol John Crown (DPSA). In addition, we had very helpful interviews with Mr. Vaughan Blackstone (DPAPP) and Mr. Dennis Miller (DPPAO). Also at...problems in managing personnel assignments. First, there is a high " tax " for special-duty jobs that requires them to place personnel officers into...targeted year-groups populated above the ideal force- structure line (called TOPLINE), in the run up to the RIF of 1992, the desire to avoid or

  11. Effects of Force Field Selection on the Computational Ranking of MOFs for CO2 Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokur, Derya; Keskin, Seda

    2018-02-14

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been considered as highly promising materials for adsorption-based CO 2 separations. The number of synthesized MOFs has been increasing very rapidly. High-throughput molecular simulations are very useful to screen large numbers of MOFs in order to identify the most promising adsorbents prior to extensive experimental studies. Results of molecular simulations depend on the force field used to define the interactions between gas molecules and MOFs. Choosing the appropriate force field for MOFs is essential to make reliable predictions about the materials' performance. In this work, we performed two sets of molecular simulations using the two widely used generic force fields, Dreiding and UFF, and obtained adsorption data of CO 2 /H 2 , CO 2 /N 2 , and CO 2 /CH 4 mixtures in 100 different MOF structures. Using this adsorption data, several adsorbent evaluation metrics including selectivity, working capacity, sorbent selection parameter, and percent regenerability were computed for each MOF. MOFs were then ranked based on these evaluation metrics, and top performing materials were identified. We then examined the sensitivity of the MOF rankings to the force field type. Our results showed that although there are significant quantitative differences between some adsorbent evaluation metrics computed using different force fields, rankings of the top MOF adsorbents for CO 2 separations are generally similar: 8, 8, and 9 out of the top 10 most selective MOFs were found to be identical in the ranking for CO 2 /H 2 , CO 2 /N 2 , and CO 2 /CH 4 separations using Dreiding and UFF. We finally suggested a force field factor depending on the energy parameters of atoms present in the MOFs to quantify the robustness of the simulation results to the force field selection. This easily computable factor will be highly useful to determine whether the results are sensitive to the force field type or not prior to performing computationally demanding

  12. A coarse-grained polarizable force field for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Johannes; Uhlig, Frank; Smiatek, Jens; Holm, Christian

    2017-12-01

    We present a coarse-grained polarizable molecular dynamics force field for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6]). For the treatment of electronic polarizability, we employ the Drude model. Our results show that the new explicitly polarizable force field reproduces important static and dynamic properties such as mass density, enthalpy of vaporization, diffusion coefficients, or electrical conductivity in the relevant temperature range. In situations where an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability might be crucial, we expect the force field to be an improvement over non-polarizable models, while still profiting from the reduction of computational cost due to the coarse-grained representation.

  13. A Force Balanced Fragmentation Method for ab Initio Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyuan Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A force balanced generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (FB-GMFCC method is proposed for ab initio molecular dynamic simulation of proteins. In this approach, the energy of the protein is computed by a linear combination of the QM energies of individual residues and molecular fragments that account for the two-body interaction of hydrogen bond between backbone peptides. The atomic forces on the caped H atoms were corrected to conserve the total force of the protein. Using this approach, ab initio molecular dynamic simulation of an Ace-(ALA9-NME linear peptide showed the conservation of the total energy of the system throughout the simulation. Further a more robust 110 ps ab initio molecular dynamic simulation was performed for a protein with 56 residues and 862 atoms in explicit water. Compared with the classical force field, the ab initio molecular dynamic simulations gave better description of the geometry of peptide bonds. Although further development is still needed, the current approach is highly efficient, trivially parallel, and can be applied to ab initio molecular dynamic simulation study of large proteins.

  14. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  15. Atomic insight into tribochemical wear mechanism of silicon at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in aqueous environment: Molecular dynamics simulations using ReaxFF reactive force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jialin; Ma, Tianbao [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Weiwei; Psofogiannakis, George; Duin, Adri C.T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao [Tribology Research Institute, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Hu, Yuanzhong [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Xinchun, E-mail: xclu@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • New ReaxFF reactive force field was applied to simulate the tribochemical wear process at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Wear of silicon atoms is due to the breaking of Si–O–Si bonds and Si–Si–O–Si bond chains on the Si substrate. • Interfacial bridge bonds play an important role during the tribochemical wear process. • Higher pressures applied to the silica phase can cause more Si atoms to be removed by forming more interfacial bridge bonds. • Water plays an opposing role in the wear process because of its both chemical and mechanical effects. - Abstract: In this work, the atomic mechanism of tribochemical wear of silicon at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in aqueous environment was investigated using ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two types of Si atom removal pathways were detected in the wear process. The first is caused by the destruction of stretched Si–O–Si bonds on the Si substrate surface and is assisted by the attachment of H atoms on the bridging oxygen atoms of the bonds. The other is caused by the rupture of Si–Si bonds in the stretched Si–Si–O–Si bond chains at the interface. Both pathways effectively remove Si atoms from the silicon surface via interfacial Si–O–Si bridge bonds. Our simulations also demonstrate that higher pressures applied to the silica phase can cause more Si atoms to be removed due to the formation of increased numbers of interfacial Si–O–Si bridge bonds. Besides, water plays a dual role in the wear mechanism, by oxidizing the Si substrate surface as well as by preventing the close contact of the surfaces. This work shows that the removal of Si atoms from the substrate is a result of both chemical reaction and mechanical effects and contributes to the understanding of tribochemical wear behavior in the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and Si chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process.

  16. All-atom force field for molecular dynamics simulations on organotransition metal solids and liquids. Application to M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Carlos E S; Canongia Lopes, José N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2013-10-31

    A previously developed OPLS-based all-atom force field for organometallic compounds was extended to a series of first-, second-, and third-row transition metals based on the study of M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) complexes. For materials that are solid at ambient temperature and pressure (M = Cr, Mo, W) the validation of the force field was based on reported structural data and on the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at 298.15 K, experimentally determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry using samples corresponding to a specific and well-characterized crystalline phase: Δ(sub)H(m)° = 72.6 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Cr(CO)(6), 73.4 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Mo(CO)(6), and 77.8 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for W(CO)(6). For liquids, where problems of polymorphism or phase mixtures are absent, critically analyzed literature data were used. The force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties of the test set (density and unit cell volume) with an average deviations smaller than 2% and the experimentally determined enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization with an accuracy better than 2.3 kJ·mol(–1). The Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function parameters used to calculate the repulsive and dispersion contributions of the metals within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable between chromium, iron, and nickel (first row) and between molybdenum and ruthenium (second row).

  17. Generalized force in classical field theory. [Euler-Lagrange equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, J [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas

    1976-02-01

    The source strengths of the Euler-Lagrange equations, for a system of interacting fields, are heuristically interpreted as generalized forces. The canonical form of the energy-momentum tensor thus consistently appears, without recourse to space-time symmetry arguments. A concept of 'conservative' generalized force in classical field theory is also briefly discussed.

  18. Martini Force Field Parameters for Glycolipids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lopéz, C. A.; Sovová, Žofie; van Eerden, F. J.; de Vries, H.; Marrink, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2013), s. 1694-1708 ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : molecular-dynamics simulations * coarse-grained model * phase-behavior * lipid-bilayer * ganglioside GM1 * domain formation * head groups * membrane * Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol * X-RAY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  19. A test on reactive force fields for the study of silica dimerization reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moqadam, Mahmoud; Riccardi, Enrico; Trinh, Thuat T.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-11-14

    We studied silica dimerization reactions in the gas and aqueous phase by density functional theory (DFT) and reactive force fields based on two parameterizations of ReaxFF. For each method (both ReaxFF force fields and DFT), we performed constrained geometry optimizations, which were subsequently evaluated in single point energy calculations using the other two methods. Standard fitting procedures typically compare the force field energies and geometries with those from quantum mechanical data after a geometry optimization. The initial configurations for the force field optimization are usually the minimum energy structures of the ab initio database. Hence, the ab initio method dictates which structures are being examined and force field parameters are being adjusted in order to minimize the differences with the ab initio data. As a result, this approach will not exclude the possibility that the force field predicts stable geometries or low transition states which are realistically very high in energy and, therefore, never considered by the ab initio method. Our analysis reveals the existence of such unphysical geometries even at unreactive conditions where the distance between the reactants is large. To test the effect of these discrepancies, we launched molecular dynamics simulations using DFT and ReaxFF and observed spurious reactions for both ReaxFF force fields. Our results suggest that the standard procedures for parameter fitting need to be improved by a mutual comparative method.

  20. Hierarchical atom type definitions and extensible all-atom force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Yang, Chunwei; Cao, Fenglei; Li, Feng; Jing, Zhifeng; Chen, Long; Shen, Zhe; Xin, Liang; Tong, Sijia; Sun, Huai

    2016-03-15

    The extensibility of force field is a key to solve the missing parameter problem commonly found in force field applications. The extensibility of conventional force fields is traditionally managed in the parameterization procedure, which becomes impractical as the coverage of the force field increases above a threshold. A hierarchical atom-type definition (HAD) scheme is proposed to make extensible atom type definitions, which ensures that the force field developed based on the definitions are extensible. To demonstrate how HAD works and to prepare a foundation for future developments, two general force fields based on AMBER and DFF functional forms are parameterized for common organic molecules. The force field parameters are derived from the same set of quantum mechanical data and experimental liquid data using an automated parameterization tool, and validated by calculating molecular and liquid properties. The hydration free energies are calculated successfully by introducing a polarization scaling factor to the dispersion term between the solvent and solute molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Radiation-Force Assisted Targeting Facilitates Ultrasonic Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhao

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic molecular imaging employs contrast agents, such as microbubbles, nanoparticles, or liposomes, coated with ligands specific for receptors expressed on cells at sites of angiogenesis, inflammation, or thrombus. Concentration of these highly echogenic contrast agents at a target site enhances the ultrasound signal received from that site, promoting ultrasonic detection and analysis of disease states. In this article, we show that acoustic radiation force can be used to displace targeted contrast agents to a vessel wall, greatly increasing the number of agents binding to available surface receptors. We provide a theoretical evaluation of the magnitude of acoustic radiation force and show that it is possible to displace micron-sized agents physiologically relevant distances. Following this, we show in a series of experiments that acoustic radiation force can enhance the binding of targeted agents: The number of biotinylated microbubbles adherent to a synthetic vessel coated with avidin increases as much as 20-fold when acoustic radiation force is applied; the adhesion of contrast agents targeted to αvβ3 expressed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells increases 27-fold within a mimetic vessel when radiation force is applied; and finally, the image signal-to-noise ratio in a phantom vessel increases up to 25 dB using a combination of radiation force and a targeted contrast agent, over use of a targeted contrast agent alone.

  2. Design principles for high–pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Horinek, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.horinek@ur.de [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Kibies, Patrick; Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M., E-mail: stefan.kast@tu-dortmund.de [Physikalische Chemie III, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Imoto, Sho, E-mail: sho.imoto@theochem.rub.de; Marx, Dominik [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland [Physikalische Chemie I, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2016-04-14

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures – while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute’s response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  3. Design principles for high-pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Kibies, Patrick; Imoto, Sho; Frach, Roland; Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland; Marx, Dominik; Horinek, Dominik; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-04-14

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures--while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute's response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  4. Design principles for high–pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Horinek, Dominik; Kibies, Patrick; Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M.; Imoto, Sho; Marx, Dominik; Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures – while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute’s response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  5. Polyphilic Interactions as Structural Driving Force Investigated by Molecular Dynamics Simulation (Project 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Peschel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of fluorinated molecules on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC bilayers by force-field molecular dynamics simulations. In the first step, we developed all-atom force-field parameters for additive molecules in membranes to enable an accurate description of those systems. On the basis of this force field, we performed extensive simulations of various bilayer systems containing different additives. The additive molecules were chosen to be of different size and shape, and they included small molecules such as perfluorinated alcohols, but also more complex molecules. From these simulations, we investigated the structural and dynamic effects of the additives on the membrane properties, as well as the behavior of the additive molecules themselves. Our results are in good agreement with other theoretical and experimental studies, and they contribute to a microscopic understanding of interactions, which might be used to specifically tune membrane properties by additives in the future.

  6. Reactive Force Field for Liquid Hydrazoic Acid with Applications to Detonation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, David; Dubnikova, Faina; van Duin, Adri; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie

    The development of a reactive force field (ReaxFF formalism) for Hydrazoic acid (HN3), a highly sensitive liquid energetic material, is reported. The force field accurately reproduces results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The quality and performance of the force field are examined by detailed comparison with DFT calculations related to uni, bi and trimolecular thermal decomposition routes. Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations are performed to reveal the initial chemical events governing the detonation chemistry of liquid HN3. The outcome of these simulations compares very well with recent results of tight-binding DFT molecular dynamics and thermodynamic calculations. Based on our RMD simulations, predictions were made for the activation energies and volumes in a broad range of temperatures and initial material compressions. Work Supported by The Center of Excellence for Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response, Department of Homeland Security.

  7. The interoperability force in the ERP field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boza, Andrés; Cuenca, Llanos; Poler, Raúl; Michaelides, Zenon

    2015-04-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems participate in interoperability projects and this participation sometimes leads to new proposals for the ERP field. The aim of this paper is to identify the role that interoperability plays in the evolution of ERP systems. To go about this, ERP systems have been first identified within interoperability frameworks. Second, the initiatives in the ERP field driven by interoperability requirements have been identified from two perspectives: technological and business. The ERP field is evolving from classical ERP as information system integrators to a new generation of fully interoperable ERP. Interoperability is changing the way of running business, and ERP systems are changing to adapt to the current stream of interoperability.

  8. Force-field dependence of the conformational properties of ,-dimethoxypolyethylene glycol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winger, Moritz; de Vries, Alex H.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study of ,-dimethoxypolyethylene glycol has been carried out under various conditions with respect to solvent composition, ionic strength, chain length, force field and temperature. A previous MD study on a 15-mer of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) suggested a helical equilibrium

  9. Nanomaterials for in vivo imaging of mechanical forces and electrical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; Kolbl, Rea; Lay, Alice; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2018-02-01

    Cellular signalling is governed in large part by mechanical forces and electromagnetic fields. Mechanical forces play a critical role in cell differentiation, tissue organization and diseases such as cancer and heart disease; electrical fields are essential for intercellular communication, muscle contraction, neural signalling and sensory perception. Therefore, quantifying a biological system's forces and fields is crucial for understanding physiology and disease pathology and for developing medical tools for repair and recovery. This Review highlights advances in sensing mechanical forces and electrical fields in vivo, focusing on optical probes. The emergence of biocompatible optical probes, such as genetically encoded voltage indicators, molecular rotors, fluorescent dyes, semiconducting nanoparticles, plasmonic nanoparticles and lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles, offers exciting opportunities to push the limits of spatial and temporal resolution, stability, multi-modality and stimuli sensitivity in bioimaging. We further discuss the materials design principles behind these probes and compare them across various metrics to facilitate sensor selection. Finally, we examine which advances are necessary to fully unravel the role of mechanical forces and electrical fields in vivo, such as the ability to probe the vectorial nature of forces, the development of combined force and field sensors, and the design of efficient optical actuators.

  10. Towards bridging the gap from molecular forces to the movement of organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    Muscles are responsible for generating the forces required for the movement of multicellular organisms. Microscopically, these forces arise as a consequence of motor proteins (myosin) pulling and sliding along actin filaments. Current knowledge states that the molecular forces between actin...

  11. A transferable force field for CdS-CdSe-PbS-PbSe solid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Koster, Rik S.; Wang, Shuaiwei; Fang, Changming; Yalcin, Anil O.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; van Huis, Marijn A.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2014-12-01

    A transferable force field for the PbSe-CdSe solid system using the partially charged rigid ion model has been successfully developed and was used to study the cation exchange in PbSe-CdSe heteronanocrystals [A. O. Yalcin et al., "Atomic resolution monitoring of cation exchange in CdSe-PbSe heteronanocrystals during epitaxial solid-solid-vapor growth," Nano Lett. 14, 3661-3667 (2014)]. In this work, we extend this force field by including another two important binary semiconductors, PbS and CdS, and provide detailed information on the validation of this force field. The parameterization combines Bader charge analysis, empirical fitting, and ab initio energy surface fitting. When compared with experimental data and density functional theory calculations, it is shown that a wide range of physical properties of bulk PbS, PbSe, CdS, CdSe, and their mixed phases can be accurately reproduced using this force field. The choice of functional forms and parameterization strategy is demonstrated to be rational and effective. This transferable force field can be used in various studies on II-VI and IV-VI semiconductor materials consisting of CdS, CdSe, PbS, and PbSe. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the force field model by molecular dynamics simulations whereby transformations are initiated by cation exchange.

  12. A transferable force field for CdS-CdSe-PbS-PbSe solid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Vlugt, Thijs J. H., E-mail: t.j.h.vlugt@tudelft.nl [Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 39, 2628 CB Delft,The Netherlands (Netherlands); Koster, Rik S.; Fang, Changming; Huis, Marijn A. van [Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science and Center for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Wang, Shuaiwei [Institute of Nanostructured Functional Materials, Huanghe Science and Technology College, Zhengzhou, Henan 450006 (China); Yalcin, Anil O.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zandbergen, Henny W. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    A transferable force field for the PbSe-CdSe solid system using the partially charged rigid ion model has been successfully developed and was used to study the cation exchange in PbSe-CdSe heteronanocrystals [A. O. Yalcin et al., “Atomic resolution monitoring of cation exchange in CdSe-PbSe heteronanocrystals during epitaxial solid-solid-vapor growth,” Nano Lett. 14, 3661–3667 (2014)]. In this work, we extend this force field by including another two important binary semiconductors, PbS and CdS, and provide detailed information on the validation of this force field. The parameterization combines Bader charge analysis, empirical fitting, and ab initio energy surface fitting. When compared with experimental data and density functional theory calculations, it is shown that a wide range of physical properties of bulk PbS, PbSe, CdS, CdSe, and their mixed phases can be accurately reproduced using this force field. The choice of functional forms and parameterization strategy is demonstrated to be rational and effective. This transferable force field can be used in various studies on II-VI and IV-VI semiconductor materials consisting of CdS, CdSe, PbS, and PbSe. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the force field model by molecular dynamics simulations whereby transformations are initiated by cation exchange.

  13. Development of a reactive force field for iron-oxyhydroxide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Masoud; van Duin, Adri C T; Kubicki, James D

    2010-06-03

    We adopt a classical force field methodology, ReaxFF, which is able to reproduce chemical reactions, and train its parameters for the thermodynamics of iron oxides as well as energetics of a few iron redox reactions. Two parametrizations are developed, and their results are compared with quantum calculations or experimental measurements. In addition to training, two test cases are considered: the lattice parameters of a selected set of iron minerals, and the molecular dynamics simulation of a model for alpha-FeOOH (goethite)-water interaction. Reliability and limitations of the developed force fields in predicting structure and energetics are discussed.

  14. Force-field compensation in a manual tracking task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Squeri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses force/movement control in a dynamic "hybrid" task: the master sub-task is continuous manual tracking of a target moving along an eight-shaped Lissajous figure, with the tracking error as the primary performance index; the slave sub-task is compensation of a disturbing curl viscous field, compatibly with the primary performance index. The two sub-tasks are correlated because the lateral force the subject must exert on the eight-shape must be proportional to the longitudinal movement speed in order to perform a good tracking. The results confirm that visuo-manual tracking is characterized by an intermittent control mechanism, in agreement with previous work; the novel finding is that the overall control patterns are not altered by the presence of a large deviating force field, if compared with the undisturbed condition. It is also found that the control of interaction-forces is achieved by a combination of arm stiffness properties and direct force control, as suggested by the systematic lateral deviation of the trajectories from the nominal path and the comparison between perturbed trials and catch trials. The coordination of the two sub-tasks is quickly learnt after the activation of the deviating force field and is achieved by a combination of force and the stiffness components (about 80% vs. 20%, which is a function of the implicit accuracy of the tracking task.

  15. The magnetic field of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoan, P.

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic field of molecular clouds (MCs) plays an important role in the process of star formation: it determines the statistical properties of supersonic turbulence that controls the fragmentation of MCs, controls the angular momentum transport during the protostellar collapse, and affects the stability of circumstellar disks. In this work, we focus on the problem of the determination of the magnetic field strength. We review the idea that the MC turbulence is super-Alfvénic, and we argue that MCs are bound to be born super-Alfvénic. We show that this scenario is supported by results from a recent simulation of supernova-driven turbulence on a scale of 250 pc, where the turbulent cascade is resolved on a wide range of scales, including the interior of MCs.

  16. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik; Szepessy, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  17. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  18. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  19. Valence force fields and the lattice dynamics of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, R.; Mani, K.K.; Singh, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    The lattice dynamics of beryllium oxide have been studied using a rigid-ion model, with short-range forces represented by a valence force field. Various existing calculations on group-IV elements using such a field have been examined as a prelude to transference of force constants from diamond to beryllium oxide. The effects of ionicity on the force constants have been included in the form of scale factors. It is shown that no satisfactory fit to the long-wavelength data on BeO can be found with transferred force constants. However, adequate least-squares fits can be found both with four- and six-parameter valence force fields, the discrepancy with experiment being large only for one optical mode at the Brillouin-zone center. Dispersion curves along Δ and Σ are presented and are in fair agreement with experiment, deviations arising essentially from the quality of the fit to the long-wavelength data. The bond-bending interactions are found to play a significant role and arguments have been presented to show that the inclusion of further angle-angle interactions would yield a very satisfactory picture of the dynamics

  20. Nonequilibrium forces between neutral atoms mediated by a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2010-01-01

    We study forces between two neutral atoms, modeled as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, arising from mutual influences mediated by an electromagnetic field but not from their direct interactions. We allow as dynamical variables the center-of-mass motion of the atom, its internal degrees of freedom, and the quantum field treated relativistically. We adopt the method of nonequilibrium quantum field theory which can provide a first-principles, systematic, and unified description including the intrinsic and induced dipole fluctuations. The inclusion of self-consistent back-actions makes possible a fully dynamical description of these forces valid for general atom motion. In thermal equilibrium we recover the known forces--London, van der Waals, and Casimir-Polder--between neutral atoms in the long-time limit. We also reproduce a recently reported force between atoms when the system is out of thermal equilibrium at late times. More noteworthy is the discovery of the existence of a type of (or identification of the source of some known) interatomic force which we call the ''entanglement force,'' originating from the quantum correlations of the internal degrees of freedom of entangled atoms.

  1. Force-free field model of ball lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the nature that the force-free magnetic field, whose current carried by the conducting plasma is everywhere parallel to the magnetic field it generates, is the minimum energy configuration under the constraint of magnetic helicity conservation, ball lightning is considered as a self-organized phenomenon with a plasma fireball immersed in a spherical force-free magnetic field. Since this field does not exert force on the plasma, the plasma pressure, by itself, is in equilibrium with the surrounding environment, and the force-free magnetic field can take on any value without affecting the plasma. Due to this second feature, singular solutions of the magnetic field that are otherwise excluded are allowed, which enable a large amount of energy to be stored to sustain the ball lightning. The singularity is truncated only by the physical limit of current density that a plasma can carry. Scaling the customary soccer-size fireball to larger dimensions could account for day and night sightings of luminous objects in the sky

  2. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

  3. Radiation reaction force and unification of electromagnetic and gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.Y.; Goldstein, G.R.; Napier, A.

    1981-04-01

    A unified theory of electromagnetic and gravitational fields should modify classical electrodynamics such that the radiation reaction force is accounted for. The analysis leads to a five-dimensional unified theory of five variables. The theory is supported by showing that, for the case of a charged particle moving in a constant magnetic field, the radiation reaction force is indeed included. Moreover, this example shows explicitly that physical changes are associated with the fifth variable. Thus, the notion of a physical five-dimensional space should be seriously taken into consideration

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Martini, Ashlie; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip–substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip–sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement. (paper)

  5. Joyce and Ulysses: integrated and user-friendly tools for the parameterization of intramolecular force fields from quantum mechanical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Cacelli, Ivo; De Mitri, Nicola; Licari, Daniele; Monti, Susanna; Prampolini, Giacomo

    2013-03-21

    The Joyce program is augmented with several new features, including the user friendly Ulysses GUI, the possibility of complete excited state parameterization and a more flexible treatment of the force field electrostatic terms. A first validation is achieved by successfully comparing results obtained with Joyce2.0 to literature ones, obtained for the same set of benchmark molecules. The parameterization protocol is also applied to two other larger molecules, namely nicotine and a coumarin based dye. In the former case, the parameterized force field is employed in molecular dynamics simulations of solvated nicotine, and the solute conformational distribution at room temperature is discussed. Force fields parameterized with Joyce2.0, for both the dye's ground and first excited electronic states, are validated through the calculation of absorption and emission vertical energies with molecular mechanics optimized structures. Finally, the newly implemented procedure to handle polarizable force fields is discussed and applied to the pyrimidine molecule as a test case.

  6. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  7. Martini Coarse-Grained Force Field : Extension to DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Ingolfsson, Helgi I.; Akhshi, Parisa; Tieleman, D. Peter; Marrink, Siewert J.

    We systematically parameterized a coarsegrained (CG) model for DNA that is compatible with the Martini force field. The model maps each nucleotide into six to seven CG beads and is parameterized following the Martini philosophy. The CG nonbonded interactions are based on partitioning of the

  8. Ponderomotive force, magnetic fields and hydrodynamics of laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.-L.; Wee Woo; Degroot, J.-S.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear effects deeply change the structure of a laser driven plasma flow. For high intensities, the radiation pressure should be taken into account. It acts through a ponderomotive force proportional to the electron density and to the gradient of the mean electric field energy density of the incident wave. Static magnetic fields originate from a term in the ponderomotive force which includes radiation absorption and whose curl is non zero. The basic properties of the structure are determined analytically in the absence of thermal conductivity and magnetic fields: steep density gradient close to the cut-off density, shelf at lower densities. The conditions of a steady state regime are set up. The isothermal case is specially investigated. It is shown that the cavities which are created in a motionless plasma may disappear due to the onset of a flow. Regions in which electromagnetic forces arising from the static field compensate the ponderomotive force are determined. The subsequent effects on the flow itself are studied [fr

  9. The MARTINI force field : Coarse grained model for biomolecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert J.; Risselada, H. Jelger; Yefimov, Serge; Tieleman, D. Peter; de Vries, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    We present an improved and extended version of our coarse grained lipid model. The new version, coined the MARTINI force field, is parametrized in a systematic way, based on the reproduction of partitioning free energies between polar and apolar phases of a large number of chemical compounds. To

  10. Martini Coarse-Grained Force Field : Extension to Carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Cesar A.; Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Huenenberger, Philippe H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    We present an extension of the Martini coarse-grained force field to carbohydrates. The parametrization follows the same philosophy as was used previously for lipids and proteins, focusing on the reproduction of partitioning free energies of small compounds between polar and nonpolar phases. The

  11. Implementation of force distribution analysis for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Christian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The way mechanical stress is distributed inside and propagated by proteins and other biopolymers largely defines their function. Yet, determining the network of interactions propagating internal strain remains a challenge for both, experiment and theory. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we developed force distribution analysis (FDA, a method that allows visualizing strain propagation in macromolecules. Results To be immediately applicable to a wide range of systems, FDA was implemented as an extension to Gromacs, a commonly used package for molecular simulations. The FDA code comes with an easy-to-use command line interface and can directly be applied to every system built using Gromacs. We provide an additional R-package providing functions for advanced statistical analysis and presentation of the FDA data. Conclusions Using FDA, we were able to explain the origin of mechanical robustness in immunoglobulin domains and silk fibers. By elucidating propagation of internal strain upon ligand binding, we previously also successfully revealed the functionality of a stiff allosteric protein. FDA thus has the potential to be a valuable tool in the investigation and rational design of mechanical properties in proteins and nano-materials.

  12. Vibrations of a molecule in an external force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J

    2018-05-01

    The oscillation frequencies of a molecule on a surface are determined by the mass distribution in the molecule and the restoring forces that occur when the molecule bends. The restoring force originates from the atomic-scale interaction within the molecule and with the surface, which plays an essential role in the dynamics and reactivity of the molecule. In 1998, a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy with inelastic tunneling spectroscopy revealed the vibrational frequencies of single molecules adsorbed on a surface. However, the probe tip itself exerts forces on the molecule, changing its oscillation frequencies. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy with inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and measure the influence of the forces exerted by the tip on the lateral vibrational modes of a carbon monoxide molecule on a copper surface. Comparing the experimental data to a mechanical model of the vibrating molecule shows that the bonds within the molecule and with the surface are weakened by the proximity of the tip. This combination of techniques can be applied to analyze complex molecular vibrations and the mechanics of forming and loosening chemical bonds, as well as to study the mechanics of bond breaking in chemical reactions and atomic manipulation.

  13. Explicit polarization: a quantum mechanical framework for developing next generation force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G; Wang, Yingjie; Mazack, Michael J M; Löffler, Patrick; Provorse, Makenzie R; Rehak, Pavel

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems ("fragments") to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative examples

  14. Various aspects of magnetic field influence on forced convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleskacz Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flows in the channels of various geometry can be found everywhere in industrial or daily life applications. They are used to deliver media to certain locations or they are the place where heat may be exchanged. For Authors both points of view are interesting. The enhancement methods for heat transfer during the forced convection are demanded due to a technological development and tendency to miniaturization. At the same time it is also worth to find mechanisms that would help to avoid negative effects like pressure losses or sedimentation in the channel flows. This paper shows and discuss various aspects of magnetic field influence on forced convection. A mathematical model consisted of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations. In the momentum conservation equation magnetic force term was included. In order to calculate this magnetic force Biot-Savart’s law was utilized. Numerical analysis was performed with the usage of commonly applied software. However, userdefined functions were implemented. The results revealed that both temperature and velocity fields were influenced by the strong magnetic field.

  15. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  16. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  17. The growth of the concept of forces and fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherji, Visvapriya

    1979-01-01

    The history and development of the concept of forces and fields in nature as was existing since two millenia ago to the ones that are being proposed and modified in the present day schools of field theorists have been traced. The concepts of Aristotle, Galileo, Democritus, Roemer, Newton, etc. which are considered classical in nature are outlined. The modern idea of field theories which owes its origin to the hypothesis propounded by Euler and the later developments by Laplace, Kelvin and Maxwell are described. Finally, Einstein's theory of relativity which projected a very novel interpretation of the gravitational field has also been explained in brief. Some of the hitherto unanswered questions in the field are also posed. (K.B.)

  18. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...... channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  19. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  20. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) I: bond perception and atom typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanommeslaeghe, K; MacKerell, A D

    2012-12-21

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug-like molecules alone or interacting with biological systems. In simulations involving biological macromolecules, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters, and charges is required. In the present article, which is part I of a series of two, we present the algorithms for bond perception and atom typing for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF). The CGenFF atom typer first associates attributes to the atoms and bonds in a molecule, such as valence, bond order, and ring membership among others. Of note are a number of features that are specifically required for CGenFF. This information is then used by the atom typing routine to assign CGenFF atom types based on a programmable decision tree. This allows for straightforward implementation of CGenFF's complicated atom typing rules and for equally straightforward updating of the atom typing scheme as the force field grows. The presented atom typer was validated by assigning correct atom types on 477 model compounds including in the training set as well as 126 test-set molecules that were constructed to specifically verify its different components. The program may be utilized via an online implementation at https://www.paramchem.org/ .

  2. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  3. Topological and statistical properties of nonlinear force-free fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalam, A.; Prasad, A.

    2018-01-01

    We use our semi-analytic solution of the nonlinear force-free field equation to construct three-dimensional magnetic fields that are applicable to the solar corona and study their statistical properties for estimating the degree of braiding exhibited by these fields. We present a new formula for calculating the winding number and compare it with the formula for the crossing number. The comparison is shown for a toy model of two helices and for realistic cases of nonlinear force-free fields; conceptually the formulae are nearly the same but the resulting distributions calculated for a given topology can be different. We also calculate linkages, which are useful topological quantities that are independent measures of the contribution of magnetic braiding to the total free energy and relative helicity of the field. Finally, we derive new analytical bounds for the free energy and relative helicity for the field configurations in terms of the linking number. These bounds will be of utility in estimating the braided energy available for nano-flares or for eruptions.

  4. Magnetoelectric force microscopy based on magnetic force microscopy with modulated electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanan; Wu, Weida

    2014-05-01

    We present the realization of a mesoscopic imaging technique, namely, the Magnetoelectric Force Microscopy (MeFM), for visualization of local magnetoelectric effect. The basic principle of MeFM is the lock-in detection of local magnetoelectric response, i.e., the electric field-induced magnetization, using magnetic force microscopy. We demonstrate MeFM capability by visualizing magnetoelectric domains on single crystals of multiferroic hexagonal manganites. Results of several control experiments exclude artifacts or extrinsic origins of the MeFM signal. The parameters are tuned to optimize the signal to noise ratio.

  5. Atomistic modeling of metal surfaces under electric fields: direct coupling of electric fields to a molecular dynamics algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Pohjonen, Aarne; Nordlund, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on metal surfaces is fairly well studied, resulting in numerous analytical models developed to understand the mechanisms of ionization of surface atoms observed at very high electric fields, as well as the general behavior of a metal surface in this condition. However, the derivation of analytical models does not include explicitly the structural properties of metals, missing the link between the instantaneous effects owing to the applied field and the consequent response observed in the metal surface as a result of an extended application of an electric field. In the present work, we have developed a concurrent electrodynamic–molecular dynamic model for the dynamical simulation of an electric-field effect and subsequent modification of a metal surface in the framework of an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The partial charge induced on the surface atoms by the electric field is assessed by applying the classical Gauss law. The electric forces acting on the partially...

  6. Modeling Enzymatic Transition States by Force Field Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Jensen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The SEAM method, which models a transition structure as a minimum on the seam of two diabatic surfaces represented by force field functions, has been used to generate 20 transition structures for the decarboxylation of orotidine by the orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase enzyme. The dependence...... of the TS geometry on the flexibility of the system has been probed by fixing layers of atoms around the active site and using increasingly larger nonbonded cutoffs. The variability over the 20 structures is found to decrease as the system is made more flexible. Relative energies have been calculated...... by various electronic structure methods, where part of the enzyme is represented by a force field description and the effects of the solvent are represented by a continuum model. The relative energies vary by several hundreds of kJ/mol between the transition structures, and tests showed that a large part...

  7. Tuning the Mass of Chameleon Fields in Casimir Force Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long range Casimir force experiments.

  8. Application of Enlisted Force Retention Levels and Career Field Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    APPLICATION OF ENLISTED FORCE RETENTION LEVELS AND CAREER FIELD STABILITY THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences ...Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Operations Research Jamie T. Zimmermann, MS, BS Captain, USAF March 2017...Appendix B. The function proc lifetest is a nonparametric estimate of the survivor function using either the Kaplan-Meier method or the actuarial

  9. A novel design for electric field deflectometry on extended molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, André; Berninger, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the optimal shape of a beam deflector with applications in electric susceptibility measurements on wide molecular beams. In contrast to the well-established 'two-wire' concept, which is optimized for beams with a small lateral extension, our design realizes a compact element that provides a high and homogeneous force field at moderate voltage for molecular beams with a large extension in the direction of deflection

  10. Implications of confining force field structures in hard hadronic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, H.-U.

    1983-04-01

    This thesis is centered on the study of confining force field structures in hard scattering processes. Perturbative QCD provides the means of calculating any process on the parton level, but to be able accurately to describe the actual outcome of an event, one still needs a phenomenological model for how quarks and gluons transform into observable hadrons. One such model is based on the assumption that the particles are produced by the confining fields stretched between the partons. The actual particle distributions will then depend on the topology of the confining fields. We have developed a Monte Carlo program to simulate complete events in hard scattering, and we use this to study the properties of the confining field in different trigger situations. We further look at the amount of hard processes that can be expected in experiments that trigger on transverse energy sum (calorimeter experiments). Finally, we investigate charm production within our model. (author)

  11. Protein-Ligand Informatics Force Field (PLIff): Toward a Fully Knowledge Driven "Force Field" for Biomolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Marcel L; Ludlow, R Frederick; Giangreco, Ilenia; Rathi, Prakash Chandra

    2016-07-28

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains a wealth of data on nonbonded biomolecular interactions. If this information could be distilled down to nonbonded interaction potentials, these would have some key advantages over standard force fields. However, there are some important outstanding issues to address in order to do this successfully. This paper introduces the protein-ligand informatics "force field", PLIff, which begins to address these key challenges ( https://bitbucket.org/AstexUK/pli ). As a result of their knowledge-based nature, the next-generation nonbonded potentials that make up PLIff automatically capture a wide range of interaction types, including special interactions that are often poorly described by standard force fields. We illustrate how PLIff may be used in structure-based design applications, including interaction fields, fragment mapping, and protein-ligand docking. PLIff performs at least as well as state-of-the art scoring functions in terms of pose predictions and ranking compounds in a virtual screening context.

  12. Accurate van der Waals force field for gas adsorption in porous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Yang, Li; Zhang, Ya-Dong; Shi, Qi; Lu, Rui-Feng; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2017-09-05

    An accurate van der Waals force field (VDW FF) was derived from highly precise quantum mechanical (QM) calculations. Small molecular clusters were used to explore van der Waals interactions between gas molecules and porous materials. The parameters of the accurate van der Waals force field were determined by QM calculations. To validate the force field, the prediction results from the VDW FF were compared with standard FFs, such as UFF, Dreiding, Pcff, and Compass. The results from the VDW FF were in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. This force field can be applied to the prediction of the gas density (H 2 , CO 2 , C 2 H 4 , CH 4 , N 2 , O 2 ) and adsorption performance inside porous materials, such as covalent organic frameworks (COFs), zeolites and metal organic frameworks (MOFs), consisting of H, B, N, C, O, S, Si, Al, Zn, Mg, Ni, and Co. This work provides a solid basis for studying gas adsorption in porous materials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Optimization of the GBMV2 implicit solvent force field for accurate simulation of protein conformational equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo Hao; Chen, Jianhan

    2017-06-15

    Accurate treatment of solvent environment is critical for reliable simulations of protein conformational equilibria. Implicit treatment of solvation, such as using the generalized Born (GB) class of models arguably provides an optimal balance between computational efficiency and physical accuracy. Yet, GB models are frequently plagued by a tendency to generate overly compact structures. The physical origins of this drawback are relatively well understood, and the key to a balanced implicit solvent protein force field is careful optimization of physical parameters to achieve a sufficient level of cancellation of errors. The latter has been hampered by the difficulty of generating converged conformational ensembles of non-trivial model proteins using the popular replica exchange sampling technique. Here, we leverage improved sampling efficiency of a newly developed multi-scale enhanced sampling technique to re-optimize the generalized-Born with molecular volume (GBMV2) implicit solvent model with the CHARMM36 protein force field. Recursive optimization of key GBMV2 parameters (such as input radii) and protein torsion profiles (via the CMAP torsion cross terms) has led to a more balanced GBMV2 protein force field that recapitulates the structures and stabilities of both helical and β-hairpin model peptides. Importantly, this force field appears to be free of the over-compaction bias, and can generate structural ensembles of several intrinsically disordered proteins of various lengths that seem highly consistent with available experimental data. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Force-Field Functor Theory: Classical Force-Fields which Reproduce Equilibrium Quantum Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eBabbush

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Feynman and Hibbs were the first to variationally determine an effective potential whose associated classical canonical ensemble approximates the exact quantum partition function. We examine the existence of a map between the local potential and an effective classical potential which matches the exact quantum equilibrium density and partition function. The usefulness of such a mapping rests in its ability to readily improve Born-Oppenheimer potentials for use with classical sampling. We show that such a map is unique and must exist. To explore the feasibility of using this result to improve classical molecular mechanics, we numerically produce a map from a library of randomly generated one-dimensional potential/effective potential pairs then evaluate its performance on independent test problems. We also apply the map to simulate liquid para-hydrogen, finding that the resulting radial pair distribution functions agree well with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The surprising accessibility and transferability of the technique suggest a quantitative route to adapting Born-Oppenheimer potentials, with a motivation similar in spirit to the powerful ideas and approximations of density functional theory.

  15. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Quynn Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient

  16. Simplified TiO2 force fields for studies of its interaction with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    Engineered TiO2 nanoparticles have been routinely applied in nanotechnology, as well as in cosmetics and food industries. Despite active experimental studies intended to clarify TiO2's biological effects, including potential toxicity, the relation between experimentally inferred nanotoxicity and industry standards for safely applying nanoparticles remains somewhat ambiguous with justified concerns. Supplemental to experiments, molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be efficacious in investigating the molecular mechanism of a biological process occurring at nanoscale. In this article, to facilitate the nanotoxicity and nanomedicine research related to this important metal oxide, we provide a simplified force field, based on the original Matsui-Akaogi force field but compatible to the Lennard-Jones potentials normally used in modeling biomolecules, for simulating TiO2 nanoparticles interacting with biomolecules. The force field parameters were tested in simulating the bulk structure of TiO2, TiO2 nanoparticle-water interaction, as well as the adsorption of proteins on the TiO2 nanoparticle. We demonstrate that these simulation results are consistent with experimental data/observations. We expect that simulations will help to better understand the interaction between TiO2 and molecules.

  17. Force fields for silicas and aluminophosphates based on ab initio calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beest, van B.W.H.; Kramer, G.J.; Santen, van R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Authors address the problem of finding interat. force fields for silicas from ab initio calcns. on small clusters. The force field cannot be detd. from cluster data alone; incorporation of bulk-system information into the force field remains essential. Bearing this in mind, authors derive a force

  18. Efficient nonparametric n -body force fields from machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glielmo, Aldo; Zeni, Claudio; De Vita, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    We provide a definition and explicit expressions for n -body Gaussian process (GP) kernels, which can learn any interatomic interaction occurring in a physical system, up to n -body contributions, for any value of n . The series is complete, as it can be shown that the "universal approximator" squared exponential kernel can be written as a sum of n -body kernels. These recipes enable the choice of optimally efficient force models for each target system, as confirmed by extensive testing on various materials. We furthermore describe how the n -body kernels can be "mapped" on equivalent representations that provide database-size-independent predictions and are thus crucially more efficient. We explicitly carry out this mapping procedure for the first nontrivial (three-body) kernel of the series, and we show that this reproduces the GP-predicted forces with meV /Å accuracy while being orders of magnitude faster. These results pave the way to using novel force models (here named "M-FFs") that are computationally as fast as their corresponding standard parametrized n -body force fields, while retaining the nonparametric character, the ease of training and validation, and the accuracy of the best recently proposed machine-learning potentials.

  19. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sulimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  20. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimov, A V; Kutov, D C; Katkova, E V; Sulimov, V B

    2017-01-01

    Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  1. The R.E.D. tools: advances in RESP and ESP charge derivation and force field library building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupradeau, François-Yves; Pigache, Adrien; Zaffran, Thomas; Savineau, Corentin; Lelong, Rodolphe; Grivel, Nicolas; Lelong, Dimitri; Rosanski, Wilfried; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-07-28

    Deriving atomic charges and building a force field library for a new molecule are key steps when developing a force field required for conducting structural and energy-based analysis using molecular mechanics. Derivation of popular RESP charges for a set of residues is a complex and error prone procedure because it depends on numerous input parameters. To overcome these problems, the R.E.D. Tools (RESP and ESP charge Derive, ) have been developed to perform charge derivation in an automatic and straightforward way. The R.E.D. program handles chemical elements up to bromine in the periodic table. It interfaces different quantum mechanical programs employed for geometry optimization and computing molecular electrostatic potential(s), and performs charge fitting using the RESP program. By defining tight optimization criteria and by controlling the molecular orientation of each optimized geometry, charge values are reproduced at any computer platform with an accuracy of 0.0001 e. The charges can be fitted using multiple conformations, making them suitable for molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. allows also for defining charge constraints during multiple molecule charge fitting, which are used to derive charges for molecular fragments. Finally, R.E.D. incorporates charges into a force field library, readily usable in molecular dynamics computer packages. For complex cases, such as a set of homologous molecules belonging to a common family, an entire force field topology database is generated. Currently, the atomic charges and force field libraries have been developed for more than fifty model systems and stored in the RESP ESP charge DDataBase. Selected results related to non-polarizable charge models are presented and discussed.

  2. Force-field parameters of the Psi and Phi around glycosidic bonds to oxygen and sulfur atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Minoru; Okazaki, Isao

    2009-12-01

    The Psi and Phi torsion angles around glycosidic bonds in a glycoside chain are the most important determinants of the conformation of a glycoside chain. We determined force-field parameters for Psi and Phi torsion angles around a glycosidic bond bridged by a sulfur atom, as well as a bond bridged by an oxygen atom as a preparation for the next study, i.e., molecular dynamics free energy calculations for protein-sugar and protein-inhibitor complexes. First, we extracted the Psi or Phi torsion energy component from a quantum mechanics (QM) total energy by subtracting all the molecular mechanics (MM) force-field components except for the Psi or Phi torsion angle. The Psi and Phi energy components extracted (hereafter called "the remaining energy components") were calculated for simple sugar models and plotted as functions of the Psi and Phi angles. The remaining energy component curves of Psi and Phi were well represented by the torsion force-field functions consisting of four and three cosine functions, respectively. To confirm the reliability of the force-field parameters and to confirm its compatibility with other force-fields, we calculated adiabatic potential curves as functions of Psi and Phi for the model glycosides by adopting the Psi and Phi force-field parameters obtained and by energetically optimizing other degrees of freedom. The MM potential energy curves obtained for Psi and Phi well represented the QM adiabatic curves and also these curves' differences with regard to the glycosidic oxygen and sulfur atoms. Our Psi and Phi force-fields of glycosidic oxygen gave MM potential energy curves that more closely represented the respective QM curves than did those of the recently developed GLYCAM force-field. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reproducing Quantum Probability Distributions at the Speed of Classical Dynamics: A New Approach for Developing Force-Field Functors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Vikram; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2018-04-05

    Modeling nuclear quantum effects is required for accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of molecules. The community has paid special attention to water and other biomolecules that show hydrogen bonding. Standard methods of modeling nuclear quantum effects like Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) are computationally costlier than running classical trajectories. A force-field functor (FFF) is an alternative method that computes an effective force field that replicates quantum properties of the original force field. In this work, we propose an efficient method of computing FFF using the Wigner-Kirkwood expansion. As a test case, we calculate a range of thermodynamic properties of Neon, obtaining the same level of accuracy as RPMD, but with the shorter runtime of classical simulations. By modifying existing MD programs, the proposed method could be used in the future to increase the efficiency and accuracy of MD simulations involving water and proteins.

  4. Nonlinear gravitational self-force: Field outside a small body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Adam

    2012-10-01

    A small extended body moving through an external spacetime gαβ creates a metric perturbation hαβ, which forces the body away from geodesic motion in gαβ. The foundations of this effect, called the gravitational self-force, are now well established, but concrete results have mostly been limited to linear order. Accurately modeling the dynamics of compact binaries requires proceeding to nonlinear orders. To that end, I show how to obtain the metric perturbation outside the body at all orders in a class of generalized wave gauges. In a small buffer region surrounding the body, the form of the perturbation can be found analytically as an expansion for small distances r from a representative worldline. Given only a specification of the body’s multipole moments, the field obtained in the buffer region suffices to find the metric everywhere outside the body via a numerical puncture scheme. Following this procedure at first and second order, I calculate the field in the buffer region around an arbitrarily structured compact body at sufficiently high order in r to numerically implement a second-order puncture scheme, including effects of the body’s spin. I also define nth-order (local) generalizations of the Detweiler-Whiting singular and regular fields and show that in a certain sense, the body can be viewed as a skeleton of multipole moments.

  5. How well do force fields capture the strength of salt bridges in proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Carab Ahmed

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Salt bridges form between pairs of ionisable residues in close proximity and are important interactions in proteins. While salt bridges are known to be important both for protein stability, recognition and regulation, we still do not have fully accurate predictive models to assess the energetic contributions of salt bridges. Molecular dynamics simulation is one technique that may be used study the complex relationship between structure, solvation and energetics of salt bridges, but the accuracy of such simulations depends on the force field used. We have used NMR data on the B1 domain of protein G (GB1 to benchmark molecular dynamics simulations. Using enhanced sampling simulations, we calculated the free energy of forming a salt bridge for three possible lysine-carboxylate ionic interactions in GB1. The NMR experiments showed that these interactions are either not formed, or only very weakly formed, in solution. In contrast, we show that the stability of the salt bridges is overestimated, to different extents, in simulations of GB1 using seven out of eight commonly used combinations of fixed charge force fields and water models. We also find that the Amber ff15ipq force field gives rise to weaker salt bridges in good agreement with the NMR experiments. We conclude that many force fields appear to overstabilize these ionic interactions, and that further work may be needed to refine our ability to model quantitatively the stability of salt bridges through simulations. We also suggest that comparisons between NMR experiments and simulations will play a crucial role in furthering our understanding of this important interaction.

  6. Vector field statistical analysis of kinematic and force trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Todd C; Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2013-09-27

    When investigating the dynamics of three-dimensional multi-body biomechanical systems it is often difficult to derive spatiotemporally directed predictions regarding experimentally induced effects. A paradigm of 'non-directed' hypothesis testing has emerged in the literature as a result. Non-directed analyses typically consist of ad hoc scalar extraction, an approach which substantially simplifies the original, highly multivariate datasets (many time points, many vector components). This paper describes a commensurately multivariate method as an alternative to scalar extraction. The method, called 'statistical parametric mapping' (SPM), uses random field theory to objectively identify field regions which co-vary significantly with the experimental design. We compared SPM to scalar extraction by re-analyzing three publicly available datasets: 3D knee kinematics, a ten-muscle force system, and 3D ground reaction forces. Scalar extraction was found to bias the analyses of all three datasets by failing to consider sufficient portions of the dataset, and/or by failing to consider covariance amongst vector components. SPM overcame both problems by conducting hypothesis testing at the (massively multivariate) vector trajectory level, with random field corrections simultaneously accounting for temporal correlation and vector covariance. While SPM has been widely demonstrated to be effective for analyzing 3D scalar fields, the current results are the first to demonstrate its effectiveness for 1D vector field analysis. It was concluded that SPM offers a generalized, statistically comprehensive solution to scalar extraction's over-simplification of vector trajectories, thereby making it useful for objectively guiding analyses of complex biomechanical systems. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scalar meson field and many-body forces. Chapter 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    In applications of field theory to the theory of the nuclear forces, one has frequently assumed that there is a scalar meson. It will then be responsible for most of the medium-range attraction between the nucleons. According to current ideas, however, it is possible to account for the medium-range attraction without an elementary sigma meson. This approach requires a careful treatment of the exchange of interacting pairs of π mesons, such as to include those ππ interactions which are responsible for the formation and decay of the sigma meson. Recently, the scalar field in the nuclear many-body problem has begun to receive more attention. There are two reasons for this change of philosophy. One reason is the discovery of neutron stars. In neutron stars, the nucleon number density can be much higher than in nuclei. One therefore wants to derive the equation of state from a relativistic many-body theory. This forces one to deal explicitly with a set of mesons, such that in the non-relativistic limit one recovers the one-boson-exchange potential. (Auth.)

  8. The Quantum Space Phase Transitions for Particles and Force Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung D.-Y.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a phenomenological formalism in which the space structure is treated in terms of attachment space and detachment space. Attachment space attaches to an object, while detachment space detaches from the object. The combination of these spaces results in three quantum space phases: binary partition space, miscible space and binary lattice space. Binary lattice space consists of repetitive units of alternative attachment space and detachment space. In miscible space, attachment space is miscible to detachment space, and there is no separation between attachment space and detachment spaces. In binary partition space, detachment space and attachment space are in two separat continuous regions. The transition from wavefunction to the collapse of wavefuction under interference becomes the quantum space phase transition from binary lattice space to miscible space. At extremely conditions, the gauge boson force field undergoes a quantum space phase transition to a "hedge boson force field", consisting of a "vacuum" core surrounded by a hedge boson shell, like a bubble with boundary.

  9. Multipolar Force Fields and Their Effects on Solvent Dynamics around Simple Solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Sofie; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The performance of multipole (MTP) and point charge (PC) force fields in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of condensed-phase systems for both equilibrium and dynamical quantities is compared. MTP electrostatics provides an improved description of the anisotropic electrostatic potential......, which is especially important to describe key, challenging interactions, such as lone pairs, π-interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These chemical environments are probed by focusing on the hydration properties of two molecules: N-methylacetamide and phenyl bromide. Both, equilibrium and dynamical...

  10. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  11. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-01-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin–rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation. (paper)

  12. Long-range force and moment calculations in multiresolution simulations of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursina, Mohammad; Anderson, Kurt S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiresolution simulations of molecular systems such as DNAs, RNAs, and proteins are implemented using models with different resolutions ranging from a fully atomistic model to coarse-grained molecules, or even to continuum level system descriptions. For such simulations, pairwise force calculation is a serious bottleneck which can impose a prohibitive amount of computational load on the simulation if not performed wisely. Herein, we approximate the resultant force due to long-range particle-body and body-body interactions applicable to multiresolution simulations. Since the resultant force does not necessarily act through the center of mass of the body, it creates a moment about the mass center. Although this potentially important torque is neglected in many coarse-grained models which only use particle dynamics to formulate the dynamics of the system, it should be calculated and used when coarse-grained simulations are performed in a multibody scheme. Herein, the approximation for this moment due to far-field particle-body and body-body interactions is also provided.

  13. Importance of Force Decomposition for Local Stress Calculations in Biomembrane Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Juan M; Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Arroyo, Marino

    2014-02-11

    Local stress fields are routinely computed from molecular dynamics trajectories to understand the structure and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers. These calculations can be systematically understood with the Irving-Kirkwood-Noll theory. In identifying the stress tensor, a crucial step is the decomposition of the forces on the particles into pairwise contributions. However, such a decomposition is not unique in general, leading to an ambiguity in the definition of the stress tensor, particularly for multibody potentials. Furthermore, a theoretical treatment of constraints in local stress calculations has been lacking. Here, we present a new implementation of local stress calculations that systematically treats constraints and considers a privileged decomposition, the central force decomposition, that leads to a symmetric stress tensor by construction. We focus on biomembranes, although the methodology presented here is widely applicable. Our results show that some unphysical behavior obtained with previous implementations (e.g. nonconstant normal stress profiles along an isotropic bilayer in equilibrium) is a consequence of an improper treatment of constraints. Furthermore, other valid force decompositions produce significantly different stress profiles, particularly in the presence of dihedral potentials. Our methodology reveals the striking effect of unsaturations on the bilayer mechanics, missed by previous stress calculation implementations.

  14. A new united atom force field for adsorption of alkenes in zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; Smit, B.; Rey, F.; Valencia, S.; Calero, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new united atom force field was developed that accurately describes the adsorption properties of linear alkenes in zeolites. The force field was specifically designed for use in the inhomogeneous system and therefore a truncated and shifted potential was used. With the determined force field, we

  15. A Kirkwood-Buff derived force field for alkaline earth halide salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naleem, Nawavi; Bentenitis, Nikolaos; Smith, Paul E.

    2018-06-01

    The activity and function of many macromolecules in cellular environments are coupled with the binding of divalent ions such as calcium or magnesium. In principle, computer simulations can be used to understand the molecular level aspects of how many important macromolecules interact with ions. However, most of the force fields currently available often fail to accurately reproduce the properties of divalent ions in aqueous environments. Here we develop classical non-polarizable force fields for the aqueous alkaline earth metal halides (MX2), where M = Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ and X = Cl-, Br-, I-, which can be used in bimolecular simulations and which are compatible with the Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) water model. The force field parameters are specifically developed to reproduce the experimental Kirkwood-Buff integrals for aqueous solutions and thereby the experimental activity derivatives, partial molar volumes, and excess coordination numbers. This ensures that a reasonable balance between ion-ion, ion-water, and water-water distributions is obtained. However, this requires a scaling of the cation to water oxygen interaction strength in order to accurately reproduce the integrals. The scaling factors developed for chloride salts are successfully transferable to the bromide and iodide salts. Use of these new models leads to reasonable diffusion constants and dielectric decrements. However, the performance of the models decreases with increasing salt concentration (>4m), and simulations of the pure crystals exhibited unstable behavior.

  16. Osmotic Pressure Simulations of Amino Acids and Peptides Highlight Potential Routes to Protein Force Field Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark S.; Lay, Wesley K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins have suggested that common force fields overestimate the strength of amino acid interactions in aqueous solution. In an attempt to determine the causes of these effects, we have measured the osmotic coefficients of a number of amino acids using the AMBER ff99SB-ILDN force field with two popular water models, and compared the results with available experimental data. With TIP4P-Ew water, interactions between aliphatic residues agree well with experiment, but interactions of the polar residues serine and threonine are found to be excessively attractive. For all tested amino acids, the osmotic coefficients are lower when the TIP3P water model is used. Additional simulations performed on charged amino acids indicate that the osmotic coefficients are strongly dependent on the parameters assigned to the salt ions, with a reparameterization of the sodium:carboxylate interaction reported by the Aksimentiev group significantly improving description of the osmotic coefficient for glutamate. For five neutral amino acids, we also demonstrate a decrease in solute-solute attractions using the recently reported TIP4P-D water model and using the KBFF force field. Finally, we show that for four two-residue peptides improved agreement with experiment can be achieved by re-deriving the partial charges for each peptide. PMID:27052117

  17. Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm: Efficient Training of ReaxFF Reactive Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, David; Carmeli, Benny; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2018-05-04

    Particle swarm optimization is a powerful metaheuristic population-based global optimization algorithm. However, when applied to non-separable objective functions its performance on multimodal landscapes is significantly degraded. Here we show that a significant improvement in the search quality and efficiency on multimodal functions can be achieved by enhancing the basic rotation-invariant particle swarm optimization algorithm with isotropic Gaussian mutation operators. The new algorithm demonstrates a superior performance across several nonlinear, multimodal benchmark functions compared to the rotation-invariant Particle Swam Optimization (PSO) algorithm and the well-established simulated annealing and sequential one-parameter parabolic interpolation methods. A search for the optimal set of parameters for the dispersion interaction model in ReaxFF-lg reactive force field is carried out with respect to accurate DFT-TS calculations. The resulting optimized force field accurately describes the equations of state of several high-energy molecular crystals where such interactions are of crucial importance. The improved algorithm also presents a better performance compared to a Genetic Algorithm optimization method in the optimization of a ReaxFF-lg correction model parameters. The computational framework is implemented in a standalone C++ code that allows a straightforward development of ReaxFF reactive force fields.

  18. Progresses in organic field-effect transistors and molecular electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Weiping; Xu Wei; Hu Wenping; Liu Yunqi; Zhu Daoben

    2006-01-01

    In the past years,organic semiconductors have been extensively investigated as electronic materials for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs).In this review,we briefly summarize the current status of organic field-effect transistors including materials design,device physics,molecular electronics and the applications of carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics.Future prospects and investigations required to improve the OFET performance are also involved.

  19. A Multiposture Locomotor Training Device with Force-Field Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Sui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a multiposture locomotor training device (MPLTD with a closed-loop control scheme based on joint angle feedback, which is able to overcome various difficulties resulting from mechanical vibration and the weight of trainer to achieve higher accuracy trajectory. By introducing the force-field control scheme used in the closed-loop control, the device can obtain the active-constrained mode including the passive one. The MPLTD is mainly composed of three systems: posture adjusting and weight support system, lower limb exoskeleton system, and control system, of which the lower limb exoskeleton system mainly includes the indifferent equilibrium mechanism with two degrees of freedom (DOF and the driving torque is calculated by the Lagrangian function. In addition, a series of experiments, the weight support and the trajectory accuracy experiment, demonstrate a good performance of mechanical structure and the closed-loop control.

  20. New arrangements in force in the field of transport

    CERN Multimedia

    Tom Wegelius

    2006-01-01

    Please take note of the following information concerning new arrangements in force in the field of transport: China: Regulations applying to wooden packaging materials as of 1st January 2006 As scheduled, China introduced standard ISPM No. 15 on 1st January 2006. This was officially confirmed in a letter from the Federal Minister for Consumer Protection, Food and Agriculture. Henceforth, China will apply the same conditions to the importation of wooden packaging materials as various other countries, including the United States, Mexico and Brazil. This means that items shipped to China in wooden packaging will no longer need to be accompanied by a certificate relating to the protection of plant species or other phytosanitary documents (such as heat treatment certificates). However, a guarantee that the wooden packaging complies with standard ISPM No. 15 will be required. Phase II of US regulations concerning wooden packaging material Phase II of regulations concerning the importation of wooden packaging ma...

  1. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Honghua

    Driven by the progress in nanotechnology, imaging and spectroscopy tools with nanometer spatial resolution are needed for in situ material characterizations. Near-field optics provides a unique way to selectively excite and detect elementary electronic and vibrational interactions at the nanometer scale, through interactions of light with matter in the near-field region. This dissertation discusses the development and applications of near-field optical imaging techniques, including plasmonic material characterization, optical spectral nano-imaging and magnetic field detection using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), and exploring new modalities of optical spectroscopy based on optical gradient force detection. Firstly, the optical dielectric functions of one of the most common plasmonic materials---silver is measured with ellipsometry, and analyzed with the Drude model over a broad spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. This work was motivated by the conflicting results of previous measurements, and the need for accurate values for a wide range of applications of silver in plasmonics, optical antennas, and metamaterials. This measurement provides a reference for dielectric functions of silver used in metamaterials, plasmonics, and nanophotonics. Secondly, I implemented an infrared s-SNOM instrument for spectroscopic nano-imaging at both room temperature and low temperature. As one of the first cryogenic s-SNOM instruments, the novel design concept and key specifications are discussed. Initial low-temperature and high-temperature performances of the instrument are examined by imaging of optical conductivity of vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O 3) across their phase transitions. The spectroscopic imaging capability is demonstrated on chemical vibrational resonances of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other samples. The third part of this dissertation explores imaging of optical magnetic fields. As a proof-of-principle, the magnetic

  2. An automated analysis workflow for optimization of force-field parameters using neutron scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Vickie E.; Borreguero, Jose M. [Neutron Data Analysis & Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Bhowmik, Debsindhu [Computational Sciences & Engineering Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Sumpter, Bobby G. [Center for Nanophase Material Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Computational Sciences & Engineering Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Proffen, Thomas E. [Neutron Data Analysis & Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Goswami, Monojoy, E-mail: goswamim@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Material Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Computational Sciences & Engineering Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An automated workflow to optimize force-field parameters. • Used the workflow to optimize force-field parameter for a system containing nanodiamond and tRNA. • The mechanism relies on molecular dynamics simulation and neutron scattering experimental data. • The workflow can be generalized to any other experimental and simulation techniques. - Abstract: Large-scale simulations and data analysis are often required to explain neutron scattering experiments to establish a connection between the fundamental physics at the nanoscale and data probed by neutrons. However, to perform simulations at experimental conditions it is critical to use correct force-field (FF) parameters which are unfortunately not available for most complex experimental systems. In this work, we have developed a workflow optimization technique to provide optimized FF parameters by comparing molecular dynamics (MD) to neutron scattering data. We describe the workflow in detail by using an example system consisting of tRNA and hydrophilic nanodiamonds in a deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) environment. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) data show a faster motion of the tRNA in the presence of nanodiamond than without the ND. To compare the QENS and MD results quantitatively, a proper choice of FF parameters is necessary. We use an efficient workflow to optimize the FF parameters between the hydrophilic nanodiamond and water by comparing to the QENS data. Our results show that we can obtain accurate FF parameters by using this technique. The workflow can be generalized to other types of neutron data for FF optimization, such as vibrational spectroscopy and spin echo.

  3. Ab initio molecular dynamics in a finite homogeneous electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2002-10-07

    We treat homogeneous electric fields within density functional calculations with periodic boundary conditions. A nonlocal energy functional depending on the applied field is used within an ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. The reliability of the method is demonstrated in the case of bulk MgO for the Born effective charges, and the high- and low-frequency dielectric constants. We evaluate the static dielectric constant by performing a damped molecular dynamics in an electric field and avoiding the calculation of the dynamical matrix. Application of this method to vitreous silica shows good agreement with experiment and illustrates its potential for systems of large size.

  4. Marine molecular biology: an emerging field of biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Narsinh L; Jain, Roopesh; Natalio, Filipe; Hamer, Bojan; Thakur, Archana N; Müller, Werner E G

    2008-01-01

    An appreciation of the potential applications of molecular biology is of growing importance in many areas of life sciences, including marine biology. During the past two decades, the development of sophisticated molecular technologies and instruments for biomedical research has resulted in significant advances in the biological sciences. However, the value of molecular techniques for addressing problems in marine biology has only recently begun to be cherished. It has been proven that the exploitation of molecular biological techniques will allow difficult research questions about marine organisms and ocean processes to be addressed. Marine molecular biology is a discipline, which strives to define and solve the problems regarding the sustainable exploration of marine life for human health and welfare, through the cooperation between scientists working in marine biology, molecular biology, microbiology and chemistry disciplines. Several success stories of the applications of molecular techniques in the field of marine biology are guiding further research in this area. In this review different molecular techniques are discussed, which have application in marine microbiology, marine invertebrate biology, marine ecology, marine natural products, material sciences, fisheries, conservation and bio-invasion etc. In summary, if marine biologists and molecular biologists continue to work towards strong partnership during the next decade and recognize intellectual and technological advantages and benefits of such partnership, an exciting new frontier of marine molecular biology will emerge in the future.

  5. Direct calculation of 1-octanol-water partition coefficients from adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Navendu; Kamath, Ganesh; Chelst, Issac; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2012-07-07

    The 1-octanol-water partition coefficient log K(ow) of a solute is a key parameter used in the prediction of a wide variety of complex phenomena such as drug availability and bioaccumulation potential of trace contaminants. In this work, adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine absolute free energies of hydration, solvation, and 1-octanol-water partition coefficients for n-alkanes from methane to octane. Two approaches are evaluated; the direct transfer of the solute from 1-octanol to water phase, and separate transfers of the solute from the water or 1-octanol phase to vacuum, with both methods yielding statistically indistinguishable results. Calculations performed with the TIP4P and SPC∕E water models and the TraPPE united-atom force field for n-alkanes show that the choice of water model has a negligible effect on predicted free energies of transfer and partition coefficients for n-alkanes. A comparison of calculations using wet and dry octanol phases shows that the predictions for log K(ow) using wet octanol are 0.2-0.4 log units lower than for dry octanol, although this is within the statistical uncertainty of the calculation.

  6. Field-effect transistors based on self-organized molecular nanostripes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavallini, M.; Stoliare, P.; Moulin, J.-F.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport properties in organic semiconductors depend strongly on molecular order. Here we demonstrate field-effect transistors where drain current flows through a precisely defined array of nanostripes made of crystalline and highly ordered molecules. The molecular stripes are fabricated ...... by the menisci once the critical concentration is reached and self-organizes into molecularly ordered stripes 100-200 nm wide and a few monolayers high. The charge mobility measured along the stripes is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the values measured for spin-coated thin films....... across the channel of the transistor by a stamp-assisted deposition of the molecular semiconductors from a solution. As the solvent evaporates, the capillary forces drive the solution to form menisci under the stamp protrusions. The solute precipitates only in the regions where the solution is confined...

  7. International Acquisitons in Multinacionals: Under a Force Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo da Costa Ramos Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to debate the performance of multinational companies concerning the management alternatives of their foreign unities, especially the ones derived from acquisitions, with consequences on the interaction between the headquarters and its subsidiaries or colligates and the managerial learning and knowledge associated to this process. First the problematic of internationalized companies by foreign direct investments – FDI’s, mainly by acquisitions and strategic alliances, is discussed. The intensity of the assimilation and interchange of values and practices within organizations in interacting process is stressed, including a set of typologies derived from the existing related literature. After this, a more specific approach about intra and interorganization aspects of the multinationals is performed, related to strategies, competences and roles of headquarters and subsidiaries, as well as their impact on the knowledge flux and its derived learning modes, evolving a established typologies set. The next step is to discuss two visions about the opposition between the universal and the particular in international management, with global and contextual aspects: a convergence-divergence opposition, like a force field, impacting on the knowledge transfer. Finally, some concluding comments are made, emphasizing, for the purpose of contribution, another type of multinationals typology relating the convergence-divergence duality to the organizational and national levels, as well the positioning of the companies in the resulted matrix.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Linear Nanomotor Driven by Thermophoretic Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    Molecular Dynamics of a Linear Nanomotor Driven by Thermophoresis Harvey A. Zambrano1, Jens H. Walther1,2 and Richard L. Jaffe3 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Mechanics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark; 2Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH...... future molecular machines a complete understanding of the friction forces involved on the transport process at the molecular level have to be addressed.18 In this work we perform Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the MD package FASTTUBE19 to study a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial...... the valence forces within the CNT using Morse, harmonic angle and torsion potentials.19We include a nonbonded carbon-carbon Lennard-Jones potential to describe the vdW interaction between the carbon atoms within the double wall portion of the system. We equilibrate the system at 300K for 0.1 ns, by coupling...

  9. Molecular Theory and the Effects of Solute Attractive Forces on Hydrophobic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2016-03-03

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar-Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar-Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2's also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. This is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.

  10. Aqueous electrolyte surfaces in strong electric fields: molecular insight into nanoscale jets and bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsák, Jan; Moučka, Filip; Škvor, Jiří; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Exposing aqueous surfaces to a strong electric field gives rise to interesting phenomena, such as formation of a floating water bridge or an eruption of a jet in electrospinning. In an effort to account for the phenomena at the molecular level, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using several protocols on both pure water and aqueous solutions of sodium chloride subjected to an electrostatic field. All simulations consistently point to the same mechanisms which govern the rearrangement of the originally planar surface. The results show that the phenomena are primarily governed by an orientational reordering of the water molecules driven by the applied field. It is demonstrated that, for pure water, a sufficiently strong field yields a columnar structure parallel to the field with an anisotropic arrangement of the water molecules with their dipole moments aligned along the applied field not only in the surface layer but over the entire cross section of the column. Nonetheless, the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule does not seem to be affected by the field regardless of its strength and molecule's orientation. In the electrolyte solutions, the ionic charge is able to overcome the effect of the external field tending to arrange the water molecules radially in the first coordination shell of an ion. The ion-water interaction interferes thus with the water-electric field interaction, and the competition between these two forces (i.e., strength of the field versus concentration) provides the key mechanism determining the stability of the observed structures.

  11. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  12. The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eFocke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called internal models. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 Ns/m. Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of forty-six subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA. Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (=-A on day 2 (ABA. The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0% or presence (19% of catch trials, in which the force field was turned off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials. In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research

  13. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  14. On radiation forces acting on a transparent nanoparticle in the field of a focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanas' ev, A A; Rubinov, A N [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Gaida, L S; Guzatov, D V; Svistun, A Ch [Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, Grodno (Belarus)

    2015-10-31

    Radiation forces acting on a transparent spherical nanoparticle in the field of a focused Gaussian laser beam are studied theoretically in the Rayleigh scattering regime. Expressions are derived for the scattering force and Cartesian components of the gradient force. The resultant force acting on a nanoparticle located in the centre of a laser beam is found. The parameters of the focused beam and optical properties of the nanoparticle for which the longitudinal component of the gradient force exceeds the scattering force are determined. Characteristics of the transverse gradient force are discussed. (nanophotonics)

  15. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen Petrov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded and oxidatively damaged (unfolded forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL, and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields

  16. Improvement of a force field to model the edges of clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouvreau, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The CLAYFF force field is widely used to model the interfaces of clay minerals - and related layered materials - with an aqueous phase. In the simulations, clay particles are typically represented by semi-infinite layers, i.e. only surfaces parallel to the layer plane (basal surfaces) are considered. This simplification is acceptable to a certain extent, but clay layers are really nano sized and terminated by lateral surfaces or edges. These surfaces can not only adsorb solvated species but are also subject to proton transfers, and all physico-chemical processes related to the aqueous phase acidity predominantly occur at the edges. By adding to the CLAYFF force field a Metal-O-H angle bending term whose parameters are correctly adjusted, the simulations of edge interfaces become possible.The parameters of Al-O-H and Mg-O-H terms were obtained from DFT calculations on bulk, basal surface and edge structural models of gibbsite Al(OH) 3 and brucite Mg(OH) 2 , whose layers can be considered as the backbones of clay minerals and related materials. In addition, the Si-O-H term was parametrized from an edge model of kaolinite Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 . Molecular dynamics simulations based on DFT and on CLAYFF with and without Metal-O-H term were performed. The modified force field clearly improves the description of hydroxylated surfaces: the orientation and the vibrational dynamics of the hydroxyl groups, the hydrogen bonding, and the coordination of metal atoms belonging to the edge are all closer to reality [fr

  17. Interaction between benzenedithiolate and gold: Classical force field for chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yongsheng; Krstić, Predrag S.; Wells, Jack C.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dean, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We have constructed a group of classical potentials based on ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to describe the chemical bonding between benzenedithiolate (BDT) molecule and gold atoms, including bond stretching, bond angle bending, and dihedral angle torsion involved at the interface between the molecule and gold clusters. Three DFT functionals, local-density approximation (LDA), PBE0, and X3LYP, have been implemented to calculate single point energies (SPE) for a large number of molecular configurations of BDT-1, 2 Au complexes. The three DFT methods yield similar bonding curves. The variations of atomic charges from Mulliken population analysis within the molecule/metal complex versus different molecular configurations have been investigated in detail. We found that, except for bonded atoms in BDT-1, 2 Au complexes, the Mulliken partial charges of other atoms in BDT are quite stable, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in partial charge selections in classical molecular simulations. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structure of BDT self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the adsorption geometry of S adatoms on Au (111) surface. We found that the bond-stretching potential is the most dominant part in chemical bonding. Whereas the local bonding geometry of BDT molecular configuration may depend on the DFT functional used, the global packing structure of BDT SAM is quite independent of DFT functional, even though the uncertainty of some force-field parameters for chemical bonding can be as large as ˜100%. This indicates that the intermolecular interactions play a dominant role in determining the BDT SAMs global packing structure.

  18. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  19. Development of a tuned interfacial force field parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption to silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, James A; Abramyan, Tigran; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption free energies for eight host-guest peptides (TGTG-X-GTGT, with X = N, D, G, K, F, T, W, and V) on two different silica surfaces [quartz (100) and silica glass] were calculated using umbrella sampling and replica exchange molecular dynamics and compared with experimental values determined by atomic force microscopy. Using the CHARMM force field, adsorption free energies were found to be overestimated (i.e., too strongly adsorbing) by about 5-9 kcal/mol compared to the experimental data for both types of silica surfaces. Peptide adsorption behavior for the silica glass surface was then adjusted using a modified version of the CHARMM program, which we call dual force-field CHARMM, which allows separate sets of nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charge and Lennard-Jones parameters) to be used to represent intra-phase and inter-phase interactions within a given molecular system. Using this program, interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for the peptide-silica glass systems were corrected to obtain adsorption free energies within about 0.5 kcal/mol of their respective experimental values, while IFF tuning for the quartz (100) surface remains for future work. The tuned IFF parameter set for silica glass will subsequently be used for simulations of protein adsorption behavior on silica glass with greater confidence in the balance between relative adsorption affinities of amino acid residues and the aqueous solution for the silica glass surface.

  20. Conservative and dissipative force field for simulation of coarse-grained alkane molecules: A bottom-up approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trément, Sébastien; Rousseau, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.rousseau@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Schnell, Benoît; Petitjean, Laurent; Couty, Marc [Manufacture Française des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2014-04-07

    We apply operational procedures available in the literature to the construction of coarse-grained conservative and friction forces for use in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The full procedure rely on a bottom-up approach: large molecular dynamics trajectories of n-pentane and n-decane modeled with an anisotropic united atom model serve as input for the force field generation. As a consequence, the coarse-grained model is expected to reproduce at least semi-quantitatively structural and dynamical properties of the underlying atomistic model. Two different coarse-graining levels are studied, corresponding to five and ten carbon atoms per DPD bead. The influence of the coarse-graining level on the generated force fields contributions, namely, the conservative and the friction part, is discussed. It is shown that the coarse-grained model of n-pentane correctly reproduces self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of real n-pentane, while the fully coarse-grained model for n-decane at ambient temperature over-predicts diffusion by a factor of 2. However, when the n-pentane coarse-grained model is used as a building block for larger molecule (e.g., n-decane as a two blobs model), a much better agreement with experimental data is obtained, suggesting that the force field constructed is transferable to large macro-molecular systems.

  1. Calculating Free Energies Using Scaled-Force Molecular Dynamics Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Eric; Wilson, Micahel A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    One common objective of molecular simulations in chemistry and biology is to calculate the free energy difference between different states of the system of interest. Examples of problems that have such an objective are calculations of receptor-ligand or protein-drug interactions, associations of molecules in response to hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions or partition of molecules between immiscible liquids. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), 'native' state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is folding of proteins or short RNA molecules. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to 'quasi non-ergodicity', whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on timescales of the simulation. A host of strategies has been developed to improve efficiency of sampling the phase space. For example, some Monte Carlo techniques involve large steps which move the system between low-energy regions in phase space without the need for sampling the configurations corresponding to energy barriers (J-walking). Most strategies, however, rely on modifying probabilities of sampling low and high-energy regions in phase space such that transitions between states of interest are encouraged. Perhaps the simplest implementation of this strategy is to increase the temperature of the system. This approach was successfully used to identify denaturation pathways in several proteins, but it is clearly not applicable to protein folding. It is also not a successful method for determining free energy differences. Finally, the approach is likely to fail for systems with co-existing phases, such as water-membrane systems, because it may lead to spontaneous

  2. Predictions of Phase Separation in Three-Component Lipid Membranes by the MARTINI Force Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Ryan S.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2013-01-01

    The phase behavior of the coarse-grained MARTINI model for three-component lipid bilayers composed of dipalmytoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol (Chol), and an unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) was systematically investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The aim of this study...... is to understand which types of unsaturated PC induce the formation of thermodynamically stable coexisting phases when added to mixtures of DPPC and Chol and to unravel the mechanisms that drive phase separation in such three-component mixtures. Our simulations indicate that the currently used MARTINI force field...... PCs, such as dilinoleyl-phosphatidylcholine (DUPC) and diarachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DAPC). Through systematic tweaking of the interactions between the hydrophobic groups of the PC molecules, we show that the appearance of phase separation in three-component lipid bilayers, as modeled through...

  3. Intermolecular Force Field Parameters Optimization for Computer Simulations of CH4 in ZIF-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phannika Kanthima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential evolution (DE algorithm is applied for obtaining the optimized intermolecular interaction parameters between CH4 and 2-methylimidazolate ([C4N2H5]− using quantum binding energies of CH4-[C4N2H5]− complexes. The initial parameters and their upper/lower bounds are obtained from the general AMBER force field. The DE optimized and the AMBER parameters are then used in the molecular dynamics (MD simulations of CH4 molecules in the frameworks of ZIF-8. The results show that the DE parameters are better for representing the quantum interaction energies than the AMBER parameters. The dynamical and structural behaviors obtained from MD simulations with both sets of parameters are also of notable differences.

  4. Dusty plasmas in a constant electric field: Role of the electron drag force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapak, S.A.; Morfill, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the forces experienced by a microparticle immersed in a weakly ionized plasma with constant electric field. These are electric force and the forces associated with the momentum transfer from electrons and ions drifting in the field (electron and ion drag forces). It is shown that the effect of the electron drag, which is often neglected, can be substantial in a certain parameter range. Numerical calculation of the forces for a reasonable set of plasma parameters is performed to illustrate the importance of this effect

  5. The Weiss molecular field and the local molecular field; Le champ moleculaire de Weiss et le champ moleculaire local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Faculte des Sciences de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1959-07-01

    Initially, the present report outlines the work done by P. Weiss in the molecular field and spontaneous magnetization theory. It then stresses the success of the theory in the interpretation of the magnetic and energetic properties of ferro-magnetic bodies, and indicates recent progress: 'the energetic molecular field, and the corrective molecular field of the equation of state'. In the second part, the author reviews the difficulties encountered by the theory, and shows how they were overcome by the introduction of the notion of the 'local molecular field', thus supplying the key to the properties of anti-ferro and ferri-magnetic bodies. The present level of progress in the interpretation of the magnetic properties of pyrrhotite, which played a major part in the molecular field discoveries, is also discussed in paragraph 4 and appendices. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, l'auteur retrace l'historique des travaux de P. Weiss sur la theorie du champ moleculaire et l'aimantation spontanee; il en souligne les succes dans l'interpretation des proprietes magnetiques et energetiques des corps ferro-magnetiques et les perfectionnements ultimes: champ moleculaire energetique et champ moleculaire correctif de l'equation d'etat. Dans une deuxieme partie, apres avoir examine les difficultes auxquelles se heurtait la theorie, l'auteur montre qu'elles ont ete resolues en introduisant la notion de champ moleculaire local et en donnant ainsi la cle des proprietes des corps antiferro-et ferri-magnetiques. II etudie egalement (paragraphe 4 et Appendice) l'etat actuel de l'interpretation des proprietes magnetiques de la pyrrhotine qui a joue un grand role dans l'histoire du champ moleculaire. (auteur)

  6. TET Offensive II Field Force Vietnam After Action Report 31 January - 18 February 1968

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-03-01

    and the 5th VC Division. V During this same period of time there were no majur shifts in ARVN forces . However III Corps shifted three...8217-".•: ’ ’SSIFJED U.S. ARMY. VIETNAM. II FIELD FORCE . TET OFFENSIVE II FIELD FORCE VIETNAM AFTER ACTION REPORT, 31 JANUARY-18 FEB- RUARY 1968...H FIELD FORCE VIETNAM AFTER ACTION REPORT 31 January-18 February 1968 RECORD K0- ! FlSjl fi-.-A-,>-•: it tT*\\ : *si h s» -wP Mr-, £< St

  7. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richters, Dorothee [Institute of Mathematics and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Kühne, Thomas D., E-mail: kuehne@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  8. Molecular structure of dipalmitoylphospatidylcholine Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers studied by atomic force microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhai, X.; Kleijn, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on the air-water interface have been transferred at various surface pressures onto quartz substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The topography of these layers, on a molecular scale, has been examined by atomic force microscopy

  9. Artificial force fields for multi-agent simulations of maritime traffic and risk estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, F.; Ligteringen, H.; Van Gulijk, C.; Ale, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic risk model is designed to estimate probabilities of collisions for shipping accidents in busy waterways. We propose a method based on multi-agent simulation that uses an artificial force field to model ship maneuvers. The artificial force field is calibrated by AIS data (Automatic

  10. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydock, David [Unilever R and D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space.

  11. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David

    2005-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space

  12. Recent advances toward a general purpose linear-scaling quantum force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J; Huang, Ming; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus There is need in the molecular simulation community to develop new quantum mechanical (QM) methods that can be routinely applied to the simulation of large molecular systems in complex, heterogeneous condensed phase environments. Although conventional methods, such as the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method, are adequate for many problems, there remain other applications that demand a fully quantum mechanical approach. QM methods are generally required in applications that involve changes in electronic structure, such as when chemical bond formation or cleavage occurs, when molecules respond to one another through polarization or charge transfer, or when matter interacts with electromagnetic fields. A full QM treatment, rather than QM/MM, is necessary when these features present themselves over a wide spatial range that, in some cases, may span the entire system. Specific examples include the study of catalytic events that involve delocalized changes in chemical bonds, charge transfer, or extensive polarization of the macromolecular environment; drug discovery applications, where the wide range of nonstandard residues and protonation states are challenging to model with purely empirical MM force fields; and the interpretation of spectroscopic observables. Unfortunately, the enormous computational cost of conventional QM methods limit their practical application to small systems. Linear-scaling electronic structure methods (LSQMs) make possible the calculation of large systems but are still too computationally intensive to be applied with the degree of configurational sampling often required to make meaningful comparison with experiment. In this work, we present advances in the development of a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) suitable for application to biological macromolecules and condensed phase simulations. QMFFs leverage the benefits provided by the LSQM and QM/MM approaches to produce a fully QM method that is able to

  13. Molecular Velcro constructed from polymer loop brushes showing enhanced adhesion force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Han, Biao; Han, Lin; Li, Christopher; Department of Materials Science; Engineering Team; School of Biomedical Engineering, Science; Health Systems Team

    2015-03-01

    Molecular Velcro is commonly seen in biological systems as the formation of strong physical entanglement at molecular scale could induce strong adhesion, which is crucial to many biological processes. To mimic this structure, we designed, and fabricated polymer loop brushes using polymer single crystals with desired surface functionality and controlled chain folding. Compared with reported loop brushes fabricated using triblock copolymers, the present loop bushes have precise loop sizes, loop grafting density, and well controlled tethering locations on the solid surface. Atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy measurements using a polymer chain coated probe reveal that the adhesion force are significantly enhanced on the loop brush surface as compared with its single-strand counterpart. This study directly shows the effect of polymer brush conformation on their properties, and suggests a promising strategy for advanced polymer surface design.

  14. Energy of Force-Free Magnetic Fields in Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.S. Choe; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    In typical observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a magnetic structure of a helmet-shaped closed configuration bulges out and eventually opens up. However, a spontaneous transition between these field configurations has been regarded to be energetically impossible in force-free fields according to the Aly-Sturrock theorem. The theorem states that the maximum energy state of force-free fields with a given boundary normal field distribution is the open field. The theorem implicitly assumes the existence of the maximum energy state, which may not be taken for granted. In this study, we have constructed force-free fields containing tangential discontinuities in multiple flux systems. These force-free fields can be generated from a potential field by footpoint motions that do not conserve the boundary normal field distribution. Some of these force-free fields are found to have more magnetic energy than the corresponding open fields. The constructed force-free configurations are compared with observational features of CME-bearing active regions. Possible mechanisms of CMEs are also discussed

  15. Energy of Force-Free Magnetic Fields in Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, G.S.; Cheng, C.Z.

    2002-01-01

    In typical observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a magnetic structure of a helmet-shaped closed configuration bulges out and eventually opens up. However, a spontaneous transition between these field configurations has been regarded to be energetically impossible in force-free fields according to the Aly-Sturrock theorem. The theorem states that the maximum energy state of force-free fields with a given boundary normal field distribution is the open field. The theorem implicitly assumes the existence of the maximum energy state, which may not be taken for granted. In this study, we have constructed force-free fields containing tangential discontinuities in multiple flux systems. These force-free fields can be generated from a potential field by footpoint motions that do not conserve the boundary normal field distribution. Some of these force-free fields are found to have more magnetic energy than the corresponding open fields. The constructed force-free configurations are compared with observational features of CME-bearing active regions. Possible mechanisms of CMEs are also discussed

  16. Interactions between Nanoparticles and Polymer Brushes: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Self-consistent Field Theory Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Wen, Chengyuan; Egorov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and self-consistent field theory calculations are employed to study the interactions between a nanoparticle and a polymer brush at various densities of chains grafted to a plane. Simulations with both implicit and explicit solvent are performed. In either case the nanoparticle is loaded to the brush at a constant velocity. Then a series of simulations are performed to compute the force exerted on the nanoparticle that is fixed at various distances from the grafting plane. The potential of mean force is calculated and compared to the prediction based on a self-consistent field theory. Our simulations show that the explicit solvent leads to effects that are not captured in simulations with implicit solvent, indicating the importance of including explicit solvent in molecular simulations of such systems. Our results also demonstrate an interesting correlation between the force on the nanoparticle and the density profile of the brush. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NVIDIA Corporation with the donation of the Tesla K40 GPU used for this research.

  17. Active mechanics in living oocytes reveal molecular-scale force kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie; Fodor, Etienne; Almonacid, Maria; Bussonnier, Matthias; Verlhac, Marie-Helene; Gov, Nir; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frederic; Betz, Timo

    Unlike traditional materials, living cells actively generate forces at the molecular scale that change their structure and mechanical properties. This nonequilibrium activity is essential for cellular function, and drives processes such as cell division. Single molecule studies have uncovered the detailed force kinetics of isolated motor proteins in-vitro, however their behavior in-vivo has been elusive due to the complex environment inside the cell. Here, we quantify active forces and intracellular mechanics in living oocytes using in-vivo optical trapping and laser interferometry of endogenous vesicles. We integrate an experimental and theoretical framework to connect mesoscopic measurements of nonequilibrium properties to the underlying molecular- scale force kinetics. Our results show that force generation by myosin-V drives the cytoplasmic-skeleton out-of-equilibrium (at frequencies below 300 Hz) and actively softens the environment. In vivo myosin-V activity generates a force of F ~ 0 . 4 pN, with a power-stroke of length Δx ~ 20 nm and duration τ ~ 300 μs, that drives vesicle motion at vv ~ 320 nm/s. This framework is widely applicable to characterize living cells and other soft active materials.

  18. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems

  19. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia, E-mail: ekalligian@tem.uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Harmandaris, Vagelis, E-mail: harman@uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (IACM), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), IACM/FORTH, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Katsoulakis, Markos A., E-mail: markos@math.umass.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Plecháč, Petr, E-mail: plechac@math.udel.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  20. Coupled-cluster treatment of molecular strong-field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2018-05-01

    Ionization rates and Stark shifts of H2, CO, O2, H2O, and CH4 in static electric fields have been computed with coupled-cluster methods in a basis set of atom-centered Gaussian functions with a complex-scaled exponent. Consideration of electron correlation is found to be of great importance even for a qualitatively correct description of the dependence of ionization rates and Stark shifts on the strength and orientation of the external field. The analysis of the second moments of the molecular charge distribution suggests a simple criterion for distinguishing tunnel and barrier suppression ionization in polyatomic molecules.

  1. Molecular-Field Calculation of the Magnetic Structure in Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1976-01-01

    A molecular-field calculation of the magnetic configurations in Er is found to reproduce the neutron diffraction results of the three different magnetic phases and to give a reasonable fit to the magnetization data at 4.2K. The two-ion coupling is considered to be described by the inter......-planar coupling parameters deduced from the dispersion of the spin waves in the low temperature conical phases. The four (effective) crystal-field parameters are determined by the fit to the experimental data. Projecting the magnetic moments present in the intermediate phase of Er (18-52.4K) to a common origin...

  2. Dynamics of solar magnetic fields. VI. Force-free magnetic fields and motions of magnetic foot-points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, B.C.; Nakagawa, Y.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to consider the evolution of force-free magnetic fields in relation to the displacements of their foot-points. For a magnetic field depending on only two Cartesian coordinates and time, the problem reduces to solving a nonlinear elliptic partial differential equation. As illustration of the physical process, two specific examples of evolving force-free magnetic fields are examined in detail, one evolving with rising and the other with descending field lines. It is shown that these two contrasting behaviors of the field lines correspond to sheared motions of their foot-points of quite different characters. The physical implications of these two examples of evolving force-free magnetic fields are discussed. (auth)

  3. Development of CHARMM-Compatible Force-Field Parameters for Cobalamin and Related Cofactors from Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Anna; Parks, Jerry M; Gumbart, James C

    2018-02-13

    Corrinoid cofactors such as cobalamin are used by many enzymes and are essential for most living organisms. Therefore, there is broad interest in investigating cobalamin-protein interactions with molecular dynamics simulations. Previously developed parameters for cobalamins are based mainly on crystal structure data. Here, we report CHARMM-compatible force field parameters for several corrinoids developed from quantum mechanical calculations. We provide parameters for corrinoids in three oxidation states, Co 3+ , Co 2+ , and Co 1+ , and with various axial ligands. Lennard-Jones parameters for the cobalt center in the Co(II) and Co(I) states were optimized using a helium atom probe, and partial atomic charges were obtained with a combination of natural population analysis (NPA) and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) fitting approaches. The Force Field Toolkit was used to optimize all bonded terms. The resulting parameters, determined solely from calculations of cobalamin alone or in water, were then validated by assessing their agreement with density functional theory geometries and by analyzing molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of several corrinoid proteins for which X-ray crystal structures are available. In each case, we obtained excellent agreement with the reference data. In comparison to previous CHARMM-compatible parameters for cobalamin, we observe a better agreement for the fold angle and lower RMSD in the cobalamin binding site. The approach described here is readily adaptable for developing CHARMM-compatible force-field parameters for other corrinoids or large biomolecules.

  4. Spatial Confinement of Ultrasonic Force Fields in Microfluidic Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manneberg, O; Hagsäter, Melker; Svennebring, J

    2009-01-01

    -PIV). The confinement of the ultrasonic fields during single-or dual-segment actuation, as well as the cross-talk between two adjacent. fields, is characterized and quantified. Our results show that the field confinement typically scales with the acoustic wavelength, and that the cross-talk is insignificant between...... adjacent. fields. The goal is to define design strategies for implementing several spatially separated ultrasonic manipulation functions in series for use in advanced particle or cell handling and processing applications. One such proof-of-concept application is demonstrated, where. flow...

  5. Ligandbook: an online repository for small and drug-like molecule force field parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Jan; Beckstein, Oliver; Iorga, Bogdan I

    2017-06-01

    Ligandbook is a public database and archive for force field parameters of small and drug-like molecules. It is a repository for parameter sets that are part of published work but are not easily available to the community otherwise. Parameter sets can be downloaded and immediately used in molecular dynamics simulations. The sets of parameters are versioned with full histories and carry unique identifiers to facilitate reproducible research. Text-based search on rich metadata and chemical substructure search allow precise identification of desired compounds or functional groups. Ligandbook enables the rapid set up of reproducible molecular dynamics simulations of ligands and protein-ligand complexes. Ligandbook is available online at https://ligandbook.org and supports all modern browsers. Parameters can be searched and downloaded without registration, including access through a programmatic RESTful API. Deposition of files requires free user registration. Ligandbook is implemented in the PHP Symfony2 framework with TCL scripts using the CACTVS toolkit. oliver.beckstein@asu.edu or bogdan.iorga@cnrs.fr ; contact@ligandbook.org . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Relativistic derivation of the ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroscio, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The ponderomotive force plays a fundamental role in the absorption of laser light on self-consistent plasma density profiles, in multiple-photon ionization, and in intense field electrodynamics. The relativistic corrections to the ponderomotive force of a transversely polarized electromagnetic wave lead to an approximately 20-percent reduction in the single particle ponderomotive force produced by a 10-γm 10 16 -W/cm 2 laser field. Recent experimental investigations are based on using two intense laser fields to produce desired lasermatter interactions. This paper presents the first derivation of the nonlinear relativistic ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields. The results demonstrate that relativistic ponderomotive forces are not additive

  7. Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator: I. Refinement Using Quantum Mechanical Base Stacking and Conformational Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkul, Justin A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-05-09

    Empirical force fields seek to relate the configuration of a set of atoms to its energy, thus yielding the forces governing its dynamics, using classical physics rather than more expensive quantum mechanical calculations that are computationally intractable for large systems. Most force fields used to simulate biomolecular systems use fixed atomic partial charges, neglecting the influence of electronic polarization, instead making use of a mean-field approximation that may not be transferable across environments. Recent hardware and software developments make polarizable simulations feasible, and to this end, polarizable force fields represent the next generation of molecular dynamics simulation technology. In this work, we describe the refinement of a polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model by targeting quantum mechanical interaction energies and conformational energy profiles of model compounds necessary to build a complete DNA force field. The parametrization strategy employed in the present work seeks to correct weak base stacking in A- and B-DNA and the unwinding of Z-DNA observed in the previous version of the force field, called Drude-2013. Refinement of base nonbonded terms and reparametrization of dihedral terms in the glycosidic linkage, deoxyribofuranose rings, and important backbone torsions resulted in improved agreement with quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces. Notably, we expand on previous efforts by explicitly including Z-DNA conformational energetics in the refinement.

  8. The influence of magnetic field on ballistic performance of aramid fibre and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.C.; Ruan, D.; Sesso, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ballistic tests conducted on Kevlar and UHMWPE within a magnetic field. • Repulsion force created by opposing magnet poles reduced the impact momentum. • High speed camera images showed no perforation on Kevlar due to magnetic field. • Standoff distance between magnets has an effect on the repulsion force. - Abstract: An innovative method is introduced here whereby using two sets of arrays of rare earth magnets aligned opposite each other in order to create a repulsion force owing to the like poles when facing close to each other. Ballistic test samples of aramid fibre (Kevlar K29) and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were sandwiched by two sets of opposing magnets. Ballistic test was conducted using a gas gun with a 7.62 mm diameter projectile at a velocity ranging from 160 to 220 m/s. High speed camera was used to capture the ballistics testing and it shows that the magnetic repulsion force created by the opposing rare earth magnets managed to suppress the projectile from advancing into the front face of the aramid fibre. Similarly, when magnets were used, the UHMWPE sample shows the projectile perforated through the first few sheets and finally rested on the last sheet showing partial perforation

  9. Force Characteristics Analysis for Linear Machine with DC Field Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A/L Krishna Preshant

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In urban regions and particularly in developing countries such as Malaysia with its ever-growing transport sector, there is the need for energy efficient systems. In urban railway systems there is a requirement of frequent braking and start/stop motion, and energy is lost during these processes. To improve the issues of the conventional braking systems, particularly in Japan, they have introduced linear induction motor techniques. The drawbacks of this method, however, is the use of permanent magnets, which not only increase the weight of the entire system but also increases magnetic cogging. Hence an alternative is required which uses the same principles as Magnetic-Levitation but using a magnet-less system. Therefore, the objective of this research is to propose an electromagnetic rail brake system and to analyze the effect of replacing permanent magnets with a magnet-less braking systems to produce a significant amount of brake thrust as compared with the permanent magnet system. The modeling and performance analysis of the model is done using Finite Element Analysis (FEA. The mechanical aspects of the model are designed on Solidworks and then imported to JMAG Software to proceed with the electro-magnetic analysis of the model. There are 3 models developed: Base Model (steel, Permanent Magnet (PM Model and DC Coil Model. The performance of the proposed 2D models developed is evaluated in terms of average force produced and motor constant square density. By comparing the values for the 3 models for the same case of 9A current supplied for a 0.1mm/s moving velocity, the base model, permanent magnet model and DC coil model produced an average force of 7.78 N, 7.55 N, and 8.34 N respectively, however, with increase in DC current supplied to the DC coil model, the average force produced is increased to 13.32 N. Thus, the advantage of the DC coil (magnet-less model, is, that the force produced can be controlled by varying the number of turns in the

  10. On the absorbing force of magnetic fields acting on magnetic particle under magnetic particle examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, N.

    1988-01-01

    During the magnetic particle examination, magnetic particles near defects are deposited by an absorbing force of magnetic fields acting on the magnetic particles. Therefore, a quantitative determination of this absorbing force is a theoretical and experimental basis for solving various problems associated with magnetic particle examinations. The absorbing force is formulated based on a magnetic dipole model, and a measuring method of the absorbing force using magnetic fields formed around linear current is proposed. Measurements according to this method produced appropriate results, verifying the validation of the concept and the measuring method

  11. Investigating the binding behaviour of two avidin-based testosterone binders using molecular recognition force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangl, Martina; Leitner, Michael; Riihimäki, Tiina; Lehtonen, Soili; Hytönen, Vesa P; Gruber, Hermann J; Kulomaa, Markku; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Ebner, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Molecular recognition force spectroscopy, a biosensing atomic force microscopy technique allows to characterise the dissociation of ligand-receptor complexes at the molecular level. Here, we used molecular recognition force spectroscopy to study the binding capability of recently developed testosterone binders. The two avidin-based proteins called sbAvd-1 and sbAvd-2 are expected to bind both testosterone and biotin but differ in their binding behaviour towards these ligands. To explore the ligand binding and dissociation energy landscape of these proteins, we tethered biotin or testosterone to the atomic force microscopy probe while the testosterone-binding protein was immobilized on the surface. Repeated formation and rupture of the ligand-receptor complex at different pulling velocities allowed determination of the loading rate dependence of the complex-rupturing force. In this way, we obtained the molecular dissociation rate (k(off)) and energy landscape distances (x(β)) of the four possible complexes: sbAvd-1-biotin, sbAvd-1-testosterone, sbAvd-2-biotin and sbAvd-2-testosterone. It was found that the kinetic off-rates for both proteins and both ligands are similar. In contrast, the x(β) values, as well as the probability of complex formations, varied considerably. In addition, competitive binding experiments with biotin and testosterone in solution differ significantly for the two testosterone-binding proteins, implying a decreased cross-reactivity of sbAvd-2. Unravelling the binding behaviour of the investigated testosterone-binding proteins is expected to improve their usability for possible sensing applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Comparison of three empirical force fields for phonon calculations in CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Anne Myers [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Three empirical interatomic force fields are parametrized using structural, elastic, and phonon dispersion data for bulk CdSe and their predictions are then compared for the structures and phonons of CdSe quantum dots having average diameters of ~2.8 and ~5.2 nm (~410 and ~2630 atoms, respectively). The three force fields include one that contains only two-body interactions (Lennard-Jones plus Coulomb), a Tersoff-type force field that contains both two-body and three-body interactions but no Coulombic terms, and a Stillinger-Weber type force field that contains Coulombic interactions plus two-body and three-body terms. While all three force fields predict nearly identical peak frequencies for the strongly Raman-active “longitudinal optical” phonon in the quantum dots, the predictions for the width of the Raman peak, the peak frequency and width of the infrared absorption peak, and the degree of disorder in the structure are very different. The three force fields also give very different predictions for the variation in phonon frequency with radial position (core versus surface). The Stillinger-Weber plus Coulomb type force field gives the best overall agreement with available experimental data.

  13. LEPS potential for H3 from force field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, A.J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A new potential energy surface for H 3 of the London--Eyring--Polanyi--Sato type has been obtained which reproduces the best available estimates for the geometry, classical barrier height, and quadratic force constants of the D/sub infinityh/ saddle point. Other attributes of the surface, e.g., minimum energy profile for the exchange process, spherically averaged potential V 0 , and leading anisotropic potential V 2 , are also shown to be in good agreement with the best available estimates. The simplicity of its functional form further commends it for future dynamical studies

  14. Finger-Shaped GelForce: Sensor for Measuring Surface Traction Fields for Robotic Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Kamiyama, K; Kawakami, N; Tachi, S

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that the use of haptic sensors to measure the magnitude, direction, and distribution of a force will enable a robotic hand to perform dexterous operations. Therefore, we develop a new type of finger-shaped haptic sensor using GelForce technology. GelForce is a vision-based sensor that can be used to measure the distribution of force vectors, or surface traction fields. The simple structure of the GelForce enables us to develop a compact finger-shaped GelForce for the robotic hand. GelForce that is developed on the basis of an elastic theory can be used to calculate surface traction fields using a conversion equation. However, this conversion equation cannot be analytically solved when the elastic body of the sensor has a complicated shape such as the shape of a finger. Therefore, we propose an observational method and construct a prototype of the finger-shaped GelForce. By using this prototype, we evaluate the basic performance of the finger-shaped GelForce. Then, we conduct a field test by performing grasping operations using a robotic hand. The results of this test show that using the observational method, the finger-shaped GelForce can be successfully used in a robotic hand.

  15. Modeling the sorption dynamics of NaH using a reactive force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojwang, J. G. O.; Santen, Rutger van; Kramer, Gert Jan; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Goddard, William A. III

    2008-01-01

    We have parametrized a reactive force field for NaH, ReaxFF NaH , against a training set of ab initio derived data. To ascertain that ReaxFF NaH is properly parametrized, a comparison between ab initio heats of formation of small representative NaH clusters with ReaxFF NaH was done. The results and trend of ReaxFF NaH are found to be consistent with ab initio values. Further validation includes comparing the equations of state of condensed phases of Na and NaH as calculated from ab initio and ReaxFF NaH . There is a good match between the two results, showing that ReaxFF NaH is correctly parametrized by the ab initio training set. ReaxFF NaH has been used to study the dynamics of hydrogen desorption in NaH particles. We find that ReaxFF NaH properly describes the surface molecular hydrogen charge transfer during the abstraction process. Results on heat of desorption versus cluster size shows that there is a strong dependence on the heat of desorption on the particle size, which implies that nanostructuring enhances desorption process. To gain more insight into the structural transformations of NaH during thermal decomposition, we performed a heating run in a molecular dynamics simulation. These runs exhibit a series of drops in potential energy, associated with cluster fragmentation and desorption of molecular hydrogen. This is consistent with experimental evidence that NaH dissociates at its melting point into smaller fragments

  16. New generation of docking programs: Supercomputer validation of force fields and quantum-chemical methods for docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimov, Alexey V; Kutov, Danil C; Katkova, Ekaterina V; Ilin, Ivan S; Sulimov, Vladimir B

    2017-11-01

    Discovery of new inhibitors of the protein associated with a given disease is the initial and most important stage of the whole process of the rational development of new pharmaceutical substances. New inhibitors block the active site of the target protein and the disease is cured. Computer-aided molecular modeling can considerably increase effectiveness of new inhibitors development. Reliable predictions of the target protein inhibition by a small molecule, ligand, is defined by the accuracy of docking programs. Such programs position a ligand in the target protein and estimate the protein-ligand binding energy. Positioning accuracy of modern docking programs is satisfactory. However, the accuracy of binding energy calculations is too low to predict good inhibitors. For effective application of docking programs to new inhibitors development the accuracy of binding energy calculations should be higher than 1kcal/mol. Reasons of limited accuracy of modern docking programs are discussed. One of the most important aspects limiting this accuracy is imperfection of protein-ligand energy calculations. Results of supercomputer validation of several force fields and quantum-chemical methods for docking are presented. The validation was performed by quasi-docking as follows. First, the low energy minima spectra of 16 protein-ligand complexes were found by exhaustive minima search in the MMFF94 force field. Second, energies of the lowest 8192 minima are recalculated with CHARMM force field and PM6-D3H4X and PM7 quantum-chemical methods for each complex. The analysis of minima energies reveals the docking positioning accuracies of the PM7 and PM6-D3H4X quantum-chemical methods and the CHARMM force field are close to one another and they are better than the positioning accuracy of the MMFF94 force field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the Polish Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiech, Jaromir; Kieliszek, Jarosław; Puta, Robert; Bartczak, Dagmara; Stankiewicz, Wanda

    2017-06-19

    Standard devices used by military personnel that may pose electromagnetic hazard include: radars, missile systems, radio navigation systems and radio transceivers. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the exposure of military personnel to electromagnetic fields. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields was analyzed in the work environment of personnel of 204 devices divided into 5 groups (surface-to-air missile system radars, aircraft and helicopters, communication devices, surveillance and height finder radars, airport radars and radio navigation systems). Measurements were carried out at indicators, device terminals, radio panels, above vehicle seats, in vehicle hatches, by cabinets containing high power vacuum tubes and other transmitter components, by transmission lines, connectors, etc. Portable radios emit the electric field strength between 20-80 V/m close to a human head. The manpack radio operator's exposure is 60-120 V/m. Inside vehicles with high frequency/very high frequency (HF/VHF) band radios, the electric field strength is between 7-30 V/m and inside the radar cabin it ranges between 9-20 V/m. Most of the personnel on ships are not exposed to the electromagnetic field from their own radar systems but rather by accidental exposure from the radar systems of other ships. Operators of surface-to-air missile systems are exposed to the electric field strength between 7-15 V/m and the personnel of non-directional radio beacons - 100-150 V/m. In 57% of military devices Polish soldiers work in the occupational protection zones. In 35% of cases, soldiers work in intermediate and hazardous zones and in 22% - only in the intermediate zone. In 43% of devices, military personnel are not exposed to electromagnetic field. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):565-577. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  18. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the Polish Armed Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Kieliszek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Standard devices used by military personnel that may pose electromagnetic hazard include: radars, missile systems, radio navigation systems and radio transceivers. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the exposure of military personnel to electromagnetic fields. Material and Methods: Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields was analyzed in the work environment of personnel of 204 devices divided into 5 groups (surface-to-air missile system radars, aircraft and helicopters, communication devices, surveillance and height finder radars, airport radars and radio navigation systems. Measurements were carried out at indicators, device terminals, radio panels, above vehicle seats, in vehicle hatches, by cabinets containing high power vacuum tubes and other transmitter components, by transmission lines, connectors, etc. Results: Portable radios emit the electric field strength between 20–80 V/m close to a human head. The manpack radio operator’s exposure is 60–120 V/m. Inside vehicles with high frequency/very high frequency (HF/VHF band radios, the electric field strength is between 7–30 V/m and inside the radar cabin it ranges between 9–20 V/m. Most of the personnel on ships are not exposed to the electromagnetic field from their own radar systems but rather by accidental exposure from the radar systems of other ships. Operators of surface-to-air missile systems are exposed to the electric field strength between 7–15 V/m and the personnel of non-directional radio beacons – 100–150 V/m. Conclusions: In 57% of military devices Polish soldiers work in the occupational protection zones. In 35% of cases, soldiers work in intermediate and hazardous zones and in 22% – only in the intermediate zone. In 43% of devices, military personnel are not exposed to electromagnetic field. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4:565–577

  19. Surface force analysis of molecular interfacial interactions of proteins and lipids with polymeric biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton-Brown, P.; Griesser, H.J.; Meagher, L.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Adverse biological responses to biomedical devices are often caused by the irreversible accumulation of biological deposits onto the surfaces of devices. Such deposits cause blocking of artificial blood vessels, fibrous encapsulation of soft tissue regenerative devices, 'fouling' of contact lenses, secondary cataracts on intraocular lenses, and other undesirable events that interfere with the intended functions of biomedical devices. The formation of deposits is triggered by an initial stage in which various proteins and lipids rapidly adsorb onto the synthetic material surface; further biological molecules and ultimately cellular entities (e.g., host cells, bacteria) then settle onto the initial adsorbed layer. Hence, to avoid or control the accumulation of biological deposits, molecular understanding is required of the initial adsorption processes. Such adsorption is caused by attractive interfacial forces, which we are characterising by the use of a novel method. In the present study, polymeric thin film coatings, polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polysaccharide coatings have been analysed in terms of their surface forces and the ensuing propensity for protein and lipid adsorption. Interfacial forces are measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a colloid-modified tip in a liquid cell using solutions of physiological pH and ionic strength. The chemical composition and uniformity of the coatings was characterised by X-ray Photon Spectroscopy (XPS). For a polymeric solid coating, repulsive forces have been measured against a silica colloid probe, and the dominant surface force is electrostatic. For the highly hydrated, 'soft' PEO and polysaccharide coatings, on the other hand, steric/entropic forces are also significant and contribute to interfacial interactions with proteins and lipids. In one system we have observed a time dependence of the electrostatic surface potential, which affects interaction with charged proteins. Force measurements were

  20. Quantitative assessment of force fields on both low-energy conformational basins and transition-state regions of the (phi-psi) space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Ensing, B.; Moore, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    The free energy surfaces (FESs) of alanine dipeptide are studied to illustrate a new strategy to assess the performance of classical molecular mechanics force field on the full range of the (phi-psi) conformational space. The FES is obtained from metadynamics simulations with five commonly used

  1. Van der Waals Forces and Photon-Less Effective Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriola, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the ultra-cold regime Van der Waals forces between neutral atoms can be represented by short range effective interactions. We show that universal low energy scaling features of the underlying vdW long range force stemming from two photon exchange impose restrictions on an Effective Field Theory without explicit photons. The role of naively redundant operators, relevant to the definition of three body forces, is also analyzed. (author)

  2. Microscopic mean field approximation and beyond with the Gogny force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péru S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations have been performed with the D1S Gogny force. A brief review on the main results obtained in this approach is presented. After a reminder on the method and on the first results concerning giant resonances in deformed Mg and Si isotopes, the multipole responses up to octupole in the deformed and heavy nucleus 238U are discussed. In order to analyse soft dipole modes in exotic nuclei, the dipole responses have been studied in Ne isotopes and in N=16 isotopes, for which results are presented. In these nuclei, the QRPA results on the low lying 2+ states are compared to the 5-Dimensional Collective Hamiltonian ones.

  3. Sigma exchange in the nuclear force and effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, John F.

    2006-01-01

    In the phenomenological description of the nuclear interaction an important role is traditionally played by the exchange of a scalar I=0 meson, the sigma, of mass 500-600 MeV, which however is not seen clearly in the particle spectrum and which has a very ambiguous status in QCD. I show that a remarkably simple and reasonably controlled combination of ingredients can reproduce the features of this part of the nuclear force. The use of chiral perturbation theory calculations for two pion exchange supplemented by the Omnes function for pion rescattering suffices to reproduce the magnitude and shape of the exchange of a supposed σ particle. I also attempt to relate this description to the contact interaction that enters more modern descriptions of the internucleon interaction

  4. Force Structure Matters: The US Field Artillery in Operational Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-23

    2003 (Fort Sill, OK: US Army Field Artillery Center, 2004), 62-63. 3 Sean Bateman and Steven Hady, “King of Battle Once Again: An Organizational...To What Ends Military Power?” International Security 4, no. 4 (Spring 1980): 3- 35. Bateman , Sean and Steven Hady. “King of Battle Once Again: An

  5. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    , the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip....

  6. Quantifying the Attractive Force Exerted on the Pinned Calcium Spiral Waves by Using the Adventive Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Kang; Tang Jun; Luo Jin-Ming; Ma Jun

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic calcium system is inhomogenous because of the discrete and random distribution of ion channels on the ER membrane. It is well known that the spiral tip can be pinned by the heterogenous area, and the field can detach the spiral from the heterogeneity. We use the adventive field to counteract the attractive force exerting on the calcium spiral wave by the heterogeneity, then the strength of the adventive field is used to quantify the attractive force indirectly. Two factors determining the attractive force are studied. It is found that: (1) the attractive force sharply increases with size of the heterogeneity for small-size heterogeneity, whereas the force increases to a saturated value for large-size heterogeneity; (2) for large-size heterogeneity, the force almost remains constant unless the level of the heterogeneity vanishes, the force decreases to zero linearly and sharply, and for small-size heterogeneity, the force decreases successively with the level of the heterogeneity. Furthermore, it is found that the forces exist only when the spiral tip is very close to the heterogenous area. Our study may shed some light on the control or suppression of the calcium spiral wave

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the time-averaged forces on a cylinder in a sound field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David

    2005-01-01

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the radiation force on an object in a standing wave acoustic field and comparisons are made to theoretical predictions. We show how viscous effects change the radiation force and predict the motion of a particle placed near a boundary where viscous effects are important

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the time-averaged forces on a cylinder in a sound field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydock, David [Unilever R and D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the radiation force on an object in a standing wave acoustic field and comparisons are made to theoretical predictions. We show how viscous effects change the radiation force and predict the motion of a particle placed near a boundary where viscous effects are important.

  9. Rapid changes in corticospinal excitability during force field adaptation of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Alain, S; Grey, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    measured changes in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before, during, and after subjects adapted to a force field applied to the ankle joint during treadmill walking. When the force field assisted dorsiflexion during...... the swing phase of the step cycle, subjects adapted by decreasing TA EMG activity. In contrast, when the force field resisted dorsiflexion, they increased TA EMG activity. After the force field was removed, normal EMG activity gradually returned over the next 5 min of walking. TA MEPs elicited in the early...... be explained by changes in background TA EMG activity. These effects seemed specific to walking, as similar changes in TA MEP were not seen when seated subjects were tested during static dorsiflexion. These observations suggest that the corticospinal tract contributes to the adaptation of walking...

  10. Force-Field Prediction of Materials Properties in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, MOF bulk properties are evaluated and compared using several force fields on several well-studied MOFs, including IRMOF-1 (MOF-5), IRMOF-10, HKUST-1, and UiO-66. It is found that, surprisingly, UFF and DREIDING provide good values for the bulk modulus and linear thermal expansion coefficients for these materials, excluding those that they are not parametrized for. Force fields developed specifically for MOFs including UFF4MOF, BTW-FF, and the DWES force field are also found to provide accurate values for these materials’ properties. While we find that each force field offers a moderately good picture of these properties, noticeable deviations can be observed when looking at properties sensitive to framework vibrational modes. This observation is more pronounced upon the introduction of framework charges. PMID:28008758

  11. New approaches and solutions of the nonlinear force-free field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Baisong; Yin Xintao; Luo Xia

    2006-01-01

    New approaches to nonlinear force-free field equations are presented and new exact solutions are found analytically. Examples are given and some implications of the results to astrophysical solar plasmas as well as tokamak plasmas are discussed

  12. The Role of Mechanical Force in Molecular and Cellular during Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Narmada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Application of mechanical force on abnormally positioned tooth, cause changes in tooth location and transmitted to the bone ia the periodontal ligament (PDL produce orthodontic tooth movement. This force application is further way that remodeling in the area occurs. In order to develop biological strategies for enhancing this movement of teeth in bone, the underlying mechanisms of bone resorption and apposition should be understood in detail. Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF may be a good means of examining the on going molecular and cellular process associated with gingival and bone turnover during orthodontic tooth movement. If it could be possible to biologically monitor and predict the outcome of orthodontic force, then the appliance management could be based on dividual tissue response and the effectiveness of the treatment could be improved and understanding their biology is critical to finding ways to modify bone biology to move teeth faster. The present article reviewed a short introduction to some mayors advanced mechanical force in molecular and cellular biology during orthodontic tooth movement.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i3.30

  13. Molecular gyroscopes and biological effects of weak extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binhi, V.N.; Savin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields are known to affect biological systems. In many cases, biological effects display 'windows' in biologically effective parameters of the magnetic fields: most dramatic is the fact that the relatively intense magnetic fields sometimes do not cause appreciable effect, while smaller fields of the order of 10-100 μT do. Linear resonant physical processes do not explain the frequency windows in this case. Amplitude window phenomena suggest a nonlinear physical mechanism. Such a nonlinear mechanism has been proposed recently to explain those 'windows'. It considers the quantum-interference effects on the protein-bound substrate ions. Magnetic fields cause an interference of ion quantum states and change the probability of ion-protein dissociation. This ion-interference mechanism predicts specific magnetic-field frequency and amplitude windows within which the biological effects occur. It agrees with a lot of experiments. However, according to the mechanism, the lifetime Γ -1 of ion quantum states within a protein cavity should be of unrealistic value, more than 0.01 s for frequency band 10-100 Hz. In this paper, a biophysical mechanism has been proposed, which (i) retains the attractive features of the ion interference mechanism, i.e., predicts physical characteristics that might be experimentally examined and (ii) uses the principles of gyroscopic motion and removes the necessity to postulate large lifetimes. The mechanism considers the dynamics of the density matrix of the molecular groups, which are attached to the walls of protein cavities by two covalent bonds, i.e., molecular gyroscopes. Numerical computations have shown almost free rotations of the molecular gyroscopes. The relaxation time due to van der Waals forces was about 0.01 s for the cavity size of 28 Aa

  14. Matter waves from localized sources in homogeneous force fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    We derive a scattering theory in constant potentials based on the energy-dependent Green function. This approach enables us to formulate modern experiments in terms of Green function. One application discussed is the photodetachment of electrons in external electromagnetic fields. In this case an intricate currentdensity distributions exists, that can be explained in terms of interfering classical trajectories. We also derive analytically the two-dimensional Green function in perpendicular el...

  15. The forced flow high field test facility SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of the 8 Tesla, 1 m bore Test Facility SULTAN - I, a common action of ENEA (I-Frascati), ECN (NL-Petten) and SIN (CH-Villigen), is completed. Results on assembly, cooldown and the first operation of the whole system are presented. The SULTAN facility provides a wide range of capability of parameter variations (field, current, cooling) for the investigation of steady state performance and stability of technical superconductors unders nominal and limiting conditions

  16. Lanthanides in molecular magnetism: old tools in a new field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, Lorenzo; Benelli, Cristiano; Gatteschi, Dante

    2011-06-01

    In this tutorial review we discuss some basic aspects concerning the magnetic properties of rare-earth ions, which are currently the subject of a renovated interest in the field of molecular magnetism, after the discovery that slow relaxation of the magnetization at liquid nitrogen temperature can occur in mononuclear complexes of these ions. Focusing on Dy(III) derivatives a tutorial discussion is given of the relation of the crystal field parameters, which determine the anisotropy of these systems and consequently their interesting magnetic properties, with the geometry of the coordination sphere around the lanthanide centre and with the pattern of f orbitals. The problem of systems of low point symmetry is also addressed by showing how detailed single crystal investigation, coupled to more sophisticated calculation procedures, is an absolute necessity to obtain meaningful structure-property relationships in these systems.

  17. Nanoscale liquid interfaces wetting, patterning and force microscopy at the molecular scale

    CERN Document Server

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the recent developments in the investigation and manipulation of liquids at the nanoscale. This new field has shown important breakthroughs on the basic understanding of physical mechanisms involving liquid interfaces, which led to applications in nanopatterning. It has also consequences in force microscopy imaging in liquid environment. The book proposes is a timely review of these various aspects. It is co-authored by 25 among the most prominent scientists in the field.

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE VELA C MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tamura, Motohide [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama-city, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yohinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Sato, Shuji, E-mail: t_kusune@nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-10-20

    We have performed extensive near-infrared ( JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ∼70–310 μ G in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  19. MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE VELA C MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tamura, Motohide; Watanabe, Makoto; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We have performed extensive near-infrared ( JHK s ) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ∼70–310 μ G in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  20. Soft matter interactions at the molecular scale: interaction forces and energies between single hydrophobic model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2017-02-08

    In all realms of soft matter research a fundamental understanding of the structure/property relationships based on molecular interactions is crucial for developing a framework for the targeted design of soft materials. However, a molecular picture is often difficult to ascertain and yet essential for understanding the many different competing interactions at play, including entropies and cooperativities, hydration effects, and the enormous design space of soft matter. Here, we characterized for the first time the interaction between single hydrophobic molecules quantitatively using atomic force microscopy, and demonstrated that single molecular hydrophobic interaction free energies are dominated by the area of the smallest interacting hydrophobe. The interaction free energy amounts to 3-4 kT per hydrophobic unit. Also, we find that the transition state of the hydrophobic interactions is located at 3 Å with respect to the ground state, based on Bell-Evans theory. Our results provide a new path for understanding the nature of hydrophobic interactions at the single molecular scale. Our approach enables us to systematically vary hydrophobic and any other interaction type by utilizing peptide chemistry providing a strategic advancement to unravel molecular surface and soft matter interactions at the single molecular scale.

  1. Simulations of A-RNA duplexes. The effect of sequence, solute force field, water model, and salt concentration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beššeová, Ivana; Banáš, Pavel; Kührová, P.; Košinová, P.; Otyepka, Michal; Šponer, Jiří

    Roč. 116, č. 33 ( 2012 ), s. 9899-9916 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1878; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/09/H046; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1476 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP301/11/P558 Program:GP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : A-RNA * molecular dynamics * force field Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.607, year: 2012

  2. Retrofitting Forced Air Combi Systems: A Cold Climate Field Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, Ben [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Bohac, Dave [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); McAlpine, Jack [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Hewett, Martha [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This project analyzed combined condensing water heaters or boilers and hydronic air coils to provide high efficiency domestic hot water (DHW) and forced air space heating. Called "combi" systems, they provided similar space and water heating performance less expensively than installing two condensing appliances. The system's installed costs were cheaper than installing a condensing furnace and either a condensing tankless or condensing storage water heater. However, combi costs must mature and be reduced before they are competitive with a condensing furnace and power vented water heater (energy factor of 0.60). Better insulation and tighter envelopes are reducing space heating loads for new and existing homes. For many homes, decreased space heating loads make it possible for both space and domestic water heating loads to be provided with a single heating plant. These systems can also eliminate safety issues associated with natural draft appliances through the use of one common sealed combustion vent. The combined space and water heating approach was not a new idea. Past systems have used non-condensing heating plants, which limited their usefulness in climates with high heating loads. Previous laboratory work (Schoenbauer et al. 2012a) showed that proper installation was necessary to achieve condensing with high efficiency appliances. Careful consideration was paid to proper system sizing and minimizing the water temperature returning from the air handling unit to facilitate condensing operation.

  3. Retrofitting Forced Air Combi Systems: A Cold Climate Field Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, Ben [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Bohac, Dave [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; McAlpine, Jake [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Hewett, Martha [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership

    2017-06-23

    This project analyzed combined condensing water heaters or boilers and hydronic air coils to provide high efficiency domestic hot water (DHW) and forced air space heating. Called 'combi' systems, they provided similar space and water heating performance less expensively than installing two condensing appliances. The system's installed costs were cheaper than installing a condensing furnace and either a condensing tankless or condensing storage water heater. However, combi costs must mature and be reduced before they are competitive with a condensing furnace and power vented water heater (energy factor of 0.60). Better insulation and tighter envelopes are reducing space heating loads for new and existing homes. For many homes, decreased space heating loads make it possible for both space and domestic water heating loads to be provided with a single heating plant. These systems can also eliminate safety issues associated with natural draft appliances through the use of one common sealed combustion vent. The combined space and water heating approach was not a new idea. Past systems have used non-condensing heating plants, which limited their usefulness in climates with high heating loads. Previous laboratory work (Schoenbauer et al. 2012a) showed that proper installation was necessary to achieve condensing with high efficiency appliances. Careful consideration was paid to proper system sizing and minimizing the water temperature returning from the air handling unit to facilitate condensing operation.

  4. Self-consistent mean field forces in turbulent plasmas: Current and momentum relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of turbulent plasmas are described using the two-fluid equations. Under some modest assumptions, global constraints for the turbulent mean field forces that act on the ion and electron fluids are derived. These constraints imply a functional form for the parallel mean field forces in the Ohm's law and the momentum balance equation. These forms suggest that the fluctuations attempt to relax the plasma to a state where both the current and the bulk plasma momentum are aligned along the mean magnetic field with proportionality constants that are global constants. Observations of flow profile evolution during discrete dynamo activity in reversed field pinch experiments are interpreted

  5. Forces on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field: the macro-micro connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avelar Sotomaior Karam, Ricardo; Kneubil, Fabiana; Robilotta, Manoel

    2017-01-01

    The classic problem of determining the force on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field is critically analysed. A common explanation found in many introductory textbooks is to represent the force on the wire as the sum of the forces on charge carriers. In this approach neither the nature...... of the forces involved nor their application points are fully discussed. In this paper we provide an alternative microscopic explanation that is suitable for introductory electromagnetism courses at university level. By considering the wire as a superposition of a positive and a negative cylindrical charge...

  6. On the Sensitivity of Peptide Nucleic Acid Duplex Formation and Crystal Dissolution to a Variation of Force-Field Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Stephan J; Lin, Zhixiong; Stafforst, Thorsten; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2014-01-14

    The technique of one-step perturbation to explore the relation between particular force-field parameters on the one hand and particular properties of a biomolecular system on the other hand from one or a few molecular dynamics simulations is applied to investigate the dependence of the free enthalpy of dimer formation and of crystal dissolution of a self-complementary fragment (H-CGTACG-NH2) of peptide nucleic acid, PNA, a mimic of DNA. The simulations show that PNA dimer formation in aqueous solution is favored by a decrease in the base charges with respect to values of the GROMOS 45A4 force field, while it is disfavored by a decrease in the backbone charges. In contrast, crystal dissolution of the PNA dimer is favored by a decrease in base charges, while a variation of backbone charges has a minor effect on this free enthalpy change. These opposite effects in a crystalline versus aqueous solution environment can be understood from the different water contents for these systems and have consequences for biomolecular force-field development.

  7. Toward Automated Benchmarking of Atomistic Force Fields: Neat Liquid Densities and Static Dielectric Constants from the ThermoML Data Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Kyle A; Behr, Julie M; Rustenburg, Ariën S; Bayly, Christopher I; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Chodera, John D

    2015-10-08

    Atomistic molecular simulations are a powerful way to make quantitative predictions, but the accuracy of these predictions depends entirely on the quality of the force field employed. Although experimental measurements of fundamental physical properties offer a straightforward approach for evaluating force field quality, the bulk of this information has been tied up in formats that are not machine-readable. Compiling benchmark data sets of physical properties from non-machine-readable sources requires substantial human effort and is prone to the accumulation of human errors, hindering the development of reproducible benchmarks of force-field accuracy. Here, we examine the feasibility of benchmarking atomistic force fields against the NIST ThermoML data archive of physicochemical measurements, which aggregates thousands of experimental measurements in a portable, machine-readable, self-annotating IUPAC-standard format. As a proof of concept, we present a detailed benchmark of the generalized Amber small-molecule force field (GAFF) using the AM1-BCC charge model against experimental measurements (specifically, bulk liquid densities and static dielectric constants at ambient pressure) automatically extracted from the archive and discuss the extent of data available for use in larger scale (or continuously performed) benchmarks. The results of even this limited initial benchmark highlight a general problem with fixed-charge force fields in the representation low-dielectric environments, such as those seen in binding cavities or biological membranes.

  8. An ionic force-field study of monomers, dimers and higher polymers in pentafluoride vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicek Onem, Z. [Department of Physics, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Akdeniz, Z. [Department of Physics, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Classe di Scienze, Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: zakdeniz@istanbul.edu.tr; Tosi, M.P. [Classe di Scienze, Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tosim@sns.it

    2008-08-01

    Pentafluoride compounds such as NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} have been reported in the literature to admit various states of polymerization coexisting with monomers in their vapor phase, in relative concentrations that vary with temperature and pressure. We construct a microscopic interionic force-field model for the molecular monomer of these compounds (including VF{sub 5}, SbF{sub 5} and MoF{sub 5} in addition to NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}), the stable form of the monomer being in the shape of a D{sub 3h} trigonal bipyramid in all cases. The model emulates chemical bonds by allowing for electrical and short-range overlap polarizabilities of the fluorines, and is used to evaluate the structure and the stability of (MF{sub 5}){sub n} molecules with n running from 2 to 6. The dimer is formed by two distorted edge-sharing octahedral, while the trimer and the higher polymers can form rings of distorted corner-sharing octahedra. A chain-like configuration is also found for the trimer of NbF{sub 5}, which consists of a seven-fold coordinated Nb bonded to two distorted octahedra via edge sharing. Comparison of calculated vibrational frequencies and bond lengths with experimental data is made whenever possible. We find that there is a small net gain of energy in the formation of a dimer, while otherwise the static energy of the n-mer is very close to that of n separated monomers. High sensitivity of the state of molecular aggregation to the thermodynamic conditions of the vapor is clearly indicated by our calculations.

  9. Gravitomagnetic field of the universe and Coriolis force on the rotating Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veto, B

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe-deduced from a simple model-exerts a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force on moving bodies, a force parallel to and with comparable strength to the Coriolis force observed on the rotating Earth. It seems after simple considerations that the Coriolis force happens to be the gravitomagnetic Lorentz force exerted by the mass of a black hole universe. The description of the phenomenon is simpler using the gravitomagnetic approach than the standard formulation of general relativity, so the method relying on gravitomagnetism is advisable in lectures intended for master's degree level physics students and advanced undergraduates.

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Water in Wood Studied by Fast Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water plays a very important role in wood and wood products. The molecular motion of water in wood is susceptible to thermal activation. Thermal energy makes water molecules more active and weakens the force between water and wood; therefore, the water molecules dynamic properties are greatly influenced. Molecular dynamics study is important for wood drying; this paper therefore focuses on water molecular dynamics in wood through fast field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry techniques. The results show that the spin-lattice relaxation rate decreases with the Larmor frequency. Nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles at different temperatures could separate the relaxation contribution of water in bigger pores and smaller pores. The T1 distribution from wide to narrow at 10 MHz Larmor frequency reflects the shrinkage of pore size with the higher temperature. The dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate on correlation time for water molecular motion based on BPP (proposed by Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound theory shows that water correlation time increases with higher temperature, and its activation energy, calculated using the Arrhenius transformation equation, is 9.06±0.53 kJ/mol.

  11. Determination of a silane intermolecular force field potential model from an ab initio calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Arvin Huang-Te; Chao, Sheng D.; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular interaction potentials of the silane dimer in 12 orientations have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent theory and the second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. We employed basis sets from Pople's medium-size basis sets [up to 6-311++G(3df, 3pd)] and Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to the triply augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta basis set). We found that the minimum energy orientations were the G and H conformers. We have suggested that the Si-H attractions, the central silicon atom size, and electronegativity play essential roles in weakly binding of a silane dimer. The calculated MP2 potential data were employed to parametrize a five-site force field for molecular simulations. The Si-Si, Si-H, and H-H interaction parameters in a pairwise-additive, site-site potential model for silane molecules were regressed from the ab initio energies.

  12. The ELBA force field for coarse-grain modeling of lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orsi

    Full Text Available A new coarse-grain model for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid membranes is presented. Following a simple and conventional approach, lipid molecules are modeled by spherical sites, each representing a group of several atoms. In contrast to common coarse-grain methods, two original (interdependent features are here adopted. First, the main electrostatics are modeled explicitly by charges and dipoles, which interact realistically through a relative dielectric constant of unity (ε(r = 1. Second, water molecules are represented individually through a new parametrization of the simple Stockmayer potential for polar fluids; each water molecule is therefore described by a single spherical site embedded with a point dipole. The force field is shown to accurately reproduce the main physical properties of single-species phospholipid bilayers comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE in the liquid crystal phase, as well as distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC in the liquid crystal and gel phases. Insights are presented into fundamental properties and phenomena that can be difficult or impossible to study with alternative computational or experimental methods. For example, we investigate the internal pressure distribution, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and spontaneous self-assembly. Simulations lasting up to 1.5 microseconds were conducted for systems of different sizes (128, 512 and 1058 lipids; this also allowed us to identify size-dependent artifacts that are expected to affect membrane simulations in general. Future extensions and applications are discussed, particularly in relation to the methodology's inherent multiscale capabilities.

  13. Interactions of fast molecular ions traversing thin foils. The contribution from field ionized Rydberg atoms in measurements on convoy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams offer many attractive possibilities for studying atomic collisions in solids. Of particular value in such experiments is the possibility of determining the force fields (primarily in the induced electric field) that surround ionic fragments traversing a solid. One has the opportunity to evaluate these fields not just at the fragments themselves (as one would, for example, in stopping-power measurements with monatomic projectiles) but in the spatial regions extending out to several Angstroms from the fragment positions. In this paper we give a brief introduction to the subject and present some recent results

  14. Probing Field Distributions on Waveguide Structures with an Atomic Force/Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgonjen, E.G.; Borgonjen, E.G.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A 'stand-alone' Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope combined with an Atomic force Microscope, using a micro-fabricated silicon-nitride probe, is applied to the imaging of field distribution in integrated optical ridge waveguides. The electric field on the waveguide is locally probed by coupling to

  15. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-05-10

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS-101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2015-03-15

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  17. Isolating strong-field dynamics in molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Gal; Pedatzur, Oren; Uzan, Ayelet J.; Bruner, Barry D.; Mairesse, Yann; Dudovich, Nirit

    2017-05-01

    Strong-field ionization followed by recollision provides a unique pump-probe measurement which reveals a range of electronic processes, combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution. A major limitation of this approach is imposed by the coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom. In this paper we focus on the study of high harmonic generation and demonstrate the ability to isolate the internal dynamics—decoupling the temporal information from the spatial one. By applying an in situ approach we reveal the universality of the intrinsic pump-probe measurement and establish its validity in molecular systems. When several orbitals are involved we identify the fingerprint of the transition from the single-channel case into the multiple-channel dynamics, where complex multielectron phenomena are expected to be observed.

  18. Molecular materials for organic field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T

    2008-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors are important applications of thin films of molecular materials. A variety of materials have been explored for improving the performance of organic transistors. The materials are conventionally classified as p-channel and n-channel, but not only the performance but also even the carrier polarity is greatly dependent on the combinations of organic semiconductors and electrode materials. In this review, particular emphasis is laid on multi-sulfur compounds such as tetrathiafulvalenes and metal dithiolates. These compounds are components of highly conducting materials such as organic superconductors, but are also used in organic transistors. The charge-transfer complexes are used in organic transistors as active layers as well as electrodes. (topical review)

  19. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  20. Fast Atomic Charge Calculation for Implementation into a Polarizable Force Field and Application to an Ion Channel Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiker Witter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polarization of atoms plays a substantial role in molecular interactions. Class I and II force fields mostly calculate with fixed atomic charges which can cause inadequate descriptions for highly charged molecules, for example, ion channels or metalloproteins. Changes in charge distributions can be included into molecular mechanics calculations by various methods. Here, we present a very fast computational quantum mechanical method, the Bond Polarization Theory (BPT. Atomic charges are obtained via a charge calculation method that depend on the 3D structure of the system in a similar way as atomic charges of ab initio calculations. Different methods of population analysis and charge calculation methods and their dependence on the basis set were investigated. A refined parameterization yielded excellent correlation of R=0.9967. The method was implemented in the force field COSMOS-NMR and applied to the histidine-tryptophan-complex of the transmembrane domain of the M2 protein channel of influenza A virus. Our calculations show that moderate changes of side chain torsion angle χ1 and small variations of χ2 of Trp-41 are necessary to switch from the inactivated into the activated state; and a rough two-side jump model of His-37 is supported for proton gating in accordance with a flipping mechanism.

  1. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physical Limitations of Empirical Field Models: Force Balance and Plasma Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin Zaharia; Cheng, C.Z.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study whether the magnetic field of the T96 empirical model can be in force balance with an isotropic plasma pressure distribution. Using the field of T96, we obtain values for the pressure P by solving a Poisson-type equation (gradient) 2 P = (gradient) · (J x B) in the equatorial plane, and 1-D profiles on the Sun-Earth axis by integrating (gradient)P = J x B. We work in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials. Our results lead to the conclusion that the T96 model field cannot be in equilibrium with an isotropic pressure. We also analyze in detail the computation of Birkeland currents using the Vasyliunas relation and the T96 field, which yields unphysical results, again indicating the lack of force balance in the empirical model. The underlying reason for the force imbalance is likely the fact that the derivatives of the least-square fitted model B are not accurate predictions of the actual magnetospheric field derivatives. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to the problem of lack of force balance in empirical field models

  3. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic hand and its flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-07-26

    This study aims to clarify the mechanism of generating unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand during swimming in order to directly measure the forces, pressure distribution, and flow field around the hand by using a robotic arm and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The robotic arm consisted of the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand, and it was independently computer controllable in five degrees of freedom. The elbow-joint angle of the robotic arm was fixed at 90°, and the arm was moved in semicircles around the shoulder joint in a plane perpendicular to the water surface. Two-component PIV was used for flow visualization around the hand. The data of the forces and pressure acting on the hand were sampled at 200Hz and stored on a PC. When the maximum resultant force acting on the hand was observed, a pair of counter-rotating vortices appeared on the dorsal surface of the hand. A vortex attached to the hand increased the flow velocity, which led to decreased surface pressure, increasing the hydrodynamic forces. This phenomenon is known as the unsteady mechanism of force generation. We found that the drag force was 72% greater and the lift force was 4.8 times greater than the values estimated under steady flow conditions. Therefore, it is presumable that swimmers receive the benefits of this unsteady hydrodynamic force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microscopic derivation of the force on a dielectric fluid in an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.M.; Suen, W.M.; Young, K.

    1982-01-01

    The force acting on a Clausius-Mossotti fluid in an electromagnetic field is evaluated microscopically. Owing to the modification of the two-particle density by the electric field, an additional mechanical force Δf/sup( M/) is found. When this is added to the electrical force f/sup( E/), the total force in the static case becomes identical to that deduced macroscopically by Helmholtz. The analysis is extended to various time-dependent cases, and it is pointed out that Δf/sup( M/) essentially assumes its static value on time scales longer than T/sub c/, the relaxation time of the two-particle density, but is otherwise negligibly small. Thus Peierls's theory of the momentum of light is valid only for pulses much shorter than T/sub c/; the necessary correction due to Δf/sup( M/) in other cases is given and discussed

  5. Force Field Benchmark of Organic Liquids: Density, Enthalpy of Vaporization, Heat Capacities, Surface Tension, Isothermal Compressibility, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Dielectric Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleman, Carl; van Maaren, Paul J; Hong, Minyan; Hub, Jochen S; Costa, Luciano T; van der Spoel, David

    2012-01-10

    The chemical composition of small organic molecules is often very similar to amino acid side chains or the bases in nucleic acids, and hence there is no a priori reason why a molecular mechanics force field could not describe both organic liquids and biomolecules with a single parameter set. Here, we devise a benchmark for force fields in order to test the ability of existing force fields to reproduce some key properties of organic liquids, namely, the density, enthalpy of vaporization, the surface tension, the heat capacity at constant volume and pressure, the isothermal compressibility, the volumetric expansion coefficient, and the static dielectric constant. Well over 1200 experimental measurements were used for comparison to the simulations of 146 organic liquids. Novel polynomial interpolations of the dielectric constant (32 molecules), heat capacity at constant pressure (three molecules), and the isothermal compressibility (53 molecules) as a function of the temperature have been made, based on experimental data, in order to be able to compare simulation results to them. To compute the heat capacities, we applied the two phase thermodynamics method (Lin et al. J. Chem. Phys.2003, 119, 11792), which allows one to compute thermodynamic properties on the basis of the density of states as derived from the velocity autocorrelation function. The method is implemented in a new utility within the GROMACS molecular simulation package, named g_dos, and a detailed exposé of the underlying equations is presented. The purpose of this work is to establish the state of the art of two popular force fields, OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulation) and GAFF (generalized Amber force field), to find common bottlenecks, i.e., particularly difficult molecules, and to serve as a reference point for future force field development. To make for a fair playing field, all molecules were evaluated with the same parameter settings, such as thermostats and barostats

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong Min; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H.; Lee, Joon Sang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong Min [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kondaraju, Sasidhar [Department of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Lee, Jung Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H. [Samsung Electronics, Mechatronics R& D Center, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Sang, E-mail: joonlee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  8. Resonance oscillations of nonreciprocal long-range van der Waals forces between atoms in electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherkunov, Yury

    2018-03-01

    We study theoretically the van der Waals interaction between two atoms out of equilibrium with an isotropic electromagnetic field. We demonstrate that at large interatomic separations, the van der Waals forces are resonant, spatially oscillating, and nonreciprocal due to resonance absorption and emission of virtual photons. We suggest that the van der Waals forces can be controlled and manipulated by tuning the spectrum of artificially created random light.

  9. The Röntgen interaction and forces on dipoles in time-modulated optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnleitner, Matthias; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2017-12-01

    The Röntgen term is an often neglected contribution to the interaction between an atom and an electromagnetic field in the electric dipole approximation. In this work we discuss how this interaction term leads to a difference between the kinetic and canonical momentum of an atom which, in turn, leads to surprising radiation forces acting on the atom. We use a number of examples to explore the main features of this interaction, namely forces acting against the expected dipole force or accelerations perpendicular to the beam propagation axis.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Solar Coronal Dynamics with an Initial Non-force-free Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, A.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Kumar, Sanjay [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur-313001 (India)

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic fields in the solar corona are generally neither force-free nor axisymmetric and have complex dynamics that are difficult to characterize. Here we simulate the topological evolution of solar coronal magnetic field lines (MFLs) using a magnetohydrodynamic model. The simulation is initialized with a non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field that best correlates with the observed vector magnetograms of solar active regions (ARs). To focus on these ideas, simulations are performed for the flaring AR 11283 noted for its complexity and well-documented dynamics. The simulated dynamics develops as the initial Lorentz force pushes the plasma and facilitates successive magnetic reconnections at the two X-type null lines present in the initial field. Importantly, the simulation allows for the spontaneous development of mass flow, unique among contemporary works, that preferentially reconnects field lines at one of the X-type null lines. Consequently, a flux rope consisting of low-lying twisted MFLs, which approximately traces the major polarity inversion line, undergoes an asymmetric monotonic rise. The rise is attributed to a reduction in the magnetic tension force at the region overlying the rope, resulting from the reconnection. A monotonic rise of the rope is in conformity with the standard scenario of flares. Importantly, the simulated dynamics leads to bifurcations of the flux rope, which, being akin to the observed filament bifurcation in AR 11283, establishes the appropriateness of the initial field in describing ARs.

  11. Free energy simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and metadynamics on GPU platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Guohui

    2016-03-05

    The free energy calculation library PLUMED has been incorporated into the OpenMM simulation toolkit, with the purpose to perform enhanced sampling MD simulations using the AMOEBA polarizable force field on GPU platform. Two examples, (I) the free energy profile of water pair separation (II) alanine dipeptide dihedral angle free energy surface in explicit solvent, are provided here to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our implementation. The converged free energy profiles could be obtained within an affordable MD simulation time when the AMOEBA polarizable force field is employed. Moreover, the free energy surfaces estimated using the AMOEBA polarizable force field are in agreement with those calculated from experimental data and ab initio methods. Hence, the implementation in this work is reliable and would be utilized to study more complicated biological phenomena in both an accurate and efficient way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A levitation force and magnetic field distribution measurement system in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.M.; Chao, X.X.; Shu, Z.B.; Zhu, S.H.; Wu, X.L.; Bian, X.B.; Liu, P.

    2006-01-01

    A levitation force and magnetic field distribution measurement system in three dimension has been designed and constructed, which can be used for the levitation force measurement between a superconductor and a magnet, or magnet to magnet in three dimensions; and for the measurement of magnetic field distribution in three dimensions according to your need in space. It can also give out the dynamical changing result of magnetic field density with time during levitation force measurement. If we change the sensor of the detector of the measurement system, it also can be used for other kinds of measurement of physical properties. It is a good device for the measurement of magnetic properties of materials. In addition the device can also be used to work at carving in three dimensions

  13. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  14. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  15. Torsional tapping atomic force microscopy for molecular resolution imaging of soft matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jamie; Mullin, Nic

    2012-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in image resolution on challenging, soft systems, a method for obtaining molecular resolution on `real' samples with significant surface roughness has remained elusive. Here we will show that a relatively new technique, torsional tapping AFM (TTAFM), is capable of imaging with resolution down to 3.7 Angrstrom on the surface of `bulk' polymer films [1]. In TTAFM T-shaped cantilevers are driven into torsional oscillation. As the tip is offset from the rotation axis this provides a tapping motion. Due to the high frequency and Q of the oscillation and relatively small increase in spring constant, improved cantilever dynamics and force sensitivity are obtained. As the tip offset from the torsional axis is relatively small (typically 25 microns), the optical lever sensitivity is considerably improved compared to flexural oscillation. Combined these give a reduction in noise floor by a factor of 12 just by changing the cantilever geometry. The ensuing low noise allows the use of ultra-sharp `whisker' tips with minimal blunting. As the cantilevers remain soft in the flexural axis, the force when imaging with error is also reduced, further protecting the tip. We will show that this combination allows routine imaging of the molecular structure of semicrystalline polymer films, including chain folds, loose loops and tie-chains in polyethylene, and the helical conformation of polypropylene within the crystal, using a standard, commercial AFM. [4pt] [1] N Mullin, JK Hobbs, PRL 107, 197801 (2011)

  16. Implementing Molecular Dynamics for Hybrid High Performance Computers - 1. Short Range Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W. Michael; Wang, Peng; Plimpton, Steven J.; Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2011-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high performance computers, machines with more than one type of floating-point processor, are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this work, we discuss several important issues in porting a large molecular dynamics code for use on parallel hybrid machines - (1) choosing a hybrid parallel decomposition that works on central processing units (CPUs) with distributed memory and accelerator cores with shared memory, (2) minimizing the amount of code that must be ported for efficient acceleration, (3) utilizing the available processing power from both many-core CPUs and accelerators, and (4) choosing a programming model for acceleration. We present our solution to each of these issues for short-range force calculation in the molecular dynamics package LAMMPS. We describe algorithms for efficient short range force calculation on hybrid high performance machines. We describe a new approach for dynamic load balancing of work between CPU and accelerator cores. We describe the Geryon library that allows a single code to compile with both CUDA and OpenCL for use on a variety of accelerators. Finally, we present results on a parallel test cluster containing 32 Fermi GPGPUs and 180 CPU cores.

  17. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huyer, S [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (US)

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  18. Marine molecular biology: An emerging field of biological sciences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Jain, R.; Natalio, F.; Hamer, B.; Thakur, A.N.; Muller, W.E.G.

    An appreciation of the potential applications of molecular biology is of growing importance in many areas of life sciences, including marine biology. During the past two decades, the development of sophisticated molecular technologies...

  19. Signal processing for molecular and cellular biological physics: an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Max A; Jones, Nick S

    2013-02-13

    Recent advances in our ability to watch the molecular and cellular processes of life in action--such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and Forster fluorescence resonance energy transfer--raise challenges for digital signal processing (DSP) of the resulting experimental data. This article explores the unique properties of such biophysical time series that set them apart from other signals, such as the prevalence of abrupt jumps and steps, multi-modal distributions and autocorrelated noise. It exposes the problems with classical linear DSP algorithms applied to this kind of data, and describes new nonlinear and non-Gaussian algorithms that are able to extract information that is of direct relevance to biological physicists. It is argued that these new methods applied in this context typify the nascent field of biophysical DSP. Practical experimental examples are supplied.

  20. A modified synthetic driving force method for molecular dynamics simulation of grain boundary migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liang; Li, Saiyi

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic driving force (SDF) molecular dynamics method, which imposes crystalline orientation-dependent driving forces for grain boundary (GB) migration, has been considered deficient in many cases. In this work, we revealed the cause of the deficiency and proposed a modified method by introducing a new technique to distinguish atoms in grains and GB such that the driving forces can be imposed properly. This technique utilizes cross-reference order parameter (CROP) to characterize local lattice orientations in a bicrystal and introduces a CROP-based definition of interface region to minimize interference from thermal fluctuations in distinguishing atoms. A validation of the modified method was conducted by applying it to simulate the migration behavior of Ni 〈1 0 0〉 and Al 〈1 1 2〉 symmetrical tilt GBs, in comparison with the original method. The discrepancies between the migration velocities predicted by the two methods are found to be proportional to their differences in distinguishing atoms. For the Al 〈1 1 2〉 GBs, the modified method predicts a negative misorientation dependency for both the driving pressure threshold for initiating GB movement and the mobility, which agree with experimental findings and other molecular dynamics computations but contradict those predicted using the original method. Last, the modified method was applied to evaluate the mobility of Ni Σ5 〈1 0 0〉 symmetrical tilt GB under different driving pressure and temperature conditions. The results reveal a strong driving pressure dependency of the mobility at relatively low temperatures and suggest that the driving pressure should be as low as possible but large enough to trigger continuous migration.

  1. Nonequilibrium forces between atoms and dielectrics mediated by a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a first principles microphysics derivation of the nonequilibrium forces between an atom, treated as a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and a bulk dielectric medium modeled as a continuous lattice of oscillators coupled to a reservoir. We assume no direct interaction between the atom and the medium but there exist mutual influences transmitted via a common electromagnetic field. By employing concepts and techniques of open quantum systems we introduce coarse-graining to the physical variables--the medium, the quantum field, and the atom's internal degrees of freedom, in that order--to extract their averaged effects from the lowest tier progressively to the top tier. The first tier of coarse-graining provides the averaged effect of the medium upon the field, quantified by a complex permittivity (in the frequency domain) describing the response of the dielectric to the field in addition to its back action on the field through a stochastic forcing term. The last tier of coarse-graining over the atom's internal degrees of freedom results in an equation of motion for the atom's center of mass from which we can derive the force on the atom. Our nonequilibrium formulation provides a fully dynamical description of the atom's motion including back-action effects from all other relevant variables concerned. In the long-time limit we recover the known results for the atom-dielectric force when the combined system is in equilibrium or in a nonequilibrium stationary state.

  2. Steady state models for filamentary plasma structures associated with force free magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents a model for filamentary plasma structures associated with force-free magnetic fields. A homogenous electric field parallel to the symmetry axis of the magnetic field is assumed. Under the influence of these fields, the plasma will drift radially inwards resulting in an accumulation of plasma in the central region. We assume recombination losses to keep the central plasma density at a finite value, and the recombined plasma i.e. the neutrals to diffuse radially outwards. Plasma density and some neutral gas density distributions for a steady state situation are calculated for various cases

  3. Simulating the physicochemical properties of borosilicate and lanthanum borosilicate glasses using a polarizable force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacaud, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    as result of the nuclear waste vitrification, the knowledge and understanding of the dynamic and structural properties of glasses, including the behavior of radionuclides, is important (in liquid and solid phases). It can influence the glass waste properties, the lifetime of the vitrification process and the amount of radionuclides introduced in the glass matrix. Molecular dynamic simulations have been done to study the influence of the glass matrix composition into the structural and dynamic properties of the glass. a simplified glass, with 3 major oxides of the R7T7 glass such as SiO_2, B_2O_3 and Na_2O, have been used to simulate the R7T7 industrial nuclear glass (a 30 oxides glass). The inclusion of La_2O_3 allows us to simulate the impact of fission products and minor actinides into the properties of the glass matrix. Both systems, the SiO_2-B_2O_3-Na_2O and SiO_2-B_2O_3-Na_2O-La_2O_3, allow us to study the sodium and lanthanum effect on the properties of the glass. During this work, a polarizable force field has been developed to do these simulations. The results obtained at room temperature let us reproduce the experimental results of the structure, the distribution of BIII/BIV and the density. a study has been done on the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the liquid. The distribution BIV/BIII and the influence of the structural changes on the density along with the temperature have also been observed with thermal quenching. The current limits of this approach are also described. (author) [fr

  4. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  5. Further along the Road Less Traveled: AMBER ff15ipq, an Original Protein Force Field Built on a Self-Consistent Physical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present the AMBER ff15ipq force field for proteins, the second-generation force field developed using the Implicitly Polarized Q (IPolQ) scheme for deriving implicitly polarized atomic charges in the presence of explicit solvent. The ff15ipq force field is a complete rederivation including more than 300 unique atomic charges, 900 unique torsion terms, 60 new angle parameters, and new atomic radii for polar hydrogens. The atomic charges were derived in the context of the SPC/Eb water model, which yields more-accurate rotational diffusion of proteins and enables direct calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters from molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic radii improve the accuracy of modeling salt bridge interactions relative to contemporary fixed-charge force fields, rectifying a limitation of ff14ipq that resulted from its use of pair-specific Lennard-Jones radii. In addition, ff15ipq reproduces penta-alanine J-coupling constants exceptionally well, gives reasonable agreement with NMR relaxation rates, and maintains the expected conformational propensities of structured proteins/peptides, as well as disordered peptides—all on the microsecond (μs) time scale, which is a critical regime for drug design applications. These encouraging results demonstrate the power and robustness of our automated methods for deriving new force fields. All parameters described here and the mdgx program used to fit them are included in the AmberTools16 distribution. PMID:27399642

  6. MODELING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORONA USING NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    We test a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization code in spherical geometry using an analytical solution from Low and Lou. Several tests are run, ranging from idealized cases where exact vector field data are provided on all boundaries, to cases where noisy vector data are provided on only the lower boundary (approximating the solar problem). Analytical tests also show that the NLFFF code in the spherical geometry performs better than that in the Cartesian one when the field of view of the bottom boundary is large, say, 20° × 20°. Additionally, we apply the NLFFF model to an active region observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) both before and after an M8.7 flare. For each observation time, we initialize the models using potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolations based on either a synoptic chart or a flux-dispersal model, and compare the resulting NLFFF models. The results show that NLFFF extrapolations using the flux-dispersal model as the boundary condition have slightly lower, therefore better, force-free, and divergence-free metrics, and contain larger free magnetic energy. By comparing the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we find that the NLFFF performs better than the PFSS not only for the core field of the flare productive region, but also for large EUV loops higher than 50 Mm.

  7. Droplet spreading driven by van der Waals force: a molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2010-07-07

    The dynamics of droplet spreading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations for two immiscible fluids of equal density and viscosity. All the molecular interactions are modeled by truncated Lennard-Jones potentials and a long-range van der Waals force is introduced to act on the wetting fluid. By gradually increasing the coupling constant in the attractive van der Waals interaction between the wetting fluid and the substrate, we observe a transition in the initial stage of spreading. There exists a critical value of the coupling constant, above which the spreading is pioneered by a precursor film. In particular, the dynamically determined critical value quantitatively agrees with that determined by the energy criterion that the spreading coefficient equals zero. The latter separates partial wetting from complete wetting. In the regime of complete wetting, the radius of the spreading droplet varies with time as R(t) ∼ √t, a behavior also found in molecular dynamics simulations where the wetting dynamics is driven by the short-range Lennard-Jones interaction between liquid and solid. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Leveraging intellectual capital through Lewin's Force Field Analysis: The case of software development companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Capatina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an original conceptual framework for the strategic management of intellectual capital assets in software development companies. The framework is based on Lewin's Force Field Analysis. The framework makes it possible to assess software company managers’ opinions regarding the way driving and restraining forces affect the pillars of intellectual capital. The capacity to adapt to change is vital for companies in knowledge-intensive industries. Accordingly, this study examined a sample of 74 Romanian software development companies. The aim was to help companies benefit from managing the driving and restraining forces acting upon the pillars of intellectual capital (human, structural, and relational. The effects of the driving forces, quantified by PathMaker software's Force Field Tool, were observed to be greater than the restraining forces for each pillar of intellectual capital. This paper contributes by showing the explanatory power of this framework. The framework thus offers a tool that helps managers drive change in their organizations through effective intellectual capital management. Furthermore, this article describes how to encourage the implementation of changes that create value for software development companies.

  9. Asymptotic forms for the energy of force-free magnetic field ion figurations of translational symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Klinchuk, J. A.; Roumeliotis, G.

    1994-01-01

    It is known from computer calculations that if a force-free magnetic field configuration is stressed progressively by footpoint displacements, the configuration expands and approaches the open configuration with the same surface flux distribution and the energy of the field increases progressively. For configurations of translationalsymmetry, it has been found empirically that the energy tends asymptotically to a certain functional form. It is here shown that analysis of a simple model of the asymptotic form of force-free fields of translational symmetry leads to and therefore justifies this functional form. According to this model, the field evolves in a well-behaved manner with no indication of instability or loss of equilibrium.

  10. Benchmarking fully analytic DFT force fields for vibrational spectroscopy: A study on halogenated compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Cornaton, Yann

    2018-05-01

    This work presents an investigation of the theoretical predictions yielded by anharmonic force fields having the cubic and quartic force constants are computed analytically by means of density functional theory (DFT) using the recursive scheme developed by M. Ringholm et al. (J. Comput. Chem. 35 (2014) 622). Different functionals (namely B3LYP, PBE, PBE0 and PW86x) and basis sets were used for calculating the anharmonic vibrational spectra of two halomethanes. The benchmark analysis carried out demonstrates the reliability and overall good performances offered by hybrid approaches, where the harmonic data obtained at the coupled cluster with single and double excitations level of theory augmented by a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), are combined with the fully analytic higher order force constants yielded by DFT functionals. These methods lead to reliable and computationally affordable calculations of anharmonic vibrational spectra with an accuracy comparable to that yielded by hybrid force fields having the anharmonic force fields computed at second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) level of theory using numerical differentiation but without the corresponding potential issues related to computational costs and numerical errors.

  11. Confinement of plasma along shaped open magnetic fields from the centrifugal force of supersonic plasma rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, C; Young, W C; Swan, G W S; Ellis, R F; Hassam, A B; Romero-Talamas, C A

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic E × B rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  12. Force field inside the void in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmer, M.; Khrapak, S.A.; Zhdanov, S.K.; Thomas, H.M.; Morfill, G.E.; Fortov, V.E.; Lipaev, A.M.; Molotkov, V.I.; Ivanov, A.I.; Turin, M.V.

    2005-01-01

    Observations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station performed with the Plasma-Kristall experiment-Nefedov facility are reported. A weak instability of the boundary between the central void (region free of microparticles) and the microparticle cloud is observed at low gas pressures. The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called the 'trampoline effect'). The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field inside the void. The experimental results are compared with theory which assumes that the most important forces inside the void are the electric and the ion drag forces. Good agreement is found clearly indicating that under conditions investigated the void formation is caused by the ion drag force

  13. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  14. The perturbation theory model of a spherical oscillator in electric field and the vibrational stark effect in polyatomic molecular species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreska, Irina; Ivanovski, Gjorgji; Pejov, Ljupčo

    2007-04-01

    The effect of external electrostatic fields on the spherical oscillator energy states was studied using stationary perturbation theory. Besides the spherical oscillator with ideal symmetry, also a variety of the deformed systems were considered in which the deformations may be induced by the external fields, but also by the short-range crystal lattice forces. The perturbation theory analysis was carried out using the field-dependent basis functions. Predicted spectral appearances and band splittings due to the deformations and external field influences were shown to be helpful in interpreting the experimental spectra of molecular oscillator possessing subsets of mutually orthogonal triply degenerate normal modes (such as, e.g. tetrahedral species). To verify the results of the perturbation theory treatments, as well as to provide a further illustration of the usefulness of the employed technique, a numerical HF/aug-cc-pVTZ study of the vibrational states of methane molecule in external electrostatic field was performed.

  15. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  16. Three-dimensional computation of magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, C.; Avest, D. ter

    1989-07-01

    Magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet are calculated using the method of image currents to represent the effect of the iron shield. The calculation is performed for coils of finite length using a parametrization for coil heads of constant perimeter. A comparison with calculations based on POISSON and TOSCA is made. (author). 5 refs.; 31 figs.; 6 tabs

  17. Adaptation of multi-joint balance coordination to whole body force fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhart, Denise; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Pasma, Jantsje; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Pasma, J.; Meskers, Carel; Maier, Andrea; van der Kooij, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: The ankles and the hips play an important role in standing balance. Multi-joint coordination adapts with task, the magnitude and type of disturbance [1]. Arm studies show that postural responses are highly dependent on externally applied force fields [2]. Our aim is to study how

  18. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rossing, T.D. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  19. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rossing, T.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  20. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  1. Researching Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: An Introduction to the Field and the Reference Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Elisa

    1999-01-01

    Describes the evolution of refugee and forced migration studies, identifies factors that render it a challenging field to research, and highlights a variety of Internet-based and other electronic resources that can be used to locate monographs, periodicals, grey literature, and current information. Provides a bibliography of reference materials in…

  2. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  3. A verification of quantum field theory – measurement of Casimir force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. Feb. & Mar. 2001 physics pp. 239–243. A verification of quantum field theory ... minum coated a sphere and flat plate using an atomic force microscope. ... where R is the radius of curvature of the spherical surface. The finite .... sured by AFM) of 60% Au/40% Pd, to form a nonreactive and conductive top layer. For.

  4. Calculation of magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in MHD superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, G.; Morini, A.; Moisio, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The realization of a superconducting prototype magnet for MHD energy conversion is under development in Italy. Electromechanical industries and University research groups are involved in the project. The paper deals with analytical methods developed at the Department of Electrical Engineering of Padova University for calculating magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in MHD superconducting magnets and utilized in the preliminary design of the prototype

  5. Optimizing Solute-Solute Interactions in the GLYCAM06 and CHARMM36 Carbohydrate Force Fields Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Wesley K; Miller, Mark S; Elcock, Adrian H

    2016-04-12

    GLYCAM06 and CHARMM36 are successful force fields for modeling carbohydrates. To correct recently identified deficiencies with both force fields, we adjusted intersolute nonbonded parameters to reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficient of glucose at 1 M. The modified parameters improve behavior of glucose and sucrose up to 4 M and improve modeling of a dextran 55-mer. While the modified parameters may not be applicable to all carbohydrates, they highlight the use of osmotic simulations to optimize force fields.

  6. Simultaneous fitting of a potential-energy surface and its corresponding force fields using feedforward neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukrittayakamee, A.; Malshe, M.; Hagan, M.; Raff, L. M.; Narulkar, R.; Bukkapatnum, S.; Komanduri, R.

    2009-04-01

    An improved neural network (NN) approach is presented for the simultaneous development of accurate potential-energy hypersurfaces and corresponding force fields that can be utilized to conduct ab initio molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies on gas-phase chemical reactions. The method is termed as combined function derivative approximation (CFDA). The novelty of the CFDA method lies in the fact that although the NN has only a single output neuron that represents potential energy, the network is trained in such a way that the derivatives of the NN output match the gradient of the potential-energy hypersurface. Accurate force fields can therefore be computed simply by differentiating the network. Both the computed energies and the gradients are then accurately interpolated using the NN. This approach is superior to having the gradients appear in the output layer of the NN because it greatly simplifies the required architecture of the network. The CFDA permits weighting of function fitting relative to gradient fitting. In every test that we have run on six different systems, CFDA training (without a validation set) has produced smaller out-of-sample testing error than early stopping (with a validation set) or Bayesian regularization (without a validation set). This indicates that CFDA training does a better job of preventing overfitting than the standard methods currently in use. The training data can be obtained using an empirical potential surface or any ab initio method. The accuracy and interpolation power of the method have been tested for the reaction dynamics of H+HBr using an analytical potential. The results show that the present NN training technique produces more accurate fits to both the potential-energy surface as well as the corresponding force fields than the previous methods. The fitting and interpolation accuracy is so high (rms error=1.2 cm-1) that trajectories computed on the NN potential exhibit point-by-point agreement with corresponding

  7. Vector electric field measurement via position-modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Ryan P.; Smieska, Louisa M.; Tirmzi, Ali Moeed; Marohn, John A.

    2017-10-01

    High-quality spatially resolved measurements of electric fields are critical to understanding charge injection, charge transport, and charge trapping in semiconducting materials. Here, we report a variation of frequency-modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy that enables spatially resolved measurements of the electric field. We measure electric field components along multiple directions simultaneously by employing position modulation and lock-in detection in addition to numeric differentiation of the surface potential. We demonstrate the technique by recording linescans of the in-plane electric field vector in the vicinity of a patch of trapped charge in a 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (DPh-BTBT) organic field-effect transistor. This technique is simple to implement and should be especially useful for studying electric fields in spatially inhomogeneous samples like organic transistors and photovoltaic blends.

  8. Calculation of electromagnetic fields and forces in coil systems of arbitrary geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program, EFFI, is described which calculates the electric and magnetic fields due to an arbitrary spatial distribution of current-carrying circular loops, circular arcs, and straight lines. The electric field is assumed to arise solely from the time variation of the magnetic field, and the magnetic field due to the changing electric field is assumed to be negligible. In addition, the conductor bundle elements (loops, arcs, lines) are assumed to be absent. Electric and magnetic flux lines and magnetic forces and inductances are also calculated by the program. The algorithm used in the code, which is based on a combination of direct and numerical integration using the Biot-Savart law, is discussed. The methods used to maintain accuracy in calculating fields within the conductor bundle, in particular, are detailed. Several examples are then presented to illustrate the input and output features as well as the accuracy obtained and the running time required

  9. Ionization induced by strong electromagnetic field in low dimensional systems bound by short range forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eminov, P.A., E-mail: peminov@mail.ru [Moscow State University of Instrument Engineering and Computer Sciences, 20 Stromynka Street, Moscow 2107996 (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 3/12 Bolshoy Trekhsvyatskiy pereulok, Moscow 109028 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-01

    Ionization processes for a two dimensional quantum dot subjected to combined electrostatic and alternating electric fields of the same direction are studied using quantum mechanical methods. We derive analytical equations for the ionization probability in dependence on characteristic parameters of the system for both extreme cases of a constant electric field and of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave. The ionization probabilities for a superposition of dc and low frequency ac electric fields of the same direction are calculated. The impulse distribution of ionization probability for a system bound by short range forces is found for a superposition of constant and alternating fields. The total probability for this process per unit of time is derived within exponential accuracy. For the first time the influence of alternating electric field on electron tunneling probability induced by an electrostatic field is studied taking into account the pre-exponential term.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of short-range force systems on 1024-node hypercubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plimpton, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, two parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor to a subset of particles; the second assigns each to a fixed region of 3d space. The algorithms are implemented on 1024-node hypercubes for problems characterized by short-range forces, diffusion (so that each particle's neighbors change in time), and problem size ranging from 250 to 10000 particles. Timings for the algorithms on the 1024-node NCUBE/ten and the newer NCUBE 2 hypercubes are given. The latter is found to be competitive with a CRAY-XMP, running an optimized serial algorithm. For smaller problems the NCUBE 2 and CRAY-XMP are roughly the same; for larger ones the NCUBE 2 is up to twice as fast. Parallel efficiencies of the algorithms and communication parameters for the two hypercubes are also examined

  11. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Boehmite Evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhanel, J.; Daum, B.; Kempe, A.; Rolfes, R.; Silbernagl, D.; Khorasani, M.Gh.Z.; Sturm, H.; Sturm, H.

    2016-01-01

    Boehmite nanoparticles show great potential in improving mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymers. In order to predict the properties of nanocomposites, knowledge about the material parameters of the constituent phases, including the boehmite particles, is crucial. In this study, the mechanical behavior of boehmite is investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Method (MDFEM) simulations. Young’s modulus of the perfect crystalline boehmite nanoparticles is derived from numerical AFM simulations. Results of AFM experiments on boehmite nanoparticles deviate significantly. Possible causes are identified by experiments on complementary types of boehmite, that is, geological and hydrothermally synthesized samples, and further simulations of imperfect crystals and combined boehmite/epoxy models. Under certain circumstances, the mechanical behavior of boehmite was found to be dominated by inelastic effects that are discussed in detail in the present work. The studies are substantiated with accompanying X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments.

  13. Force fields of charged particles in micro-nanofluidic preconcentration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lingyan; Ouyang, Wei; Li, Zirui; Han, Jongyoon

    2017-12-01

    Electrokinetic concentration devices based on the ion concentration polarization (ICP) phenomenon have drawn much attention due to their simple setup, high enrichment factor, and easy integration with many subsequent processes, such as separation, reaction, and extraction etc. Despite significant progress in the experimental research, fundamental understanding and detailed modeling of the preconcentration systems is still lacking. The mechanism of the electrokinetic trapping of charged particles is currently limited to the force balance analysis between the electric force and fluid drag force in an over-simplified one-dimensional (1D) model, which misses many signatures of the actual system. This letter studies the particle trapping phenomena that are not explainable in the 1D model through the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) force fields. The trapping of charged particles is shown to significantly distort the electric field and fluid flow pattern, which in turn leads to the different trapping behaviors of particles of different sizes. The mechanisms behind the protrusions and instability of the focused band, which are important factors determining overall preconcentration efficiency, are revealed through analyzing the rotating fluxes of particles in the vicinity of the ion-selective membrane. The differences in the enrichment factors of differently sized particles are understood through the interplay between the electric force and convective fluid flow. These results provide insights into the electrokinetic concentration effect, which could facilitate the design and optimization of ICP-based preconcentration systems.

  14. Self-consistent Optomechanical Dynamics and Radiation Forces in Thermal Light Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnleitner, M.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss two different aspects of the mechanical interaction between neutral matter and electromagnetic radiation.The first part addresses the complex dynamics of an elastic dielectric deformed by optical forces. To do so we use a one-dimensional model describing the medium by an array of beam splitters such that the interaction with the incident waves can be described with a transfer-matrix approach. Since the force on each individual beam splitter is known we thus obtain the correct volumetric force density inside the medium. Sending a light field through an initially homogeneous dielectric then results in density modulations which in turn alter the optical properties of this medium.The second part is concerned with mechanical light-effects on atoms in thermal radiation fields. At hand of a generic setup of an atom interacting with a hot sphere emitting blackbody radiation we show that the emerging gradient force may surpass gravity by several orders of magnitude. The strength of the repulsive scattering force strongly depends on the spectrum of the involved atoms and can be neglected in some setups. A special emphasis lies on possible implications on astrophysical scenarios where the interactions between heated dust and atoms, molecules or nanoparticles are of crucial interest. (author) [de

  15. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  16. Ultrasonic force microscopy: detection and imaging of ultra-thin molecular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinelli, Franco; Albonetti, Cristiano; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of the formation of ultra-thin organic films is a very important issue. In fact, it is known that the properties of organic light emitting diodes and field effect transistors are strongly affected by the early growth stages. For instance, in the case of sexithiophene, the presence of domains made of molecules with the backbone parallel to the substrate surface has been indirectly evidenced by photoluminescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy. On the contrary, conventional scanning force microscopy both in contact and intermittent contact modes have failed to detect such domains. In this paper, we show that Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), sensitive to nanomechanical properties, allows one to directly identify the structure of sub-monolayer thick films. Sexithiophene flat domains have been imaged for the first time with nanometer scale spatial resolution. A comparison with lateral force and intermittent contact modes has been carried out in order to explain the origins of the UFM contrast and its advantages. In particular, it indicates that UFM is highly suitable for investigations where high sensitivity to material properties, low specimen damage and high spatial resolution are required. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing thermal gradient driving force for grain boundary migration using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Strong thermal gradients in low-thermal-conductivity ceramics may drive extended defects, such as grain boundaries and voids, to migrate in preferential directions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study thermal gradient driven grain boundary migration and to verify a previously proposed thermal gradient driving force equation, using uranium dioxide as a model system. It is found that a thermal gradient drives grain boundaries to migrate up the gradient and the migration velocity increases under a constant gradient owing to the increase in mobility with temperature. Different grain boundaries migrate at very different rates due to their different intrinsic mobilities. The extracted mobilities from the thermal gradient driven simulations are compared with those calculated from two other well-established methods and good agreement between the three different methods is found, demonstrating that the theoretical equation of the thermal gradient driving force is valid, although a correction of one input parameter should be made. The discrepancy in the grain boundary mobilities between modeling and experiments is also discussed.

  18. Thermal characterization of static and dynamical properties of the confined molecular systems interacting through dispersion force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Sergio Luis L M; Ogino, Michihiko; Oguni, Masaharu

    2015-01-28

    We investigated the thermal properties of liquid methylcyclohexane and racemic sec-butylcyclohexane, as representatives of a molecular system with only dispersion-force intermolecular interactions, confined in the pores (thickness/diameter d = 12, 6, 1.1 nm) of silica gels by adiabatic calorimetry. The results imply a heterogeneous picture for molecular aggregate under confinement consisting of an interfacial region and an inner pore one. In the vicinity of a glass-transition temperature T(g,bulk) of bulk liquid, two distinguishable relaxation phenomena were observed for the confined systems and their origins were attributed to the devitrification, namely glass transition, processes of (1) a layer of interfacial molecules adjacent to the pore walls and (2) the molecules located in the middle of the pore. A third glass-transition phenomenon was observed at lower temperatures and ascribed to a secondary relaxation process. The glass transition of the interfacial-layer molecules was found to proceed at temperatures rather above T(g,bulk), whereas that of the molecules located in the inner pore region occurred at temperatures below T(g,bulk). We discuss the reason why the molecules located in different places in the pores reveal the respectively different dynamical properties.

  19. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  20. Lienard-Wiechert field as covariant dynamics of electric lines of force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Lienard-Wiechert field of an arbitrarily moving charge is presented as a system of Lorentz-covariant moving electric lines of force. It is shown that the 4-vector describing these lines is written as a sum of the 4-vector of the charge and the isotropic 4-vector directed to the observation point. The motion of this 4-vector is described by the equation coinciding with the equation of motion for magnetic moment in external fields provided that the intrinsic magnetic moment is zero. By the system of lines that corresponds to the complete equation of magnetic moment in external fields the electromagnetic field is restored. It turned out that the spatial magnetic current proportional to the isotropic 4-vector directed to the observation point corresponds to this field. 8 refs

  1. A NEW CODE FOR NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF THE GLOBAL CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Xiang Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Reliable measurements of the solar magnetic field are still restricted to the photosphere, and our present knowledge of the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field is largely based on extrapolations from photospheric magnetograms using physical models, e.g., the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) model that is usually adopted. Most of the currently available NLFFF codes have been developed with computational volume such as a Cartesian box or a spherical wedge, while a global full-sphere extrapolation is still under development. A high-performance global extrapolation code is in particular urgently needed considering that the Solar Dynamics Observatory can provide a full-disk magnetogram with resolution up to 4096 × 4096. In this work, we present a new parallelized code for global NLFFF extrapolation with the photosphere magnetogram as input. The method is based on the magnetohydrodynamics relaxation approach, the CESE-MHD numerical scheme, and a Yin-Yang spherical grid that is used to overcome the polar problems of the standard spherical grid. The code is validated by two full-sphere force-free solutions from Low and Lou's semi-analytic force-free field model. The code shows high accuracy and fast convergence, and can be ready for future practical application if combined with an adaptive mesh refinement technique.

  2. Ab initio protein structure assembly using continuous structure fragments and optimized knowledge-based force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2012-07-01

    Ab initio protein folding is one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology owing to the difficulties in force field design and conformational search. We developed a novel program, QUARK, for template-free protein structure prediction. Query sequences are first broken into fragments of 1-20 residues where multiple fragment structures are retrieved at each position from unrelated experimental structures. Full-length structure models are then assembled from fragments using replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, which are guided by a composite knowledge-based force field. A number of novel energy terms and Monte Carlo movements are introduced and the particular contributions to enhancing the efficiency of both force field and search engine are analyzed in detail. QUARK prediction procedure is depicted and tested on the structure modeling of 145 nonhomologous proteins. Although no global templates are used and all fragments from experimental structures with template modeling score >0.5 are excluded, QUARK can successfully construct 3D models of correct folds in one-third cases of short proteins up to 100 residues. In the ninth community-wide Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction experiment, QUARK server outperformed the second and third best servers by 18 and 47% based on the cumulative Z-score of global distance test-total scores in the FM category. Although ab initio protein folding remains a significant challenge, these data demonstrate new progress toward the solution of the most important problem in the field. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dipole and quadrupole forces exerted on atoms in laser fields: The nonperturbative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelka, Milan; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2006-01-01

    Manipulation of cold atoms by lasers has so far been studied solely within the framework of the conventional dipole approximation, and the atom-light interaction has been treated using low order perturbation theory. Laser control of atomic motions has been ascribed exclusively to the corresponding light-induced dipole forces. In this work, we present a general theory to derive the potential experienced by an atom in a monochromatic laser field in a context analogous to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for molecules in the field-free case. The formulation goes beyond the dipole approximation and gives rise to the field-atom coupling potential terms which so far have not been taken into consideration in theoretical or experimental studies. Contrary to conventional approaches, our method is based upon the many electron Floquet theory and remains valid also for high intensity laser fields (i.e., for a strongly nonperturbative atom-light interaction). As an illustration of the developed theory, we investigate the trapping of cold atoms in optical lattices. We find that for some atoms for specific laser parameters, despite the absence of the dipole force, the laser trapping is still possible due to the electric quadrupole forces. Namely, we show that by using realistic laser parameters one can form a quadrupole optical lattice which is sufficiently strong to trap Ca and Na atoms

  4. On the Shape of Force-Free Field Lines in the Solar Corona

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, C.

    2012-02-02

    This paper studies the shape parameters of looped field lines in a linear force-free magnetic field. Loop structures with a sufficient amount of kinking are generally seen to form S or inverse S (Z) shapes in the corona (as viewed in projection). For a single field line, we can ask how much the field line is kinked (as measured by the writhe), and how much neighbouring flux twists about the line (as measured by the twist number). The magnetic helicity of a flux element surrounding the field line can be decomposed into these two quantities. We find that the twist helicity contribution dominates the writhe helicity contribution, for field lines of significant aspect ratio, even when their structure is highly kinked. These calculations shed light on some popular assumptions of the field. First, we show that the writhe of field lines of significant aspect ratio (the apex height divided by the footpoint width) can sometimes be of opposite sign to the helicity. Secondly, we demonstrate the possibility of field line structures which could be interpreted as Z-shaped, but which have a helicity value sign expected of an S-shaped structure. These results suggest that caution should be exercised in using two-dimensional images to draw conclusions on the helicity value of field lines and flux tubes. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Fano resonance of the ultrasensitve optical force excited by Gaussian evanescent field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Jiafang; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the angle-dependent Fano-like optical force spectra of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles, which exhibit extraordinary transformation from Lorentzian resonance to Fano resonance when excited by a Gaussian evanescent wave. We systematically analyze the behavior of this asymmetric scattering induced optical force under different conditions and find that this Fano interference-induced force is ultrasensitive to the excitation wavelength, incident angle and particle size, as well as the core–shell configuration, which could be useful for wavelength- and angle-dependent size-selective optical manipulation. The origin of this Fano resonance is further identified as the interference between the two adjacent-order multipolar plasmonic modes excited in the Ag particle under the excitation of an inhomogeneously distributed evanescent field. (paper)

  6. A nonlinear eigenvalue problem for self-similar spherical force-free magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, I. [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III, Martin-Luther Universität, D-06099 Halle (Germany); Low, B. C. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    An axisymmetric force-free magnetic field B(r, θ) in spherical coordinates is defined by a function r sin θB{sub φ}=Q(A) relating its azimuthal component to its poloidal flux-function A. The power law r sin θB{sub φ}=aA|A|{sup 1/n}, n a positive constant, admits separable fields with A=(A{sub n}(θ))/(r{sup n}) , posing a nonlinear boundary-value problem for the constant parameter a as an eigenvalue and A{sub n}(θ) as its eigenfunction [B. C. Low and Y. Q Lou, Astrophys. J. 352, 343 (1990)]. A complete analysis is presented of the eigenvalue spectrum for a given n, providing a unified understanding of the eigenfunctions and the physical relationship between the field's degree of multi-polarity and rate of radial decay via the parameter n. These force-free fields, self-similar on spheres of constant r, have basic astrophysical applications. As explicit solutions they have, over the years, served as standard benchmarks for testing 3D numerical codes developed to compute general force-free fields in the solar corona. The study presented includes a set of illustrative multipolar field solutions to address the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) issues underlying the observation that the solar corona has a statistical preference for negative and positive magnetic helicities in its northern and southern hemispheres, respectively; a hemispherical effect, unchanging as the Sun's global field reverses polarity in successive eleven-year cycles. Generalizing these force-free fields to the separable form B=(H(θ,φ))/(r{sup n+2}) promises field solutions of even richer topological varieties but allowing for φ-dependence greatly complicates the governing equations that have remained intractable. The axisymmetric results obtained are discussed in relation to this generalization and the Parker Magnetostatic Theorem. The axisymmetric solutions are mathematically related to a family of 3D time-dependent ideal MHD solutions for a polytropic fluid of index γ = 4

  7. Simulation of body force field effects on airfoil separation control and optimization of plasma actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdoli, A; Mirzaee, I; Purmahmod, N; Anvari, A

    2008-01-01

    Among all active flow control methods, EHD, MHD and EMHD are the only methods which operate on the basis of body force induction on flow field. The EHD plasma actuator is the proper method which has been used in various flow control applications recently. In this paper, the effects of different body force fields on different domains have been studied for separation control on NACA 0021 and the results have been discussed. The airflow velocity has been assumed to be 35 m s -1 at a post-stall angle of attack of 23 deg. Three different domains have been used around the airfoil to investigate body forces with different strengths and directions and those which give the best result in separation control have been obtained for each domain. It has been shown that the results could be used for optimizing the plasma actuator by manipulating its electrode configuration. Two non-dimensional numbers, A b and D c , have been obtained and validated by different applied body forces. These numbers have been defined for plasma actuators to show their efficiency in different applications

  8. Simulation of body force field effects on airfoil separation control and optimization of plasma actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdoli, A; Mirzaee, I; Purmahmod, N [Faculty of Engineering, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Anvari, A [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ab.abdoli@gmail.com

    2008-09-07

    Among all active flow control methods, EHD, MHD and EMHD are the only methods which operate on the basis of body force induction on flow field. The EHD plasma actuator is the proper method which has been used in various flow control applications recently. In this paper, the effects of different body force fields on different domains have been studied for separation control on NACA 0021 and the results have been discussed. The airflow velocity has been assumed to be 35 m s{sup -1} at a post-stall angle of attack of 23 deg. Three different domains have been used around the airfoil to investigate body forces with different strengths and directions and those which give the best result in separation control have been obtained for each domain. It has been shown that the results could be used for optimizing the plasma actuator by manipulating its electrode configuration. Two non-dimensional numbers, A{sub b} and D{sub c}, have been obtained and validated by different applied body forces. These numbers have been defined for plasma actuators to show their efficiency in different applications.

  9. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand and its flow field during sculling motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Shimada, Shohei; Miwa, Takahiro; Kudo, Shigetada; Sanders, Ross; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this research is to clarify the mechanism by which unsteady forces are generated during sculling by a skilled swimmer and thereby to contribute to improving propulsive techniques. We used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to acquire data on the kinematics of the hand during sculling, such as fluid forces and flow field. By investigating the correlations between these data, we expected to find a new propulsion mechanism. The experiment was performed in a flow-controlled water channel. The participant executed sculling motions to remain at a fixed position despite constant water flow. PIV was used to visualize the flow-field cross-section in the plane of hand motion. Moreover, the fluid forces acting on the hand were estimated from pressure distribution measurements performed on the hand and simultaneous three-dimensional motion analysis. By executing the sculling motion, a skilled swimmer produces large unsteady fluid forces when the leading-edge vortex occurs on the dorsal side of the hand and wake capture occurs on the palm side. By using a new approach, we observed interesting unsteady fluid phenomena similar to those of flying insects. The study indicates that it is essential for swimmers to fully exploit vortices. A better understanding of these phenomena might lead to an improvement in sculling techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomistic Force Field for Pyridinium-Based Ionic Liquids: Reliable Transport Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voroshylova, I. V.; Chaban, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable force field (FF) is a central issue in successful prediction of physical chemical properties via computer simulations. This work introduces refined FF parameters for six popular ionic liquids (ILs) of the pyridinium family (butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)......Reliable force field (FF) is a central issue in successful prediction of physical chemical properties via computer simulations. This work introduces refined FF parameters for six popular ionic liquids (ILs) of the pyridinium family (butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, bis......(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, dicyanamide, hexafluorophosphate, triflate, chloride). We elaborate a systematic procedure, which allows accounting for specific cationanion interactions in the liquid phase. Once these interactions are described accurately, all experimentally determined transport properties can be reproduced. We prove...... and elevated temperature. The developed atomistic models provide a systematic refinement upon the well-known Canongia LopesPadua (CL&P) FF. Together with the original CL&P parameters the present models foster a computational investigation of ionic liquids....

  11. Crystal structure prediction of flexible molecules using parallel genetic algorithms with a standard force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonah; Orendt, Anita M; Ferraro, Marta B; Facelli, Julio C

    2009-10-01

    This article describes the application of our distributed computing framework for crystal structure prediction (CSP) the modified genetic algorithms for crystal and cluster prediction (MGAC), to predict the crystal structure of flexible molecules using the general Amber force field (GAFF) and the CHARMM program. The MGAC distributed computing framework includes a series of tightly integrated computer programs for generating the molecule's force field, sampling crystal structures using a distributed parallel genetic algorithm and local energy minimization of the structures followed by the classifying, sorting, and archiving of the most relevant structures. Our results indicate that the method can consistently find the experimentally known crystal structures of flexible molecules, but the number of missing structures and poor ranking observed in some crystals show the need for further improvement of the potential. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Transferable Force Field for Metal–Organic Frameworks from First-Principles: BTW-FF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present an ab-initio derived force field to describe the structural and mechanical properties of metal–organic frameworks (or coordination polymers). The aim is a transferable interatomic potential that can be applied to MOFs regardless of metal or ligand identity. The initial parametrization set includes MOF-5, IRMOF-10, IRMOF-14, UiO-66, UiO-67, and HKUST-1. The force field describes the periodic crystal and considers effective atomic charges based on topological analysis of the Bloch states of the extended materials. Transferable potentials were developed for the four organic ligands comprising the test set and for the associated Cu, Zn, and Zr metal nodes. The predicted materials properties, including bulk moduli and vibrational frequencies, are in agreement with explicit density functional theory calculations. The modal heat capacity and lattice thermal expansion are also predicted. PMID:25574157

  13. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Ashcroft, Colby K; O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-08-15

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically "pushing" a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques.

  14. Zero mass field quantization and Kibble's long-range force criterion for the Goldstone theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The central theme of the dissertation is an investigation of the long-range force criterion used by Kibble in his discussion of the Goldstone Theorem. This investigation is broken up into the following sections: I. Introduction. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the Goldstone Theorem and the conditions under which it holds are discussed. II. Massless Wave Expansions. In order to make explicit calculations of the operator commutators used in applying Kibble's criterion, it is necessary to work out the operator expansions for a massless field. Unusual results are obtained which include operators corresponding to classical macroscopic field modes. III. The Kibble Criterion for Simple Models Exhibiting Spontaneously Broken Symmetries. The results of the previous section are applied to simple models with spontaneously broken symmetries, namely, the real scalar massless field and the Goldstone model without gauge coupling. IV. The Higgs Mechanism in Classical Field Theory. It is shown that the Higgs Mechanism has a simple interpretation in terms of classical field theory, namely, that it arises from a derivative coupling term between the Goldstone fields and the gauge fields. V. The Higgs Mechanism and Kibble's Criterion. This section draws together the material discussed in sections II to IV. Explicit calculations are made to evaluate Kibble's criterion on a Goldstone-Higgs type of model in the Coulomb gauge. It is found, as expected, that the criterion is not met, but not for reasons relating to the range of the mediating force. By referring to the findings of sections III and IV, it is concluded that the common denominator underlying both the Higgs Mechanism and the failure of Kibble's criterion is a structural aspect of the field equations: derivative coupling between fields

  15. Continuous Force Decoding from Local Field Potentials of the Primary Motor Cortex in Freely Moving Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Abed; Heydari Beni, Nargess; Shalchyan, Vahid; Daliri, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-21

    Local field potential (LFP) signals recorded by intracortical microelectrodes implanted in primary motor cortex can be used as a high informative input for decoding of motor functions. Recent studies show that different kinematic parameters such as position and velocity can be inferred from multiple LFP signals as precisely as spiking activities, however, continuous decoding of the force magnitude from the LFP signals in freely moving animals has remained an open problem. Here, we trained three rats to press a force sensor for getting a drop of water as a reward. A 16-channel micro-wire array was implanted in the primary motor cortex of each trained rat, and obtained LFP signals were used for decoding of the continuous values recorded by the force sensor. Average coefficient of correlation and the coefficient of determination between decoded and actual force signals were r = 0.66 and R 2  = 0.42, respectively. We found that LFP signal on gamma frequency bands (30-120 Hz) had the most contribution in the trained decoding model. This study suggests the feasibility of using low number of LFP channels for the continuous force decoding in freely moving animals resembling BMI systems in real life applications.

  16. A Basic Experiment on Two-Dimensional Force of HTSC-Bulk in DC Magnetic-Field

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 欣二郎; 松田, 茂雄; 松本, 洋和

    2000-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTSC) bulk can levitate stably on a track which consists of permanent magnets of the same polarity. This is because HTSC-bulk has a pinning force which keeps from vertical displacement due to the weight. We have proposed a new LSM theory which is based on an idea of considering the pinning force as synchronizing force in using armature travelling-magnetic-field instead of permanent magnets. However, the lift force enough to levitate the vehicle on the ground ...

  17. Dissolved organic carbon--contaminant interaction descriptors found by 3D force field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, H A J; Krop, H B; Parsons, J R; Tambach, T; Kubicki, J D

    2002-03-01

    Enthalpies of transfer at 300 K of various partitioning processes were calculated in order to study the suitability of 3D force fields for the calculation of partitioning constants. A 3D fulvic acid (FA) model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was built in a MM+ force field using AMI atomic charges and geometrical optimization (GO). 3,5-Dichlorobiphenyl (PCB14), 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (PCB15), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (PPDDT) and 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine (Atrazine) were inserted into different sites and their interaction energies with FA were calculated. Energies of hydration were calculated and subtracted from FA-contaminant interactions of selected sites. The resulting values for the enthalpies of transfer from water to DOC were 2.8, -1.4, -6.4 and 0.0 kcal/mol for PCB 14, PCB15, PPDDT and Atrazine, respectively. The value of PPDDT compared favorably with the experimental value of -5.0 kcal/mol. Prior to this, the method was studied by the calculation of the enthalpies of vaporization and aqueous solution using various force fields. In the MM + force field GO predicted enthalpies of vaporization deviated by +0.7 (PCB14), +3.6 (PCB15) and -0.7 (PPDDT)kcal/mol from experimental data, whereas enthalpies of aqueous solution deviated by -3.6 (PCB14), +5.8 (PCB15) and +3.7 (PPDDT) kcal/mol. Only for PCB14 the wrong sign of this enthalpy value was predicted. Potential advantages and limitations of the approach were discussed.

  18. Force-free fields in the vicinity of a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelidis, E.

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of a force-free field has been studied in a Reissner-Nordstroem metric. An expansion in tensor harmonics of even-odd parity reduced the radial equations in a differential equation of the Sturm-Liouville system which was solved asymptotically in a conveniently defined space coordinate. Further, it has been possible to regularize the singular behaviour of the Reissner-Nordstroem metric at the event horizon and the modified metric to be given explicitly. (Auth.)

  19. Coarse-graining polymers with the MARTINI force-field: polystyrene as a benchmark case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, G.; Monticelli, L.; Puisto, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    We hereby introduce a new hybrid thermodynamic-structural approach to the coarse-graining of polymers. The new model is developed within the framework of the MARTINI force-field (Marrink et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2007, 111, 7812), which uses mainly thermodynamic properties as targets...... of microseconds. Finally, we tested our model in dilute conditions. The collapse of the polymer chains in a bad solvent and the swelling in a good solvent could be reproduced....

  20. Relativistic equation of the orbit of a particle in a arbitrary central force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, Francisc D.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of the orbit of a relativistic particle moving in an arbitrary central force field is derived. Straightforward generalizations of well-known first and second order differential equations are given. It is pointed out that the relativistic equation of the orbit has the same form as in the non-relativistic case, the only changes consisting in the appearance of additional terms proportional to 1/c 2 in both potential and total energies. (author)

  1. Study of vapour phase dynamics with nitrogen boiling in the field of centrifugal forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, N.M.; Kolod'ko, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    The vapour phase dynamics during film boiling of liquid nitrogen on horizontal wire in the field of centrifugal forces has been studied experimentally in a wide range of overloads(1 ≤ η ≤ 375) and heat fluxes (q kp2 ≤ q ≤ 4q kpi ). The available data confirmed and the theoretical relationships suggested make it possible to calculate the hydrodynamic film boiling parameters (wave length, bubble departure diameter and frequency) for other liquids

  2. The scaled-charge additive force field for amino acid based ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fileti, E. E.; Chaban, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute an emerging research field. New ILs involve more and more organic and inorganic ions. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to their evolutional connection to proteins. We report a new non-polarizable force field (FF) for the eight AAILs...... comprising 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and amino acid anions. The anions were obtained via deprotonation of carboxyl group. Specific cation-anion non-covalent interactions were taken into account by computing electrostatic potential for ion pairs. The van der Waals interactions were adopted from...

  3. Baryonic forces and hyperons in nuclear matter from SU(3) chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan Karl

    2016-02-12

    In this work the baryon-baryon interaction is studied at next-to-leading order in SU(3) chiral effective field theory and applied to hyperon-nucleon scattering. The properties of hyperons in isospin-symmetric as well as asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated within the Bruecker-Hartree-Fock formalism. Moreover, the leading three-baryon interaction is derived and its low-energy constants are estimated from decuplet intermediate states. We conclude, that chiral effective field theory is a well-suited tool to describe the baryonic forces.

  4. AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field Parameters of the Heme Cofactor in Its Ferrous and Ferric Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Clavaguera, Carine; Lagardère, Louis; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2018-04-16

    We report the first parameters of the heme redox cofactors for the polarizable AMOEBA force field in both the ferric and ferrous forms. We consider two types of complexes, one with two histidine side chains as axial ligands and one with a histidine and a methionine side chain as ligands. We have derived permanent multipoles from second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). The sets of parameters have been validated in a first step by comparison of AMOEBA interaction energies of heme and a collection of biologically relevant molecules with MP2 and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In a second validation step, we consider interaction energies with large aggregates comprising around 80 H 2 O molecules. These calculations are repeated for 30 structures extracted from semiempirical PM7 DM simulations. Very encouraging agreement is found between DFT and the AMOEBA force field, which results from an accurate treatment of electrostatic interactions. We finally report long (10 ns) MD simulations of cytochromes in two redox states with AMOEBA testing both the 2003 and 2014 AMOEBA water models. These simulations have been carried out with the TINKER-HP (High Performance) program. In conclusion, owing to their ubiquity in biology, we think the present work opens a wide array of applications of the polarizable AMOEBA force field on hemeproteins.

  5. Kirkwood-Buff Approach Rescues Overcollapse of a Disordered Protein in Canonical Protein Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Davide; Milles, Sigrid; Fuertes, Gustavo; Svergun, Dmitri I; Lemke, Edward A; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-06-25

    Understanding the function of intrinsically disordered proteins is intimately related to our capacity to correctly sample their conformational dynamics. So far, a gap between experimentally and computationally derived ensembles exists, as simulations show overcompacted conformers. Increasing evidence suggests that the solvent plays a crucial role in shaping the ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins and has led to several attempts to modify water parameters and thereby favor protein-water over protein-protein interactions. This study tackles the problem from a different perspective, which is the use of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions to reproduce the correct conformational ensemble of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). A protein force field recently developed on such a basis was found to be highly effective in reproducing ensembles for a fragment from the FG-rich nucleoporin 153, with dimensions matching experimental values obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and single molecule FRET experiments. Kirkwood-Buff theory presents a complementary and fundamentally different approach to the recently developed four-site TIP4P-D water model, both of which can rescue the overcollapse observed in IDPs with canonical protein force fields. As such, our study provides a new route for tackling the deficiencies of current protein force fields in describing protein solvation.

  6. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  7. Mean-field Ohm's law and coaxial helicity injection in force-free plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weening, R. H.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of steady-state coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in force-free plasmas is presented using a parallel mean-field Ohm's law that includes resistivity η and hyper-resistivity Λ terms. Using Boozer coordinates, a partial differential equation is derived for the time evolution of the mean-field poloidal magnetic flux, or magnetic Hamiltonian function, from the parallel mean-field Ohm's law. A general expression is obtained from the mean-field theory for the efficiency of CHI current drive in force-free plasmas. Inductances of internal energy, magnetic helicity, and poloidal magnetic flux are used to characterize axisymmetric plasma equilibria that have a model current profile. Using the model current profile, a method is suggested to determine the level of magnetohydrodynamic activity at the magnetic axis and the consequent deviation from the completely relaxed Taylor state. The mean-field Ohm's law model suggests that steady-state CHI can be viewed most simply as a boundary layer problem.

  8. A Simple Model of Fields Including the Strong or Nuclear Force and a Cosmological Speculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Spencer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reexamining the assumptions underlying the General Theory of Relativity and calling an object's gravitational field its inertia, and acceleration simply resistance to that inertia, yields a simple field model where the potential (kinetic energy of a particle at rest is its capacity to move itself when its inertial field becomes imbalanced. The model then attributes electromagnetic and strong forces to the effects of changes in basic particle shape. Following up on the model's assumption that the relative intensity of a particle's gravitational field is always inversely related to its perceived volume and assuming that all black holes spin, may create the possibility of a cosmic rebound where a final spinning black hole ends with a new Big Bang.

  9. Collapse and coexistence for a molecular braid with an attractive interaction component subject to mechanical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic J O'

    2015-04-15

    Dual mechanical braiding experiments provide a useful tool with which to investigate the nature of interactions between rod-like molecules, for instance actin and DNA. In conditions close to molecular condensation, one would expect an appearance of a local minimum in the interaction potential between the two molecules. We investigate this situation, introducing an attractive component into the interaction potential, using a model developed for describing such experiments. We consider both attractive interactions that do not depend on molecular structure and those which depend on a DNA-like helix structure. In braiding experiments, an attractive term may lead to certain effects. A local minimum may cause molecules to collapse from a loosely braided configuration into a tight one, occurring at a critical value of the moment applied about the axis of the braid. For a fixed number of braid pitches, this may lead to coexistence between the two braiding states, tight and loose. Coexistence implies certain proportions of the braid are in each state, their relative size depending on the number of braid pitches. This manifests itself as a linear dependence in numerically calculated quantities as functions of the number of braid pitches. Also, in the collapsed state, the braid radius stays roughly constant. Furthermore, if the attractive interaction is helix dependent, the left-right handed braid symmetry is broken. For a DNA like charge distribution, using the Kornyshev-Leikin interaction model, our results suggest that significant braid collapse and coexistence only occurs for left handed braids. Regardless of the interaction model, the study highlights the possible qualitative physics of braid collapse and coexistence; and the role helix specific forces might play, if important. The model could be used to connect other microscopic theories of interaction with braiding experiments.

  10. Collapse and coexistence for a molecular braid with an attractive interaction component subject to mechanical forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dominic J

    2015-01-01

    Dual mechanical braiding experiments provide a useful tool with which to investigate the nature of interactions between rod-like molecules, for instance actin and DNA. In conditions close to molecular condensation, one would expect an appearance of a local minimum in the interaction potential between the two molecules. We investigate this situation, introducing an attractive component into the interaction potential, using a model developed for describing such experiments. We consider both attractive interactions that do not depend on molecular structure and those which depend on a DNA-like helix structure. In braiding experiments, an attractive term may lead to certain effects. A local minimum may cause molecules to collapse from a loosely braided configuration into a tight one, occurring at a critical value of the moment applied about the axis of the braid. For a fixed number of braid pitches, this may lead to coexistence between the two braiding states, tight and loose. Coexistence implies certain proportions of the braid are in each state, their relative size depending on the number of braid pitches. This manifests itself as a linear dependence in numerically calculated quantities as functions of the number of braid pitches. Also, in the collapsed state, the braid radius stays roughly constant. Furthermore, if the attractive interaction is helix dependent, the left-right handed braid symmetry is broken. For a DNA like charge distribution, using the Kornyshev–Leikin interaction model, our results suggest that significant braid collapse and coexistence only occurs for left handed braids. Regardless of the interaction model, the study highlights the possible qualitative physics of braid collapse and coexistence; and the role helix specific forces might play, if important. The model could be used to connect other microscopic theories of interaction with braiding experiments. (paper)

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Membrane/Water Interface : The Ordering of Water and Its Relation to the Hydration Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berkowitz, Max; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the origin of the hydration force, three molecular dynamic simulations of phospholipid/water multilamellar systems were performed. The simulated systems only differed in the amount of interbilayer water, ranging from the minimum to the maximum amount of

  12. Influence of the Molecular Adhesion Force on the Indentation Depth of a Particle into the Wafer Surface in the CMP Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By theoretical calculation, the external force on the particle conveyed by pad asperities and the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer are compared and analyzed quantitatively. It is confirmed that the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer has a great influence on the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP material removal process. Considering the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer, a more precise model for the indentation of a particle into the wafer surface is developed in this paper, and the new model is compared with the former model which neglected the molecular adhesion force. Through theoretical analyses, an approach and corresponding critical values are applied to estimate whether the molecular adhesion force in CMP can be neglected. These methods can improve the precision of the material removal model of CMP.

  13. A bidirectional brain-machine interface algorithm that approximates arbitrary force-fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Vato

    Full Text Available We examine bidirectional brain-machine interfaces that control external devices in a closed loop by decoding motor cortical activity to command the device and by encoding the state of the device by delivering electrical stimuli to sensory areas. Although it is possible to design this artificial sensory-motor interaction while maintaining two independent channels of communication, here we propose a rule that closes the loop between flows of sensory and motor information in a way that approximates a desired dynamical policy expressed as a field of forces acting upon the controlled external device. We previously developed a first implementation of this approach based on linear decoding of neural activity recorded from the motor cortex into a set of forces (a force field applied to a point mass, and on encoding of position of the point mass into patterns of electrical stimuli delivered to somatosensory areas. However, this previous algorithm had the limitation that it only worked in situations when the position-to-force map to be implemented is invertible. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a new non-linear form of the bidirectional interface that can approximate a virtually unlimited family of continuous fields. The new algorithm bases both the encoding of position information and the decoding of motor cortical activity on an explicit map between spike trains and the state space of the device computed with Multi-Dimensional-Scaling. We present a detailed computational analysis of the performance of the interface and a validation of its robustness by using synthetic neural responses in a simulated sensory-motor loop.

  14. RNAi: An emerging field of molecular research | Kabir | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a specific technique using only a few double stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules to stop the expression which has made it one of the important areas in molecular biology. By introducing a gene into the host genome which is highly homologous to an endogenous gene, the RNA silencing is ...

  15. Lane-Emden equation with inertial force and general polytropic dynamic model for molecular cloud cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, DaLei; Lou, Yu-Qing; Esimbek, Jarken

    2018-01-01

    We study self-similar hydrodynamics of spherical symmetry using a general polytropic (GP) equation of state and derive the GP dynamic Lane-Emden equation (LEE) with a radial inertial force. In reference to Lou & Cao, we solve the GP dynamic LEE for both polytropic index γ = 1 + 1/n and the isothermal case n → +∞; our formalism is more general than the conventional polytropic model with n = 3 or γ = 4/3 of Goldreich & Weber. For proper boundary conditions, we obtain an exact constant solution for arbitrary n and analytic variable solutions for n = 0 and n = 1, respectively. Series expansion solutions are derived near the origin with the explicit recursion formulae for the series coefficients for both the GP and isothermal cases. By extensive numerical explorations, we find that there is no zero density at a finite radius for n ≥ 5. For 0 ≤ n 0 for monotonically decreasing density from the origin and vanishing at a finite radius for c being less than a critical value Ccr. As astrophysical applications, we invoke our solutions of the GP dynamic LEE with central finite boundary conditions to fit the molecular cloud core Barnard 68 in contrast to the static isothermal Bonnor-Ebert sphere by Alves et al. Our GP dynamic model fits appear to be sensibly consistent with several more observations and diagnostics for density, temperature and gas pressure profiles.

  16. Analytic nuclear forces and molecular properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Overy, Catherine; Opalka, Daniel; Alavi, Ali; Knowles, Peter J.; Booth, George H.

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased stochastic sampling of the one- and two-body reduced density matrices is achieved in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo with the introduction of a second, “replica” ensemble of walkers, whose population evolves in imaginary time independently from the first and which entails only modest additional computational overheads. The matrices obtained from this approach are shown to be representative of full configuration-interaction quality and hence provide a realistic opportunity to achieve high-quality results for a range of properties whose operators do not necessarily commute with the Hamiltonian. A density-matrix formulated quasi-variational energy estimator having been already proposed and investigated, the present work extends the scope of the theory to take in studies of analytic nuclear forces, molecular dipole moments, and polarisabilities, with extensive comparison to exact results where possible. These new results confirm the suitability of the sampling technique and, where sufficiently large basis sets are available, achieve close agreement with experimental values, expanding the scope of the method to new areas of investigation

  17. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  18. Nanophotonic force microscopy: characterizing particle-surface interactions using near-field photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-02-11

    Direct measurements of particle-surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. Here we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. As shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  19. Small strain multiphase-field model accounting for configurational forces and mechanical jump conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Daniel; Schoof, Ephraim; Tschukin, Oleg; Reiter, Andreas; Herrmann, Christoph; Schwab, Felix; Selzer, Michael; Nestler, Britta

    2018-03-01

    Computational models based on the phase-field method have become an essential tool in material science and physics in order to investigate materials with complex microstructures. The models typically operate on a mesoscopic length scale resolving structural changes of the material and provide valuable information about the evolution of microstructures and mechanical property relations. For many interesting and important phenomena, such as martensitic phase transformation, mechanical driving forces play an important role in the evolution of microstructures. In order to investigate such physical processes, an accurate calculation of the stresses and the strain energy in the transition region is indispensable. We recall a multiphase-field elasticity model based on the force balance and the Hadamard jump condition at the interface. We show the quantitative characteristics of the model by comparing the stresses, strains and configurational forces with theoretical predictions in two-phase cases and with results from sharp interface calculations in a multiphase case. As an application, we choose the martensitic phase transformation process in multigrain systems and demonstrate the influence of the local homogenization scheme within the transition regions on the resulting microstructures.

  20. Streamwise-body-force-model for rapid simulation combining internal and external flow fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Rong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A streamwise-body-force-model (SBFM is developed and applied in the overall flow simulation for the distributed propulsion system, combining internal and external flow fields. In view of axial stage effects, fan or compressor effects could be simplified as body forces along the streamline. These body forces which are functions of local parameters could be added as source terms in Navier-Stokes equations to replace solid boundary conditions of blades and hubs. The validation of SBFM with uniform inlet and distortion inlet of compressors shows that pressure performance characteristics agree well with experimental data. A three-dimensional simulation of the integration configuration, via a blended wing body aircraft with a distributed propulsion system using the SBFM, has been completed. Lift coefficient and drag coefficient agree well with wind tunnel test results. Results show that to reach the goal of rapid integrated simulation combining internal and external flow fields, the computational fluid dynamics method based on SBFM is reasonable.

  1. Magnetic Field Equivalent Current Analysis-Based Radial Force Control for Bearingless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangqiu Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bearingless permanent magnet synchronous motors (BPMSMs, with all advantages of permanent magnet motors (PMSMs and magnetic bearings, have become an important research direction in the bearingless motor field. To realize a stable suspension for the BPMSM, accurate decoupling control between the electromagnetic torque and radial suspension force is indispensable. In this paper, a concise and reliable analysis method based on a magnetic field equivalent current is presented. By this analysis method, the operation principle is analyzed theoretically, and the necessary conditions to produce a stable radial suspension force are confirmed. In addition, mathematical models of the torque and radial suspension force are established which is verified by the finite element analysis (FEA software ANSYS. Finally, an experimental prototype of a 2-4 poles surface-mounted BPMSM is tested with the customized control strategy. The simulation and experimental results have shown that the motor has good rotation and suspension performance, and validated the accuracy of the proposed analysis method and the feasibility of the control strategy.

  2. Theory and numerical calculation of the acoustic field exerted by eddy-current forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    The equations for calculating the acoustic field produced within a nonmagnetic metal by interaction of eddy currents with a static magnetic field were obtained on the assumptions (1) an ultrasonic wave is generated by the electromagentic force through classical and macroscopic phenomena; (2) the electric, magnetic, and elastic properties of the metal are linear, isotropic, and homogeneous throughout the metal, which occupies semi-infinite space; (3) the whole system is axially symmetric; and (4) eddy currents and elastic waves show a steady-state sinusoidal variation. The acoustic field produced by a specific electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer with axial symmetry was calculated numerically, and the results showed a well-defined ultrasonic wave beam, which was narrower than had been expected from the size of the transducer. (auth)

  3. The truncated conjugate gradient (TCG), a non-iterative/fixed-cost strategy for computing polarization in molecular dynamics: Fast evaluation of analytical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviat, Félix; Lagardère, Louis; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2017-10-01

    In a recent paper [F. Aviat et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 13, 180-190 (2017)], we proposed the Truncated Conjugate Gradient (TCG) approach to compute the polarization energy and forces in polarizable molecular simulations. The method consists in truncating the conjugate gradient algorithm at a fixed predetermined order leading to a fixed computational cost and can thus be considered "non-iterative." This gives the possibility to derive analytical forces avoiding the usual energy conservation (i.e., drifts) issues occurring with iterative approaches. A key point concerns the evaluation of the analytical gradients, which is more complex than that with a usual solver. In this paper, after reviewing the present state of the art of polarization solvers, we detail a viable strategy for the efficient implementation of the TCG calculation. The complete cost of the approach is then measured as it is tested using a multi-time step scheme and compared to timings using usual iterative approaches. We show that the TCG methods are more efficient than traditional techniques, making it a method of choice for future long molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable force fields where energy conservation matters. We detail the various steps required for the implementation of the complete method by software developers.

  4. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S H; Hashi, S; Ishiyama, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and 19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  5. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  6. A code for calculating force and temperature of a bitter plate type toroidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, U.

    1989-01-01

    To assist the design effort of the TF coils for CIT, a set of programs was developed to calculate the transient spatial distribution of the current density, the temperature and the forces in the TF coil conductor region. The TF coils are of the Bitter (disk) type design and therefore have negligible variation of current density in the toroidal direction. During the TF pulse, voltages are induced which cause the field and current to diffuse in the minor radial direction. This penetration, combined with the increase of resistance due to the temperature rise determines the distribution of the current. After the current distribution has been determined, the in-plane (TF-TF) and the out-of-plane (TF-PF) forces in the conductor are computed. The predicted currents and temperatures have been independently corroborated using the SPARK code which has been modified for this type of problem. 6 figs

  7. Novel System for Bite-Force Sensing and Monitoring Based on Magnetic Near Field Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Sanz Maudes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID technology (NFC. The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient’s dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system’s operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials.

  8. Effect of simulated resistance, fleeing, and use of force on standardized field sobriety testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffrey; Dawes, Donald; Nystrom, Paul; Moore, Johanna; Steinberg, Lila; Tilton, Annemarie; Miner, James

    2015-07-01

    When a law enforcement officer (LEO) stops a suspect believed to be operating (a vehicle) while impaired (OWI), the suspect may resist or flee, and the LEO may respond with force. The suspect may then undergo a Standardized Field Sobriety Test (SFST) to gauge impairment. It is not known whether resistance, fleeing, or actions of force can create an inaccurate SFST result. We examined the effect of resistance, fleeing, and force on the SFST. Human volunteers were prospectively randomized to have a SFST before and after one of five scenarios: (1) five-second conducted electrical weapon exposure; (2) 100-yard (91.4 m) sprint; (3) 45-second physical fight; (4) police dog bite with protective gear; and (5) Oleoresin Capsicum spray to the face with eyes shielded. The SFST was administered and graded by a qualified LEO. After the SFST, the volunteer entered their scenario and was then administered another SFST. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. SFST performance was compared before and after using chi-square tests. Fifty-seven subjects enrolled. Three received a single-point penalty during one component of the three-component SFST pre-scenario. No subject received a penalty point in any components of the SFST post-scenario (p = 0.08). This is the first human study to examine the effects of physical resistance, flight, and use of force on the SFST result. We did not detect a difference in the performance of subjects taking the SFST before and after exposure to resistance, flight, or a simulated use of force. © Australian Council for Educational Research 2014.

  9. Mapping the global football field: a sociological model of transnational forces within the world game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianotti, Richard; Robertson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a sociological model of the key transnational political and economic forces that are shaping the 'global football field'. The model draws upon, and significantly extends, the theory of the 'global field' developed previously by Robertson. The model features four quadrants, each of which contains a dominant operating principle, an 'elemental reference point', and an 'elemental theme'. The quadrants contain, first, neo-liberalism, associated with the individual and elite football clubs; second, neo-mercantilism, associated with nation-states and national football systems; third, international relations, associated with international governing bodies; and fourth, global civil society, associated with diverse institutions that pursue human development and/or social justice. We examine some of the interactions and tensions between the major institutional and ideological forces across the four quadrants. We conclude by examining how the weakest quadrant, featuring global civil society, may gain greater prominence within football. In broad terms, we argue that our four-fold model may be utilized to map and to examine other substantive research fields with reference to globalization. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2012.

  10. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-12-23

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding.

  11. Effect of magnetic field and radiative condensation on the Jeans instability of dusty plasma with polarization force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajapati, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma with polarization force is investigated considering the effects of magnetic field, dust temperature and radiative condensation. The condition of Jeans instability and expression of critical Jeans wave number are obtained which depend upon polarization force and dust temperature but these are unaffected by the presence of magnetic field. The radiative heat-loss functions also modify the Jeans condition of instability and expression of critical Jeans wave number. It is observed that the polarization force and ratio of radiative heat-loss functions have destabilizing while magnetic field and dust temperature have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  12. Analysis of PM Magnetization Field Effects on the Unbalanced Magnetic Forces due to Rotor Eccentricity in BLDC Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahdiuon-Rad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates both static and dynamic eccentricities in single phase brushless DC (BLDC motors and analyzes the effect of the PM magnetization field on unbalanced magnetic forces acting on the rotor. Three common types of PM magnetization field patterns including radial, parallel and sinusoidal magnetizations are considered. In both static and dynamic eccentricities, harmonic components of the unbalanced magnetic forces on the rotor are extracted and analyzed. Based on simulation results, the magnetization fields that produce the lowest and highest unbalanced magnetic forces are determined in rotor eccentricity conditions.

  13. The force analysis for superparamagnetic nanoparticles-based gene delivery in an oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiajia [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Shi, Zongqian, E-mail: zqshi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Jia, Shenli [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Zhang, Pengbo [Department of Anesthesiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, No.157 West 5 Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710004 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Due to the peculiar magnetic properties and the ability to function in cell-level biological interaction, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) have been being the attractive carrier for gene delivery. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles with surface-bound gene vector can be attracted to the surface of cells by the Kelvin force provided by external magnetic field. In this article, the influence of the oscillating magnetic field on the characteristics of magnetofection is studied in terms of the magnetophoretic velocity. The magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet is calculated by equivalent current source (ECS) method, and the Kelvin force is derived by using the effective moment method. The results show that the static magnetic field accelerates the sedimentation of the particles, and drives the particles inward towards the axis of the magnet. Based on the investigation of the magnetophoretic velocity of the particle under horizontally oscillating magnetic field, an oscillating velocity within the amplitude of the magnet oscillation is observed. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that the oscillating amplitude plays an important role in regulating the active region, where the particles may present oscillating motion. The analysis of the magnetophoretic velocity gives us an insight into the physical mechanism of the magnetofection. It's also helpful to the optimal design of the magnetofection system. - Highlights: • We compare the results of the ECS method and FEA method with the commercial software, Ansys. • We analyze the physic mechanism of the oscillating motion of the particles in the presence of an oscillating magnet. • We discuss the influence of the oscillating amplitude of the magnet on the behavior of the particle.

  14. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  15. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoil, Charles [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Nonaka, Takahiro [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Afrin, Rehana [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Biofrontier Center, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Ikai, Atsushi, E-mail: ikai.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  16. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  17. Holding molecular dications together in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chunlei

    2006-01-01

    Metastable channel of doubly ionized carbon monoxide, CO 2+ , was scantly seen in previous strong-field experiments at the visible wavelength region, but was commonly observed using single high-energy photon or electron excitation. For the first time with near-IR ultrashort-pulse radiation, we observe an abundance of CO 2+ . We show that CO 2+ results from nonsequential double ionization, while its dissociation counterpart, C + +O + , results from sequential processes, and CO 2+ can be obtained through either single high-energy photon or electron excitation or multiphoton ionization with ultrashort pulses before a critical internuclear distance is reached. Our study demonstrates the experimental conditions to converge the outcomes from two vastly different regimes, namely, multiphoton excitation and ionization in strong fields and single high-energy photon or electron excitation and ionization in weak fields

  18. Development of a Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field for Peptides in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    differ. Raman and IR techniques are complimentary which helps in assignment of observed vibrational modes. As described in beginning organic ...1588 I NH, .i.sor(98) 2076 2100 24 CH3 55(95) 2125 2207 82 CH3 as’ (56), CH3 as’ (43) 2235 2253 18 CH3 as’(55), CH3 as’(41) 2888 COff .(100) 3155 NH...Application of self- consistent-field ab initio calculations to organic molecules I. Equilibrium struc- ture and force constants of hydrocarbons

  19. Study of vapour phase dynamics with nitrogen boiling in the field of centrifugal forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchenko, N M; Kolod' ko, I M

    1987-07-01

    The vapour phase dynamics during film boiling of liquid nitrogen on horizontal wire in the field of centrifugal forces has been studied experimentally in a wide range of overloads(1 less than or equal to eta less than or equal to 375) and heat fluxes (q/sub kp2/ less than or equal to q less than or equal to 4q/sub kpi/). The available data confirmed and the theoretical relationships suggested make it possible to calculate the hydrodynamic film boiling parameters (wave length, bubble departure diameter and frequency) for other liquids.

  20. Self-consistent treatment of electrostatics in molecular DNA braiding through external forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic J

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we consider a physical system in which two DNA molecules braid about each other. The distance between the two molecular ends, on either side of the braid, is held at a distance much larger than supercoiling radius of the braid. The system is subjected to an external pulling force, and a moment that induces the braiding. In a model, developed for understanding such a system, we assume that each molecule can be divided into a braided and unbraided section. We also suppose that the DNA is nicked so that there is no constraint of the individual linking numbers of the molecules. Included in the model are steric and electrostatic interactions, thermal fluctuations of the braided and unbraided sections of the molecule, as well as the constraint on the braid linking (catenation) number. We compare two approximations used in estimating the free energy of the braided section. One is where the amplitude of undulations of one molecule with respect to the other is determined only by steric interactions. The other is a self-consistent determination of the mean-squared amplitude of these undulations. In this second approximation electrostatics should play an important role in determining this quantity, as suggested by physical arguments. We see that if the electrostatic interaction is sufficiently large there are indeed notable differences between the two approximations. We go on to test the self-consistent approximation-included in the full model-against experimental data for such a system, and we find good agreement. However, there seems to be a slight left-right-handed braid asymmetry in some of the experimental results. We discuss what might be the origin of this small asymmetry.

  1. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth [CaSTL Center, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Huang, Fei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H., E-mail: hkwick@uci.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 142 Engineering Tower, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Nowak, Derek [Molecular Vista, Inc., 6840 Via Del Oro, San Jose, California 95119 (United States)

    2016-06-06

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  2. Molecular alignment and orientation in short pulse laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1999-01-01

    An analytical expression for the propagator associated with impulsive excitation is derived based on the Magnus expansion. We apply this expression to the excitation of angular motion out of a rotational eigenstate for a linear polar molecule in a plane polarized electromagnetic field. We show...

  3. Projection and nested force-gradient methods for quantum field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Dmitry

    2017-07-26

    For the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm (HMC), often used to study the fundamental quantum field theory of quarks and gluons, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), on the lattice, one is interested in efficient numerical time integration schemes which preserve geometric properties of the flow and are optimal in terms of computational costs per trajectory for a given acceptance rate. High order numerical methods allow the use of larger step sizes, but demand a larger computational effort per step; low order schemes do not require such large computational costs per step, but need more steps per trajectory. So there is a need to balance these opposing effects. In this work we introduce novel geometric numerical time integrators, namely, projection and nested force-gradient methods in order to improve the efficiency of the HMC algorithm in application to the problems of quantum field theories.

  4. Coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations for high-field electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, X. L.

    2008-01-01

    It is pointed out that in the framework of balance-equation approach, the coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations can be used as a complete set of equations to determine the high-field transport of semiconductors in both strong and weak electron-electron interaction limits. We call to attention that the occupation rate equation conserves the total particle number and maintains the energy balance of the relative electron system, and there is no need to introduce any other term in it. The addition of an energy-drift term in the particle-occupation rate equation [Phys. Rev. B 71, 195205 (2005)] is physically inadequate for the violation of the total particle-number conservation and the energy balance. It may lead to a substantial unphysical increase of the total particle number by the application of a dc electric field

  5. Developmant of a Reparametrized Semi-Empirical Force Field to Compute the Rovibrational Structure of Large PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Ryan

    The Spitzer Space Telescope observation of spectra most likely attributable to diverse and abundant populations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in space has led to tremendous interest in these molecules as tracers of the physical conditions in different astrophysical regions. A major challenge in using PAHs as molecular tracers is the complexity of the spectral features in the 3-20 μm region. The large number and vibrational similarity of the putative PAHs responsible for these spectra necessitate determination for the most accurate basis spectra possible for comparison. It is essential that these spectra be established in order for the regions explored with the newest generation of observatories such as SOFIA and JWST to be understood. Current strategies to develop these spectra for individual PAHs involve either matrixisolation IR measurements or quantum chemical calculations of harmonic vibrational frequencies. These strategies have been employed to develop the successful PAH IR spectral database as a repository of basis functions used to fit astronomically observed spectra, but they are limited in important ways. Both techniques provide an adequate description of the molecules in their electronic, vibrational, and rotational ground state, but these conditions do not represent energetically hot regions for PAHs near strong radiation fields of stars and are not direct representations of the gas phase. Some non-negligible matrix effects are known in condensed-phase studies, and the inclusion of anharmonicity in quantum chemical calculations is essential to generate physically-relevant results especially for hot bands. While scaling factors in either case can be useful, they are agnostic to the system studied and are not robustly predictive. One strategy that has emerged to calculate the molecular vibrational structure uses vibrational perturbation theory along with a quartic force field (QFF) to account for higher-order derivatives of the potential

  6. Optical Characterization of Lorentz Force Based CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, John Ojur; Ahmad, Farooq; Khir, M Haris Bin Md; Bin Hamid, Nor Hisham

    2015-07-27

    Magnetic field sensors are becoming an essential part of everyday life due to the improvements in their sensitivities and resolutions, while at the same time they have become compact, smaller in size and economical. In the work presented herein a Lorentz force based CMOS-MEMS magnetic field sensor is designed, fabricated and optically characterized. The sensor is fabricated by using CMOS thin layers and dry post micromachining is used to release the device structure and finally the sensor chip is packaged in DIP. The sensor consists of a shuttle which is designed to resonate in the lateral direction (first mode of resonance). In the presence of an external magnetic field, the Lorentz force actuates the shuttle in the lateral direction and the amplitude of resonance is measured using an optical method. The differential change in the amplitude of the resonating shuttle shows the strength of the external magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the shuttle is determined to be 8164 Hz experimentally and from the resonance curve, the quality factor and damping ratio are obtained. In an open environment, the quality factor and damping ratio are found to be 51.34 and 0.00973 respectively. The sensitivity of the sensor is determined in static mode to be 0.034 µm/mT when a current of 10 mA passes through the shuttle, while it is found to be higher at resonance with a value of 1.35 µm/mT at 8 mA current. Finally, the resolution of the sensor is found to be 370.37 µT.

  7. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELD FITTING TO CORONAL LOOPS WITH AND WITHOUT STEREOSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new nonlinear force-free magnetic field (NLFFF) forward-fitting algorithm based on an analytical approximation of force-free and divergence-free NLFFF solutions, which requires as input a line-of-sight magnetogram and traced two-dimensional (2D) loop coordinates of coronal loops only, in contrast to stereoscopically triangulated three-dimensional loop coordinates used in previous studies. Test results of simulated magnetic configurations and from four active regions observed with STEREO demonstrate that NLFFF solutions can be fitted with equal accuracy with or without stereoscopy, which relinquishes the necessity of STEREO data for magnetic modeling of active regions (on the solar disk). The 2D loop tracing method achieves a 2D misalignment of μ 2 = 2.°7 ± 1.°3 between the model field lines and observed loops, and an accuracy of ≈1.0% for the magnetic energy or free magnetic energy ratio. The three times higher spatial resolution of TRACE or SDO/AIA (compared with STEREO) also yields a proportionally smaller misalignment angle between model fit and observations. Visual/manual loop tracings are found to produce more accurate magnetic model fits than automated tracing algorithms. The computation time of the new forward-fitting code amounts to a few minutes per active region.

  8. DOE Task Force meeting on Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.

    1991-08-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and presentation material from the Research Assistance Task Force Meeting ''Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High-Radiation Field.'' The meeting was jointly sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Fusion Energy of the US Department of Energy in Vail, Colorado, May 28--June 1, 1991. The 26 participants represented expertise in fusion, radiation damage, electrical breakdown, ceramics, and semiconductor and electronic structures. These participants came from universities, industries, national laboratories, and government. The attendees represented eight nations. The Task Force meeting was organized in response to the recent discovery that a combination of temperature, electric field, and radiation for an extended period of time has an unexplained adverse effect in ceramics, termed radiation-enhanced electrical degradation (REED). REED occurs after an incubation period and continues to accelerate with irradiation until the ceramics can no longer be regarded as insulators. It appears that REED is irreversible and the ceramic insulators cannot be readily annealed or otherwise repaired for future services. This effect poses a serious threat for fusion reactors, which require electrical insulators in diagnostic devices, in radio frequency and neutral beam systems, and in magnetic assemblies. The problem of selecting suitable electrical insulating materials in thus far more serious than previously anticipated

  9. Toward Structure Prediction for Short Peptides Using the Improved SAAP Force Field Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Dedachi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the observation that Ramachandran-type potential energy surfaces of single amino acid units in water are in good agreement with statistical structures of the corresponding amino acid residues in proteins, we recently developed a new all-atom force field called SAAP, in which the total energy function for a polypeptide is expressed basically as a sum of single amino acid potentials and electrostatic and Lennard-Jones potentials between the amino acid units. In this study, the SAAP force field (SAAPFF parameters were improved, and classical canonical Monte Carlo (MC simulation was carried out for short peptide models, that is, Met-enkephalin and chignolin, at 300 K in an implicit water model. Diverse structures were reasonably obtained for Met-enkephalin, while three folded structures, one of which corresponds to a native-like structure with three native hydrogen bonds, were obtained for chignolin. The results suggested that the SAAP-MC method is useful for conformational sampling for the short peptides. A protocol of SAAP-MC simulation followed by structural clustering and examination of the obtained structures by ab initio calculation or simply by the number of the hydrogen bonds (or the hardness was demonstrated to be an effective strategy toward structure prediction for short peptide molecules.

  10. Effects of lorentz force on flow fields of free burning arc and wall stabilized non-transferred arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yi; Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    The flow fields of two typical DC plasma arcs, namely the transferred free burning arc and the non-transferred arc were simulated by solving hydrodynamic equations and electromagnetic equations. The effects of the Lorentz force on the characteristics of the flow fields of these two typical DC plasma arcs were estimated. Results show that in the case of the free burning arc, the Lorentz force due to the current self-induced magnetic field has significant impact on the flow fields, as the self-induced magnetic compression is the main arc constraint mechanism. However, in the case of the non-transferred arc generated in a torch with long and narrow inter-electrode inserts and an abruptly expanded anode, the Lorentz force has limited impact on the flow fields of the plasma especially at the downstream of the inter-electrode inserts, compared with the strong wall constraints and relatively high aerodynamic force. This is because the ratio of the electromagnetic force to the aerodynamic force is only about 0.01 in this region. When the main consideration is outlet parameters of the wall stabilized non-transferred DC arc plasma generator, in order to improve the efficiency of the numerical simulation program, the Lorentz force could be neglected in the non-transferred arc in some cases. (authors)

  11. En route to surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Huahua; Tour, James M

    2003-06-27

    Four caltrop-shaped molecules that might be useful as surface-bound electric field-driven molecular motors have been synthesized. The caltrops are comprised of a pair of electron donor-acceptor arms and a tripod base. The molecular arms are based on a carbazole or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) core with a strong net dipole. The tripod base uses a silicon atom as its core. The legs of the tripod bear sulfur-tipped bonding units, as acetyl-protected benzylic thiols, for bonding to a gold surface. The geometry of the tripod base allows the caltrop to project upward from a metallic surface after self-assembly. Ellipsometric studies show that self-assembled monolayers of the caltrops are formed on Au surfaces with molecular thicknesses consistent with the desired upright-shaft arrangement. As a result, the zwitterionic molecular arms might be controllable when electric fields are applied around the caltrops, thereby constituting field-driven motors.

  12. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report Air Force Officer Accession Planning Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements...potential performance, and how to include these quality measures in the classification process. The research sponsor asked us to focus on academic ...Andrew P., and James K. Lowe, “Decision Support for the Career Field Selection Process at the US Air Force Academy,” European Journal of Operational

  13. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Leobardo Herrera-May

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases.

  14. Construction of force-free fields which have toroidal surfaces about a given surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.

    1983-05-01

    A study of two-fields (B vector, rotB vector) of conservative flux which admits a family of toroidal surfaces of parameter phi on a domain limited by a given surface S, suggests their construction by a Cauchy-Arzela method of step by step. Taking into account the Newcomb condition this method is consistent with force-free magnetic fields and with helical equilibria with scalar pressure. The method supposes that B vector is of class C 1 . This construction makes use of the remarkable property of the field B vector to be the surface gradient of a generating multivalued function Q on a closed surface. Consequently, the initial surface will be given with its normal metric coefficient K; that is to say, B vector admits a family F of homotopic surfaces on a infinitesimal domain about S, an element of F. From this, the periodic part of Q is a solution of a Beltrami equation for the flux conservation of which numerical resolution is envisaged. The study of these fields is made in a biorthogonal system of coordinates. The coeffficients of the two fundamental metric forms of magnetic surfaces vary with phi and are interrelated by a sixth order differential system of equations which gives their variation [fr

  15. Controlling the structure of forced convective flow by means of rotating magnetic-field inductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorkin, M.Z.; Mozgirs, O.Kh.

    1993-01-01

    The forced convective flow generated by a rotating magnetic-field inductor is used in a melt as a means of controlling the transfer of mass and heat in the case of directed crystallization. An obvious advantage in using a rotating field is the generation of azimuthal twisting of the fluid, this providing for an evening out of the crystallization conditions in the azimuthal direction under nonsymmetrical boundary conditions in an actual technological process. From the standpoint of affecting the crystallization processes it would be preferable to use an inductor which would allow alteration of the intensity and of the direction of the meridional flow. Mixing in the form of velocity pulsations generated by the inductor within the melt would be if interest from the standpoint of affecting the crystallization processes, in particular to intensify the crystallization purification. The authors propose the use of a double magnetohydrodynmic rotator which consists of two rotating magnetic-field inductors, separated in altitude, with separate power supplies. The supply of power to the inductors with various current loads allows the generation of a controllable nonuniformity in field distribution and in the azimuthal velocity through the altitude and thus allows control of both the intensity and configuration of the meridional flows. The dual rotator makes it possible to purposefully control the structure of the meridional flows and the pulsation component of velocity and can be recommended for use in processes of directed crystallization as well as in crystallization purification. 4 refs., 3 figs

  16. External-field shifts in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Korobov, Vladimir [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Schiller, Stephan [Heinrich-Heine-Universitat Dusseldorf, Institut fur Experimentalphysik (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    The Effective Hamiltonian of the hydrogen molecular ions is a convenient tool for the evaluation of the shift of the energy levels of the ro-vibrational states and the frequencies of the transitions between them, due to external electric and magnetic fields. Using the Effective Hamiltonian, composite frequencies of suppressed susceptibility to external fields are constructed.

  17. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP OF FLARE SIGNATURES AND THE FORCE-FREE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A.; Su, Y., E-mail: julia.thalmann@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the plasma and magnetic environment of active region NOAA 11261 on 2011 August 2 around a GOES M1.4 flare/CME (SOL2011-08-02T06:19). We compare coronal emission at the (extreme) ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, using SDO AIA and RHESSI images, in order to identify the relative timing and locations of reconnection-related sources. We trace flare ribbon signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths in order to pin down the intersection of previously reconnected flaring loops in the lower solar atmosphere. These locations are used to calculate field lines from three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear force-free magnetic field models, established on the basis of SDO HMI photospheric vector magnetic field maps. Using this procedure, we analyze the quasi-static time evolution of the coronal model magnetic field previously involved in magnetic reconnection. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the elevation speed of the current sheet’s lower tip during an on-disk observed flare as a few kilometers per second. A comparison to post-flare loops observed later above the limb in STEREO EUVI images supports this velocity estimate. Furthermore, we provide evidence for an implosion of parts of the flaring coronal model magnetic field, and identify the corresponding coronal sub-volumes associated with the loss of magnetic energy. Finally, we spatially relate the build up of magnetic energy in the 3D models to highly sheared fields, established due to the dynamic relative motions of polarity patches within the active region.

  18. Dynamics of Molecular Gyroscopes Created by Strong Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy

    2015-03-01

    We explore the behavior of molecules in ultra-high angular momentum states prepared in an optical centrifuge and detected with transient IR absorption spectroscopy. In the optical centrifuge, the polarizable electron cloud of molecules interacts with the electric field of linearly polarized light that angularly accelerates over the time of the optical pulse. The centrifuge pulse is generated by combining oppositely chirped pulsed of light. Trapped molecules are driven into high angular momentum states that are spatially oriented with the optical field and have energies far above the average at 300 K. High resolution transient IR spectroscopy reveals the dynamics of collisional energy transfer for the super-rotors. Polarization-dependent studies show that the initial angular momentum orientation persists for many collisions, indicating that molecules in an optical centrifuge behave as quantum gyroscopes. Time-dependent population and energy profiles for individual J- states give information about the dynamics of super-rotors. Research support provided by NSF and the University of Maryland.

  19. FieldChopper, a new tool for automatic model generation and virtual screening based on molecular fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Ronkko, Toni; Poso, Antti

    2008-06-01

    Algorithms were developed for ligand-based virtual screening of molecular databases. FieldChopper (FC) is based on the discretization of the electrostatic and van der Waals field into three classes. A model is built from a set of superimposed active molecules. The similarity of the compounds in the database to the model is then calculated using matrices that define scores for comparing field values of different categories. The method was validated using 12 publicly available data sets by comparing the method to the electrostatic similarity comparison program EON. The results suggest that FC is competitive with more complex descriptors and could be used as a molecular sieve in virtual screening experiments when multiple active ligands are known.

  20. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  1. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  2. Influence of AC external magnetic field on guidance force relaxation between HTS bulk and NdFeB guideway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Longcai [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, P.O. Box 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)], E-mail: zhlcai2000@163.com; Wang Suyu; Wang Jiasu; Zheng Jun [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, P.O. Box 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2007-12-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to time-varying external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. So it is required to study whether the guidance force of the bulks is influenced by the inhomogeneity. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the guidance force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet was used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experiment results, it was found that the guidance force was decreased with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increased with the amplitude and was almost independent of the frequency.

  3. Relationship of scattering phase shifts to special radiation force conditions for spheres in axisymmetric wave-fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2017-05-01

    When investigating the radiation forces on spheres in complicated wave-fields, the interpretation of analytical results can be simplified by retaining the s-function notation and associated phase shifts imported into acoustics from quantum scattering theory. For situations in which dissipation is negligible, as taken to be the case in the present investigation, there is an additional simplification in that partial-wave phase shifts become real numbers that vanish when the partial-wave index becomes large and when the wave-number-sphere-radius product vanishes. By restricting attention to monopole and dipole phase shifts, transitions in the axial radiation force for axisymmetric wave-fields are found to be related to wave-field parameters for traveling and standing Bessel wave-fields by considering the ratio of the phase shifts. For traveling waves, the special force conditions concern negative forces while for standing waves, the special force conditions concern vanishing radiation forces. An intermediate step involves considering the functional dependence on phase shifts. An appendix gives an approximation for zero-force plane standing wave conditions. Connections with early investigations of acoustic levitation are mentioned and some complications associated with viscosity are briefly noted.

  4. A Long-Range Electric Field Solver for Molecular Dynamics Based on Atomistic-to-Continuum Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jeremy A; Jones, Reese E; Lee, Jonathan W; Zimmerman, Jonathan A; Wong, Bryan M

    2011-06-14

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating nonperiodic, anisotropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, we develop a model for including electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and the algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. Our model represents the electric potential on a FE mesh satisfying a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagate to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical solutions are known or comparisons can be made to existing techniques. In addition, a calculation of a salt water solution in a silicon nanochannel is performed to demonstrate the method in a target scientific application in which ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  5. Continuous micro-feeding of fine cohesive powders actuated by pulse inertia force and acoustic radiation force in ultrasonic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongcheng; Wu, Liqun; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Rangrang; Zhang, Linan

    2018-07-10

    Stable continuous micro-feeding of fine cohesive powders has recently gained importance in many fields. However, it remains a great challenge in practice because of the powder aggregate caused by interparticle cohesive forces in small capillaries. This paper describes a novel method of feeding fine cohesive powder actuated by a pulse inertia force and acoustic radiation force simultaneously in an ultrasonic standing wave field using a tapered glass nozzle. Nozzles with different outlet diameters are fabricated using glass via a heating process. A pulse inertia force is excited to drive powder movement to the outlet section of the nozzle in a consolidated columnar rod mode. An acoustic radiation force is generated to suspend the particles and make the rod break into large quantities of small agglomerates which impact each other randomly. So the aggregation phenomenon in the fluidization of cohesive powders can be eliminated. The suspended powder is discharged continuously from the nozzle orifice owing to the self-gravities and collisions between the inner particles. The micro-feeding rates can be controlled accurately and the minimum values for RespitoseSV003 and Granulac230 are 0.4 mg/s and 0.5 mg/s respectively. The relative standard deviations of all data points are below 0.12, which is considerably smaller than those of existing vibration feeders with small capillaries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Theoretical modeling of large molecular systems. Advances in the local self consistent field method for mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Antonio; Rivail, Jean-Louis; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-02-19

    Molecular mechanics methods can efficiently compute the macroscopic properties of a large molecular system but cannot represent the electronic changes that occur during a chemical reaction or an electronic transition. Quantum mechanical methods can accurately simulate these processes, but they require considerably greater computational resources. Because electronic changes typically occur in a limited part of the system, such as the solute in a molecular solution or the substrate within the active site of enzymatic reactions, researchers can limit the quantum computation to this part of the system. Researchers take into account the influence of the surroundings by embedding this quantum computation into a calculation of the whole system described at the molecular mechanical level, a strategy known as the mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The accuracy of this embedding varies according to the types of interactions included, whether they are purely mechanical or classically electrostatic. This embedding can also introduce the induced polarization of the surroundings. The difficulty in QM/MM calculations comes from the splitting of the system into two parts, which requires severing the chemical bonds that link the quantum mechanical subsystem to the classical subsystem. Typically, researchers replace the quantoclassical atoms, those at the boundary between the subsystems, with a monovalent link atom. For example, researchers might add a hydrogen atom when a C-C bond is cut. This Account describes another approach, the Local Self Consistent Field (LSCF), which was developed in our laboratory. LSCF links the quantum mechanical portion of the molecule to the classical portion using a strictly localized bond orbital extracted from a small model molecule for each bond. In this scenario, the quantoclassical atom has an apparent nuclear charge of +1. To achieve correct bond lengths and force constants, we must take into account the inner shell of

  7. Force Field Benchmark of the TraPPE_UA for Polar Liquids: Density, Heat of Vaporization, Dielectric Constant, Surface Tension, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Isothermal Compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Rojas, Edgar; Aguilar-Pineda, Jorge Alberto; Pérez de la Luz, Alexander; de Jesús González, Edith Nadir; Alejandre, José

    2018-02-08

    The transferable potential for a phase equilibria force field in its united-atom version, TraPPE_UA, is evaluated for 41 polar liquids that include alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, and esters to determine its ability to reproduce experimental properties that were not included in the parametrization procedure. The intermolecular force field parameters for pure components were fit to reproduce experimental boiling temperature, vapor-liquid coexisting densities, and critical point (temperature, density, and pressure) using Monte Carlo simulations in different ensembles. The properties calculated in this work are liquid density, heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, surface tension, volumetric expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the gas and liquid phases, and also at the liquid-vapor interface. We found that relative error between calculated and experimental data is 1.2% for density, 6% for heat of vaporization, and 6.2% for surface tension, in good agreement with the experimental data. The dielectric constant is systematically underestimated, and the relative error is 37%. Evaluating the performance of the force field to reproduce the volumetric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility requires more experimental data.

  8. Bioactive conformational generation of small molecules: A comparative analysis between force-field and multiple empirical criteria based methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hualiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformational sampling for small molecules plays an essential role in drug discovery research pipeline. Based on multi-objective evolution algorithm (MOEA, we have developed a conformational generation method called Cyndi in the previous study. In this work, in addition to Tripos force field in the previous version, Cyndi was updated by incorporation of MMFF94 force field to assess the conformational energy more rationally. With two force fields against a larger dataset of 742 bioactive conformations of small ligands extracted from PDB, a comparative analysis was performed between pure force field based method (FFBM and multiple empirical criteria based method (MECBM hybrided with different force fields. Results Our analysis reveals that incorporating multiple empirical rules can significantly improve the accuracy of conformational generation. MECBM, which takes both empirical and force field criteria as the objective functions, can reproduce about 54% (within 1Å RMSD of the bioactive conformations in the 742-molecule testset, much higher than that of pure force field method (FFBM, about 37%. On the other hand, MECBM achieved a more complete and efficient sampling of the conformational space because the average size of unique conformations ensemble per molecule is about 6 times larger than that of FFBM, while the time scale for conformational generation is nearly the same as FFBM. Furthermore, as a complementary comparison study between the methods with and without empirical biases, we also tested the performance of the three conformational generation methods in MacroModel in combination with different force fields. Compared with the methods in MacroModel, MECBM is more competitive in retrieving the bioactive conformations in light of accuracy but has much lower computational cost. Conclusions By incorporating different energy terms with several empirical criteria, the MECBM method can produce more reasonable conformational

  9. Reactive force field simulation of proton diffusion in BaZrO{sub 3} using an empirical valence bond approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Bussi, Giovanni, E-mail: paolo@ivec.org, E-mail: julian@ivec.org [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-08-24

    A new reactive force field to describe proton diffusion within the solid oxide fuel cell material BaZrO{sub 3} has been derived. Using a quantum mechanical potential energy surface, the parameters of an interatomic potential model to describe hydroxyl groups within both pure and yttrium-doped BaZrO{sub 3} have been determined. Reactivity is then incorporated through the use of the empirical valence bond model. Molecular dynamics simulations (EVB-MD) have been performed to explore the diffusion of hydrogen using a stochastic thermostat and barostat whose equations are extended to the isostress-isothermal ensemble. In the low concentration limit, the presence of yttrium is found not to significantly influence the diffusivity of hydrogen, despite the proton having a longer residence time at oxygen adjacent to the dopant. This lack of influence is due to the fact that trapping occurs infrequently, even when the proton diffuses through octahedra adjacent to the dopant. The activation energy for diffusion is found to be 0.42 eV, in good agreement with experimental values, though the prefactor is slightly underestimated.

  10. Development of the ReaxFFCBN reactive force field for the improved design of liquid CBN hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sung Jin; Yeo, Byung Chul; Han, Sang Soo

    2016-01-21

    Liquid CBN (carbon-boron-nitrogen) hydrogen-storage materials such as 3-methyl-1,2-BN-cyclopentane have the advantage of being easily accessible for use in current liquid-fuel infrastructure. To develop practical liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials, it is of great importance to understand the reaction pathways of hydrogenation/dehydrogenation in the liquid phase, which are difficult to discover by experimental methods. Herein, we developed a reactive force field (ReaxFFCBN) from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations based on density functional theory for the storage of hydrogen in BN-substituted cyclic hydrocarbon materials. The developed ReaxFFCBN provides similar dehydrogenation pathways and energetics to those predicted by QM calculations. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed ReaxFFCBN can predict the stability and dehydrogenation behavior of various liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. Our simulations reveal that a unimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism is preferred in liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials. However, as the temperature in the simulation increases, the contribution of a bimolecular dehydrogenation mechanism also increases. Moreover, our ReaxFF MD simulations show that in terms of thermal stability and dehydrogenation kinetics, liquid CBN materials with a hexagonal structure are more suitable materials than those with a pentagonal structure. We expect that the developed ReaxFFCBN could be a useful protocol in developing novel liquid CBN hydrogen-storage materials.

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Robert W. [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Uniformed Services University, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20815 (United States)], E-mail: bob@bob.usuhs.mil; Schluecker, Sebastian [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hudson, Bruce S. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2008-01-22

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes.

  12. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Schluecker, Sebastian; Hudson, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes

  13. Action-at-a-distance metamaterials: Distributed local actuation through far-field global forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R.; Mirzaali, M. J.; Vergani, L.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are a sub-category of designer materials where the geometry of the material at the small-scale is rationally designed to give rise to unusual properties and functionalities. Here, we propose the concept of "action-at-a-distance" metamaterials where a specific pattern of local deformation is programmed into the fabric of (cellular) materials. The desired pattern of local actuation could then be achieved simply through the application of one single global and far-field force. We proposed graded designs of auxetic and conventional unit cells with changing Poisson's ratios as a way of making "action-at-a-distance" metamaterials. We explored five types of graded designs including linear, two types of radial gradients, checkered, and striped. Specimens were fabricated with indirect additive manufacturing and tested under compression, tension, and shear. Full-field strain maps measured with digital image correlation confirmed different patterns of local actuation under similar far-field strains. These materials have potential applications in soft (wearable) robotics and exosuits.

  14. Action-at-a-distance metamaterials: Distributed local actuation through far-field global forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hedayati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical metamaterials are a sub-category of designer materials where the geometry of the material at the small-scale is rationally designed to give rise to unusual properties and functionalities. Here, we propose the concept of “action-at-a-distance” metamaterials where a specific pattern of local deformation is programmed into the fabric of (cellular materials. The desired pattern of local actuation could then be achieved simply through the application of one single global and far-field force. We proposed graded designs of auxetic and conventional unit cells with changing Poisson’s ratios as a way of making “action-at-a-distance” metamaterials. We explored five types of graded designs including linear, two types of radial gradients, checkered, and striped. Specimens were fabricated with indirect additive manufacturing and tested under compression, tension, and shear. Full-field strain maps measured with digital image correlation confirmed different patterns of local actuation under similar far-field strains. These materials have potential applications in soft (wearable robotics and exosuits.

  15. Effects of kinesthetic and cutaneous stimulation during the learning of a viscous force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Giulio; Oscari, Fabio; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Haptic stimulation can help humans learn perceptual motor skills, but the precise way in which it influences the learning process has not yet been clarified. This study investigates the role of the kinesthetic and cutaneous components of haptic feedback during the learning of a viscous curl field, taking also into account the influence of visual feedback. We present the results of an experiment in which 17 subjects were asked to make reaching movements while grasping a joystick and wearing a pair of cutaneous devices. Each device was able to provide cutaneous contact forces through a moving platform. The subjects received visual feedback about joystick's position. During the experiment, the system delivered a perturbation through (1) full haptic stimulation, (2) kinesthetic stimulation alone, (3) cutaneous stimulation alone, (4) altered visual feedback, or (5) altered visual feedback plus cutaneous stimulation. Conditions 1, 2, and 3 were also tested with the cancellation of the visual feedback of position error. Results indicate that kinesthetic stimuli played a primary role during motor adaptation to the viscous field, which is a fundamental premise to motor learning and rehabilitation. On the other hand, cutaneous stimulation alone appeared not to bring significant direct or adaptation effects, although it helped in reducing direct effects when used in addition to kinesthetic stimulation. The experimental conditions with visual cancellation of position error showed slower adaptation rates, indicating that visual feedback actively contributes to the formation of internal models. However, modest learning effects were detected when the visual information was used to render the viscous field.

  16. Validation of the GROMOS force-field parameter set 45A3 against nuclear magnetic resonance data of hen egg lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, T. A. [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Daura, X. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, InstitucioCatalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats and Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (Spain); Oostenbrink, C. [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Smith, L. J. [University of Oxford, Oxford Centre for Molecular Sciences, Central Chemistry Laboratory (United Kingdom); Gunsteren, W. F. van [ETH Hoenggerberg Zuerich, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)], E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch

    2004-12-15

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins depends critically on the biomolecular force field that is used. Such force fields are defined by force-field parameter sets, which are generally determined and improved through calibration of properties of small molecules against experimental or theoretical data. By application to large molecules such as proteins, a new force-field parameter set can be validated. We report two 3.5 ns molecular dynamics simulations of hen egg white lysozyme in water applying the widely used GROMOS force-field parameter set 43A1 and a new set 45A3. The two MD ensembles are evaluated against NMR spectroscopic data NOE atom-atom distance bounds, {sup 3}J{sub NH{alpha}} and {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}} coupling constants, and {sup 1}5N relaxation data. It is shown that the two sets reproduce structural properties about equally well. The 45A3 ensemble fulfills the atom-atom distance bounds derived from NMR spectroscopy slightly less well than the 43A1 ensemble, with most of the NOE distance violations in both ensembles involving residues located in loops or flexible regions of the protein. Convergence patterns are very similar in both simulations atom-positional root-mean-square differences (RMSD) with respect to the X-ray and NMR model structures and NOE inter-proton distances converge within 1.0-1.5 ns while backbone {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}}-coupling constants and {sup 1}H- {sup 1}5N order parameters take slightly longer, 1.0-2.0 ns. As expected, side-chain {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}-coupling constants and {sup 1}H- {sup 1}5N order parameters do not reach full convergence for all residues in the time period simulated. This is particularly noticeable for side chains which display rare structural transitions. When comparing each simulation trajectory with an older and a newer set of experimental NOE data on lysozyme, it is found that the newer, larger, set of experimental data agrees as well with each of the

  17. Validation of the GROMOS force-field parameter set 45A3 against nuclear magnetic resonance data of hen egg lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, T. A.; Daura, X.; Oostenbrink, C.; Smith, L. J.; Gunsteren, W. F. van

    2004-01-01

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins depends critically on the biomolecular force field that is used. Such force fields are defined by force-field parameter sets, which are generally determined and improved through calibration of properties of small molecules against experimental or theoretical data. By application to large molecules such as proteins, a new force-field parameter set can be validated. We report two 3.5 ns molecular dynamics simulations of hen egg white lysozyme in water applying the widely used GROMOS force-field parameter set 43A1 and a new set 45A3. The two MD ensembles are evaluated against NMR spectroscopic data NOE atom-atom distance bounds, 3 J NHα and 3 J αβ coupling constants, and 1 5N relaxation data. It is shown that the two sets reproduce structural properties about equally well. The 45A3 ensemble fulfills the atom-atom distance bounds derived from NMR spectroscopy slightly less well than the 43A1 ensemble, with most of the NOE distance violations in both ensembles involving residues located in loops or flexible regions of the protein. Convergence patterns are very similar in both simulations atom-positional root-mean-square differences (RMSD) with respect to the X-ray and NMR model structures and NOE inter-proton distances converge within 1.0-1.5 ns while backbone 3 J HNα -coupling constants and 1 H- 1 5N order parameters take slightly longer, 1.0-2.0 ns. As expected, side-chain 3 J αβ -coupling constants and 1 H- 1 5N order parameters do not reach full convergence for all residues in the time period simulated. This is particularly noticeable for side chains which display rare structural transitions. When comparing each simulation trajectory with an older and a newer set of experimental NOE data on lysozyme, it is found that the newer, larger, set of experimental data agrees as well with each of the simulations. In other words, the experimental data converged towards the theoretical result

  18. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  19. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-07-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  20. Volume pinning force and upper critical field of irradiated Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Seibt, E.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiation by neutrons and ions in A15 superconductors (Nb 3 Sn, V 3 Ga) exerts a stronger influence on the pinning behavior than in nonordered alloys (NbTi). In this work it is shown for deuteron irradiated Nb 3 /Sn wires prepared by the bronze process that the dose curve of the volume pinning force P/sub V/ can be conveniently described by a sum of two terms, due to the grain boundary pinning and to the radiation pinning, respectively. After deduction of the contribution by the radiation-induced pinning centers, good agreement is obtained between the measured P/sub V/ values and those calculated using the upper critical field B/sub c/2 and the transition temperature T/sub c/ on the basis of the irradiation fluence. The use of a theoretical relationship between B/sub c/2 and T/sub c/ is supported by measured values. Application to multifilamentary superconductors with high current carrying capabilities simplifies the calculation of P/sub V/, since the radiation induced volume pinning force can be neglected

  1. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past intensive use in manufacture of nuclear weapons at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Because of its facile oxidation/reduction [Hg(II)/Hg(0)] chemistry, ability to bond to carbon [as in highly toxic methylmercury: MeHg(I)] and its unique physical properties [e.g., volatility of Hg(0)], Hg has a complex environmental cycle involving soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere and including biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations.1 Understanding such processes well enough to design stewardship plans that minimize negative impacts in diverse ecological settings requires rich knowledge of the contributing abiotic and biotic processes. Prokaryotes are major players in the global Hg cycle. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria can form MeHg(I) with consequent intoxication of wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship of Hg-contaminated sites requires eliminating not only MeHg(I) but also the Hg(II) substrate for methylation. Fortunately, a variety of mercury resistant (HgR) aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea can do both things. Prokaryotes harboring narrow or broad Hg resistance (mer) loci detoxify Hg(II) or RHg(I), respectively, to relatively inert, less toxic, volatile Hg(0). HgR microbes are enriched in highly contaminated sites and extensive field data show they depress levels of MeHg >500-fold in such zones2. So, enhancing the natural capacity of indigenous HgR microbes to remove Hg(II) and RHg(I) from soils, sediments and waterways is a logical component of a comprehensive plan for clean up and stewardship of contaminated sites.

  2. Research on desulfurisation of fine coal under compounding the physics force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Y.; Fu, D.; Tao, D.; Liu, J.; Zhao, Y. [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China)

    2005-08-15

    Desulphurization experiment carried on under compounding the physics force field was described for -0.5 mm fine particle of high sulphur coal. The experiment factorial plan of desulphurization on centrifugal gravity Falcon separator was designed and its results were analyzed by using Design-Expert 6.0 software. The 2-reactor interaction relation model between comprehensive desulphurization efficiency of pyrite sulphur and different operation variable was drawn, i.e. 2 FI model, and the 2-factor interaction on pyrite desulphurization efficiency of the operation factors differently was analyzed. The interaction on pyrite desulphurization efficiency of feed rate and feed concentration is significant. The optimization test condition for desulphurization was proposed by Design-Expert 6.0, and comprehensive desulphurization efficiency of 86.90% can be achieved. 5 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Plasmonic micropillars for precision cell force measurement across a large field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fan; Wen, Ximiao; Tan, Xing Haw Marvin; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2018-01-01

    A plasmonic micropillar platform with self-organized gold nanospheres is reported for the precision cell traction force measurement across a large field-of-view (FOV). Gold nanospheres were implanted into the tips of polymer micropillars by annealing gold microdisks with nanosecond laser pulses. Each gold nanosphere is physically anchored in the center of a pillar tip and serves as a strong, point-source-like light scattering center for each micropillar. This allows a micropillar to be clearly observed and precisely tracked even under a low magnification objective lens for the concurrent and precision measurement across a large FOV. A spatial resolution of 30 nm for the pillar deflection measurement has been accomplished on this platform with a 20× objective lens.

  4. Mind as a force field: comments on a new interactionistic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, B I; Arhem, P

    1994-11-07

    The survival and development of consciousness in biological evolution call for an explanation. An interactionistic mind-brain theory seems to have the greatest explanatory value in this context. An interpretation of an interactionistic hypothesis, recently proposed by Karl Popper, is discussed both theoretically and based on recent experimental data. In the interpretation, the distinction between the conscious mind and the brain is seen as a division into what is subjective and what is objective, and not as an ontological distinction between something immaterial and something material. The interactionistic hypothesis is based on similarities between minds and physical forces. The conscious mind is understood to interact with randomly spontaneous spatio-temporal patterns of action potentials through an electromagnetic field. Consequences and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  5. Refined OPLS All-Atom Force Field for Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers at Full Hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciejewski, A.; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M.; Cramariuc, O.

    2014-01-01

    validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule....... In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3...... one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM)....

  6. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Baker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon

  7. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Biais, Nicolas; Tama, Florence

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon stretching.

  8. Electric field and dielectrophoretic force on a dielectric particle chain in a parallel-plate electrode system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techaumnat, B; Eua-arporn, B; Takuma, T

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculations of the electric field and dielectrophoretic force on a dielectric particle chain suspended in a host liquid lying between parallel-plate electrodes. The method of calculation is based on the method of multipole images using the multipole re-expansion technique. We have investigated the effect of the particle permittivity, the tilt angle (between the chain and the applied field) and the chain arrangement on the electric field and force. The results show that the electric field intensification rises in accordance with the increase in the ratio of the particle-to-liquid permittivity, Γ ε . The electric field at the contact point between the particles decreases with increasing tilt angle, while the maximal field at the contact point between the particles and the plate electrodes is almost unchanged. The maximal field can be approximated by a simple formula, which is a quadratic function of Γ ε . The dielectrophoretic force depends significantly on the distance from other particles or an electrode. However, for the tilt angles in this paper, the horizontal force on the upper particle of the chain always has the direction opposite to the shear direction. The maximal horizontal force of a chain varies proportional to (Γ ε - 1) 1.7 if the particles in the chain are still in contact with each other. The approximated force, based on the force on an isolated chain, has been compared with our calculation results. The comparison shows that no approximation model agrees well with our results throughout the range of permittivity ratios

  9. The outflows accelerated by the magnetic fields and radiation force of accretion disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xinwu, E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai, 200030 (China)

    2014-03-01

    The inner region of a luminous accretion disk is radiation-pressure-dominated. We estimate the surface temperature of a radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk, Θ=c{sub s}{sup 2}/r{sup 2}Ω{sub K}{sup 2}≪(H/r){sup 2}, which is significantly lower than that of a gas-pressure-dominated disk, Θ ∼ (H/r){sup 2}. This means that the outflow can be launched magnetically from the photosphere of the radiation-pressure-dominated disk only if the effective potential barrier along the magnetic field line is extremely shallow or no potential barrier is present. For the latter case, the slow sonic point in the outflow will probably be in the disk, which leads to a slow circular dense flow above the disk. This implies that hot gas (probably in the corona) is necessary for launching an outflow from the radiation-pressure-dominated disk, which provides a natural explanation for the observational evidence that the relativistic jets are related to hot plasma in some X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We investigate the outflows accelerated from the hot corona above the disk by the magnetic field and radiation force of the accretion disk. We find that with the help of the radiation force, the mass loss rate in the outflow is high, which leads to a slow outflow. This may be why the jets in radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert galaxies are in general mildly relativistic compared with those in blazars.

  10. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-09-04

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Its facile redox [Hg2+/0] chemistry, bonding to carbon [e.g. MeHg+] and unique physical properties [e.g., Hg0 volatility] underlie a complex global Hg cycle involving biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations in soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria make MeHg+, which is neurotoxic to wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship requires eliminating both MeHg+ and even more toxic Hg2+, which is also the substrate for methylation. The proteins encoded by the mer locus in aerobic and facultative mercury resistant (HgR) bacteria convert soil or waterborne Hg2+ or MeHg+ to less toxic, gaseous Hg0. HgR microbes live in highly Hg-contaminated sites and depress MeHg+ formation >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the capacity of natural HgR microbes to remove Hg2+/MeHg+ from wetlands and waterways is a logical component of contaminated site stewardship. To apply enhancement in the field requires knowing how the HgR pathway works including the metabolic demands it makes on the cell, i.e., the entire cell is the relevant catalytic unit. HgR loci occur in metabolically diverse bacteria and unique mer-host co-evolution has been found. In this project we extended our previous studies of mer enzymes in γ-proteobacteria, which are abundant in high Hg areas of the ORR to include studies of mer enzymes from HgR α-proteobacteria and HgR actinobacteria, which also increase in the high Hg regions of the ORR. Specifically, we (1) examined interactions between structural compoenents of MerA and MerB enzymes from γ-proteobacteria, (2) investigated effects of mutations on kinetic efficiency of Hg2+ reduction by γ-proteobacterial MerA, (3) cloned and performed initital characterization of MerA and MerB enzymes from Streptomyces lividans, an actinobacterium, (4) cloned and performed initial characterization of a fused Mer

  11. Molecular recognition of DNA-protein complexes: A straightforward method combining scanning force and fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Sanchez (Humberto); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCombining scanning force and fluorescent microscopy allows simultaneous identification of labeled biomolecules and analysis of their nanometer level architectural arrangement. Fluorescent polystyrene nano-spheres were used as reliable objects for alignment of optical and topographic

  12. Identification of BKCa channel openers by molecular field alignment and patent data-driven analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen Gigani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first comprehensive molecular field analysis of patent structures on how the chemical structure of drugs impacts the biological binding. This task was formulated as searching for drug structures to reveal shared effects of substitutions across a common scaffold and the chemical features that may be responsible. We used the SureChEMBL patent database, which provides search of the patent literature using keyword-based functionality, as a query engine. The extraction of data of the BKCa channel openers and aligning them for molecular field similarity with newly designed structures did provide a probable validation method with accurate values. Therefore, in an attempt to increase the true positives, we report a procedure that functions on a multiple analyses modeled on molecular field similarity and common sub-structural search with consensus scoring and high confidence values to obtain greater accuracy during conventional virtual screening.

  13. MAGNETO-FRICTIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS. I. TESTING WITH ANALYTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.; Keppens, R. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xia, C. [Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Valori, G., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-10

    We report our implementation of the magneto-frictional method in the Message Passing Interface Adaptive Mesh Refinement Versatile Advection Code (MPI-AMRVAC). The method aims at applications where local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is essential to make follow-up dynamical modeling affordable. We quantify its performance in both domain-decomposed uniform grids and block-adaptive AMR computations, using all frequently employed force-free, divergence-free, and other vector comparison metrics. As test cases, we revisit the semi-analytic solution of Low and Lou in both Cartesian and spherical geometries, along with the topologically challenging Titov–Démoulin model. We compare different combinations of spatial and temporal discretizations, and find that the fourth-order central difference with a local Lax–Friedrichs dissipation term in a single-step marching scheme is an optimal combination. The initial condition is provided by the potential field, which is the potential field source surface model in spherical geometry. Various boundary conditions are adopted, ranging from fully prescribed cases where all boundaries are assigned with the semi-analytic models, to solar-like cases where only the magnetic field at the bottom is known. Our results demonstrate that all the metrics compare favorably to previous works in both Cartesian and spherical coordinates. Cases with several AMR levels perform in accordance with their effective resolutions. The magneto-frictional method in MPI-AMRVAC allows us to model a region of interest with high spatial resolution and large field of view simultaneously, as required by observation-constrained extrapolations using vector data provided with modern instruments. The applications of the magneto-frictional method to observations are shown in an accompanying paper.

  14. Regularization of fields for self-force problems in curved spacetime: Foundations and a time-domain application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Ian; Detweiler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    We propose an approach for the calculation of self-forces, energy fluxes and waveforms arising from moving point charges in curved spacetimes. As opposed to mode-sum schemes that regularize the self-force derived from the singular retarded field, this approach regularizes the retarded field itself. The singular part of the retarded field is first analytically identified and removed, yielding a finite, differentiable remainder from which the self-force is easily calculated. This regular remainder solves a wave equation which enjoys the benefit of having a nonsingular source. Solving this wave equation for the remainder completely avoids the calculation of the singular retarded field along with the attendant difficulties associated with numerically modeling a delta-function source. From this differentiable remainder one may compute the self-force, the energy flux, and also a waveform which reflects the effects of the self-force. As a test of principle, we implement this method using a 4th-order (1+1) code, and calculate the self-force for the simple case of a scalar charge moving in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. We achieve agreement with frequency-domain results to ∼0.1% or better.

  15. Investigation of the Interaction between Patulin and Human Serum Albumin by a Spectroscopic Method, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuqin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of patulin with human serum albumin (HSA was studied in vitro under normal physiological conditions. The study was performed using fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and molecular modeling techniques. The quenching mechanism was investigated using the association constants, the number of binding sites, and basic thermodynamic parameters. A dynamic quenching mechanism occurred between HSA and patulin, and the binding constants (K were 2.60 × 104, 4.59 × 104, and 7.01 × 104 M−1 at 288, 300, and 310 K, respectively. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and patulin was determined to be 2.847 nm. The ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0 values across various temperatures indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The UV-Vis and CD results confirmed that the secondary structure of HSA was altered in the presence of patulin. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with patulin. In addition, molecular modeling showed that the patulin-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. The study results suggested that a weak intermolecular interaction occurred between patulin and HSA. Overall, the results are potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of patulin when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological, testing and other experiments.

  16. The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with human serum albumin as determined by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Nana; Chen, Gaopan; Lin, Yuejuan; Gao, Wenhua

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. This study used fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling techniques. Association constants, the number of binding sites and basic thermodynamic parameters were used to investigate the quenching mechanism. Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and MBI was 2.495 nm. The ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) values across temperature indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding Force. The UV, FT-IR, CD and Raman spectra confirmed that the HSA secondary structure was altered in the presence of MBI. In addition, the molecular modeling showed that the MBI-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which resulted from amino acid residues. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with MBI. Overall, this study suggested a method for characterizing the weak intermolecular interaction. In addition, this method is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of MBI when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and other experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Compatibility of the Chameleon-Field Model with Fifth-Force Experiments, Cosmology, and PVLAS and CAST Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Bruck, Carsten van de; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the PVLAS results using a chameleon field whose properties depend on the environment. We find that, assuming a runaway bare potential V(φ) and a universal coupling to matter, the chameleon potential is such that the scalar field can act as dark energy. Moreover, the chameleon-field model is compatible with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope results, fifth-force experiments, and cosmology

  18. Corrected placement of Mus-Rattus fossil calibration forces precision in the molecular tree of rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yuri; Hawkins, Melissa T. R.; McDonough, Molly M.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Flynn, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Time calibration derived from the fossil record is essential for molecular phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Fossil mice and rats, discovered in the Siwalik Group of Pakistan, have served as one of the best-known fossil calibration points in molecular phylogenic studies. Although these fossils have been widely used as the 12 Ma date for the Mus/Rattus split or a more basal split, conclusive paleontological evidence for the nodal assignments has been absent. This study analyzes newly reco...

  19. Micro-fabricated mechanical sensors for lateral molecular-force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicary, J.A., E-mail: james.vicary@bristol.ac.uk [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ulcinas, A. [Research Centre for Microsystems and Nanotechnology, Kaunas University of Technology, LT-51369 Kaunas (Lithuania); Hoerber, J.K.H.; Antognozzi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Centre for Nanoscience and Quantum Information, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1FD (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been very successful in measuring forces perpendicular to the sample plane. Here, we present the advantages of turning the AFM cantilever 90 Degree-Sign in order for it to be perpendicular to the sample. This rotation leads naturally to the detection of in-plane forces with some extra advantages with respect to the AFM orientation. In particular, the use of extremely small (1 {mu}m wide) and soft (k{approx_equal}10{sup -5} N/m) micro-fabricated cantilevers is demonstrated by recording their thermal power spectral density in ambient conditions and in liquid. These measurements lead to the complete characterisation of the sensors in terms of their stiffness and resonant frequency. Future applications, which will benefit from the use of this force microscopy technique, are also described. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-fabrication of ultra-soft silicon nitride sensors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEW detection system enables the use of extremely small cantilevers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Choice of sensor geometry permits control of thermal excitations and axial rotations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LMFM can be used in a force regime not previously associated with AFM.

  20. Brownian force noise from molecular collisions and the sensitivity of advanced gravitational wave observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolesi, R.; Hueller, M.; Nicolodi, D.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wass, P. J.; Weber, W. J.; Evans, M.; Fritschel, P.; Weiss, R.; Gundlach, J. H.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Schlamminger, S.; Ciani, G.; Cavalleri, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of Brownian force noise from residual gas damping of reference test masses as a fundamental sensitivity limit in small force experiments. The resulting acceleration noise increases significantly when the distance of the test mass to the surrounding experimental apparatus is smaller than the dimension of the test mass itself. For the Advanced LIGO interferometric gravitational wave observatory, where the relevant test mass is a suspended 340 mm diameter cylindrical end mirror, the force noise power is increased by roughly a factor 40 by the presence of a similarly shaped reaction mass at a nominal separation of 5 mm. The force noise, of order 20 fN/Hz 1/2 for 2x10 -6 Pa of residual H 2 gas, rivals quantum optical fluctuations as the dominant noise source between 10 and 30 Hz. We present here a numerical and analytical analysis for the gas damping force noise for Advanced LIGO, backed up by experimental evidence from several recent measurements. Finally, we discuss the impact of residual gas damping on the gravitational wave sensitivity and possible mitigation strategies.

  1. The exotic molecular ion H43+ in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares P, H.

    2006-01-01

    Using the variational method, a detailed study of the lowest m = 0, -1 electronic states of the exotic molecular ion H3+ 4 in a strong magnetic field, in the linear symmetric configuration parallel to the direction of the magnetic field is carried out. A extended study of the 1σg ground state (J.C. Lopez and A.Turbiner, Phys. Rev A 62, 022510, 2000) was performed obtaining that the potential energy curve displays a sufficiently deep minimum for finite internuclear distances, indicating the possible existence of the molecular ion H 4 3+ , for magnetic fields of strength B > ∼ 3 x 10 13 G. It is demonstrated that the excited state 1π u , can exist for a magnetic field B = 4.414 x 10 13 G corresponding to the limit of applicability of the non-relativistic theory. (Author)

  2. An inverse method for determining the interaction force between the probe and sample using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Win-Jin; Fang, Te-Hua

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a means for calculating the interaction force during the scanning process using a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe. The determination of the interaction force in the scanning system is regarded as an inverse vibration problem. The conjugate gradient method is applied to treat the inverse problem using available displacement measurements. The results show that the conjugate gradient method is less sensitive to measurement errors and prior information on the functional form of quality was not required. Furthermore, the initial guesses for the interaction force can be arbitrarily chosen for the iteration process

  3. Energy expenditure and intake during Special Operations Forces field training in a jungle and glacial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caleb D; Simonson, Andrew J; Darnell, Matthew E; DeLany, James P; Wohleber, Meleesa F; Connaboy, Christopher

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare energy requirements specific to Special Operations Forces in field training, in both cool and hot environments. Three separate training sessions were evaluated, 2 in a hot environment (n = 21) and 1 in a cool environment (n = 8). Total energy expenditure was calculated using doubly labeled water. Dietary intake was assessed via self-report at the end of each training mission day, and macronutrient intakes were calculated. Across the 3 missions, mean energy expenditure (4618 ± 1350 kcal/day) exceeded mean energy intake (2429 ± 838 kcal/day) by an average of 2200 kcal/day. Macronutrient intakes (carbohydrates (g/(kg·day body weight (bw)) -1 ) = 3.2 ± 1.2; protein (g/(kg·day bw) -1 ) = 1.3 ± 0.7; fat (g/(kg·day bw) -1 ) = 1.2 ± 0.7) showed inadequate carbohydrate and possibly protein intake across the study period, compared with common recommendations. Total energy expenditures were found to be similar between hot (4664 ± 1399 kcal/day) and cool (4549 ± 1221 kcal/day) environments. However, energy intake was found to be higher in the cool (3001 ± 900 kcal/day) compared with hot (2200 ± 711 kcal/day) environments. Based on the identified energy deficit, high variation in energy expenditures, and poor macronutrient intake, a greater attention to feeding practices during similar training scenarios for Special Operations Forces is needed to help maintain performance and health. The differences in environmental heat stress between the 2 climates/environments had no observed effect on energy expenditures, but may have influenced intakes.

  4. Trace Contraband Detection Field-Test by the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection Dept.; Shannon, Gary W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection Dept.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNL’s Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories’ (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  5. A Non-Linear Force-Free Field Model for the Evolving Magnetic Structure of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Duncan H.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the effect of a small magnetic element approaching the main body of a solar filament is considered through non-linear force-free field modeling. The filament is represented by a series of magnetic dips. Once the dips are calculated, a simple hydrostatic atmosphere model is applied to determine which structures have sufficient column mass depth to be visible in Hα. Two orientations of the bipole are considered, either parallel or anti-parallel to the overlying arcade. The magnetic polarity that lies closest to the filament is then advected towards the filament. Initially for both the dominant and minority polarity advected elements, right/left bearing barbs are produced for dextral/sinsitral filaments. The production of barbs due to dominant polarity elements is a new feature. In later stages the filament breaks into two dipped sections and takes a highly irregular, non-symmetrical form with multiple pillars. The two sections are connected by field lines with double dips even though the twist of the field is less than one turn. Reconnection is not found to play a key role in the break up of the filament. The non-linear force-free fields produce very different results to extrapolated linear-force free fields. For the cases considered here the linear force-free field does not produce the break up of the filament nor the production of barbs as a result of dominant polarity elements.

  6. Encaged molecules in external electric fields: A molecular "tug-of-war"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Nalini D.; Gejji, Shridhar P.; Bartolotti, Libero J.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2016-08-01

    Response of polar molecules CH3OH and H2O2 and a non-polar molecule, CO2, as "guests" encapsulated in the dodecahedral water cage (H2O)20 "host," to an external, perturbative electric field is investigated theoretically. We employ the hybrid density-functionals M06-2X and ωB97X-D incorporating the effects of damped dispersion, in conjunction with the maug-cc-pVTZ basis set, amenable for a hydrogen bonding description. While the host cluster (cage) tends to confine the embedded guest molecule through cooperative hydrogen bonding, the applied electric field tends to rupture the cluster-composite by stretching it; these two competitive effects leading to a molecular "tug-of-war." The composite remains stable up to a maximal sustainable threshold electric field, beyond which, concomitant with the vanishing of the HOMO-LUMO gap, the field wins over and the cluster breaks down. The electric-field effects are gauged in terms of the changes in the molecular geometry of the confined species, interaction energy, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, and frequency shifts of characteristic normal vibrations in the IR regime. Interestingly, beyond the characteristic threshold electric field, the labile, distorted host cluster fragmentizes, and the guest molecule still tethered to a remnant fragment, an effect attributed to the underlying hydrogen-bonded networks.

  7. AN EFFICIENT, BOX SHAPE INDEPENDENT NONBONDED FORCE AND VIRIAL ALGORITHM FOR MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.; Dijkstra, E.J; Renardus, M.K.R.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    A notation is introduced and used to transform a conventional specification of the non-bonded force and virial algorithm in the case of periodic boundary conditions into an alternative specification. The implementation of the transformed specification is simpler and typically a factor of 1.5 faster

  8. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, A.H.; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM

  9. Alterations in molecular muscle mass regulators after 8 days immobilizing Special Forces mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, J. G.; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Nedergaard, A.

    2015-01-01

    In military operations, declined physical capacity can endanger the life of soldiers. During special support and reconnaissance (SSR) missions, Special Forces soldiers sustain 1-2 weeks full-body horizontal immobilization, which impairs muscle strength and performance. Adequate muscle mass and st...

  10. A molecular dynamics algorithm for simulation of field theories in the canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, J.B.; Sinclair, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    We add a single scalar degree of freedom (''demon'') to the microcanonical ensemble which converts its molecular dynamics into a simulation method for the canonical ensemble (euclidean path integral) of the underlying field theory. This generalization of the microcanonical molecular dynamics algorithm simulates the field theory at fixed coupling with a completely deterministic procedure. We discuss the finite size effects of the method, the equipartition theorem and ergodicity. The method is applied to the planar model in two dimensions and SU(3) lattice gauge theory with four species of light, dynamical quarks in four dimensions. The method is much less sensitive to its discrete time step than conventional Langevin equation simulations of the canonical ensemble. The method is a straightforward generalization of a procedure introduced by S. Nose for molecular physics. (orig.)

  11. Constraining Carbonaceous Aerosol Climate Forcing by Bridging Laboratory, Field and Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Saleh, R.; Cappa, C. D.; Williams, L. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Gorkowski, K.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Yokelson, R. J.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass and fossil fuel combustion emits black (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) aerosols that absorb sunlight to warm climate and organic carbon (OC) aerosols that scatter sunlight to cool climate. The net forcing depends strongly on the composition, mixing state and transformations of these carbonaceous aerosols. Complexities from large variability of fuel types, combustion conditions and aging processes have confounded their treatment in models. We analyse recent laboratory and field measurements to uncover fundamental mechanism that control the chemical, optical and microphysical properties of carbonaceous aerosols that are elaborated below: Wavelength dependence of absorption and the single scattering albedo (ω) of fresh biomass burning aerosols produced from many fuels during FLAME-4 was analysed to determine the factors that control the variability in ω. Results show that ω varies strongly with fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCEFI)—higher MCEFI results in lower ω values and greater spectral dependence of ω (Liu et al GRL 2014). A parameterization of ω as a function of MCEFI for fresh BB aerosols is derived from the laboratory data and is evaluated by field data, including BBOP. Our laboratory studies also demonstrate that BrC production correlates with BC indicating that that they are produced by a common mechanism that is driven by MCEFI (Saleh et al NGeo 2014). We show that BrC absorption is concentrated in the extremely low volatility component that favours long-range transport. We observe substantial absorption enhancement for internally mixed BC from diesel and wood combustion near London during ClearFlo. While the absorption enhancement is due to BC particles coated by co-emitted OC in urban regions, it increases with photochemical age in rural areas and is simulated by core-shell models. We measure BrC absorption that is concentrated in the extremely low volatility components and attribute it to wood burning. Our results support

  12. Nanojets, Electrospray, and Ion Field Evaporation: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laboratory Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luedtke, W. D; Landman, Uzi; Chiu, Y. H; Levandier, D. J; Dressler, R. A; Sok, S; Gordon, M. S

    2008-01-01

    ... experiment and using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The electrospray source is operated in a Taylor cone-jet mode, with the nanojet that forms being characterized by high surface-normal electric field strengths in the vicinity of I V/nm...

  13. Investigating the Fundamentals of Molecular Depth Profiling Using Strong-field Photoionization of Sputtered Neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, D.; Brenes, D. A.; Winograd, N.; Wucher, A.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular depth profiles of model organic thin films were performed using a 40 keV C60+ cluster ion source in concert with TOF-SIMS. Strong-field photoionization of intact neutral molecules sputtered by 40 keV C60+ primary ions was used to analyze changes in the chemical environment of the guanine thin films as a function of ion fluence. Direct comparison of the secondary ion and neutral components of the molecular depth profiles yields valuable information about chemical damage accumulation as well as changes in the molecular ionization probability. An analytical protocol based on the erosion dynamics model is developed and evaluated using guanine and trehalose molecular secondary ion signals with and without comparable laser photoionization data. PMID:26269660

  14. Corrected placement of Mus-Rattus fossil calibration forces precision in the molecular tree of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuri; Hawkins, Melissa T R; McDonough, Molly M; Jacobs, Louis L; Flynn, Lawrence J

    2015-09-28

    Time calibration derived from the fossil record is essential for molecular phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Fossil mice and rats, discovered in the Siwalik Group of Pakistan, have served as one of the best-known fossil calibration points in molecular phylogenic studies. Although these fossils have been widely used as the 12 Ma date for the Mus/Rattus split or a more basal split, conclusive paleontological evidence for the nodal assignments has been absent. This study analyzes newly recognized characters that demonstrate lineage separation in the fossil record of Siwalik murines and examines the most reasonable nodal placement of the diverging lineages in a molecular phylogenetic tree by ancestral state reconstruction. Our specimen-based approach strongly indicates that Siwalik murines of the Karnimata clade are fossil members of the Arvicanthini-Otomyini-Millardini clade, which excludes Rattus and its relatives. Combining the new interpretation with the widely accepted hypothesis that the Progonomys clade includes Mus, the lineage separation event in the Siwalik fossil record represents the Mus/Arvicanthis split. Our test analysis on Bayesian age estimates shows that this new calibration point provides more accurate estimates of murine divergence than previous applications. Thus, we define this fossil calibration point and refine two other fossil-based points for molecular dating.

  15. Introducing time-dependent molecular fields: a new derivation of the wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Michael

    2018-02-01

    This article is part of a series of articles trying to establish the concept molecular field. The theory that induced us to introduce this novel concept is based on the Born-Huang expansion as applied to the Schroedinger equation that describes the interaction of a molecular system with an external electric field. Assuming the molecular system is made up of two coupled adiabatic states the theory leads from a single spatial curl equation, two space-time curl equations and one single space-time divergent equation to a pair of decoupled wave equations usually encountered within the theory of fields. In the present study, just like in the previous study [see Baer et al., Mol. Phys. 114, 227 (2016)] the wave equations are derived for an electric field having two features: (a) its intensity is high enough; (b) its duration is short enough. Although not all the findings are new the derivation, in the present case, is new, straightforward, fluent and much friendlier as compared to the previous one and therefore should be presented again. For this situation the study reveals that the just described interaction creates two fields that coexist within a molecule: one is a novel vectorial field formed via the interaction of the electric field with the Born-Huang non-adiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) and the other is an ordinary, scalar, electric field essentially identical to the original electric field. Section 4 devoted to the visualization of the outcomes via two intersecting Jahn-Teller cones which contain NACTs that become singular at the intersection point of these cones. Finally, the fact that eventually we are facing a kind of a cosmic situation may bring us to speculate that singular NACTs are a result of cosmic phenomena. Thus, if indeed this singularity is somehow connected to reality then, like other singularities in physics, it is formed at (or immediately after) the Big Bang and consequently, guarantees the formation of molecules.

  16. Water liquid-vapor interface subjected to various electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Mohammadreza; Azimian, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Majid; Nikzad, Safoora

    2017-11-01

    Investigation of the effects of E-fields on the liquid-vapor interface is essential for the study of floating water bridge and wetting phenomena. The present study employs the molecular dynamics method to investigate the effects of parallel and perpendicular E-fields on the water liquid-vapor interface. For this purpose, density distribution, number of hydrogen bonds, molecular orientation, and surface tension are examined to gain a better understanding of the interface structure. Results indicate enhancements in parallel E-field decrease the interface width and number of hydrogen bonds, while the opposite holds true in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Moreover, perpendicular fields disturb the water structure at the interface. Given that water molecules tend to be parallel to the interface plane, it is observed that perpendicular E-fields fail to realign water molecules in the field direction while the parallel ones easily do so. It is also shown that surface tension rises with increasing strength of parallel E-fields, while it reduces in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Enhancement of surface tension in the parallel field direction demonstrates how the floating water bridge forms between the beakers. Finally, it is found that application of external E-fields to the liquid-vapor interface does not lead to uniform changes in surface tension and that the liquid-vapor interfacial tension term in Young's equation should be calculated near the triple-line of the droplet. This is attributed to the multi-directional nature of the droplet surface, indicating that no constant value can be assigned to a droplet's surface tension in the presence of large electric fields.

  17. The impact of previous knee injury on force plate and field-based measures of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltich, Jennifer; Whittaker, Jackie; Von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Nigg, Benno M; Emery, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with post-traumatic osteoarthritis demo