WorldWideScience

Sample records for molecular electronic systems

  1. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasha, M.

    1985-01-01

    Our new optical pumping spectroscopy (steady state, and double-laser pulse) allows the production and study of the unstable rare tautomer in its ground and excited states, including picosecond dynamic studies. Molecules under study here included 7-azaindole (model for biological purines), 3-hydroxyflavone (model for plant flavones), lumichrome, and other heterocyclics. New detailed molecular mechanisms for proton transfer are derived, especially with catalytic assisting molecules. A new proton-transfer laser of extraordinary efficiency has become a side dividend, possibly worth of industrial development. The excited and highly reactive singlet molecular oxygen species 1 Δ/sub g/) has proven to be ubiquitous in chemical peroxide systems and in physically excited sensitizer-oxygen systems. Hyperbaric oxygen mechanisms in biology probably involve singlet oxygen. We have undertaken a spectroscopic study of tris - dibenzoylmethane chelates of Al, Gd, Eu, and Yb trivalent ions. These chelates offer a variety of electronic behaviors, from Z-effects on π-electron spin-orbital coupling (Al, Gd) to Weissman intramolecular energy transfer to 4f mestable levels (Eu, Gd). Elegant new spectroscopic resolution at 77K permits separation of tautomeric, parasitic self-absorption, dissociation, and cage effects to be resolved. 18 refs., 4 figs

  2. Electron-nuclear dynamics of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diz, A.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The content of an ab initio time-dependent theory of quantum molecular dynamics of electrons and atomic nuclei is presented. Employing the time-dependent variational principle and a family of approximate state vectors yields a set of dynamical equations approximating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. These equations govern the time evolution of the relevant state vector parameters as molecular orbital coefficients, nuclear positions, and momenta. This approach does not impose the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, does not use potential energy surfaces, and takes into account electron-nuclear coupling. Basic conservation laws are fully obeyed. The simplest model of the theory employs a single determinantal state for the electrons and classical nuclei and is implemented in the computer code ENDyne. Results from this ab-initio theory are reported for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions

  3. Energy Transformation in Molecular Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasha, Michael

    1999-05-17

    This laboratory has developed many new ideas and methods in the electronic spectroscopy of molecules. This report covers the contract period 1993-1995. A number of the projects were completed in 1996, and those papers are included in the report. The DOE contract was terminated at the end of 1995 owing to a reorganizational change eliminating nationally the projects under the Office of Health and Environmental Research, U. S. Department of Energy.

  4. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  5. Intermolecular thermoelectric-like effects in molecular nano electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzyan, H.; Safari, R.

    2012-01-01

    Intramolecular thermoelectric-like coefficients are introduced and computed of a single molecule nano electronic system. Values of the electronic Intramolecular thermoelectric-like coefficients are calculated based on the density and energy transfers between different parts of the molecule using quantum theory of atoms in molecule. Since, Joule and Peltier heating are even (symmetrical) and odd (antisymmetric) functions of the external bias, it is possible to divide Intramolecular thermoelectric-like coefficients into two components, symmetrical and antisymmetrical Intramolecular thermoelectric-like coefficients, which describe the intramolecular Joule-like and Peltier-like effects, respectively. In addition, a semiclassical temperature model is presented to describe intramolecular temperature mapping (intramolecular energy distributions) in molecular nano electronic systems.

  6. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  7. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J O; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given

  8. Exploring coherent transport through π-stacked systems for molecular electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Understanding electron transport across π-stacked systems can help to elucidate the role of intermolecular tunneling in molecular junctions and potentially with the design of high-efficiency molecular devices. Here we show how conjugation length and substituent groups influence the electron trans...

  9. Dynamic analysis of electron density in the course of the internal motion of molecular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, A.; Hori, K.; Asai, Y.; Yamabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general dynamic aspect of electron density of a molecular system is studied on the basis of the general equation of the electron orbital which is formulated for the dynamic study of electronic motion. The newly defined electron orbital incorporates the dynamics of molecular vibration into the electronic structures. In this scheme, the change of electron distribution caused by excitation of vibrational state is defined as the ''dynamic electron transfer.'' The dynamic electron density is found to have the remarkable ''additive'' property. The time-dependent aspect of the dynamic electron redistribution is also analyzed on the basis of the ''coherent state.'' The new method relates the classical vibrational amplitude to the quantum number of the vibrational state. As a preliminary application of the present treatment, the dynamic electron densities of H 2 , HD, HT, HF, and HCl molecules are calculated by use of ab initio molecular orbital method

  10. Molecular studies by electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansteen, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in experimental nuclear physics has played a large role in the development of electron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for studying chemical systems. The use of ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) for the mapping of molecular properties connected with inner as well as outer electron shells is reviewed, mainly from a phenomological point of view. Molecular Auger electron spectroscopy is described as a means of gaining information on details in molecular structure, simultaneously being extensively applied for surface studies. Future highly promising research areas for molecular electron spectroscopy are suggested to be (e,2e) processes as well as continued exploitation of synchrotron radiation from high energy nuclear devices. (Auth.)

  11. Simple molecules as benchmark systems for molecular electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djukić, Darko

    2006-01-01

    In society there is a constant urge to improve existing devices and the level of success is perhaps the easiest to observe in the world of electronic devices. The complexity, functionality and reliability of these machines has increased enormously, but it approaches its limits. A new giant step

  12. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  13. Time-dependent theoretical treatments of the dynamics of electrons and nuclei in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deumens, E.; Diz, A.; Longo, R.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is presented of methods for time-dependent treatments of molecules as systems of electrons and nuclei. The theoretical details of these methods are reviewed and contrasted in the light of a recently developed time-dependent method called electron-nuclear dynamics. Electron-nuclear dynamics (END) is a formulation of the complete dynamics of electrons and nuclei of a molecular system that eliminates the necessity of constructing potential-energy surfaces. Because of its general formulation, it encompasses many aspects found in other formulations and can serve as a didactic device for clarifying many of the principles and approximations relevant in time-dependent treatments of molecular systems. The END equations are derived from the time-dependent variational principle applied to a chosen family of efficiently parametrized approximate state vectors. A detailed analysis of the END equations is given for the case of a single-determinantal state for the electrons and a classical treatment of the nuclei. The approach leads to a simple formulation of the fully nonlinear time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including nuclear dynamics. The nonlinear END equations with the ab initio Coulomb Hamiltonian have been implemented at this level of theory in a computer program, ENDyne, and have been shown feasible for the study of small molecular systems. Implementation of the Austin Model 1 semiempirical Hamiltonian is discussed as a route to large molecular systems. The linearized END equations at this level of theory are shown to lead to the random-phase approximation for the coupled system of electrons and nuclei. The qualitative features of the general nonlinear solution are analyzed using the results of the linearized equations as a first approximation. Some specific applications of END are presented, and the comparison with experiment and other theoretical approaches is discussed

  14. Fragment-orbital tunneling currents and electronic couplings for analysis of molecular charge-transfer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Yeon; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2018-04-04

    In theoretical charge-transfer research, calculation of the electronic coupling element is crucial for examining the degree of the electronic donor-acceptor interaction. The tunneling current (TC), representing the magnitudes and directions of electron flow, provides a way of evaluating electronic couplings, along with the ability of visualizing how electrons flow in systems. Here, we applied the TC theory to π-conjugated organic dimer systems, in the form of our fragment-orbital tunneling current (FOTC) method, which uses the frontier molecular-orbitals of system fragments as diabatic states. For a comprehensive test of FOTC, we assessed how reasonable the computed electronic couplings and the corresponding TC densities are for the hole- and electron-transfer databases HAB11 and HAB7. FOTC gave 12.5% mean relative unsigned error with regard to the high-level ab initio reference. The shown performance is comparable with that of fragment-orbital density functional theory, which gave the same error by 20.6% or 13.9% depending on the formulation. In the test of a set of nucleobase π stacks, we showed that the original TC expression is also applicable to nondegenerate cases under the condition that the overlap between the charge distributions of diabatic states is small enough to offset the energy difference. Lastly, we carried out visual analysis on the FOTC densities of thiophene dimers with different intermolecular alignments. The result depicts an intimate topological connection between the system geometry and electron flow. Our work provides quantitative and qualitative grounds for FOTC, showing it to be a versatile tool in characterization of molecular charge-transfer systems.

  15. An analytic approach to 2D electronic PE spectra of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoecs, V.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems using direct calculation from electronic Hamiltonians allows peak classification from 3P-PE spectra dynamics. Display Omitted Highlights: → RWA approach to electronic photon echo. → A straightforward calculation of 2D electronic spectrograms in finite molecular systems. → Importance of population time dynamics in relation to inter-site coherent coupling. - Abstract: The three-pulse photon echo (3P-PE) spectra of finite molecular systems and simplified line broadening models is presented. The Fourier picture of a heterodyne detected three-pulse rephasing PE signal in the δ-pulse limit of the external field is derived in analytic form. The method includes contributions of one and two-excitonic states and allows direct calculation of Fourier PE spectrogram from corresponding Hamiltonian. As an illustration, the proposed treatment is applied to simple systems, e.g. 2-site two-level system (TLS) and n-site TLS model of photosynthetic unit. The importance of relation between Fourier picture of 3P-PE dynamics (corresponding to nonzero population time, T) and coherent inter-state coupling is emphasized.

  16. Noncovalent Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryn'ova, G; Corminboeuf, C

    2018-05-03

    Molecular electronics covers several distinctly different conducting architectures, including organic semiconductors and single-molecule junctions. The noncovalent interactions, abundant in the former, are also often found in the latter, i.e., the dimer junctions. In the present work, we draw the parallel between the two types of noncovalent molecular electronics for a range of π-conjugated heteroaromatic molecules. In silico modeling allows us to distill the factors that arise from the chemical nature of their building blocks and from their mutual arrangement. We find that the same compounds are consistently the worst and the best performers in the two types of electronic assemblies, emphasizing the universal imprint of the underlying chemistry of the molecular cores on their diverse charge transport characteristics. The interplay between molecular and intermolecular factors creates a spectrum of noncovalent conductive architectures, which can be manipulated using the design strategies based upon the established relationships between chemistry and transport.

  17. Electron-correlated fragment-molecular-orbital calculations for biomolecular and nano systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Mochizuki, Yuji; Komeiji, Yuto; Okiyama, Yoshio; Fukuzawa, Kaori

    2014-06-14

    Recent developments in the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method for theoretical formulation, implementation, and application to nano and biomolecular systems are reviewed. The FMO method has enabled ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations for large molecular systems such as protein-ligand complexes at a reasonable computational cost in a parallelized way. There have been a wealth of application outcomes from the FMO method in the fields of biochemistry, medicinal chemistry and nanotechnology, in which the electron correlation effects play vital roles. With the aid of the advances in high-performance computing, the FMO method promises larger, faster, and more accurate simulations of biomolecular and related systems, including the descriptions of dynamical behaviors in solvent environments. The current status and future prospects of the FMO scheme are addressed in these contexts.

  18. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  19. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  20. Molecular electron affinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, E.K.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular electron affinities have historically been difficult quantities to measure accurately. These difficulties arise from differences in structure between the ion and neutral as well as the existence of excited negative ion states. To circumvent these problems, relative electron affinities were determined in this dissertation by studying equilibrium electron transfer reactions using a pulsed ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer. Direct measurement of ion and neutral concentrations for reactions of the general type, A - + B = B - + A, allow calculation of the equilibrium constant and, therefore, the free energy change. The free energy difference is related to the difference in electron affinities between A and B. A relative electron affinity scale covering a range of about 45 kcal/mol was constructed with various substituted p-benzoquinones, nitrobenzenes, anhydrides, and benzophenones. To assign absolute electron affinities, various species with accurately known electron affinities are tied to the scale via ion-cyclotron double resonance bracketing techniques. After the relative scale is anchored to these species with well-known electron affinities, the scale is then used as a check on other electron affinity values as well as generating new electron affinity values. Many discrepancies were found between the electron affinities measured using the ICR technique and previous literature determinations

  1. Path integral molecular dynamics for exact quantum statistics of multi-electronic-state systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinzijian; Liu, Jian

    2018-03-14

    An exact approach to compute physical properties for general multi-electronic-state (MES) systems in thermal equilibrium is presented. The approach is extended from our recent progress on path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), Liu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024103 (2016)] and Zhang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 147, 034109 (2017)], for quantum statistical mechanics when a single potential energy surface is involved. We first define an effective potential function that is numerically favorable for MES-PIMD and then derive corresponding estimators in MES-PIMD for evaluating various physical properties. Its application to several representative one-dimensional and multi-dimensional models demonstrates that MES-PIMD in principle offers a practical tool in either of the diabatic and adiabatic representations for studying exact quantum statistics of complex/large MES systems when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, Condon approximation, and harmonic bath approximation are broken.

  2. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Lower-Dimensional Systems and Molecular Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Peter; Papavassiliou, George

    1990-01-01

    This volume represents the written account of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Lower-Dimensional Systems and Molecular Electronics" held at Hotel Spetses, Spetses Island, Greece from 12 June to 23 June 1989. The goal of the Institute was to demonstrate the breadth of chemical and physical knowledge that has been acquired in the last 20 years in inorganic and organic crystals, polymers, and thin films, which exhibit phenomena of reduced dimensionality. The interest in these systems started in the late 1960's with lower-dimensional inorganic conductors, in the early 1970's with quasi-one-dimensional crystalline organic conductors. which by 1979 led to the first organic superconductors, and, in 1977, to the fITSt conducting polymers. The study of monolayer films (Langmuir-Blodgett films) had progressed since the 1930's, but reached a great upsurge in . the early 1980's. The pursuit of non-linear optical phenomena became increasingly popular in the early 1980's, as the attention turned from inorganic crystals t...

  4. The general atomic and molecular electronic structure system HONDO: Version 7.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.; Watts, J.D.; Villar, H.O.; Hurst, G.J.B.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a computer program for ab initio quantum mechanical calculations of atomic and molecular wavefunctions and energies. Capabilities for the calculation of energy gradients and second derivatives with respect to nuclear coordinates are provided for several types of wavefunctions. Calculations of many molecular properties based on the electron density are possible. The program contains automated algorithms for the determination of equilibrium structures, saddle points, reaction pathways, vibrational spectra including infrared and Raman intensities. We illustrate the capabilities of the program by highlighting research problems recently investigated with the present program. (orig.)

  5. Polypeptides Based Molecular Electronics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lam, Yeng M; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Li, Lain-Jong; Dravid, Vinayak P; Shekhawat, Gajendra S; Suri, Raman

    2008-01-01

    ... the formation of molecular devices such as transistors, diodes, and sensors. We have designed the peptides, arranged them on substrates using self-assembly, Dip-PEN nanolithography, and also e-beam assisted lithography...

  6. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  7. Silane and Germane Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Timothy A; Li, Haixing; Klausen, Rebekka S; Kim, Nathaniel T; Neupane, Madhav; Leighton, James L; Steigerwald, Michael L; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2017-04-18

    This Account provides an overview of our recent efforts to uncover the fundamental charge transport properties of Si-Si and Ge-Ge single bonds and introduce useful functions into group 14 molecular wires. We utilize the tools of chemical synthesis and a scanning tunneling microscopy-based break-junction technique to study the mechanism of charge transport in these molecular systems. We evaluated the fundamental ability of silicon, germanium, and carbon molecular wires to transport charge by comparing conductances within families of well-defined structures, the members of which differ only in the number of Si (or Ge or C) atoms in the wire. For each family, this procedure yielded a length-dependent conductance decay parameter, β. Comparison of the different β values demonstrates that Si-Si and Ge-Ge σ bonds are more conductive than the analogous C-C σ bonds. These molecular trends mirror what is seen in the bulk. The conductance decay of Si and Ge-based wires is similar in magnitude to those from π-based molecular wires such as paraphenylenes However, the chemistry of the linkers that attach the molecular wires to the electrodes has a large influence on the resulting β value. For example, Si- and Ge-based wires of many different lengths connected with a methyl-thiomethyl linker give β values of 0.36-0.39 Å -1 , whereas Si- and Ge-based wires connected with aryl-thiomethyl groups give drastically different β values for short and long wires. This observation inspired us to study molecular wires that are composed of both π- and σ-orbitals. The sequence and composition of group 14 atoms in the σ chain modulates the electronic coupling between the π end-groups and dictates the molecular conductance. The conductance behavior originates from the coupling between the subunits, which can be understood by considering periodic trends such as bond length, polarizability, and bond polarity. We found that the same periodic trends determine the electric field

  8. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems: Comprehensive progress report, 1986--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasha, M.

    1989-01-01

    Our research focuses on discovering the fundamental issues in proton-transfer and charge-transfer excitations in model systems, with an eye on which molecular systems will serve as the best guide to biological systems. This report addresses an intramolecular proton transfer classification system, proton-transfer potentials, proton-transfer spectroscopy of benzanilides, proton-transfer in aminosalicylates, proton-transfer in lumichrome, development of proton-transfer lasers, and triplet excitation enhancement via proton-transfer tunneling. 6 refs., 2 figs

  9. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...... transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific...

  10. Organic-based molecular switches for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Noelia; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Ribagorda, Maria; Parra, Andres; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-10-05

    In a general sense, molecular electronics (ME) is the branch of nanotechnology which studies the application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. Among the different types of molecules, organic compounds have been revealed as promising candidates for ME, due to the easy access, great structural diversity and suitable electronic and mechanical properties. Thanks to these useful capabilities, organic molecules have been used to emulate electronic devices at the nanoscopic scale. In this feature article, we present the diverse strategies used to develop organic switches towards ME with special attention to non-volatile systems.

  11. Triazatriangulene as binding group for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Zhongming; Wang, Xintai; Borges, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The triazatriangulene (TATA) ring system was investigated as a binding group for tunnel junctions of molecular wires on gold surfaces. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of TATA platforms with three different lengths of phenylene wires were fabricated, and their electrical conductance was recorded ...... with its high stability and directionality make this binding group very attractive for molecular electronic measurements and devices. (Figure Presented)....

  12. Electron scattering on molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingerden, B. van.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers scattering phenomena which occur when a beam of electrons interacts with a molecular hydrogen gas of low density. Depending on the energy loss of the scattered electrons one can distinguish elastic scattering, excitation and (auto)ionization of the H 2 -molecule. The latter processes may also lead to dissociation. These processes are investigated in four experiments in increasing detail. (Auth.)

  13. Interatomic Coulombic electron capture in atomic, molecular, and quantum dot systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bande Annika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interatomic Coulombic electron capture (ICEC process has recently been predicted theoretically for clusters of atoms and molecules. For an atom A capturing an electron e(ε it competes with the well known photorecombination, because in an environment of neutral or anionic neighboring atoms B, A can transfer its excess energy in the ultrafast ICEC process to B which is then ionized. The cross section for e(ε + A + B → A− + B+ + e(ε′ has been obtained in an asymptotic approximation based on scattering theory for several clusters [1,2]. It was found that ICEC starts dominating the PR for distances among participating species of nanometers and lower. Therefore, we believe that the ICEC process might be of importance in the atmosphere, in biological systems, plasmas, or in nanostructured materials. As an example for the latter, ICEC has been investigated by means of electron dynamics in a model potential for semiconductor double quantum dots (QDs [3]. In the simplest case one QD captures an electron while the outgoing electron is emitted from the other. The reaction probability for this process was found to be relatively large.

  14. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  15. A step towards molecular electronics. The ferrocene molecule on a metal-semiconductor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeidel, Jedrzej Piotr

    2012-05-14

    In the first part, the domain walls on Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) are investigated and structural and electronic model are introduced and discussed. Furthermore, the temperature dependence is investigated, showing the Peierls-type transition along the domain wall chain. In the second part, the high resolution STM data of the local adsorption geometry of FDT on Ag {radical}(3)< x {radical}(3) are presented. The comparison of theoretical results obtained for the molecule, on Ag(lll) and Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) surfaces, with STM measurement at RT, support the chemisorption with thiolate bonds to the Ag trimers on the HCT surface. The molecule is aligned with the Cp-Fe-Cp axis parallel to the surface, while the rotational freedom of the molecule is limited due to chemisorption. The presented adsorption model is supported by experiment and simulation. In the third part, the perfect Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) is prepared and investigated by means of STM, focusing on structural and electronic characteristics. The different reconstructions and amounts of Ag on Si are investigated; the submonolayer amounts, Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) wetting layers, perfect epitaxial layers and multilayer systems. The influence of wetting layer on electronic character of deposited Ag nanostructures is studied. The occurrence of effective single and double barriers in tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy for the Ag {radical}(3) x <{radical}(3) system is investigated in the monolayer regime by varying the measurement and preparation conditions. The Coulomb Blockade oscillations are found for granular multilayer Ag films, whereas similar structures with existence of Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) show only a single barrier characteristic. The vertical transport properties in this metal/ semiconductor system depend on the structure and bonding on the atomic scale and on the lateral two-dimensional properties of the interface.

  16. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-12-28

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with the ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by an overview of the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. The latest developments in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also described.

  17. Dynamical mechanism of charge separation by photoexcited generation of proton–electron pairs in organic molecular systems. A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-08-22

    Graphical abstract: Asymptotic biradical state produced by the excited-state coupled proton–electron transfer (CPET), resulting in charge separation (proton–electron pair creation) on a proton–electron acceptor A, in a series of photochemical systems generally denoted as X–Mn–OH{sub 2}⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH){sub 3}) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole, or ammonia clusters). - Abstract: In this perspective article, we review, along with presenting new results, a series of our theoretical analyses on the excited-state mechanism of charge separation (proton–electron pair creation) relevant to the photoinduced water-splitting reaction (2H{sub 2}O → 4H{sup +} + 4e{sup −} + O{sub 2}) in organic and biological systems, which quite often includes Mn clusters in various molecular configurations. The present mechanism is conceived to be universal in the triggering process of the photoexcited water splitting dynamics. In other words, any Mn-based catalytic charge separation is quite likely to be initiated according to this mechanism. As computationally tractable yet realistic models, we examine a series of systems generally expressed as X–Mn–OH{sub 2}⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH){sub 3}) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole or ammonia cluster) in terms of the theory of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics. We first find both an electron and a proton are simultaneously transferred to the acceptors through conical intersections upon photoexcitation. In this mechanism, the electron takes different pathways from that of the proton and reaches the densely lying Rydberg-like states of the acceptors in the end, thereby inducing charge separation. Therefore the presence of the Rydberg-like diffused unoccupied states as an electron acceptor is critical for this reaction to proceed. We also have found another crucial nonadiabatic process that deteriorates the efficiency of charge separation by rendering the created pair of proton

  18. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  19. Electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duddy, P.E.

    1999-03-01

    Collisions of electrons with molecules is one of the fundamental processes which occur both in atomic and molecular physics and also in chemistry. These collisions are vital in determining the energy balance and transport properties of electrons in gases and plasmas at low temperatures. There are many important applications for the basic understanding of these collision processes. For example, the study of planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium involves electron collisions with both molecules and molecular ions. In particular, two of the major cooling mechanisms of electrons in the Earth's ionosphere are (i) the fine structure changing transitions of oxygen atoms by electron impact and (ii) the resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation of N 2 . Other applications include magnetohydrodynamic power generation and laser physics. A molecule, by definition, will contain more than one nucleus and consequently the effect of nuclear motion in the molecule leads to many extra processes in electron scattering by molecules which cannot occur in electron-atom scattering. As for atoms, both elastic and inelastic scattering occur, but in the case of inelastic electron scattering by molecules, the target molecule is excited to a different state by the process. The excitation may be one, or some combination, of rotational, vibrational and electronic transitions. Other reactions which may occur include dissociation of the molecule into its constituent atoms or ionisation. Another difficulty arises when considering the interactions between the electron and the molecule, This interaction, which considerably complicates the calculation, is non-spherical and various methods have been developed over the years to represent this interaction. This thesis considers electron scattering by molecular oxygen in the low energy range i.e. 0-15eV. These collisions are of considerable interest in atmospheric physics and chemistry where the electron impact excitation of O 2 has

  20. Ultra-Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy and Pump-Probe Microscopy of Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Boris M.

    Ultrafast spectroscopy offers an unprecedented view on the dynamic nature of chemical reactions. From charge transfer in semiconductors to folding and isomerization of proteins, these all important processes can now be monitored and in some instances even controlled on real, physical timescales. One of the biggest challenges of ultrafast science is the incredible energetic complexity of most systems. It is not uncommon to encounter macromolecules or materials with absorption spectra spanning significant portions of the visible spectrum. Monitoring a multitude of electronic and vibrational transitions, all dynamically interacting with each other on femtosecond timescales poses a truly daunting experimental task. The first part of this thesis deals with the development of a novel Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy (2DES) and its associated, advanced detection methodologies. Owing to its ultra-broadband implementation, this technique enables us to monitor femtosecond chemical dynamics that span the energetic landscape of the entire visible spectrum. In order to demonstrate the utility of our method, we apply it to two laser dye molecules, IR-144 and Cresyl Violet. Variation of photophysical properties on a microscopic scale in either man-made or naturally occurring systems can have profound implications on how we understand their macroscopic properties. Recently, inorganic hybrid perovskites have been tapped as the next generation solar energy harvesting materials. Their remarkable properties include low exciton binding energy, low exciton recombination rates and long carrier diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, considerable variability in device properties made with nearly identical preparation methods has puzzled the community. In the second part of this thesis we use non-linear pump probe microscopy to study the heterogeneous nature of femtosecond carrier dynamics in thin film perovskites. We show that the local morphology of the perovskite thin films has a

  1. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems. Progress report, December 1, 1981-November 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasha, M.

    1982-01-01

    Summaries are presented of studies on: molecular translational-rotovibronic Hamiltonians for nonlinear and linear molecules, singlet oxygen in potassium superoxide-water, proton-transfer spectroscopy of water in chromones, mechanism of 4-level molecular lasers, and cationic/anionic potential in proton-transfer spectroscopy

  2. Fullerene Derived Molecular Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Madhu; Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subbash

    1998-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale electronic devices. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal grapheme sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural and electronic properties of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  4. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  6. Control of electron localization to isolate and enhance molecular harmonic plateau in asymmetric HeH2+ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ruifeng; Yu, Chao; Wang, Yunhui; Shi, Qi; Zhang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation from the asymmetric molecular ion HeH 2+ exposed to intense laser fields was investigated by quantum wave packet calculations in which the initial wave packet of HeH 2+ was prepared in the first excited 2pσ state. The calculated molecular harmonic plateau at low frequencies was effectively isolated and enhanced by adjusting the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the laser field. Furthermore, double-well model, time-dependent electronic density, electronic state population, and time-frequency analyses were presented to explain the underlying mechanism of the efficient isolated molecular plateau. By taking advantage of the CEP effect to control the electronic dynamics, this isolated molecular plateau can be used to generate high-intensity single attosecond pulses.

  7. Young-type interferences with electrons basics and theoretical challenges in molecular collision systems

    CERN Document Server

    Frémont, François

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that atomic-size particles can be described as waves, many interference experiments have been realized with electrons to demonstrate their wave behavior. In this book, after describing the different steps that led to the present knowledge, we focus on the strong link existing between photon and electron interferences, highlighting the similarities and the differences. For example, the atomic centers of a hydrogen molecule are used to mimic the slits in the Young's famous interference experiment with light. We show, however, that the basic time-dependent ionization theories that describe these Young-type electron interferences are not able to reproduce the experiment. This crucial point remains a real challenge for theoreticians in atomic collision physics.

  8. Electron-phonon interaction in quantum transport through quantum dots and molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum transport and effects of decoherence properties are studied in quantum dots systems and finite homogeneous chains of aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. We study these systems based on the tight-binding approach through Green's function technique within a real space renormalization and polaron transformation schemes. In particular, we calculate the transmission probability following the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the I - V characteristics and the noise power of current fluctuations taken into account the decoherence. Our results may explain the inelastic effects through nanoscopic systems.

  9. The merger of electrochemistry and molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Molecular Electronics has the potential to greatly enhance existing silicon-based microelectronics to realize new functions, higher device density, lower power consumption, and lower cost. Although the investigation of electron transport through single molecules and molecular monolayers in "molecular junctions" is a recent development, many of the relevant concepts and phenomena are derived from electrochemistry, as practiced for the past several decades. The past 10+ years have seen an explosion of research activity directed toward how the structure of molecules affects electron transport in molecular junctions, with the ultimate objective of "rational design" of molecular components with new electronic functions, such as chemical sensing, interactions with light, and low-cost, low-power consumer electronics. In order to achieve these scientifically and commercially important objectives, the factors controlling charge transport in molecules "connected" to conducting contacts must be understood, and methods for massively parallel manufacturing of molecular circuits must be developed. This Personal Account describes the development of reproducible and robust molecular electronic devices, starting with modified electrodes used in electrochemistry and progressing to manufacturable molecular junctions. Although the field faced some early difficulties in reliability and characterization, the pieces are now in place for rapid advances in understanding charge transport at the molecular level. Inherent in the field of Molecular Electronics are many electrochemical concepts, including tunneling, redox exchange, activated electron transfer, and electron coupling between molecules and conducting contacts. Copyright © 2012 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Electronic Rydberg wavepacket effects on molecular vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, I.G.; Meacher, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Electronic wavepacket states of molecular hydrogen are considered which represent the situation of a spectator electron orbiting a molecular core. A quantum defect theory approach is used to determine the energy level structure, wavefunctions and molecular potentials, which is valid in regions where the quantum defects approach zero. In such a region the orbital motion of the wavepacket leads to a periodic variation in the molecular vibration frequency of the order of 100 cm -1 . Possible detection schemes are discussed. (author)

  11. Electron-impact excitation of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, D.A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression is derived that relates the rate coefficient for dipole-allowed electron-impact excitation of a molecular ion in the Coulomb-Born approximation to the Einstein A coefficient for the corresponding radiative decay. Results are given for several molecular ions of astrophysical interest. A general analytic expression is obtained for the equilibrium rotational level populations in the ground vibrational state of any molecular ion excited by collisions with electrons. The expression depends only upon the electron temperature, the electron density, and the rotational constant of the molecular ion. A similar expression is obtained for neutral polar molecules

  12. Understanding charge transport in molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushmerick, J J; Pollack, S K; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Holt, D B; Ratner, M A; Shashidhar, R

    2003-12-01

    For molecular electronics to become a viable technology the factors that control charge transport across a metal-molecule-metal junction need to be elucidated. We use an experimentally simple crossed-wire tunnel junction to interrogate how factors such as metal-molecule coupling, molecular structure, and the choice of metal electrode influence the current-voltage characteristics of a molecular junction.

  13. Dealing with chemical reaction pathways and electronic excitations in molecular systems via renormalized and active-space coupled-cluster methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse J. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Włoch, Marta [Department of Chemistry, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Gour, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA and Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Coupled-cluster (CC) theory has become the de facto standard for high-accuracy molecular calculations, but the widely used CC and equation-of-motion (EOM) CC approaches, such as CCSD(T) and EOMCCSD, have difficulties with capturing stronger electron correlations that characterize multi-reference molecular problems. This presentation demonstrates that many of these difficulties can be addressed by exploiting the completely renormalized (CR) CC and EOMCC approaches, such as CR-CC(2,3), CR-EOMCCSD(T), and CR-EOMCC(2,3), and their local correlation counterparts applicable to systems with hundreds of atoms, and the active-space CC/EOMCC approaches, such as CCSDt and EOMCCSDt, and their extensions to valence systems via the electron-attached and ionized formalisms.

  14. Molecular Electronics of Self-Assembled Monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xintai

    This thesis deals withmolecular electronic investigations on self-assembledmonolayers. The thesis is divided into seven chapters, as outlined below.Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the history of molecular electronics and its current state.Chapter 2 is separated into three parts. Part I...... providesa brief introduction toself-assembledmonolayers(SAMs), includingits structure, formation, and its role in molecular electronic investigations. Part II is an introduction of different molecular functions, which are interesting for designing real devices. Part III is an introduction of a novel carbon...... material: graphene, and how such material can be incorporated intothe field of molecular electronics.Chapter 3 is a brief introduction of important instruments used in this thesis.Chapter 4, 5 and 6 describe the major experimental work in this thesis. Chapter 4 introduces two novel anchoring...

  15. Electron Interference in Molecular Circular Polarization Attosecond XUV Photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-center electron interference in molecular attosecond photoionization processes is investigated from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Both symmetric H\\(_2^+\\ and nonsymmetric HHe\\(^{2+}\\ one electron diatomic systems are ionized by intense attosecond circularly polarized XUV laser pulses. Photoionization of these molecular ions shows signature of interference with double peaks (minima in molecular attosecond photoelectron energy spectra (MAPES at critical angles \\(\\vartheta_c\\ between the molecular \\(\\textbf{R}\\ axis and the photoelectron momentum \\(\\textbf{p}\\. The interferences are shown to be a function of the symmetry of electronic states and the interference patterns are sensitive to the molecular orientation and pulse polarization. Such sensitivity offers possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals.

  16. Spiers Memorial Lecture. Molecular mechanics and molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Robert; Beverly, Kris; Boukai, Akram; Bunimovich, Yuri; Choi, Jang Wook; DeIonno, Erica; Green, Johnny; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Luo, Yi; Sheriff, Bonnie; Stoddart, Fraser; Heath, James R

    2006-01-01

    We describe our research into building integrated molecular electronics circuitry for a diverse set of functions, and with a focus on the fundamental scientific issues that surround this project. In particular, we discuss experiments aimed at understanding the function of bistable rotaxane molecular electronic switches by correlating the switching kinetics and ground state thermodynamic properties of those switches in various environments, ranging from the solution phase to a Langmuir monolayer of the switching molecules sandwiched between two electrodes. We discuss various devices, low bit-density memory circuits, and ultra-high density memory circuits that utilize the electrochemical switching characteristics of these molecules in conjunction with novel patterning methods. We also discuss interconnect schemes that are capable of bridging the micrometre to submicrometre length scales of conventional patterning approaches to the near-molecular length scales of the ultra-dense memory circuits. Finally, we discuss some of the challenges associated with fabricated ultra-dense molecular electronic integrated circuits.

  17. Electronic payment systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mláka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis analysis issue of electronic payment systems. It discusses their use for payments on the internet and sending funds via e-mail. The first part is devoted to the theoretical definition and legislation of the issuance of electronic money and activities of electronic money institutions. The main part of the work clearly focuses on the use of e-wallets, which is an integral part of electronic payment systems. E-wallet of electronic payment system Moneybookers is considered as...

  18. Light and redox switchable molecular components for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen numerous unexpected challenges that have slowed progress and the initial promise of complex molecular-based computers has not yet been realised. Primarily this has been due to the realisation at an early stage that molecular-based nano-electronics brings with it the interface between the hard (semiconductor) and soft (molecular) worlds and the challenges which accompany working in such an environment. Issues such as addressability, cross-talk, molecular stability and perturbation of molecular properties (e.g., inhibition of photochemistry) have nevertheless driven development in molecular design and synthesis as well as our ability to interface molecular components with bulk metal contacts to a very high level of sophistication. Numerous groups have played key roles in progressing this field not least teams such as those led by Whitesides, Aviram, Ratner, Stoddart and Heath. In this short review we will however focus on the contributions from our own group and those of our collaborators, in employing diarylethene based molecular components.

  19. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  20. Electron screening in molecular fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoppa, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent laboratory experiments have measured fusion cross sections at center-of-mass energies low enough for the effects of atomic and molecular electrons to be important. To extract the cross section for bare nuclei from these data (as required for astrophysical applications), it is necessary to understand these screening effects. We study electron screening effects in the low-energy collisions of Z=1 nuclei with hydrogen molecules. Our model is based on a dynamical evolution of the electron wave functions within the TDHF scheme, while the motion of the nuclei is treated classically. We find that at the currently accessible energies the screening effects depend strongly on the molecular orientation. The screening is found to be larger for molecular targets than for atomic targets, due to the reflection symmetry in the latter. The results agree fairly well with data measured for deuteron collisions on molecular deuterium and tritium targets. (orig.)

  1. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhro, W.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  2. An antilock molecular braking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Ting; Huang, Shou-Ling; Yao, Hsuan-Hsiao; Chen, I-Chia; Lin, Ying-Chih; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2012-08-17

    A light-driven molecular brake displaying an antilock function is constructed by introducing a nonradiative photoinduced electron transfer (PET) decay channel to compete with the trans (brake-off) → cis (brake-on) photoisomerization. A fast release of the brake can be achieved by deactivating the PET process through addition of protons. The cycle of irradiation-protonation-irradiation-deprotonation conducts the brake function and mimics the antilock braking system (ABS) of vehicles.

  3. Information theory of molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nalewajski, Roman F

    2006-01-01

    As well as providing a unified outlook on physics, Information Theory (IT) has numerous applications in chemistry and biology owing to its ability to provide a measure of the entropy/information contained within probability distributions and criteria of their information ""distance"" (similarity) and independence. Information Theory of Molecular Systems applies standard IT to classical problems in the theory of electronic structure and chemical reactivity. The book starts by introducing the basic concepts of modern electronic structure/reactivity theory based upon the Density Functional Theory

  4. Light and Redox Switchable Molecular Components for Molecular Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen

  5. Towards molecular electronics with large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, HB; Blom, PWM; de Leeuw, DM; de Boer, B

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transport through single molecules has been studied extensively by academic(1-8) and industrial(9,10) research groups. Discrete tunnel junctions, or molecular diodes, have been reported using scanning probes(11,12), break junctions(13,14), metallic crossbars(6) and nanopores(8,15). For

  6. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...

  7. Synergetics of molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lupichev, Lev N; Kadantsev, Vasiliy N

    2014-01-01

    Synergetics is the quantitative study of multicomponent systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics and cooperativity. This book specifically considers basic models of the nonlinear dynamics of molecular systems and discusses relevant applications in biological physics and the polymer sciences.Emphasis is placed on specific solutions to the dynamical equations that correspond to the coherent formation of spatial-temporal structures, such as solitons, kinks and breathers, in particular. The emergence of these patterns in molecular structures provides a variety of information on their structural pro

  8. Computational Nanotechnology Molecular Electronics, Materials and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation covers research being performed on computational nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes at the NASA Ames Research Center. Topics cover include: nanomechanics of nanomaterials, nanotubes and composite materials, molecular electronics with nanotube junctions, kinky chemistry, and nanotechnology for solid-state quantum computers using fullerenes.

  9. Scanning probe methods applied to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlicek, Niko

    2013-08-01

    Scanning probe methods on insulating films offer a rich toolbox to study electronic, structural and spin properties of individual molecules. This work discusses three issues in the field of molecular and organic electronics. An STM head to be operated in high magnetic fields has been designed and built up. The STM head is very compact and rigid relying on a robust coarse approach mechanism. This will facilitate investigations of the spin properties of individual molecules in the future. Combined STM/AFM studies revealed a reversible molecular switch based on two stable configurations of DBTH molecules on ultrathin NaCl films. AFM experiments visualize the molecular structure in both states. Our experiments allowed to unambiguously determine the pathway of the switch. Finally, tunneling into and out of the frontier molecular orbitals of pentacene molecules has been investigated on different insulating films. These experiments show that the local symmetry of initial and final electron wave function are decisive for the ratio between elastic and vibration-assisted tunneling. The results can be generalized to electron transport in organic materials.

  10. Electronic theodolite intersection systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bingley, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of electronic surveying instruments, such as electronic theodolites, and concurrent advances in computer technology, has revolutionised engineering surveying; one of the more recent examples being the introduction of Electronic Theodolite Intersection Systems (ETISs). An ETIS consists of two or more electronic theodolites and a computer, with peripheral hardware and suitable software. The theoretical principles on which they are based have been known for a long time, but ...

  11. Molecular characterization of organic electronic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLongchamp, Dean M; Kline, R Joseph; Fischer, Daniel A; Richter, Lee J; Toney, Michael F

    2011-01-18

    Organic electronics have emerged as a viable competitor to amorphous silicon for the active layer in low-cost electronics. The critical performance of organic electronic materials is closely related to their morphology and molecular packing. Unlike their inorganic counterparts, polymers combine complex repeat unit structure and crystalline disorder. This combination prevents any single technique from being able to uniquely solve the packing arrangement of the molecules. Here, a general methodology for combining multiple, complementary techniques that provide accurate unit cell dimensions and molecular orientation is described. The combination of measurements results in a nearly complete picture of the organic film morphology. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Theoretical investigations of molecular wires: Electronic spectra and electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julio Leopoldo

    The results of theoretical and computational research are presented for two promising molecular wires, the Nanostar dendrimer, and a series of substituted azobenzene derivatives connected to aluminum electrodes. The electronic absorption spectra of the Nanostar (a phenylene-ethynylene dendrimer attached to an ethynylperylene chromophore) were calculated using a sequential Molecular Dynamics/Quantum Mechanics (MD/QM) method to perform an analysis of the temperature dependence of the electronic absorption process. We modeled the Nanostar as a series of connected units, and performed MD simulations for each chromophore at 10 K and 300 K to study how the temperature affected the structures and, consequently, the spectra. The absorption spectra of the Nanostar were computed using an ensemble of 8000 structures for each chromophore. Quantum Mechanical (QM) ZINDO/S calculations were performed for each conformation in the ensemble, including 16 excited states, for a total of 128,000 excitation energies. The spectral intensity was then scaled linearly with the number of conjugated units. Our calculations for both the individual chromophores and the Nanostar, are in good agreement with experiments. We explain in detail the effects of temperature and the consequences for the absorption process. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the effects of chemical substituents on the electron transport properties of the azobenzene molecule, which has been proposed recently as a component of a light-driven molecular switch. This molecule has two stable conformations (cis and trans) in its electronic ground state, with considerable differences in their conductance. The electron transport properties were calculated using first-principles methods combining non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) techniques with density functional theory (DFT). For the azobenzene studies, we included electron-donating groups and electron-withdrawing groups in meta- and ortho-positions with

  13. Mechanically controllable break junctions for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dong; Jeong, Hyunhak; Lee, Takhee; Mayer, Dirk

    2013-09-20

    A mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) represents a fundamental technique for the investigation of molecular electronic junctions, especially for the study of the electronic properties of single molecules. With unique advantages, the MCBJ technique has provided substantial insight into charge transport processes in molecules. In this review, the techniques for sample fabrication, operation and the various applications of MCBJs are introduced and the history, challenges and future of MCBJs are discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  15. Electronic transport properties of phenylacetylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wen; Cheng Jie; Yan Cui-Xia; Li Hai-Hong; Wang Yong-Juan; Liu De-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Electronic transport properties of a kind of phenylacetylene compound— (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene are calculated by the first-principles method in the framework of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The molecular junction shows an obvious rectifying behaviour at a bias voltage larger than 1.0 V. The rectification effect is attributed to the asymmetry of the interface contacts. Moreover, at a bias voltage larger than 2.0 V, which is not referred to in a relevant experiment [Fang L, Park J Y, Ma H, Jen A K Y and Salmeron M 2007 Langmuir 23 11522], we find a negative differential resistance phenomenon. The negative differential resistance effect may originate from the change of the delocalization degree of the molecular orbitals induced by the bias. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Secondary electron emission with molecular projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroneberger, K.; Rothard, H.; Koschar, P.; Lorenzen, P.; Kemmler, J.; Keller, N.; Maier, R.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Clouvas, A.; Veje, E.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results for the secondary electron emission (SEE) from thin foil targets, induced by both molecular ions and their atomic constituents as projectiles. The Sternglass theory for kinetic SEE states a proportionality between γ and the electronic stopping power, S e , which has been verified in various experiments. With comparing secondary electron (SE) yields induced by molecular projectiles to those induced by monoatomic projectiles, it is therefore possible to test models for the energy loss of molecular or cluster projectiles. Since the atomic constituents of the molecule are repelled from each other due to Coulomb explosion (superimposed by multiple scattering) while traversing the solid, it is interesting to measure the residual mutual influence on SEE and S e with increasing internuclear separation. This can only be achieved with thin foils, where (as in the present case) the SE-yields from the exit surface can be measured separately. The authors measured the SE-yields from the entrance (γ B ) and exit (γ F ) surfaces of thin C- and Al-foils (150 to 1,000 angstrom) with CO + , C + and O + (15 to 85 keV/u) and H 2 + and H + (0.3 to 1.2 MeV/u). The molecular effect defined as the ratio R(γ) between the yields induced by molecular projectiles and the sum of those induced by their atomic constituents was calculated. The energy dependence of R(γ) can be well represented by the calculated energy loss ratio of di-proton-clusters by Brandt. This supports Brandt's model for the energy loss of clusters

  17. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  18. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2007-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Each chapter ends with a set

  19. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2011-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Ea

  20. Using an ePortfolio System as an Electronic Laboratory Notebook in Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Practical Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jill; Kant, Sashi; Gysbers, Vanessa; Hancock, Dale; Denyer, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Despite many apparent advantages, including security, back-up, remote access, workflow, and data management, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) in the modern research laboratory is still developing. This presents a challenge to instructors who want to give undergraduate students an introduction to the kinds of data curation and…

  1. Observation of molecular level behavior in molecular electronic junction device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitani, Masato

    In this dissertation, I utilize AFM based scanning probe measurement and surface enhanced Raman scattering based vibrational spectroscopic analysis to directly characterize topographic, electronic, and chemical properties of molecules confined in the local area of M3 junction to elucidate the molecular level behavior of molecular junction electronic devices. In the introduction, the characterization of molecular electronic devices with different types of metal-molecule-metal (M3) structures based upon self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is reviewed. A background of the characterization methods I use in this dissertation, conducting probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), is provided in chapter 1. Several attempts are performed to create the ideal top metal contacts on SAMs by metal vapor phase deposition in order to prevent the metal penetration inducing critical defects of the molecular electronic devices. The scanning probe microscopy (SPM), such as cp-AFM, contact mode (c-) AFM and non-contact mode (nc-) AFM, in ultra high vacuum conditions are utilized to study the process of the metal-SAM interface construction in terms of the correlation between the morphological and electrical properties including the metal nucleation and filament generation as a function of the functionalization of long-chain alkane thiolate SAMs on Au. In chapter 2, the nascent condensation process of vapor phase Al deposition on inert and reactive SAMs are studied by SPM. The results of top deposition, penetration, and filament generation of deposited Al are discussed and compared to the results previously observed by spectroscopic measurements. Cp-AFM was shown to provide new insights into Al filament formation which has not been observed by conventional spectroscopic analysis. Additionally, the electronic characteristics of individual Al filaments are measured. Chapter 3 reveals SPM characterization of Au deposition onto --COOH terminated SAMs

  2. A theory of electron baths: One-electron system dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    The second-quantized, many-electron, atomic, and molecular Hamiltonian is partitioned both by the identity or labeling of the spin orbitals and by the dynamics of the spin orbitals into a system coupled to a bath. The electron bath is treated by a molecular time scale generalized Langevin equation approach designed to include one-electron dynamics in the system dynamics. The bath is formulated as an equivalent chain of spin orbitals through the introduction of equivalent-chain annihilation and creation operators. Both the dynamics and the quantum grand canonical statistical properties of the electron bath are examined. Two versions for the statistical properties of the bath are pursued. Using a weak bath assumption, a bath statistical average is defined which allows one to achieve a reduced dynamics description of the electron system which is coupled to the electron bath. In a strong bath assumption effective Hamiltonians are obtained which reproduce the dynamics of the bath and which lead to the same results as found in the weak bath assumption. The effective (but exact) Hamiltonian is found to be a one-electron Hamiltonian. A reduced dynamics equation of motion for the system population matrix is derived and found to agree with a previous version. This equation of motion is useful for studying electron transfer in the system when coupled to an electron bath

  3. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Sören Lühmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  4. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  5. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: GENOME, ELECTRONIC HEALTH AND INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS. PART 2. MOLECULAR GENETICS AND METHODS OF INTELLECTUAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kobrinskii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition to personalized medicine in practical terms should combine the problems of molecular-genetic predisposition to diseases with transient states in the organism in the direction of possible pathology. Classification and monitoring of the state can be  effectively carried out using artificial intelligence methods. Various intellectual approaches are considered in different conditions for  monitoring patient.

  6. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H + ), alkali metal cations (M + ), calcium ions (Ca 2+ ), and hydronium ions (H 3 O + ) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C 9 H 7 NS 2 ), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M + + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M + = H + , Li + , Na + , or K + . Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry

  7. Molecularly Stretchable Electronics for Energy and Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren

    The term ``plastic electronics'' masks the wide range of mechanical behavior possessed by films of π-conjugated (semiconducting) small molecules and polymers. Such materials are promising for biosensors, large-area displays, low-energy lighting, and low-cost photovoltaic modules. There is also an apparent trade-off between electronic performance and mechanical compliance in films of some of the best-performing semiconducting polymers, which fracture at tensile strains not significantly greater than those at which conventional inorganic semiconductors fail. The design of intrinsically deformable electronic materials-i.e., imagine a semiconducting rubber band-would facilitate roll-to-roll production, mechanical robustness for potable applications, and conformal bonding to curved surfaces. This seminar describes my group's efforts to understand and control the structural parameters that influence the mechanical properties of π-conjugated polymers. The techniques we employ include synthetic chemistry, spectroscopy and microstructural characterization, computation from the molecular to continuum level, and electrical measurements of devices. A complex picture emerges for the interplay between molecular structure, the way the process of solidification influences the morphology, and how molecular structure and morphology combine to produce a film with a given modulus, elastic range, ductility, and toughness. We are also exploring ways to introduce other properties into organic semiconductors that are inspired by biological tissue. That is, not just elasticity and toughness, but also biodegradability and the capacity for self-repair. The seminar will also touch on our use of self-assembled metallic nanoislands on graphene for ultra-sensitive mechanical sensing using piezoresistive and ``piezoplasmonic'' mechanisms. The applications for these materials are in detecting human motion and measuring the mechanics of cardiac and musculoskeletal cells. My group is broadly

  8. BEPCII electronic logbook system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shu; Zhao Jijiu; Wang Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    According to demands of BEPCII construction and future operation, we are going to supply an open electronic logbook platform for people to record their message in developing and running BEPCII, and browse the log-book on website. That gives people an open and transparent logbook, rather than traditional paper notebook. With the template of DESY's Elogbook, the BEPCII electronic logbook was developed, using the popular JSP technology to develop dynamic Web applications. This paper will introduce the development of BEPCII electronic logbook system. (authors)

  9. Electronic components and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, W H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Components and Systems focuses on the principles and processes in the field of electronics and the integrated circuit. Covered in the book are basic aspects and physical fundamentals; different types of materials involved in the field; and passive and active electronic components such as capacitors, inductors, diodes, and transistors. Also covered in the book are topics such as the fabrication of semiconductors and integrated circuits; analog circuitry; digital logic technology; and microprocessors. The monograph is recommended for beginning electrical engineers who would like to kn

  10. Projected quasiparticle theory for molecular electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Samanta, Kousik; Ellis, Jason K.

    2011-09-01

    We derive and implement symmetry-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) equations and apply them to the molecular electronic structure problem. All symmetries (particle number, spin, spatial, and complex conjugation) are deliberately broken and restored in a self-consistent variation-after-projection approach. We show that the resulting method yields a comprehensive black-box treatment of static correlations with effective one-electron (mean-field) computational cost. The ensuing wave function is of multireference character and permeates the entire Hilbert space of the problem. The energy expression is different from regular HFB theory but remains a functional of an independent quasiparticle density matrix. All reduced density matrices are expressible as an integration of transition density matrices over a gauge grid. We present several proof-of-principle examples demonstrating the compelling power of projected quasiparticle theory for quantum chemistry.

  11. Electronics a systems approach

    CERN Document Server

    Storey, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Electronics plays a central role in our everyday lives. It is at the heart of almost all of today's essential technology, from mobile phones to computers and from cars to power stations. As such, all engineers, scientists and technologists need to have a fundamental understanding of this exciting subject, and for many this will just be the beginning. Now in its sixth edition, Electronics: A Systems Approach provides an outstanding introduction to this fast-moving and important field. Comprehensively revised and updated to cover the latest developments in the world of electronics, the text continues to use Neil Storey's established and well-respected systems approach. It introduces the basic concepts first before progressing to a more advanced analysis, enabling you to contextualise what a system is designed to achieve before tackling the intricacies of designing or analysing its various components with confidence. This book is accompanied by a website which contains over 100 video tutorials to help explain ke...

  12. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  13. Contorted Organic Semiconductors for Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis, properties and applications of two types of contorted organic molecules: contorted molecular ribbons and conjugated corrals. We utilized the power of reaction chemistry to writing information into conjugated molecules with contorted structures and studied "structure-property" relationships. The unique properties of the molecules were expressed in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as field-effect transistors, solar cells, photodetectors, etc. In Chapter 2, I describe the design and synthesis of a new graphene ribbon architecture that consists of perylenediimide (PDI) subunits fused together by ethylene bridges. We created a prototype series of oligomers consisting of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. The steric congestion at the fusion point between the PDI units creates helical junctions, and longer oligomers form helical ribbons. Thin films of these oligomers form the active layer in n-type field effect transistors. UV-vis spectroscopy reveals the emergence of an intense long-wavelength transition in the tetramer. From DFT calculations, we find that the HOMO-2 to LUMO transition is isoenergetic with the HOMO to LUMO transition in the tetramer. We probe these transitions directly using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The HOMO-2 to LUMO transition electronically connects the PDI subunits with the ethylene bridges, and its energy depends on the length of the oligomer. In Chapter 3, I describe an efficiency of 6.1% for a solution processed non-fullerene solar cell using a helical PDI dimer as the electron acceptor. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces, indicating that charge carriers are created from photogenerated excitons in both the electron donor and acceptor phases. Light-intensity-dependent current?voltage measurements suggested different recombination rates under short-circuit and open-circuit conditions. In

  14. Electron-nuclear corellations for photoinduced dynamics in molecular dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Dmitri S.; Pereversev, Yuryi V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2003-03-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced dynamics of electronic excitation in molecular dimers is drastically affected by dynamic reorganization of of inter- and intra- molecular nuclear configuration modelled by quantized nuclear degree of freedom [1]. The dynamics of the electronic population and nuclear coherence is analyzed with help of both numerical solution of the chain of coupled differential equations for mean coordinate, population inversion, electronic-vibrational correlation etc.[2] and by propagating the Gaussian wavepackets in relevant adiabatic potentials. Intriguing results were obtained in the approximation of small energy difference and small change of nuclear equilibrium configuration for excited electronic states. In the limiting case of resonance between electronic states energy difference and frequency of the nuclear mode these results have been justified by comparison to exactly solvable Jaynes-Cummings model. It has been found that the photoinduced processes in dimer are arranged according to their time scales:(i) fast scale of nuclear motion,(ii) intermediate scale of dynamical redistribution of electronic population between excited states as well as growth and dynamics of electronic -nuclear correlation,(iii) slow scale of electronic population approaching to the quasiequilibrium distribution, decay of electronic-nuclear correlation, and diminishing the amplitude of mean coordinate oscillations, accompanied by essential growth of the nuclear coordinate dispersion associated with the overall nuclear wavepacket width. Demonstrated quantum-relaxational features of photoinduced vibronic dinamical processess in molecular dimers are obtained by simple method, applicable to large biological systems with many degrees of freedom. [1] J. A. Cina, D. S. Kilin, T. S. Humble, J. Chem. Phys. (2003) in press. [2] O. V. Prezhdo, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2995 (2002).

  15. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems: Research progress report for the period December 1, 1986-November 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasha, M.

    1987-01-01

    The main research activity on our project continues to be the very active field of proton-transfer spectroscopy. Categories of research are: (1) Systematics of Proton-Transfer classes; (2) Picosecond Spectroscopy of Proton-Transfer in Lumichrome (a photolysis product of riboflavin); (3) Proton-Transfer Laser Research; (4) Computer Calculations on Proton-Transfer Systems; and (5) Unscheduled Research. New facets of the research program are: (1) Charge-Transfer (CT) Perturbation of Proton-Transfer Spectroscopy; (2) Super Computer Calculations on Proton-Transfer; (3) Dielectric Effects on Extended Dipoles in Proton-Transfer Spectroscopy; and (4) Proton-Transfer in Biological Systems

  16. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references

  17. Discontinuous approximate molecular electronic wave-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuebing, E.W.; Weare, J.H.; Parr, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Following Kohn, Schlosser and Marcus and Weare and Parr an energy functional is defined for a molecular problem which is stationary in the neighborhood of the exact solution and permits the use of trial functions that are discontinuous. The functional differs from the functional of the standard Rayleigh--Ritz method in the replacement of the usual kinetic energy operators circumflex T(μ) with operators circumflex T'(μ) = circumflex T(μ) + circumflex I(μ) generates contributions from surfaces of nonsmooth behavior. If one uses the nabla PSI . nabla PSI way of writing the usual kinetic energy contributions, one must add surface integrals of the product of the average of nabla PSI and the change of PSI across surfaces of discontinuity. Various calculations are carried out for the hydrogen molecule-ion and the hydrogen molecule. It is shown that ab initio calculations on molecules can be carried out quite generally with a basis of atomic orbitals exactly obeying the zero-differential overlap (ZDO) condition, and a firm basis is thereby provided for theories of molecular electronic structure invoking the ZDO aoproximation. It is demonstrated that a valence bond theory employing orbitals exactly obeying ZDO can provide an adequate account of chemical bonding, and several suggestions are made regarding molecular orbital methods

  18. Mechanisms of molecular electronic rectification through electronic levels with strong vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2002-01-01

    We present a new view and an analytical formalism of electron flow through a donor-acceptor molecule inserted between a pair of metal electrodes. The donor and acceptor levels are strongly coupled to an environmental nuclear continuum. The formalism applies to molecular donor-acceptor systems bot...

  19. Programmable electronic safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally safety systems intended for protecting personnel from electrical and radiation hazards at particle accelerator laboratories have made extensive use of electromechanical relays. These systems have the advantage of high reliability and allow the designer to easily implement fail-safe circuits. Relay based systems are also typically simple to design, implement, and test. As systems, such as those presently under development at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL), increase in size, and the number of monitored points escalates, relay based systems become cumbersome and inadequate. The move toward Programmable Electronic Safety Systems is becoming more widespread and accepted. In developing these systems there are numerous precautions the designer must be concerned with. Designing fail-safe electronic systems with predictable failure states is difficult at best. Redundancy and self-testing are prime examples of features that should be implemented to circumvent and/or detect failures. Programmable systems also require software which is yet another point of failure and a matter of great concern. Therefore the designer must be concerned with both hardware and software failures and build in the means to assure safe operation or shutdown during failures. This paper describes features that should be considered in developing safety systems and describes a system recently installed at the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility of the SSCL

  20. Programmable Electronic Safety Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, R.

    1993-05-01

    Traditionally safety systems intended for protecting personnel from electrical and radiation hazards at particle accelerator laboratories have made extensive use of electromechanical relays. These systems have the advantage of high reliability and allow the designer to easily implement failsafe circuits. Relay based systems are also typically simple to design, implement, and test. As systems, such as those presently under development at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL), increase in size, and the number of monitored points escalates, relay based systems become cumbersome and inadequate. The move toward Programmable Electronic Safety Systems is becoming more widespread and accepted. In developing these systems there are numerous precautions the designer must be concerned with. Designing fail-safe electronic systems with predictable failure states is difficult at best. Redundancy and self-testing are prime examples of features that should be implemented to circumvent and/or detect failures. Programmable systems also require software which is yet another point of failure and a matter of great concern. Therefore the designer must be concerned with both hardware and software failures and build in the means to assure safe operation or shutdown during failures. This paper describes features that should be considered in developing safety systems and describes a system recently installed at the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility of the SSCL

  1. Electron-electron interactions in disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Efros, AL

    1985-01-01

    ``Electron-Electron Interactions in Disordered Systems'' deals with the interplay of disorder and the Coulomb interaction. Prominent experts give state-of-the-art reviews of the theoretical and experimental work in this field and make it clear that the interplay of the two effects is essential, especially in low-dimensional systems.

  2. Electron beam processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam Processing Systems (EPS) are used as useful and powerful tools in many industrial application fields such as the production of cross-linked wire, rubber tire, heat shrinkable film and tubing, curing, degradation of polymers, sterilization and environmental application. In this paper, the feature and application fields, the selection of machine ratings and safety measures of EPS will be described. (author)

  3. Theory and practice of uncommon molecular electronic configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryn'ova, Ganna; Coote, Michelle L; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2015-01-01

    The electronic configuration of the molecule is the foundation of its structure and reactivity. The spin state is one of the key characteristics arising from the ordering of electrons within the molecule's set of orbitals. Organic molecules that have open-shell ground states and interesting physicochemical properties, particularly those influencing their spin alignment, are of immense interest within the up-and-coming field of molecular electronics. In this advanced review, we scrutinize various qualitative rules of orbital occupation and spin alignment, viz., the aufbau principle, Hund's multiplicity rule, and dynamic spin polarization concept, through the prism of quantum mechanics. While such rules hold in selected simple cases, in general the spin state of a system depends on a combination of electronic factors that include Coulomb and Pauli repulsion, nuclear attraction, kinetic energy, orbital relaxation, and static correlation. A number of fascinating chemical systems with spin states that fluctuate between triplet and open-shell singlet, and are responsive to irradiation, pH, and other external stimuli, are highlighted. In addition, we outline a range of organic molecules with intriguing non-aufbau orbital configurations. In such quasi-closed-shell systems, the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is energetically lower than one or more doubly occupied orbitals. As a result, the SOMO is not affected by electron attachment to or removal from the molecule, and the products of such redox processes are polyradicals. These peculiar species possess attractive conductive and magnetic properties, and a number of them that have already been developed into molecular electronics applications are highlighted in this review. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:440-459. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1233 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Dihydroazulene Photochromism:Synthesis, Molecular Electronics and Hammett Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk

    This thesis describes the development of a versatile synthetic protocol for preparation of a large selection of dihydroazulenes (DHAs) with both electron withdrawing and donating groups. By UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopies and even in a single-molecule junction, their ability to undergo a light...... will be discussed in detail. The second chapter describes the design and synthesis of DHA/VHFs intended for use in molecular electronics and their solution and single-molecule junction switching properties. By the expansion of the recently reported procedure for functionalization of this system by Suzuki cross...

  5. Photochromic molecules as building blocks for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Belser

    2010-01-01

    Energy and electron transfer processes can be easily induced by a photonic excitation of a donor metal complex ([Ru(bpy)3]2), which is connected via a wire-type molecular fragment to an acceptor metal complex ([Os(bpy)3]2+). The rate constant for the transfer process can be determined by emission measurements of the two connected metal complexes. The system can be modified by incorporation of a switching unit or an interrupter into the wire, influencing the transfer process. Such a molecular device corresponds to an interrupter, mimic the same function applied in molecular electronics. We have used organic switches, which show photochromic properties. By irradiation with light of different wavelengths, the switch changes its functionality by a photochemical reaction from an OFF- to an ON-state and vice versa. The ON- respectively OFF-state is manifested by a color change but also in different conductivity properties for energy and electron transfer processes. Therefore, the mentioned molecular device can work as a simple interrupter, controlling the rate of the transfer processes.

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal localization and time evolution dynamics of an excess electron in heterogeneous CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang, E-mail: byx@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China)

    2014-01-28

    In view of the important implications of excess electrons (EEs) interacting with CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O clusters in many fields, using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation technique, we reveal the structures and dynamics of an EE associated with its localization and subsequent time evolution in heterogeneous CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O mixed media. Our results indicate that although hydration can increase the electron-binding ability of a CO{sub 2} molecule, it only plays an assisting role. Instead, it is the bending vibrations that play the major role in localizing the EE. Due to enhanced attraction of CO{sub 2}, an EE can stably reside in the empty, low-lying π{sup *} orbital of a CO{sub 2} molecule via a localization process arising from its initial binding state. The localization is completed within a few tens of femtoseconds. After EE trapping, the ∠OCO angle of the core CO{sub 2}{sup −} oscillates in the range of 127°∼142°, with an oscillation period of about 48 fs. The corresponding vertical detachment energy of the EE is about 4.0 eV, which indicates extreme stability of such a CO{sub 2}-bound solvated EE in [CO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup −} systems. Interestingly, hydration occurs not only on the O atoms of the core CO{sub 2}{sup −} through formation of O⋯H–O H–bond(s), but also on the C atom, through formation of a C⋯H–O H–bond. In the latter binding mode, the EE cloud exhibits considerable penetration to the solvent water molecules, and its IR characteristic peak is relatively red-shifted compared with the former. Hydration on the C site can increase the EE distribution at the C atom and thus reduce the C⋯H distance in the C⋯H–O H–bonds, and vice versa. The number of water molecules associated with the CO{sub 2}{sup −} anion in the first hydration shell is about 4∼7. No dimer-core (C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup −}) and core-switching were observed in the double CO{sub 2} aqueous media. This work provides molecular dynamics

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal localization and time evolution dynamics of an excess electron in heterogeneous CO2-H2O systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang

    2014-01-28

    In view of the important implications of excess electrons (EEs) interacting with CO2-H2O clusters in many fields, using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation technique, we reveal the structures and dynamics of an EE associated with its localization and subsequent time evolution in heterogeneous CO2-H2O mixed media. Our results indicate that although hydration can increase the electron-binding ability of a CO2 molecule, it only plays an assisting role. Instead, it is the bending vibrations that play the major role in localizing the EE. Due to enhanced attraction of CO2, an EE can stably reside in the empty, low-lying π(*) orbital of a CO2 molecule via a localization process arising from its initial binding state. The localization is completed within a few tens of femtoseconds. After EE trapping, the ∠OCO angle of the core CO2 (-) oscillates in the range of 127°∼142°, with an oscillation period of about 48 fs. The corresponding vertical detachment energy of the EE is about 4.0 eV, which indicates extreme stability of such a CO2-bound solvated EE in [CO2(H2O)n](-) systems. Interestingly, hydration occurs not only on the O atoms of the core CO2 (-) through formation of O⋯H-O H-bond(s), but also on the C atom, through formation of a C⋯H-O H-bond. In the latter binding mode, the EE cloud exhibits considerable penetration to the solvent water molecules, and its IR characteristic peak is relatively red-shifted compared with the former. Hydration on the C site can increase the EE distribution at the C atom and thus reduce the C⋯H distance in the C⋯H-O H-bonds, and vice versa. The number of water molecules associated with the CO2 (-) anion in the first hydration shell is about 4∼7. No dimer-core (C2O4 (-)) and core-switching were observed in the double CO2 aqueous media. This work provides molecular dynamics insights into the localization and time evolution dynamics of an EE in heterogeneous CO2-H2O media.

  8. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  9. Molecular electronics: some views on transport junctions and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Christian; Ratner, Mark A

    2005-06-21

    The field of molecular electronics comprises a fundamental set of issues concerning the electronic response of molecules as parts of a mesoscopic structure and a technology-facing area of science. We will overview some important aspects of these subfields. The most advanced ideas in the field involve the use of molecules as individual logic or memory units and are broadly based on using the quantum state space of the molecule. Current work in molecular electronics usually addresses molecular junction transport, where the molecule acts as a barrier for incoming electrons: This is the fundamental Landauer idea of "conduction as scattering" generalized to molecular junction structures. Another point of view in terms of superexchange as a guiding mechanism for coherent electron transfer through the molecular bridge is discussed. Molecules generally exhibit relatively strong vibronic coupling. The last section of this overview focuses on vibronic effects, including inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, hysteresis in junction charge transport, and negative differential resistance in molecular transport junctions.

  10. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mingsen [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China); Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jiangj1@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Cai, Shaohong, E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang, 550004 (China); Sun, Guangyu [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  11. Electronics for embedded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    This book provides semester-length coverage of electronics for embedded systems, covering most common analog and digital circuit-related issues encountered while designing embedded system hardware. It is written for students and young professionals who have basic circuit theory background and want to learn more about passive circuits, diode and bipolar transistor circuits, the state-of-the-art CMOS logic family and its interface with older logic families such as TTL, sensors and sensor physics, operational amplifier circuits to condition sensor signals, data converters and various circuits used in electro-mechanical device control in embedded systems. The book also provides numerous hardware design examples by integrating the topics learned in earlier chapters. The last chapter extensively reviews the combinational and sequential logic design principles to be able to design the digital part of embedded system hardware.

  12. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  13. Common Principles of Molecular Electronics and Nanoscale Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Paulo Roberto

    2018-05-24

    The merging of nanoscale electronics and electrochemistry can potentially modernize the way electronic devices are currently engineered or constructed. It is well known that the greatest challenges will involve not only miniaturizing and improving the performance of mobile devices, but also manufacturing reliable electrical vehicles, and engineering more efficient solar panels and energy storage systems. These are just a few examples of how technological innovation is dependent on both electrochemical and electronic elements. This paper offers a conceptual discussion of this central topic, with particular focus on the impact that uniting physical and chemical concepts at a nanoscale could have on the future development of electroanalytical devices. The specific example to which this article refers pertains to molecular diagnostics, i.e., devices that employ physical and electrochemical concepts to diagnose diseases.

  14. Electron Scattering by biomass molecular fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The replacement of fossil fuels by biofuels from renewable sources may not be a definite answer for greenhouse gas emissions problems, but it is a good step towards a sustainable energy strategy. Few per cent of ethanol is being mixed to gasoline in many countries and in some of them, like Brazil, a very aggressive program has been developed, using, in large scale, flex fuel engines that can run with any mixture of gasoline and ethanol, including 100% ethanol. Important points are how to produce ethanol in a sustainable way and with which technology? Biomass is a good candidate to enhance the first generation (produced from Corn in USA and from sugarcane in Brazil) production towards the so-called second-generation ethanol, since it has cellulose and hemicellulose as source of sugars. In order to liberate these sugars for fermentation, it is important to learn how to separate the main components. Chemical routes (acid treatment) and biological routes (enzymatic hydrolysis) are combined and used for these purposes. Atmospheric plasmas can be useful for attacking the biomass in a controlled manner and low energy electrons may have an important role in the process. Recently, we have been studying the interaction of electrons with lignin subunits (phenol, guaiacol, p-coumaryl alcohol), cellulose components, β-D-glucose and cellobiose (β(1-4) linked glucose dimer) and hemicellulose components [2] (β-D-xylose). We also obtained results for the amylose subunits α-D-glucose and maltose (α(1-4) linked glucose dimer). Altogether, the resonance spectra of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose components establish a physical-chemical basis for electron-induced biomass pretreatment that could be applied to biofuel production. In order to describe a more realistic system (where molecules are ``wet''), we have obtained the shape resonance spectra of phenol-water clusters, as obtained previously from elastic electron scattering calculations. Our results, obtained in a simple

  15. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-01-01

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He + 2 . The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He + 2 , which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD + is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  16. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  17. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  18. Molecular-Scale Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dong; Wang, Xiaolong; Jia, Chuancheng; Lee, Takhee; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-04-13

    Creating functional electrical circuits using individual or ensemble molecules, often termed as "molecular-scale electronics", not only meets the increasing technical demands of the miniaturization of traditional Si-based electronic devices, but also provides an ideal window of exploring the intrinsic properties of materials at the molecular level. This Review covers the major advances with the most general applicability and emphasizes new insights into the development of efficient platform methodologies for building reliable molecular electronic devices with desired functionalities through the combination of programmed bottom-up self-assembly and sophisticated top-down device fabrication. First, we summarize a number of different approaches of forming molecular-scale junctions and discuss various experimental techniques for examining these nanoscale circuits in details. We then give a full introduction of characterization techniques and theoretical simulations for molecular electronics. Third, we highlight the major contributions and new concepts of integrating molecular functionalities into electrical circuits. Finally, we provide a critical discussion of limitations and main challenges that still exist for the development of molecular electronics. These analyses should be valuable for deeply understanding charge transport through molecular junctions, the device fabrication process, and the roadmap for future practical molecular electronics.

  19. Electron beam irradiation effect on nanostructured molecular sieve catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhongyong; Zhou Wuzong; Parvulescu, Viorica; Su Baolian

    2003-01-01

    Electron impact can induce chemical changes on particle surfaces of zeolites and molecular sieve catalysts. Some experimental observations of electron irradiation effect on molecular sieve catalysts are presented, e.g., electron-beam-induced growth of bare silver nanowires from zeolite crystallites, formation of vesicles in calcium phosphate, migration of microdomains in iron-oxide doped mesoporous silicas, structural transformation from mesostructured MCM-41 to microporous ZSM-5, etc. The formation mechanisms of the surface structures are discussed

  20. Progresses in organic field-effect transistors and molecular electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Weiping; Xu Wei; Hu Wenping; Liu Yunqi; Zhu Daoben

    2006-01-01

    In the past years,organic semiconductors have been extensively investigated as electronic materials for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs).In this review,we briefly summarize the current status of organic field-effect transistors including materials design,device physics,molecular electronics and the applications of carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics.Future prospects and investigations required to improve the OFET performance are also involved.

  1. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  3. Effect of protonation on the electronic properties of DNA base pairs: applications for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallajosyula, Sairam S; Pati, Swapan K

    2007-10-11

    Protonation of DNA basepairs is a reversible phenomenon that can be controlled by tuning the pH of the system. Under mild acidic conditions, the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the DNA basepairs undergoes a change. We study the effect of protonation on the electronic properties of the DNA basepairs to probe for possible molecular electronics applications. We find that, under mild acidic pH conditions, the A:T basepair shows excellent rectification behavior that is, however, absent in the G:C basepair. The mechanism of rectification has been discussed using a simple chemical potential model. We also consider the noncanonical A:A basepair and find that it can be used as efficient pH dependent molecular switch. The switching action in the A:A basepair is explained in the light of pi-pi interactions, which lead to efficient delocalization over the entire basepair.

  4. Long-distance photoinitiated electron transfer through polyene molecular wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.; Kersey, K.M.; Cragg, D.E.; Minsek, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Long-chain polyenes can be used as molecular wires to facilitate electron transfer between a photo-excited donor and an acceptor in an artificial photosynthetic system. The authors present data here on two Zn-porphyrin-polyene-anthraquinone molecules possessing either 5 or 9 all trans double bonds between the donor and acceptor, 1 and 2. The center-to-center distances between the porphyrin and the quinone in these relatively rigid molecules are 25 angstrom for 1 and 35 angstrom for 2. Selective picosecond laser excitation of the Zn-porphyrin and 1 and 2 results in the very rapid transfer of an electron to the anthraquinone in <2 ps and 10 ps, respectively. The resultant radical ion pairs recombine with τ = 10 ps for 1 and τ = 25 ps for 2. The electron transfer rates remain remarkably rapid over these long distances. The involvement of polyene radical cations in the mechanism of the radical ion pair recombination reaction is clear from the transient absorption spectra of 1 and 2, which show strong absorbances in the near-infrared. The strong electronic coupling between the Zn-porphyrin n the anthraquinone provided by low-lying states of the polyene make it possible to transfer an electron rapidly over very long distances

  5. Molecular modeling and multiscaling issues for electronic material applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Nancy; Yuen, Matthew; Fan, Haibo

    Volume 1 : Molecular Modeling and Multiscaling Issues for Electronic Material Applications provides a snapshot on the progression of molecular modeling in the electronics industry and how molecular modeling is currently being used to understand material performance to solve relevant issues in this field. This book is intended to introduce the reader to the evolving role of molecular modeling, especially seen through the eyes of the IEEE community involved in material modeling for electronic applications.  Part I presents  the role that quantum mechanics can play in performance prediction, such as properties dependent upon electronic structure, but also shows examples how molecular models may be used in performance diagnostics, especially when chemistry is part of the performance issue.  Part II gives examples of large-scale atomistic methods in material failure and shows several examples of transitioning between grain boundary simulations (on the atomistic level)and large-scale models including an example ...

  6. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during se...

  7. Tailored Surfaces/Assemblies for Molecular Plasmonics and Plasmonic Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Pascal; Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2017-06-12

    Molecular plasmonics uses and explores molecule-plasmon interactions on metal nanostructures for spectroscopic, nanophotonic, and nanoelectronic devices. This review focuses on tailored surfaces/assemblies for molecular plasmonics and describes active molecular plasmonic devices in which functional molecules and polymers change their structural, electrical, and/or optical properties in response to external stimuli and that can dynamically tune the plasmonic properties. We also explore an emerging research field combining molecular plasmonics and molecular electronics.

  8. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy via electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.H.

    1990-01-01

    In this work, a new aspect of the correlation between optical and photoelectron spectra is discussed on the basis of which the first ionization potentials of condensed-ring aromatics can be estimated from certain features in the electronic spectra of their positive ions. Furthermore, it is noticed that the first IP's are very sensitive to molecular size as the latter's inclusion in the regression formulas improves the results considerably. Once the first ionization potential for a molecule is determined, its higher IP's may be computed if the lower-energy electronic bands for its cation are known. This procedure is especially useful for such systems whose uv photoelectron spectra are unknown. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  10. Molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Cao, Lingchao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2004-12-13

    Over the past several years, there have been many significant advances toward the realization of electronic computers integrated on the molecular scale and a much greater understanding of the types of materials that will be useful in molecular devices and their properties. It was demonstrated that individual molecules could serve as incomprehensibly tiny switch and wire one million times smaller than those on conventional silicon microchip. This has resulted very recently in the assembly and demonstration of tiny computer logic circuits built from such molecular scale devices. The purpose of this review is to provide a general introduction to molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

  11. Tuning intermetallic electronic coupling in polyruthenium systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular architecture. SANDEEP GHUMAAN and GOUTAM KUMAR LAHIRI ... complexes encompassing selective combinations of spacer (bridging ligand, BL) and ancillary (AL) functionalities have been designed. ... plications in designing molecular electronic devices3 such as molecular wires, semi-conductors, rods etc.

  12. Reliability of electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Jose L.

    2001-01-01

    Reliability techniques have been developed subsequently as a need of the diverse engineering disciplines, nevertheless they are not few those that think they have been work a lot on reliability before the same word was used in the current context. Military, space and nuclear industries were the first ones that have been involved in this topic, however not only in these environments it is that it has been carried out this small great revolution in benefit of the increase of the reliability figures of the products of those industries, but rather it has extended to the whole industry. The fact of the massive production, characteristic of the current industries, drove four decades ago, to the fall of the reliability of its products, on one hand, because the massively itself and, for other, to the recently discovered and even not stabilized industrial techniques. Industry should be changed according to those two new requirements, creating products of medium complexity and assuring an enough reliability appropriated to production costs and controls. Reliability began to be integral part of the manufactured product. Facing this philosophy, the book describes reliability techniques applied to electronics systems and provides a coherent and rigorous framework for these diverse activities providing a unifying scientific basis for the entire subject. It consists of eight chapters plus a lot of statistical tables and an extensive annotated bibliography. Chapters embrace the following topics: 1- Introduction to Reliability; 2- Basic Mathematical Concepts; 3- Catastrophic Failure Models; 4-Parametric Failure Models; 5- Systems Reliability; 6- Reliability in Design and Project; 7- Reliability Tests; 8- Software Reliability. This book is in Spanish language and has a potentially diverse audience as a text book from academic to industrial courses. (author)

  13. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  14. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    1996-09-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img1, fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where 0034-4885/59/9/003/img2 is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0034-4885/59/9/003/img3 even at 0034-4885/59/9/003/img4, a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation 0034-4885/59/9/003/img5 can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img6 for short-range forces, and 0034-4885/59/9/003/img7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz - Kac - Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips - Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S( Q,t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from 0034-4885/59/9/003/img8 to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Böhmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular 0034-4885/59/9/003/img9, semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in 0034-4885/59/9/003/img10, spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van

  15. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, exp[-(t/τ) β ], fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where β is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0 g , a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation β(T g ) can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, β SR =3/5 for short-range forces, and β K =3/7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz-Kac-Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips-Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S(Q, t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from μs to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Boehmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular C 60 , semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in TaS 3 , spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van der Waals supercooled liquids and glasses, orientational glasses, water, fused salts, and heme proteins. In the intrinsic cases the theory of β(T g ) is often accurate to 2%, which

  16. Determination of molecular parameters by electron collisions and laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a general procedure to study diatomic molecules in intermediate coupling scheme has been developed. This study allows to obtain expressions to calculate molecular line strengths and rotational transition intensities. These results are used in a numerical program to synthetize vibrational and rotational band spectra of any diatomic molecule. With this technique the experimental spectra of the first negative system of N 2 + and the fist positive system of N 2 are reproduced theoretically and it is possible to deduce its electronic transition moments values by comparison. Also the method has been applied to compare the synthetized bands with the experimental spectra of the B O u + -- x 1 Σ g + system of Au 2 and the A 2 Σ--- x 2 π system of OH. From these comparison band intensities and electronic moments can be deduced. The branching ratio method to measure the relative spectral response in the 1100-1560 A o =wavelength range of a vacuum uv monochromator has been used. Relative intensity of rotational lines with origine in a common upper vibrational-rotational level of Warner and Lyman systems of H 2 , have been measured. Also in this work, the deexcitation of the B 3 π + (0 + u ), v'=14 level of I 2 after pulsed laser excitation has been studied. The quenching cross sections by collisions with I 2 , H 2 , CO 2 and CH 4 have been determin-ed. (Author)

  17. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  18. Electron and molecular ion collisions relevant to divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, H.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of the multi-channel quantum defect theory (MQDT) and show the outline of the MQDT newly extended to include the dissociative states. We investigate some molecular processes relevant to the divertor plasma by using the MQDT: the dissociative recombination, dissociative excitation, and rotation-vibrational transition in the hydrogen molecular ion and electron collisions. (author)

  19. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic H2+ show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented.

  20. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-01-01

    We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic H2+ show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented. PMID:26798785

  1. Novel electron gas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senatore, G.; Rapisarda, F.; Conti, S.

    1998-01-01

    We review recent progress on the physics of electrons in the bilayered electron gas, relevant to coupled quantum wells in GaAs/AIGaAs heterostructures. First we focus on the phase diagram of a symmetric bilayer at T = B = 0, obtained by diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations. It is found that inter-layer correlations stabilize crystalline structures at intermediate inter-layer separation, while favoring a liquid phase at smaller distance. Also, the available DMC evidence is in contrast with the recently (Hartree-Fock) predicted total charge transfer (TCT), whereby all the electron spontaneously jump in one layer. In fact, one can show that such a TCT state is never stable in the ideal bilayer with no tunneling. We finally comment on ongoing DMC investigations on the electron-hole bilayer, where excitonic condensation is expected to take place. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  2. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo; Hassenkam, Tue; Wan, Qing; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-06-17

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self-assembly and the gap length was determined by the molecule length. The gold nanorods and gold nanoparticles, respectively covalently bonded at the two ends of the molecule, had very small dimensions, e.g. a width of approximately 20 nm, and hence were expected to minimize the screening effect. The ultra-long conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires provided the bridge to connect one of the electrodes of the molecular device (gold nanoparticle) to the external circuit. The tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was contacted onto the other electrode (gold nanorod) for the electrical measurement of the OPV device. The conductance measurement confirmed that the self-assembly of the molecules and the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanorods was a feasible method for the fabrication of the nanogap of the molecular devices.

  3. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qingxin; Tong Yanhong; Jain, Titoo; Hassenkam, Tue; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjoernholm, Thomas; Wan Qing

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self-assembly and the gap length was determined by the molecule length. The gold nanorods and gold nanoparticles, respectively covalently bonded at the two ends of the molecule, had very small dimensions, e.g. a width of ∼20 nm, and hence were expected to minimize the screening effect. The ultra-long conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires provided the bridge to connect one of the electrodes of the molecular device (gold nanoparticle) to the external circuit. The tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was contacted onto the other electrode (gold nanorod) for the electrical measurement of the OPV device. The conductance measurement confirmed that the self-assembly of the molecules and the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanorods was a feasible method for the fabrication of the nanogap of the molecular devices.

  4. Electron-vibrational transitions under molecular ions collisions with slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    A concept of a multichannel quantum defect is considered and basic theoretic ratios of inelastic collisional processes with the participation of molecular positive ions and slow electrons playing an important role both in atmospheric and laboratory plasma, are presented. The problem of scattering channel number limitation with the provision of S-matrix unique character is considered. Different models of electron rotation-vibrational connection under collision of two-atom molecular ions with slow electrons are analysed. Taking N 2 + as an example, a high efficiency of transitions between different electron states of a molecular ion is shown. 73 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  6. [Electronic poison information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  7. Theoretical modeling of electronic transport in molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinin, Simone

    In this thesis a novel approach for simulating electronic transport in nanoscale structures is introduced. We consider an open quantum system (the electrons of structure) accelerated by an external electromotive force and dissipating energy through inelastic scattering with a heat bath (phonons) acting on the electrons. This method can be regarded as a quantum-mechanical extension of the semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation. We use periodic boundary conditions and employ Density Functional Theory to recast the many-particle problem in an effective single-particle mean-field problem. By explicitly treating the dissipation in the electrodes, the behavior of the potential is an outcome of our method, at variance with the scattering approaches based on the Landauer formalism. We study the self-consistent steady-state solution, analyzing the out-of-equilibrium electron distribution, the electrical characteristics, the behavior of the self-consistent potential and the density of states of the system. We apply the method to the study of electronic transport in several molecular devices, consisting of small organic molecules or atomic wires sandwiched between gold surfaces. For gold wires we recover the experimental evidence that transport in short wires is ballistic, independent of the length of the wire and with conductance of one quantum. In benzene-1,4-dithiol we find that the delocalization of the frontier orbitals of the molecule is responsible for the high value of conductance and that, by inserting methylene groups to decouple the sulfur atoms from the carbon ring, the current is reduced, in agreement with the experimental measurements. We study the effect a geometrical distortion in a molecular device, namely the relative rotation of the carbon rings in a biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol molecule. We find that the reduced coupling between pi orbitals of the rings induced by the rotation leads to a reduction of the conductance and that this behavior is captured by a

  8. Preface: Special Topic on Frontiers in Molecular Scale Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Ferdinand; Venkataraman, Latha

    2017-03-01

    The electronic, mechanical, and thermoelectric properties of molecular scale devices have fascinated scientists across several disciplines in natural sciences and engineering. The interest is partially technological, driven by the fast miniaturization of integrated circuits that now have reached characteristic features at the nanometer scale. Equally important, a very strong incentive also exists to elucidate the fundamental aspects of structure-function relations for nanoscale devices, which utilize molecular building blocks as functional units. Thus motivated, a rich research field has established itself, broadly termed "Molecular Electronics," that hosts a plethora of activities devoted to this goal in chemistry, physics, and electrical engineering. This Special Topic on Frontiers of Molecular Scale Electronics captures recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field.

  9. Decal electronics for printed high performance cmos electronic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Sevilla, Galo Torres; Cordero, Marlon Diaz; Kutbee, Arwa T.

    2017-01-01

    High performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are critical for any full-fledged electronic system. However, state-of-the-art CMOS electronics are rigid and bulky making them unusable for flexible electronic applications

  10. Molecular type channeling of relativistic electrons in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyatkin, E.G.; Filimonov, Yu.M.; Taratin, A.M.; Vorobiev, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Channeling of relativistic electrons in direction in a diamond crystal and the channeling radiation spectra are investigated using computer simulation by the binary collision model and using the model of a continuum potential of the atomic rows. In a computer experiment the atomic- and molecular-type states of channeled elcetrons are revealed, and the orientational dependence of the electron trapping probability in these states is obtained. The peculiarities revealed of the angular distributions and radiation spectra of electrons in the molecular-type states allow to discover these states in the experiment. (author)

  11. Molecular structure determination of cyclootane by ab initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can ma...

  12. Hydration of excess electrons trapped in charge pockets on molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Del Castillo, R.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-01-01

    In this work we strive to design a novel electron trap located on a molecular surface. The process of electron trapping involves hydration of the trapped electron. Previous calculations on surface electron trapping revealed that clusters of OH groups can form stable hydrogen-bonded networks on one side of a hydrocarbon surface (i.e. cyclohexane sheets), while the hydrogen atoms on the opposite side of the surface form pockets of positive charge that can attract extra negative charge. The excess electron density on such surfaces can be further stabilized by interactions with water molecules. Our calculations show that these anionic systems are stable with respect to vertical electron detachment (VDE).

  13. Electronic Resource Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ellingsen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer applications which deal with electronic resource management (ERM are quite a recent development. They have grown out of the need to manage the burgeoning number of electronic resources particularly electronic journals. Typically, in the early years of e-journal acquisition, library staff provided an easy means of accessing these journals by providing an alphabetical list on a web page. Some went as far as categorising the e-journals by subject and then grouping the journals either on a single web page or by using multiple pages. It didn't take long before it was recognised that it would be more efficient to dynamically generate the pages from a database rather than to continually edit the pages manually. Of course, once the descriptive metadata for an electronic journal was held within a database the next logical step was to provide administrative forms whereby that metadata could be manipulated. This in turn led to demands for incorporating more information and more functionality into the developing application.

  14. The ALS gun electronics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.

    1993-01-01

    The ALS Gun Electronics system has been designed to accommodate the gun with a custom made socket and a high speed electronics circuit which is capable of producing single and multiple electron bunches with time jitters measured at better than 50 PS. The system generates the gated RF signal at ground level before sending it up to the 120 KV-biased gun deck via a fiber optic cable. The current pulse width as a function of grid bias, using an Eimac 8847A planar triode simulating an electron gun, was measured to show the relationship between the two parameters

  15. The ALS Gun Electronics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.

    1993-05-01

    The ALS Gun Electronics system has been designed to accommodate gun with a custom made socket and high speed electronics circuit which is capable of producing single and multiple electron bunches with time jitters measured at better than 50 PS. The system generates the gated RF signal at ground level before sending it up to the 120 KV-biased gun deck via a fiber optic cable. The current pulse width as a function of grid bias, using an Eimac 8847A planar triode simulating an electron gun, was measured to show the relationship between the two parameters

  16. Molecular Insights into Variable Electron Transfer in Amphibian Cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Lüdemann, Gesa; Kubař, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    are mutated, radical-pair formation is still observed. In this study, we computationally investigate electron-transfer pathways in the X. laevis cryptochrome DASH by extensively equilibrating a previously established homology model using molecular dynamics simulations and then mutating key amino acids......Cryptochrome proteins are activated by the absorption of blue light, leading to the formation of radical pairs through electron transfer in the active site. Recent experimental studies have shown that once some of the amino acid residues in the active site of Xenopus laevis cryptochrome DASH...... involved in the electron transfer. The electron-transfer pathways are then probed by using tight-binding density-functional theory. We report the alternative electron-transfer pathways resolved at the molecular level and, through comparison of amino acid sequences for cryptochromes from different species...

  17. An overview of the first half-century of molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Noel S

    2003-12-01

    The seminal ideas from which molecular electronics has developed were the theories of molecular conduction advanced in the late 1940s by Robert S. Mulliken and Albert Szent-Gyorgi. These were, respectively, the concept of donor-acceptor charge transfer complexes and the possibility that proteins might in fact not be insulators The next two decades saw a burgeoning of experimental and theoretical work on electron transfer systems, together with a lone effort by D.D. Eley on conduction in proteins. The call by Feynman in his famous 1959 lecture There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom for chemists, engineers and physicists to combine to build up structures from the molecular level was influential in turning attention to the possibility of engineering single molecules to function as elements in information-processing systems. This was made tangible by the proposal of Aviram and Ratner in 1974 to use a Mulliken-like electron donor-acceptor molecule as a molecular diode, generalizing molecular conduction into molecular electronics. In the early 1970s the remarkably visionary work of Forrest L. Carter of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratories began to appear: designs for molecular wires, switches, complex molecular logic elements, and a host of related ideas were advanced. Shortly after that, conferences on molecular electronics began to be held, and the interdisciplinary programs that Feynman envisaged. There was a surge in both experimental and theoretical work in molecular electronics, and the establishment of many research centres. The past five years or so have seen extraordinarily rapid progress in fabrication and theoretical understanding. The history of how separate lines of research emanating from fundamental insights of about 50 years ago have coalesced into a thriving international research program in what might be called the ultimate nanotechnology is the subject of this review; it concentrates on the lesser-appreciated early developments in the field.

  18. Delocalized electrons in atomic and molecular nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kresin, Vitaly [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2018-01-17

    The aim of the award (Program director: Dr. Mark Pederson) was to facilitate the attendance of researchers, students, and postdocs from the U.S. at the international workshop co-organized by the applicant. The award succeeded in making it possible for a number of US attendees to present their work and participate in the meeting, which was a significant event in the research community at the interdisciplinary interface of physical chemistry, nanoscience, atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter physics, and spectroscopy. The workshop did not issue proceedings, but the present report includes present the schedule, the abstracts, and the attendance list of the July 2016 Workshop. DOE sponsorship is gratefully acknowledged in the program.

  19. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  20. Wearable and flexible electronics for continuous molecular monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiran; Gao, Wei

    2018-04-03

    Wearable biosensors have received tremendous attention over the past decade owing to their great potential in predictive analytics and treatment toward personalized medicine. Flexible electronics could serve as an ideal platform for personalized wearable devices because of their unique properties such as light weight, low cost, high flexibility and great conformability. Unlike most reported flexible sensors that mainly track physical activities and vital signs, the new generation of wearable and flexible chemical sensors enables real-time, continuous and fast detection of accessible biomarkers from the human body, and allows for the collection of large-scale information about the individual's dynamic health status at the molecular level. In this article, we review and highlight recent advances in wearable and flexible sensors toward continuous and non-invasive molecular analysis in sweat, tears, saliva, interstitial fluid, blood, wound exudate as well as exhaled breath. The flexible platforms, sensing mechanisms, and device and system configurations employed for continuous monitoring are summarized. We also discuss the key challenges and opportunities of the wearable and flexible chemical sensors that lie ahead.

  1. ELECTRONIC FILE MONITORING SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GBUBEMI

    2014-11-06

    Nov 6, 2014 ... The result of the developed system shows a simple and effective graphic user interface ... business transactions, decision-making records and storage of .... Start. Input username and password. Access denied was login.

  2. Vessel Electronic Reporting System (VERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The VERS system is composed of a database and other related applications which facilitate the reporting of electronically collected research data via Fisheries...

  3. High sensitivity optical molecular imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yu; Yuan, Gao; Huang, Chao; Jiang, Shixin; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Optical Molecular Imaging (OMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorescent or bioluminescence probes, OMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of the probes in vivo, which play the key role in cancer research, pharmacokinetics and other biological studies. In preclinical and clinical application, the image depth, resolution and sensitivity are the key factors for researchers to use OMI. In this paper, we report a high sensitivity optical molecular imaging system developed by our group, which can improve the imaging depth in phantom to nearly 5cm, high resolution at 2cm depth, and high image sensitivity. To validate the performance of the system, special designed phantom experiments and weak light detection experiment were implemented. The results shows that cooperated with high performance electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, precision design of light path system and high efficient image techniques, our OMI system can simultaneously collect the light-emitted signals generated by fluorescence molecular imaging, bioluminescence imaging, Cherenkov luminance and other optical imaging modality, and observe the internal distribution of light-emitting agents fast and accurately.

  4. Electronic structure of molecular Rydberg states of some small molecules and molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Biao; Li Jiaming

    1993-01-01

    Based on an independent-particle-approximation (i.e. the multiple scattering self-consistent-field theory), the electronic structures of Rydberg states of the small diatomic molecules H 2 , He 2 and the He 2 + molecular ion were studied. The principal quantum number of the first state of the Rydberg series is determined from a convention of the limit of the molecular electronic configuration. The dynamics of the excited molecules and molecular ion has been elucidated. The theoretical results are in fair agreement with the existing experimental measurements, thus they can serve as a reliable basis for future refined treatment such as the configuration interaction calculation

  5. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  6. Ionic fragmentation channels in electron collisions of small molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Dissociative Recombination (DR) is one of the most important loss processes of molecular ions in the interstellar medium (IM). Ion storage rings allow to investigate these processes under realistic conditions. At the Heidelberg test storage ring TSR a new detector system was installed within the present work in order to study the DR sub-process of ion pair formation (IPF). The new detector expands the existing electron target setup by the possibility to measure strongly deflected negative ionic fragments. At the TSR such measurements can be performed with a uniquely high energy resolution by independently merging two electron beams with the ion beam. In this work IPF of HD + , H 3 + and HF + has been studied. In the case of HD + the result of the high resolution experiment shows quantum interferences. Analysis of the quantum oscillations leads to a new understanding of the reaction dynamics. For H 3 + it was for the first time possible to distinguish different IPF channels and to detect quantum interferences in the data. Finally the IPF of HF + was investigated in an energy range, where in previous experiments no conclusive results could be obtained. (orig.)

  7. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  8. Ionic molecular films. Applications. 3. Electron beam stimulated enhanced adherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G; Montereali, R M; Scavarda do Carmo, L C

    1989-11-01

    This paper reports on the advantages of the use of the technique of electron beam lithography to imprint enhanced sensitive patterns on ionic molecular substrates (bulk crystals or films). With this technique, localized superficial defects are produced which change the chemical properties of surfaces. Sensitized surfaces react with absorbates providing enhanced adherence of such substances. The use of spacially controlled electron beams allows the construction of small (sub-micron) feature chemical and very localized enhanced adherence of absorbates.

  9. Two dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting, DNA sequencing, and cancerous DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Arunkumar Chitteth; Rezapour, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Jeonghun; Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-02-25

    Laser-driven molecular spectroscopy of low spatial resolution is widely used, while electronic current-driven molecular spectroscopy of atomic scale resolution has been limited because currents provide only minimal information. However, electron transmission of a graphene nanoribbon on which a molecule is adsorbed shows molecular fingerprints of Fano resonances, i.e., characteristic features of frontier orbitals and conformations of physisorbed molecules. Utilizing these resonance profiles, here we demonstrate two-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy (2D MES). The differential conductance with respect to bias and gate voltages not only distinguishes different types of nucleobases for DNA sequencing but also recognizes methylated nucleobases which could be related to cancerous cell growth. This 2D MES could open an exciting field to recognize single molecule signatures at atomic resolution. The advantages of the 2D MES over the one-dimensional (1D) current analysis can be comparable to those of 2D NMR over 1D NMR analysis.

  10. Development of the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method for Calculating Nonlocal Excitations in Large Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Mochizuki, Yuji

    2018-04-19

    We developed the fragment-based method for calculating nonlocal excitations in large molecular systems. This method is based on the multilayer fragment molecular orbital method and the configuration interaction single (CIS) wave function using localized molecular orbitals. The excited-state wave function for the whole system is described as a superposition of configuration state functions (CSFs) for intrafragment excitations and for interfragment charge-transfer excitations. The formulation and calculations of singlet excited-state Hamiltonian matrix elements in the fragment CSFs are presented in detail. The efficient approximation schemes for calculating the matrix elements are also presented. The computational efficiency and the accuracy were evaluated using the molecular dimers and molecular aggregates. We confirmed that absolute errors of 50 meV (relative to the conventional calculations) are achievable for the molecular systems in their equilibrium geometries. The perturbative electron correlation correction to the CIS excitation energies is also demonstrated. The present theory can compute a large number of excited states in large molecular systems; in addition, it allows for the systematic derivation of a model exciton Hamiltonian. These features are useful for studying excited-state dynamics in condensed molecular systems based on the ab initio electronic structure theory.

  11. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  12. Molecular fingerprints in the electronic properties of crystalline organic semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciuchi, S.; Hatch, R.C.; Höchst, H.

    2012-01-01

    bands can be achieved in organic semiconductors provided that one properly accounts for the coupling to molecular vibrational modes and the presence of disorder. Our findings rationalize the growing experimental evidence that even the best band structure theories based on a many-body treatment...... of electronic interactions cannot reproduce the experimental photoemission data in this important class of materials....

  13. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers carbon nanotubes, their characteristics, and their potential future applications. The presentation include predictions on the development of nanostructures and their applications, the thermal characteristics of carbon nanotubes, mechano-chemical effects upon carbon nanotubes, molecular electronics, and models for possible future nanostructure devices. The presentation also proposes a neural model for signal processing.

  14. Fullerene-based Anchoring Groups for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christian A.; Ding, Dapeng; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger

    2008-01-01

    We present results on a new fullerene-based anchoring group for molecular electronics. Using lithographic mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum we have determined the conductance and stability of single-molecule junctions of 1,4-bis(fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzene. The compound can...

  15. Variational cellular model of the molecular and crystal electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.G.; Leite, J.R.

    1977-12-01

    A variational version of the cellular method is developed to calculate the electronic structure of molecules and crystals. Due to the simplicity of the secular equation, the method is easy to be implemented. Preliminary calculations on the hydrogen molecular ion suggest that it is also accurate and of fast convergence [pt

  16. Component reliability for electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bajenescu, Titu-Marius I

    2010-01-01

    The main reason for the premature breakdown of today's electronic products (computers, cars, tools, appliances, etc.) is the failure of the components used to build these products. Today professionals are looking for effective ways to minimize the degradation of electronic components to help ensure longer-lasting, more technically sound products and systems. This practical book offers engineers specific guidance on how to design more reliable components and build more reliable electronic systems. Professionals learn how to optimize a virtual component prototype, accurately monitor product reliability during the entire production process, and add the burn-in and selection procedures that are the most appropriate for the intended applications. Moreover, the book helps system designers ensure that all components are correctly applied, margins are adequate, wear-out failure modes are prevented during the expected duration of life, and system interfaces cannot lead to failure.

  17. Fundamentals of electronic systems design

    CERN Document Server

    Lienig, Jens

    2017-01-01

    This textbook covers the design of electronic systems from the ground up, from drawing and CAD essentials to recycling requirements. Chapter by chapter, it deals with the challenges any modern system designer faces: the design process and its fundamentals, such as technical drawings and CAD, electronic system levels, assembly and packaging issues and appliance protection classes, reliability analysis, thermal management and cooling, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), all the way to recycling requirements and environmental-friendly design principles. Enables readers to face various challenges of designing electronic systems, including coverage from various engineering disciplines; Written to be accessible to readers of varying backgrounds; Uses illustrations extensively to reinforce fundamental concepts; Organized to follow essential design process, although chapters are self-contained and can be read in any order.

  18. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  19. Analytical purpose electron backscattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desdin, L.; Padron, I.; Laria, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this work an analytical purposes electron backscattering system improved at the Center of Applied Studies for Nuclear Development is described. This system can be applied for fast, exact and nondestructive testing of binary and AL/Cu, AL/Ni in alloys and for other applications

  20. The PAUCam readout electronics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Jorge; Illa, José M.; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; de Vicente, Juan; Castilla, Javier; Casas, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    The PAUCam is an optical camera with a wide field of view of 1 deg x 1 deg and up to 46 narrow and broad band filters. The camera is already installed on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in the Canary Islands, Spain and successfully commissioned during the first period of 2015. The paper presents the main results from the readout electronics commissioning tests and include an overview of the whole readout electronics system, its configuration and current performance.

  1. Bending of conjugated molecular wires and its effect on electron conduction properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Bidisa

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and electron transport properties of simple conjugated molecular wires like oligophenylene ethynylene (OPE) and oligophenylene vinylene (OPV) are studied under compression. If artificially confined to a given shorter length, the oligomers tend to bend and bending causes a loss in the overlap of the conjugated molecular orbitals. Theoretical modeling of electronic transport has been carried out for all undistorted and compressed OPE/OPV oligomers. OPV exists in step-like or V-like conformations and they have the same stability with very similar frontier molecular orbitals. The conductances of these molecular wires are calculated when inserted between two gold probes and the conductances for OPV are found to be comparable to OPE when the interfaces are same. The conductance decreases with bending due to the gradual loss in overlap of the molecular orbitals. It is also found that the conductances of the molecular wires decrease very strongly if the terminal sulfur atom is simultaneously bonded to hydrogen and a gold surface, thus reflecting the importance of the interface in determining the conductance in two-probe systems. From the conductance studies it may be concluded that if one or more benzene rings of OPE are rotated from coplanar conditions, the orthogonal molecular orbitals may completely block the electronic transport, rendering the molecule insulating.

  2. Quantum mechanical simulations of polymers for molecular electronics and photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.; Villar, H.O.; Clementi, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical studies can play an important role in obtaining a detailed understanding of the electronic structure of existing materials, and in predicting the properties of new ones. In this article the authors give a general outline of their research activity in two areas dealing with new materials, specifically, conducting polymers and polymers with non-linear optical properties. The authors present the strategy followed for the study of these molecular systems, and an overview of their findings concerning the structure of the prototypical conducting polymer, i.e. pure and doped polyacetylene (PA). They focused attention on vibrational spectra and infrared and Raman intensities. The results of self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations on charged soliton-like molecules are consistent with experimental observation. In particular, they show that the theoretically established accidental mutual exclusion of infrared and Raman bands invalidates the requirement formulated on the basis of the interpretation of experimental data, that defects in PA must have local C/sub 2h/ symmetry. These conclusions are derived from extensive calculations for which supercomputer performance was imperative and carried out on the parallel supercomputer assembled at IBM-Kingston as a loosely coupled array of processors (LCAP). The authors briefly describe this computer system which has proven to be ideally suited to the methods of ab initio quantum chemistry

  3. Dynamics of photoionization from molecular electronic wavepacket states in intense pulse laser fields: A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-04-07

    A theory for dynamics of molecular photoionization from nonadiabatic electron wavepackets driven by intense pulse lasers is proposed. Time evolution of photoelectron distribution is evaluated in terms of out-going electron flux (current of the probability density of electrons) that has kinetic energy high enough to recede from the molecular system. The relevant electron flux is in turn evaluated with the complex-valued electronic wavefunctions that are time evolved in nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics in laser fields. To uniquely rebuild such wavefunctions with its electronic population being lost by ionization, we adopt the complex-valued natural orbitals emerging from the electron density as building blocks of the total wavefunction. The method has been implemented into a quantum chemistry code, which is based on configuration state mixing for polyatomic molecules. Some of the practical aspects needed for its application will be presented. As a first illustrative example, we show the results of hydrogen molecule and its isotope substitutes (HD and DD), which are photoionized by a two-cycle pulse laser. Photon emission spectrum associated with above threshold ionization is also shown. Another example is taken from photoionization dynamics from an excited state of a water molecule. Qualitatively significant effects of nonadiabatic interaction on the photoelectron spectrum are demonstrated.

  4. Quality cost system in electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denzer, H.O.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of a formal cost of quality system used in an electronic manufacturing facility. The system elements and reports are illustrated. Examples of the use of a quality cost system to measure quality performance and to improve product quality are included. A comparison to industry averages for quality costs is made. The paper attempts to show that the collection and use of quality costs are an aid to management and can be accompanied by improved product quality

  5. Portable digital electronic radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiography is a standard nondestructive technique in the industrial testing of materials and components. It is routinely used during the construction, maintenance and repair of nuclear plants. Traditionally, radiography is performed using photographic film (film radiography, FR). Recent developments in solid-state area imaging radiation detectors, miniature electronics and computer software/hardware techniques have brought electronic alternatives to FR. In recent years various electronic radiography (ER) techniques have served as alternatives to FR, these proved beneficial in some applications. While originally developed to provide real time imaging, ER may offer other advantages over FR, depending on the application. Work was undertaken at CRL to review progress in ER techniques and evaluate the possibility of constructing a portable DER (digital electronic radiography) system, for the inspection of power plant components. A suitable DER technique has been developed and a proof of principle portable system constructed. As this paper demonstrates, a properly designed ER system can be small and compact, while providing radiographic examination with acceptable image quality and the benefits of ER imaging. The CRL DER system can operate with radioactive sources typical of FR. While it does not replace FR, our DER system is expected to be beneficial in specific applications for Candu maintenance, reducing cost, labour and time. Practical, cost saving applications of this system are expected to include valve monitoring and foreign object location during maintenance at Candu reactors

  6. Fulleropyrrolidine end-capped molecular wires for molecular electronics--synthesis, spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Kryger; Fock, Jeppe; Pedersen, Anders Holmen

    2011-01-01

    In continuation of previous studies showing promising metal-molecule contact properties a variety of C(60) end-capped "molecular wires" for molecular electronics were prepared by variants of the Prato 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Either benzene or fluorene was chosen as the central wire...... state. However, the fluorescence of C(60) was quenched by charge transfer from the wire to C(60). Quantum chemical calculations predict and explain the collapse of coherent electronic transmission through one of the fulleropyrrolidine-terminated molecular wires......., and synthetic protocols for derivatives terminated with one or two fullero[c]pyrrolidine "electrode anchoring" groups were developed. An aryl-substituted aziridine could in some cases be employed directly as the azomethine ylide precursor for the Prato reaction without the need of having an electron...

  7. Chemical Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2017-03-08

    Inserting molecular monolayers within metal/semiconductor interfaces provides one of the most powerful expressions of how minute chemical modifications can affect electronic devices. This topic also has direct importance for technology as it can help improve the efficiency of a variety of electronic devices such as solar cells, LEDs, sensors, and possible future bioelectronic ones. The review covers the main aspects of using chemistry to control the various aspects of interface electrostatics, such as passivation of interface states and alignment of energy levels by intrinsic molecular polarization, as well as charge rearrangement with the adjacent metal and semiconducting contacts. One of the greatest merits of molecular monolayers is their capability to form excellent thin dielectrics, yielding rich and unique current-voltage characteristics for transport across metal/molecular monolayer/semiconductor interfaces. We explain the interplay between the monolayer as tunneling barrier on the one hand, and the electrostatic barrier within the semiconductor, due to its space-charge region, on the other hand, as well as how different monolayer chemistries control each of these barriers. Practical tools to experimentally identify these two barriers and distinguish between them are given, followed by a short look to the future. This review is accompanied by another one, concerning the formation of large-area molecular junctions and charge transport that is dominated solely by molecules.

  8. Large-Area, Ensemble Molecular Electronics: Motivation and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilan, Ayelet; Aswal, Dinesh; Cahen, David

    2017-03-08

    We review charge transport across molecular monolayers, which is central to molecular electronics (MolEl), using large-area junctions (NmJ). We strive to provide a wide conceptual overview of three main subtopics. First, a broad introduction places NmJ in perspective to related fields of research and to single-molecule junctions (1mJ) in addition to a brief historical account. As charge transport presents an ultrasensitive probe for the electronic perfection of interfaces, in the second part ways to form both the monolayer and the contacts are described to construct reliable, defect-free interfaces. The last part is dedicated to understanding and analyses of current-voltage (I-V) traces across molecular junctions. Notwithstanding the original motivation of MolEl, I-V traces are often not very sensitive to molecular details and then provide a poor probe for chemical information. Instead, we focus on how to analyze the net electrical performance of molecular junctions, from a functional device perspective. Finally, we point to creation of a built-in electric field as a key to achieve functionality, including nonlinear current-voltage characteristics that originate in the molecules or their contacts to the electrodes. This review is complemented by a another review that covers metal-molecule-semiconductor junctions and their unique hybrid effects.

  9. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Julio R; Villalta-Cerdas, Adrián; Echegoyen, Luis

    2012-01-01

    With the constant growing complexity of electronic devices, the top-down approach used with silicon based technology is facing both technological and physical challenges. Carbon based nanomaterials are good candidates to be used in the construction of electronic circuitry using a bottom-up approach, because they have semiconductor properties and dimensions within the required physical limit to establish electrical connections. The unique electronic properties of fullerenes for example, have allowed the construction of molecular rectifiers and transistors that can operate with more than two logical states. Carbon nanotubes have shown their potential to be used in the construction of molecular wires and FET transistors that can operate in the THz frequency range. On the other hand, graphene is not only the most promising material for replacing ITO in the construction of transparent electrodes but it has also shown quantum Hall effect and conductance properties that depend on the edges or chemical doping. The purpose of this review is to present recent developments on the utilization carbon nanomaterials in molecular electronics.

  10. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S M

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed by a

  11. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  12. Electron impact study of molecular ions of some benzyl derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, E.T.; Rabia, M.A.; Fahmy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization energies at threshold and values of higher energy levels for the molecular ions of benzyl alcohol, benzyl amine and benzyl cyanide are reported using electron impact technique. The first ionization energy values are found to be 8.26 eV (benzyl alcohol), 8.49 eV(benzyl amine)and 9.32 eV (benzyl cyanide). Some of the reported higher energy levels for the molecular ions are tentatively explained. The differences in the relative abundances for the main fragment ions are discussed and attributed to the effect of the different substituents - OH, -NH2 and -CN groups

  13. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Serrano-Andres, L.; Klein, D.J.; Schleyer, P.V.R.; Mich, J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of poly carborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i) the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii) endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii) the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv) higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photo energy processes.

  14. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  15. FTU bolometer electronic system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollastrone, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pollastrone@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Neri, Carlo; Florean, Marco; Ciccone, Giovanni [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Design and realization of a new bolometer electronic system. ► Many improvements over the actual commercial system. ► Architecture based on digital electronic hardware with minimal analog front end. ► Auto off-set correction, real time visualization features and small system size. ► Test results for the electronic system. -- Abstract: The FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) requires a bolometer diagnostic in order to measure the total plasma radiation. The current diagnostic architecture is based on a full analog multichannel AC bolometer system, which uses a carrier frequency amplifier with a synchronous demodulation. Taking into account the technological upgrades in the field of electronics, it was decided to realize an upgrade for the bolometric electronic system by using a hybrid analog/digital implementation. The new system developed at the ENEA Frascati laboratories has many improvements, and mainly a massive system volume reduction, a good measurement linearity and a simplified use. The new hardware system consists of two subsystems: the Bolometer Digital Control and the Bolometer Analog System. The Bolometer Digital Control can control 16 bolometer bridges through the Bolometer Analog System. The Bolometer Digital Control, based on the FPGA architecture, is connected via Ethernet with a PC; therefore, it can receive commands settings from the PC and send the stream of bolometric measurements in real time to the PC. In order to solve the cross-talk between the bridges and the cables, each of the four bridges in the bolometer head receives a different synthesized excitation frequency. Since the system is fully controlled by a PC GUI (Graphic User Interface), it is very user friendly. Moreover, some useful features have been developed, such as: auto off-set correction, bridge amplitude regulation, software gain setting, real time visualization, frequency excitation selection and noise spectrum analyzer embedded function. In this paper, the

  16. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  17. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  18. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ladik, János

    1975-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals" was held at the Facultes Universi­ taires de Namur (F.U.N.) from September 1st till September 14th, 1974. We wish to express our appreciation to the NATO Scientific Affairs Division whose generous support made this Institute possible and to the Facultes Universitaires de Namur and the Societe Chimique de Belgique which provided fellowships and travel grants to a number of students. This volume contains the main lectures about the basic principles of the field and about different recent developments of the theory of the electronic structure of polymers and molecular crystals. The school started with the presentation of the basic SCF-LCAO theory of the electronic structure of periodic polymers and molecular crystals (contributions by Ladik, Andre & Delhalle) showing how a combination of quantum chemical and solid state physical methods can provide band structures for these systems. The numerical aspects of these ...

  19. Molecular structure determination of cyclooctane by Ab Initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Wagner B. de

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can make a significant contribution for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination of the molecular structure of the cyclooctane molecule by electron diffraction in the gas phase an initio calculations will be addressed, providing an example of a comparative analysis of theoretical and experimental predictions. (author)

  20. Electron dopable molecular wires based on the extended viologens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolivoška, Viliam; Gál, Miroslav; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Valášek, Michal; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 23 (2011), s. 11422-11429 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1157; GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA AV ČR IAA400400802; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB041006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * spectroelectrochemistry * molecular wires Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  1. Electron-molecular cation reactive collisions: from channel mixing to competitive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motapon, O; Tamo, F O Waffeu; Backodissa, D; Chakrabarti, K; Mezei, J. Zs; Lique, F; Schneider, I F; Tudorache, D; Bultel, A; Tchang-Brillet, L; Dulieu, O; Tennyson, J; Wolf, A; Urbain, X

    2011-01-01

    The competition between dissociative recombination, vibrational excitation, and dissociative excitation of molecular cations in electron-impact collisions is discussed within the formalism of the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory. Illustrative results are given for the HD + /HD and CO + /CO systems.

  2. Generative electronic background music system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz [Faculty of Computer Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Zolnierska Street 49, Szczecin, PL (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  3. Generative electronic background music system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions

  4. Fast Electron Repulsion Integrals for Molecular Coulomb Sturmians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil

    2013-01-01

    A new method is presented for calculating interelectron repulsion integrals for molecular Coulomb Sturmian basis sets. This makes use of an expansion of densities in terms of 2k-Sturmians, and the interelectron repulsion integrals are then calculated by a method based on the theory of hyperspheri......A new method is presented for calculating interelectron repulsion integrals for molecular Coulomb Sturmian basis sets. This makes use of an expansion of densities in terms of 2k-Sturmians, and the interelectron repulsion integrals are then calculated by a method based on the theory...... of hyperspherical harmonics. A rudimentary software library has been implemented and preliminary benchmarks indicate very good performance: On average 40 ns, or approximately 80 clock cycles, per electron repulsion integral. This makes molecular Coulomb Sturmians competitive with Gaussian type orbitals in terms...

  5. Molecular surface mesh generation by filtering electron density map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Joachim; Macq, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics applied to macromolecules are now widely spread and in continuous expansion. In this context, representing external molecular surface such as the Van der Waals Surface or the Solvent Excluded Surface can be useful for several applications. We propose a fast and parameterizable algorithm giving good visual quality meshes representing molecular surfaces. It is obtained by isosurfacing a filtered electron density map. The density map is the result of the maximum of Gaussian functions placed around atom centers. This map is filtered by an ideal low-pass filter applied on the Fourier Transform of the density map. Applying the marching cubes algorithm on the inverse transform provides a mesh representation of the molecular surface.

  6. Molecular Surface Mesh Generation by Filtering Electron Density Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Giard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics applied to macromolecules are now widely spread and in continuous expansion. In this context, representing external molecular surface such as the Van der Waals Surface or the Solvent Excluded Surface can be useful for several applications. We propose a fast and parameterizable algorithm giving good visual quality meshes representing molecular surfaces. It is obtained by isosurfacing a filtered electron density map. The density map is the result of the maximum of Gaussian functions placed around atom centers. This map is filtered by an ideal low-pass filter applied on the Fourier Transform of the density map. Applying the marching cubes algorithm on the inverse transform provides a mesh representation of the molecular surface.

  7. Effect of torsion angle on electronic transport through different anchoring groups in molecular junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Caijuan; Fang Changfeng; Zhao Peng; Xie Shijie; Liu Desheng

    2009-01-01

    By applying nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory, we investigate effect of torsion angle on electronic transport properties of 4,4 ' -biphenyl molecule connected with different anchoring groups (dithiocarboxylate and thiol group) to Au(111) electrodes. The influence of the HOMO-LUMO gaps and the spatial distributions of molecular orbitals on the quantum transport through the molecular device are discussed. Theoretical results show that the torsion angle plays important role in conducting behavior of molecular devices. By changing the torsion angle between two phenyl rings, namely changing the magnitude of the intermolecular coupling effect, a different transport behavior can be observed in these two systems.

  8. Pressure shifts and electron scattering in atomic and molecular gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupnik, K.; McGlynn, S.P.; Asaf, U.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the authors focus on one aspect of Rydberg electron scattering, namely number density effects in molecular gases. The recent study of Rydberg states of CH 3 I and C 6 H 6 perturbed by H 2 is the first attempt to investigate number density effects of a molecular perturber on Rydberg electrons. Highly excited Rydberg states, because of their ''large orbital'' nature, are very sensitive to the surrounding medium. Photoabsorption or photoionization spectra of CH 3 I have also been measured as a function of perturber pressure in 11 different binary gas mixtures consisting of CH 3 I and each one of eleven different gaseous perturbers. Five of the perturbers were rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) and six were non-dipolar molecules (H 2 , CH 4 , N 2 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 ). The goal of this work is to underline similarities and differences between atomic and molecular perturbers. The authors first list some results of the molecular study

  9. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  10. Molecular simulations in electrochemistry : Electron and proton transfer reactions mediated by flavins in different molecular environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kılıç, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to address specific questions about the role of solvent reorganization on electron transfer in different environments and about the calculation of acidity constant, as well. Particularly, we focus on molecular simulation of flavin in water and different protein (BLUF and

  11. Field reliability of electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elm, T.

    1984-02-01

    This report investigates, through several examples from the field, the reliability of electronic units in a broader sense. That is, it treats not just random parts failure, but also inadequate reliability design and (externally and internally) induced failures. The report is not meant to be merely an indication of the state of the art for the reliability prediction methods we know, but also as a contribution to the investigation of man-machine interplay in the operation and repair of electronic equipment. The report firmly links electronics reliability to safety and risk analyses approaches with a broader, system oriented view of reliability prediction and with postfailure stress analysis. It is intended to reveal, in a qualitative manner, the existence of symptom and cause patterns. It provides a background for further investigations to identify the detailed mechanisms of the faults and the remedical actions and precautions for achieving cost effective reliability. (author)

  12. Decal electronics for printed high performance cmos electronic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-11-23

    High performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are critical for any full-fledged electronic system. However, state-of-the-art CMOS electronics are rigid and bulky making them unusable for flexible electronic applications. While there exist bulk material reduction methods to flex them, such thinned CMOS electronics are fragile and vulnerable to handling for high throughput manufacturing. Here, we show a fusion of a CMOS technology compatible fabrication process for flexible CMOS electronics, with inkjet and conductive cellulose based interconnects, followed by additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing based packaging) and finally roll-to-roll printing of packaged decal electronics (thin film transistors based circuit components and sensors) focusing on printed high performance flexible electronic systems. This work provides the most pragmatic route for packaged flexible electronic systems for wide ranging applications.

  13. Connecting Biology to Electronics: Molecular Communication via Redox Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Jinyang; Tschirhart, Tanya; Terrell, Jessica L; Kim, Eunkyoung; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-01

    Biology and electronics are both expert at for accessing, analyzing, and responding to information. Biology uses ions, small molecules, and macromolecules to receive, analyze, store, and transmit information, whereas electronic devices receive input in the form of electromagnetic radiation, process the information using electrons, and then transmit output as electromagnetic waves. Generating the capabilities to connect biology-electronic modalities offers exciting opportunities to shape the future of biosensors, point-of-care medicine, and wearable/implantable devices. Redox reactions offer unique opportunities for bio-device communication that spans the molecular modalities of biology and electrical modality of devices. Here, an approach to search for redox information through an interactive electrochemical probing that is analogous to sonar is adopted. The capabilities of this approach to access global chemical information as well as information of specific redox-active chemical entities are illustrated using recent examples. An example of the use of synthetic biology to recognize external molecular information, process this information through intracellular signal transduction pathways, and generate output responses that can be detected by electrical modalities is also provided. Finally, exciting results in the use of redox reactions to actuate biology are provided to illustrate that synthetic biology offers the potential to guide biological response through electrical cues. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  15. Electron-impact dissociation of molecular hydrogen into neutral fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Liam H.; Tapley, Jonathan K.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor

    2018-02-01

    We present convergent close-coupling calculations of electron-impact dissociation of the ground state of molecular hydrogen into neutral fragments over the range of impact energies from 6 to 300 eV. The calculations account for dissociative excitation, excitation radiative decay dissociation, and predissociation through all bound electronic triplet states, and singlet states up to the D' 1 Π u state. An estimate is given for the contribution from the remaining bound electronic singlet states. Our results are in agreement with the recommended data of Yoon et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 37, 913 (2008)] in the low (6-12 eV) and high (60-70 eV) energy regions, but somewhat lower at the intermediate energies.

  16. Electron Stimulated Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 at Room Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2001-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a NEG St 707 (SAES GettersTM) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide2,13C18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 1015 electrons s-1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120oC. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  17. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of different states of the KRb+ molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korek, M.; Younis, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text.The molecular activities in ultra-cold alkali atom trapping stimulate theoretical developments to compute relevant adiabatic potential curves, especially in the framework of the pseudopotential methods. For these methods the molecular ion KRb+ is treated as system with one active electron moving in a field of two ionic cores, where core valence electron interactions are presented by an effective potential. Potential energies have been calculated over a wide range of internuclear distance (5.0-60a o ) for the lowest states of symmetry 2 Σ, 2 Π, 2 Δ and Ω for the molecular ion KRb+. To avoid an over estimation of the dissociation energy the perturbative treatment is replaced by an l-dependent core-polarization potential of the Foucrault et al. For the one valence electron of the two considered atoms, we recalculated the polarization potential cut-off parameters r k l , and r R b l by taking l=0,1,2 and r i 2 =r i 3 . Molecular orbital for the molecular ion KRb+ were derived from Self Consistent Field calculations (SCF), and full valence Configuration Interaction (IC) calculations were performed. Extensive tables of energy values versus internuclear distance are displayed and molecular spectroscopic constants have been derived, for the first time, for the bound states with regular shape

  18. Solvation of excess electrons trapped in charge pockets on molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.

    This work considers the ability of hydrogen fluoride (HF) to solvate excess electrons located on cyclic hydrocarbon surfaces. The principle applied involves the formation of systems in which excess electrons can be stabilized not only on concentrated molecular surface charge pockets but also by HF. Recent studies have shown that OH groups can form stable hydrogen-bonded networks on one side of a hydrocarbon surface (i.e. cyclohexane sheets), at the same time, the hydrogen atoms on the opposite side of this surface form a pocket of positive charge can attract the excess electron. This density can be further stabilized by the addition of an HF molecule that can form an 'anion with an internally solvated electron' (AISE) state. These systems are shown to be stable with respect to vertical electron detachment (VDE).

  19. Electronic effects and fundamental physics studied in molecular interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thomas; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun; Hofer, Werner A

    2018-05-29

    Scanning probe instruments in conjunction with a very low temperature environment have revolutionized the ability of building, functionalizing, and analysing two dimensional interfaces in the last twenty years. In addition, the availability of fast, reliable, and increasingly sophisticated methods to simulate the structure and dynamics of these interfaces allow us to capture even very small effects at the atomic and molecular level. In this review we shall focus largely on metal surfaces and organic molecular compounds and show that building systems from the bottom up and controlling the physical properties of such systems is no longer within the realm of the desirable, but has become day to day reality in our best laboratories.

  20. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  1. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01–200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01–2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2–100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100–200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  2. Molecular electronics--resonant transport through single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Riel, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The mechanically controllable break-junction technique (MCBJ) enables us to investigate charge transport through an individually contacted and addressed molecule in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment at variable temperature ranging from room temperature down to 4 K. Using a statistical measurement and analysis approach, we acquire current-voltage (I-V) characteristics during the repeated formation, manipulation, and breaking of a molecular junction. At low temperatures, voltages accessing the first molecular orbitals in resonance can be applied, providing spectroscopic information about the junction's energy landscape, in particular about the molecular level alignment in respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. Thereby, we can investigate the non-linear transport properties of various types of functional molecules and explore their potential use as functional building blocks for future nano-electronics. An example will be given by the reversible and controllable switching between two distinct conductive states of a single molecule. As a proof-of-principle for functional molecular devices, a single-molecule memory element will be demonstrated.

  3. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  4. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  5. Improving Single-Carbon-Nanotube-Electrode Contacts Using Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Ngamchuea, Kamonwad; Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Sawangphruk, Montree; Compton, Richard G

    2017-08-17

    We report the use of an electroactive species, acetaminophen, to modify the electrical connection between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and an electrode. By applying a potential across two electrodes, some of the CNTs in solution occasionally contact the electrified interface and bridge between two electrodes. By observing a single CNT contact between two microbands of an interdigitated Au electrode in the presence and absence of acetaminophen, the role of the molecular species at the electronic junction is revealed. As compared with the pure CNT, the current magnitude of the acetaminophen-modified CNTs significantly increases with the applied potentials, indicating that the molecule species improves the junction properties probably via redox shuttling.

  6. Molecular electronics: insight from first-principles transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about the atomic arrangement and transport channels.

  7. Electronic tunneling through a fullerene-like molecular bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaie, H.; Yaghobi, M.

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to consider the electronic transport properties of the N_{36} B_{36} molecule, using the Green's function method based on the GW model. The number, width, height and position of density of state peaks are dramatically dependent on the correlation effect, the contact type and symmetric properties of the molecule. Also, negative differential resistance behavior was observed for all modes in voltages 4.4 V (- 4.5 V) to 4.7 V (- 4.7 V). The N_{36} B_{36} molecule behaves as an insulator where the total current becomes zero for the same values of the gate voltages but acts as a metal at other values. Therefore, the physical picture of electron conduction may change in N_{36} B_{36}—based molecular devices and it could behave as a semiconductor.

  8. Electronic structure of spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We review the theoretical modeling of quantum spin systems. • We apply the Nth order muffin-tin orbital electronic structure method. • The method shows the importance of chemistry in the modeling. • CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 5} showed a 2-dimensional coupled spin dimer behavior. • Ti substituted Zn{sub 2}VO(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} showed spin gap behavior. - Abstract: Low-dimensional quantum spin systems, characterized by their unconventional magnetic properties, have attracted much attention. Synthesis of materials appropriate to various classes within these systems has made this field very attractive and a site of many activities. The experimental results like susceptibility data are fitted with the theoretical model to derive the underlying spin Hamiltonian. However, often such a fitting procedure which requires correct guess of the assumed spin Hamiltonian leads to ambiguity in deciding the representative model. In this review article, we will describe how electronic structure calculation within the framework of Nth order muffin-tin orbital (NMTO) based Wannier function technique can be utilized to identify the underlying spin model for a large number of such compounds. We will show examples from compounds belonging to vanadates and cuprates.

  9. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  10. Fragmentation of molecular ions in slow electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Steffen

    2008-06-25

    The fragmentation of positively charged hydrogen molecular ions by the capture of slow electrons, the so called dissociative recombination (DR), has been investigated in storage ring experiments at the TSR, Heidelberg, where an unique twin-electron-beam arrangement was combined with high resolution fragment imaging detection. Provided with well directed cold electrons the fragmentation kinematics were measured down to meV collision energies where pronounced rovibrational Feshbach resonances appear in the DR cross section. For thermally excited HD{sup +} the fragmentation angle and the kinetic energy release were studied at variable precisely controlled electron collision energies on a dense energy grid from 10 to 80 meV. The anisotropy described for the first time by Legendre polynomials higher 2{sup nd} order and the extracted rotational state contributions were found to vary on a likewise narrow energy scale as the rotationally averaged DR rate coefficient. Ro-vibrationally resolved DR experiments were performed on H{sub 2}{sup +} produced in distinct internal excitations by a novel ion source. Both the low-energy DR rate as well as the fragmentation dynamics at selected resonances were measured individually in the lowest two vibrational and first three excited rotational states. State-specific DR rates and angular dependences are reported. (orig.)

  11. Fragmentation of molecular ions in slow electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation of positively charged hydrogen molecular ions by the capture of slow electrons, the so called dissociative recombination (DR), has been investigated in storage ring experiments at the TSR, Heidelberg, where an unique twin-electron-beam arrangement was combined with high resolution fragment imaging detection. Provided with well directed cold electrons the fragmentation kinematics were measured down to meV collision energies where pronounced rovibrational Feshbach resonances appear in the DR cross section. For thermally excited HD + the fragmentation angle and the kinetic energy release were studied at variable precisely controlled electron collision energies on a dense energy grid from 10 to 80 meV. The anisotropy described for the first time by Legendre polynomials higher 2 nd order and the extracted rotational state contributions were found to vary on a likewise narrow energy scale as the rotationally averaged DR rate coefficient. Ro-vibrationally resolved DR experiments were performed on H 2 + produced in distinct internal excitations by a novel ion source. Both the low-energy DR rate as well as the fragmentation dynamics at selected resonances were measured individually in the lowest two vibrational and first three excited rotational states. State-specific DR rates and angular dependences are reported. (orig.)

  12. Synthesis, reactivity, and electronic structure of molecular uranium nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of metal-ligand multiple bonding offers insight into the electronic structure and bond of metal systems. Until recently, for uranium, such systems were limited to uranyl, and terminal chalcogenide, imide and carbene complexes. In 2012, this was extended to nitrides with the first preparation of a uranium–nitride (U≡N) species isolable under standard conditions, namely [U(TrenTIPS)(N)][Na(12C4)2] (52), which is prepared by the two-electron reduction of sodium azide with a trivalent u...

  13. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic which outlines key facts related to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), including...

  14. The impact of chemical structure and molecular packing on the electronic polarisation of fullerene arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Sheridan; Chia, Cleaven; Teo, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-07-19

    Electronic polarisation contributes to the electronic landscape as seen by separating charges in organic materials. The nature of electronic polarisation depends on the polarisability, density, and arrangement of polarisable molecules. In this paper, we introduce a microscopic, coarse-grained model in which we treat each molecule as a polarisable site, and use an array of such polarisable dipoles to calculate the electric field and associated energy of any arrangement of charges in the medium. The model incorporates chemical structure via the molecular polarisability and molecular packing patterns via the structure of the array. We use this model to calculate energies of charge pairs undergoing separation in finite fullerene lattices of different chemical and crystal structures. The effective dielectric constants that we estimate from this approach are in good quantitative agreement with those measured experimentally in C 60 and phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) films, but we find significant differences in dielectric constant depending on packing and on direction of separation, which we rationalise in terms of density of polarisable fullerene cages in regions of high field. In general, we find lattices containing molecules of more isotropic polarisability tensors exhibit higher dielectric constants. By exploring several model systems we conclude that differences in molecular polarisability (and therefore, chemical structure) appear to be less important than differences in molecular packing and separation direction in determining the energetic landscape for charge separation. We note that the results are relevant for finite lattices, but not necessarily for infinite systems. We propose that the model could be used to design molecular systems for effective electronic screening.

  15. Molecular self-assembly approaches for supramolecular electronic and organic electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hin-Lap

    Molecular self-assembly represents an efficient bottom-up strategy to generate structurally well-defined aggregates of semiconducting pi-conjugated materials. The capability of tuning the chemical structures, intermolecular interactions and nanostructures through molecular engineering and novel materials processing renders it possible to tailor a large number of unprecedented properties such as charge transport, energy transfer and light harvesting. This approach does not only benefit traditional electronic devices based on bulk materials, but also generate a new research area so called "supramolecular electronics" in which electronic devices are built up with individual supramolecular nanostructures with size in the sub-hundred nanometers range. My work combined molecular self-assembly together with several novel materials processing techniques to control the nucleation and growth of organic semiconducting nanostructures from different type of pi-conjugated materials. By tailoring the interactions between the molecules using hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking, semiconducting nanoplatelets and nanowires with tunable sizes can be fabricated in solution. These supramolecular nanostructures were further patterned and aligned on solid substrates through printing and chemical templating methods. The capability to control the different hierarchies of organization on surface provides an important platform to study their structural-induced electronic properties. In addition to using molecular self-assembly to create different organic nanostructures, functional self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by spontaneous chemisorption on surfaces was used to tune the interfacial property in organic solar cells. Devices showed dramatically improved performance when appropriate SAMs were applied to optimize the contact property for efficiency charge collection.

  16. First-principles study of the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P., E-mail: ss_zhaop@ujn.edu.c [School of Science, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu, D.S. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Physics, Jining University, Qufu 273155 (China); Wang, P.J.; Zhang, Z. [School of Science, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Fang, C.F.; Ji, G.M. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-02-15

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch. The molecule that comprises the switch can be converted between the hydroquinone (HQ) and anthraquinone (AQ) forms via redox reactions. The transmission spectra of these two forms are remarkably distinctive. Our results show that the current through the HQ form is significantly larger than that through the AQ form, which suggests that this system has attractive potential application in future molecular switch technology.

  17. First-principles study of the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Liu, D.S.; Wang, P.J.; Zhang, Z.; Fang, C.F.; Ji, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch. The molecule that comprises the switch can be converted between the hydroquinone (HQ) and anthraquinone (AQ) forms via redox reactions. The transmission spectra of these two forms are remarkably distinctive. Our results show that the current through the HQ form is significantly larger than that through the AQ form, which suggests that this system has attractive potential application in future molecular switch technology.

  18. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  19. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O

    2013-01-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure–property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost. (paper)

  20. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron scattering in dense atomic and molecular gases: An empirical correlation of polarizability and electron scattering length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupnik, K.; Asaf, U.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear correlation exists between the electron scattering length, as measured by a pressure shift method, and the polarizabilities for He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe gases. The correlative algorithm has excellent predictive capability for the electron scattering lengths of mixtures of rare gases, simple molecular gases such as H 2 and N 2 and even complex molecular entities such as methane, CH 4

  2. Molecular motor assembly of a biomimetic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Active biological molecules and functional structures can be fabricated into a bio-mimetic system by using molecular assembly method. Such materials can be used for the drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy, and new nanodevice construction.

  3. An analytical procedure to evaluate electronic integrals for molecular quantum mechanical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundim, Kleber C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We propose an alternative methodology for the calculation of electronic integrals, through an analytical function based on the generalized Gaussian function (q Gaussian), where a single q Gaussian replaces the usual linear combination of Gaussian functions for different basis set. Moreover, the integrals become analytical functions of the interatomic distances. Therefore, when estimating certain quantities such as molecular energy, g Gaussian avoid new calculations of the integrals: they are simply another value of the corresponding function. The procedure proposed here is particularly advantageous, when compared with the usual one, because it reduces drastically the number of two-electronic integrals used in the construction of the Fock matrix, enabling the use of the quantum mechanics in the description of macro-molecular systems. This advantage increases when the size of the molecular systems become larger and more complex. While in the usual approach CPU time increases with n4, in the one proposed here the CPU time scales linearly with n. This catastrophic dependence of the rank the Hamiltonian or Fock matrix with n4 two-electron integrals is a severe bottleneck for petaFLOPS computing time. Its is important to emphasize that this methodology is equally applicable to systems of any sizes, including biomolecules, solid materials and solutions, within the HF, post-HF and DFT theories. (author)

  4. Well-ordered monolayers of alkali-doped coronene and picene: Molecular arrangements and electronic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, M.; Endo, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Okada, R.; Yamada, Y., E-mail: yamada@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Sasaki, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Adsorptions of alkali metals (such as K and Li) on monolayers of coronene and picene realize the formation of ordered phases, which serve as well-defined model systems for metal-intercalated aromatic superconductors. Upon alkali-doping of the monolayers of coronene and picene, scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the rearrangement of the entire molecular layer. The K-induced reconstruction of both monolayers resulted in the formation of a structure with a herringbone-like arrangement of molecules, suggesting the intercalation of alkali metals between molecular planes. Upon reconstruction, a shift in both the vacuum level and core levels of coronene was observed as a result of a charge transfer from alkali metals to coronene. In addition, a new density of states near the Fermi level was formed in both the doped coronene and the doped picene monolayers. This characteristic electronic feature of the ordered monolayer has been also reported in the multilayer picene films, ensuring that the present monolayer can model the properties of the metal-intercalated aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that the electronic structure near the Fermi level is sensitive to the molecular arrangement, and that both the strict control and determinations of the molecular structure in the doped phase should be important for the determination of the electronic structure of these materials.

  5. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  6. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Digital simulation of power electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehring, P.; Jentsch, W.; John, G.; Kraemer, D.

    1981-01-01

    The following paper contains the final report on the NETSIM-Project. The purpose of this project is to develop a special digital simulation system, which could serve as a base for routine application of simulation in planning and development of power electronic systems. The project is realized in two steps. First a basic network analysis system is established. With this system the basic models and methods in treating power electronic networks could be probed. The resulting system is then integrated into a general digital simulation system for continous systems (CSSL-System). This integrated simulation system allows for convenient modeling and simulation of power electronic systems. (orig.) [de

  8. Recent advances in molecular electronics based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Campidelli, Stéphane; Chenevier, Pascale; Derycke, Vincent; Filoramo, Arianna; Goffman, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional physical properties that make them one of the most promising building blocks for future nanotechnologies. They may in particular play an important role in the development of innovative electronic devices in the fields of flexible electronics, ultra-high sensitivity sensors, high frequency electronics, opto-electronics, energy sources and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS). Proofs of concept of several high performance devices already exist, usually at the single device level, but there remain many serious scientific issues to be solved before the viability of such routes can be evaluated. In particular, the main concern regards the controlled synthesis and positioning of nanotubes. In our opinion, truly innovative use of these nano-objects will come from: (i) the combination of some of their complementary physical properties, such as combining their electrical and mechanical properties, (ii) the combination of their properties with additional benefits coming from other molecules grafted on the nanotubes, and (iii) the use of chemically- or bio-directed self-assembly processes to allow the efficient combination of several devices into functional arrays or circuits. In this article, we outline the main issues concerning the development of carbon nanotubes based electronics applications and review our recent results in the field.

  9. Tuning electron transport through a single molecular junction by bridge modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Qiu, Qi; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of controlling electron transport in a single molecular junction represents the ultimate goal of molecular electronics. Here, we report that the modification of bridging group makes it possible to improve the performance and obtain new functions in a single cross-conjugated molecular junction, designed from a recently synthesized bipolar molecule bithiophene naphthalene diimide. Our first principles results show that the bipolar characteristic remains after the molecule was modified and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. Rectifying is the intrinsic characteristic of the molecular junction and its performance can be enhanced by replacing the saturated bridging group with an unsaturated group. A further improvement of the rectifying and a robust negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior can be achieved by the modification of unsaturated bridge. It is revealed that the modification can induce a deviation angle about 4° between the donor and the acceptor π-conjugations, making it possible to enhance the communication between the two π systems. Meanwhile, the low energy frontier orbitals of the junction can move close to the Fermi level and encounter in energy at certain biases, thus a transport channel with a considerable transmission can be formed near the Fermi level only at a narrow bias regime, resulting in the improvement of rectifying and the robust NDR behavior. This finding could be useful for the design of single molecular devices.

  10. Reliability of Power Electronic Converter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -link capacitance in power electronic converter systems; wind turbine systems; smart control strategies for improved reliability of power electronics system; lifetime modelling; power module lifetime test and state monitoring; tools for performance and reliability analysis of power electronics systems; fault...... for advancing the reliability, availability, system robustness, and maintainability of PECS at different levels of complexity. Drawing on the experience of an international team of experts, this book explores the reliability of PECS covering topics including an introduction to reliability engineering in power...... electronic converter systems; anomaly detection and remaining-life prediction for power electronics; reliability of DC-link capacitors in power electronic converters; reliability of power electronics packaging; modeling for life-time prediction of power semiconductor modules; minimization of DC...

  11. The electronic system of Beijing spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Deming

    1990-01-01

    Beijing Spectrometer (BES) in an experimental facility of high energy physics on Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). A brief description including the global design, the read out circuits, the performances and the recent status of its electronic system is presented

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of electron trapping in the sapphire lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaut, C.; Oh, K.H.; Fayeulle, S.; Kohanoff, J.

    1995-10-01

    Energy storage and release in dielectric materials can be described on the basis of the charge trapping mechanism. Most phenomenological aspects have been recently rationalized in terms of the space charge mode. Dynamical aspects are studied here by performing Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that an excess electron introduced into the sapphire lattice (α -Al 2 O 3 ) can be trapped only at a limited number of sites. The energy gained by allowing the electron to localize in these sites is of the order of 4-5 eV, in good agreement with the results of the space charge model. Displacements of the neighboring ions due to the implanted charge are shown to be localized in a small region of about 5 A. Detrapping is observed at 250 K. The ionic displacements turn out to play an important role in modifying the potential landscape by lowering, in a dynamical way, the barriers that cause localization at low temperature. (author). 18 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Oscillating molecular dipoles require strongly correlated electronic and nuclear motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Palacios, Alicia; Martín, Fernando; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-01-01

    To create an oscillating electric dipole in an homonuclear diatomic cation without an oscillating driver one needs (i) to break the symmetry of the system and (ii) to sustain highly correlated electronic and nuclear motion. Based on numerical simulations in H 2 + we present results for two schemes. In the first one (i) is achieved by creating a superposition of symmetric and antisymmetric electronic states freely evolving, while (ii) fails. In a second scheme, by preparing the system in a dressed state of a strong static field, both conditions hold. We then analyze the robustness of this scheme with respect to features of the nuclear wave function and its intrinsic sources of decoherence. (tutorial)

  14. Connections between molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering with emphasis on shape resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dill, D.

    1979-01-01

    Most of our detailed information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the electronic continuum of molecules is based on the complementary probes - photoionization and electron scattering. Though usually studied separately, it is most useful to appreciate the connections between these two processes since our understanding of one is often the key to interpreting or even generating new results in the other. We approach this subject in two steps. First, we very briefly outline the well-established connections, e.g., the Bethe-Born theory and comparisons of isoelectronic systems. Then we focus on a point of contact - the role of shape resonances in molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering - for which a substantial amount of new information has become available. Specific topics include mapping of resonances from the neutral (hν + molecule) to the negative ion (e + molecule) system, angular distributions, and interaction with vibration

  15. Synthesis of one-dimensional metal-containing insulated molecular wire with versatile properties directed toward molecular electronics materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hiroshi; Terao, Jun; Seki, Shu; Nakashima, Shigeto; Kiguchi, Manabu; Okoshi, Kento; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2014-02-05

    We report, herein, the design, synthesis, and properties of new materials directed toward molecular electronics. A transition metal-containing insulated molecular wire was synthesized through the coordination polymerization of a Ru(II) porphyrin with an insulated bridging ligand of well-defined structure. The wire displayed not only high linearity and rigidity, but also high intramolecular charge mobility. Owing to the unique properties of the coordination bond, the interconversion between the monomer and polymer states was realized under a carbon monoxide atmosphere or UV irradiation. The results demonstrated a high potential of the metal-containing insulated molecular wire for applications in molecular electronics.

  16. Hydration effect on the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong-Liang, Li; Huai-Zhi, Li; Yong, Ma; Guang-Ping, Zhang; Chuan-Kui, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles computational method based on the hybrid density functional theory is developed to simulate the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions with H 2 O molecules accumulated in the vicinity as recently reported by Na et al. [Nanotechnology 18 424001 (2007)]. The numerical results show that the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecule and H 2 O molecules result in the localisation of the molecular orbitals and lead to the lower transition peaks. The H 2 O molecular chains accumulated in the vicinity of the molecular junction can not only change the electronic structure of the molecular junctions, but also open additional electronic transport pathways. The obvious influence of H 2 O molecules on the electronic structure of the molecular junction and its electronic transport properties is thus demonstrated. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. Micro-Electronic Nose System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Frank C.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to "smell" various gas vapors and complex odors is important for many applications such as environmental monitoring for detecting toxic gases as well as quality control in the processing of food, cosmetics, and other chemical products for commercial industries. Mimicking the architecture of the biological nose, a miniature electronic nose system was designed and developed consisting of an array of sensor devices, signal-processing circuits, and software pattern-recognition algorithms. The array of sensors used polymer/carbon-black composite thin-films, which would swell or expand reversibly and reproducibly and cause a resistance change upon exposure to a wide variety of gases. Two types of sensor devices were fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques to form "wells" that confined the polymer/carbon-black to a small and specific area. The first type of sensor device formed the "well" by etching into the silicon substrate using bulk micromachining. The second type built a high-aspect-ratio "well" on the surface of a silicon wafer using SU-8 photoresist. Two sizes of "wells" were fabricated: 500 x 600 mum² and 250 x 250 mum². Custom signal-processing circuits were implemented on a printed circuit board and as an application-specific integrated-circuit (ASIC) chip. The circuits were not only able to measure and amplify the small resistance changes, which corresponded to small ppm (parts-per-million) changes in gas concentrations, but were also adaptable to accommodate the various characteristics of the different thin-films. Since the thin-films were not specific to any one particular gas vapor, an array of sensors each containing a different thin-film was used to produce a distributed response pattern when exposed to a gas vapor. Pattern recognition, including a clustering algorithm and two artificial neural network algorithms, was used to classify the response pattern and identify the gas vapor or odor. Two gas experiments were performed, one

  18. Atomic and Molecular Systems in Intense Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, A.

    2008-07-01

    The full quantum mechanical treatment of atomic and molecular systems exposed to intense laser pulses is a so far unsolved challenge, even for systems as small as molecular hydrogen. Therefore, a number of simplified qualitative and quantitative models have been introduced in order to provide at least some interpretational tools for experimental data. The assessment of these models describing the molecular response is complicated, since a comparison to experiment requires often a number of averages to be performed. This includes in many cases averaging of different orientations of the molecule with respect to the laser field, focal volume effects, etc. Furthermore, the pulse shape and even the peak intensity is experimentally not known with very high precision; considering, e.g., the exponential intensity dependence of the ionization signal. Finally, experiments usually provide only relative yields. As a consequence of all these averagings and uncertainties, it is possible that different models may successfully explain some experimental results or features, although these models disagree substantially, if their predictions are compared before averaging. Therefore, fully quantum-mechanical approaches at least for small atomic and molecular systems are highly desirable and have been developed in our group. This includes efficient codes for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation of atomic hydrogen, helium or other effective one- or two-electron atoms as well as for the electronic motion in linear (effective) one-and two-electron diatomic molecules like H_2.Very recently, a code for larger molecular systems that adopts the so-called single-active electron approximation was also successfully implemented and applied. In the first part of this talk popular models describing intense laser-field ionization of atoms and their extensions to molecules are described. Then their validity is discussed on the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations. Finally, some

  19. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-01-01

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through ...

  20. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  1. Assembly, destruction and manipulation of atomic, molecular and complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Padellec, Arnaud Pierre Frederic

    2003-04-01

    In this report for Accreditation to Supervise Researches (HDR), the author first indicates his professional curriculum (diplomas, teaching activities, responsibilities in the field of education and research, publications), and then proposes a presentation of his scientific works and researches. He notably proposes an overview of the different experimental techniques he implemented: CRYRING storage ring, confluent beams, flow post-discharge with mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe, crossed beams, and so on. He reports works dealing with the manipulation and destruction of atomic, molecular and complex systems: detachment of atomic anions by electronic impact, detachment and dissociation of small carbon aggregates by electronic impact, dissociative recombination, dissociative ionisation and excitation, creation of pairs of ions, manipulation of sodium fluoride aggregates. He finally presents research projects regarding the assembly of molecular and complex systems

  2. Integrated control system for electron beam processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, L.; Koleva, E.; Batchkova, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ISO/IEC 62264 standard is widely used for integration of the business systems of a manufacturer with the corresponding manufacturing control systems based on hierarchical equipment models, functional data and manufacturing operations activity models. In order to achieve the integration of control systems, formal object communication models must be developed, together with manufacturing operations activity models, which coordinate the integration between different levels of control. In this article, the development of integrated control system for electron beam welding process is presented as part of a fully integrated control system of an electron beam plant, including also other additional processes: surface modification, electron beam evaporation, selective melting and electron beam diagnostics.

  3. Excess electron is trapped in a large single molecular cage C60F60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Sun, Chia-Chung; Gu, Feng-Long

    2010-01-15

    A new kind of solvated electron systems, sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) and capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), in contrast to the endohedral complex M@C60, is represented at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) + dBF (diffusive basis functions) density functional theory. It is proven, by examining the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) and the spin density map of e(-)@C60F60, that the excess electron is indeed encapsulated inside the C60F60 cage. The shape of the electron cloud in SOMO matches with the shape of C60F60 cage. These cage-like single molecular solvated electrons have considerably large vertical electron detachment energies VDE of 4.95 (I(h)) and 4.67 eV (D6h) at B3LYP/6-31+G(3df) + dBF level compared to the VDE of 3.2 eV for an electron in bulk water (Coe et al., Int Rev Phys Chem 2001, 20, 33) and that of 3.66 eV for e(-)@C20F20 (Irikura, J Phys Chem A 2008, 112, 983), which shows their higher stability. The VDE of the sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) is greater than that of the capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), indicating that the excess electron prefers to reside in the cage with the higher symmetry to form the more stable solvated electron. It is also noticed that the cage size [7.994 (I(h)), 5.714 and 9.978 A (D6h) in diameter] is much larger than that (2.826 A) of (H2O)20- dodecahedral cluster (Khan, Chem Phys Lett 2005, 401, 85). Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  5. Survey of electronic payment methods and systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Helme, A.; Verbraeck, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an overview of electronic payment methods and systems is given. This survey is done as part of the Moby Dick project. Electronic payment systems can be grouped into three broad classes: traditional money transactions, digital currency and creditdebit payments. Such payment systems have

  6. ProbeZT: Simulation of transport coefficients of molecular electronic junctions under environmental effects using Büttiker's probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Roman; Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2018-03-01

    We present our in-house quantum transport package, ProbeZT. This program provides linear response coefficients: electrical and electronic thermal conductances, as well as the thermopower of molecular junctions in which electrons interact with the surrounding thermal environment. Calculations are performed based on the Büttiker probe method, which introduces decoherence, energy exchange and dissipation effects phenomenologically using virtual electrode terminals called probes. The program can realize different types of probes, each introducing various environmental effects, including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons. The molecular system is described by an arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonian, allowing the study of different geometries beyond simple one-dimensional wires. Applications of the program to study the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions are illustrated. The program also has a built-in functionality to simulate electron transport in double-stranded DNA molecules based on a tight-binding (ladder) description of the junction.

  7. Electronic Official Personnel Folder System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The eOPF is a digital recreation of paper personnel folder that stores electronic personnel data spanning an individual's Federal career. eOPF allows employees to...

  8. Test-beds for molecular electronics: metal-molecules-metal junctions based on Hg electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Felice Carlo; Rampi, Maria Anita

    2010-01-01

    Junctions based on mesoscopic Hg electrodes are used to characterize the electrical properties of the organic molecules organized in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The junctions M-SAM//SAM-Hg are formed by one electrode based on metals (M) such as Hg, Ag, Au, covered by a SAM, and by a second electrode always formed by a Hg drop carrying also a SAM. The electrodes, brought together by using a micromanipulator, sandwich SAMs of different nature at the contact area (approximately = 0.7 microm2). The high versatility of the system allows a series of both electrical and electrochemical junctions to be assembled and characterized: (i) The compliant nature of the Hg electrodes allows incorporation into the junction and measurement of the electrical behavior of a large number of molecular systems and correlation of their electronic structure to the electrical behavior; (ii) by functionalizing both electrodes with SAMs exposing different functional groups, X and Y, it is possible to compare the rate of electron transfer through different X...Y molecular interactions; (iii) when the junction incorporates one of the electrode formed by a semitransparent film of Au, it allows electrical measurements under irradiation of the sandwiched SAMs. In this case the junction behaves as a photoswitch; iv) incorporation of redox centres with low lying, easily reachable energy levels, provides electron stations as indicated by the hopping mechanism dominating the current flow; (v) electrochemical junctions incorporating redox centres by both covalent and electrostatic interactions permit control of the potential of the electrodes with respect to that of the redox state by means of an external reference electrode. Both these junctions show an electrical behavior similar to that of conventional diodes, even though the mechanism generating the current flow is different. These systems, demonstrating high mechanical stability and reproducibility, easy assembly, and a wide variety of

  9. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown

  10. A new apparatus for the study of electron impact fragmentation of molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, G; Burgt, P J M van der

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new experiment for the study of electron-impact induced dissociation and fragmentation of molecular clusters and biomolecules and other species solvated in water clusters. The purpose is to look at clusters that are of interest to biophysics, atmospheric physics, and other fields. The experiment consists of a differentially pumped vacuum system, with an expansion chamber to generate a pulsed supersonic beam of clusters, and a collision chamber where the cluster beam intersects with an electron beam. Water clusters can be seeded with biomolecules emerging from a resistively heated oven. Investigation will be possible into both ion yields and long-lived neutral metastable yields produced by electron-impact fragmentation of relevant clusters and biomolecules

  11. Initial vibrational and rotational yields from subexcitation electrons in molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    As the energy of a single source electron injected into a molecular gas is degraded through collisions, initial products include secondary electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Electrons with kinetic energies less than the minimum required for excitation of the lowest electronic state are given the designation subexcitation electrons. These electrons are still capable of exciting vibrational and rotational states of molecular gases. In this calculation, the initial numbers of vibrational and rotational excitations (yields) produced as the subexcitation electrons undergo further energy degradation are determined for molecular hydrogen. The calculation requires a complete set of cross section data for numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. The initial energy distribution of electrons is taken to be the subexcitation distribution which was determined previously. The initial yields are tabulated for gas temperatures from 50 K to 1500 K for a source electron with initial energy 10 keV. 26 references

  12. Electronic transport properties in [n]cycloparaphenylenes molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lizhi; Guo, Yandong; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Hongli; Zhou, Jie

    2017-07-01

    The electronic transport of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) is investigated based on nonequilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with the density-functional theory. Negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon is observed. Further analysis shows that the reduction of the transmission peak induced by the bias changing near Fermi energy results in the NDR effect. Replacing the electrode (from carbon chain to Au electrode), doping with N atom and changing the size of the nanohoop (n = 5, 6, 8, 10) have also been studied and the NDR still exists, suggesting the NDR behavior is the intrinsic feature of such [n]CPPs systems, which would be quite useful in future nanoelectronic devices.

  13. Simulations of the ILC Electron Gun and Electron Bunching System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakonsen, C.B.; McGill U.

    2006-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed electron-positron collider, expected to provide insight into important questions in particle physics. A part of the global R and D effort for the ILC is the design of its electron gun and electron bunching system. The present design of the bunching system has two sub-harmonic bunchers, one operating at 108 MHz and one at 433MHz, and two 5-cell 1.3 GHz (L-band) bunchers. This bunching system has previously been simulated using the Phase and Radial Motion in Electron Linear Accelerators (PARMELA) software, and those simulations indicated that the design provides sufficient bunching and acceleration. Due to the complicated dynamics governing the electrons in the bunching system we decided to verify and expand the PARMELA results using the more recent and independent simulation software General Particle Tracer (GPT). GPT tracks the motion and interactions of a set of macro particles, each of which represent a number of electrons, and provides a variety of analysis capabilities. To provide initial conditions for the macro particles, a method was developed for deriving the initial conditions from detailed simulations of particle trajectories in the electron gun. These simulations were performed using the Egun software. For realistic simulation of the L-band bunching cavities, their electric and magnetic fields were calculated using the Superfish software and imported into GPT. The GPT simulations arrived at similar results to the PARMELA simulations for sub-harmonic bunching. However, using GPT it was impossible to achieve an efficient bunching performance of the first L-band bunching cavity. To correct this, the first L-band buncher cell was decoupled from the remaining 4 cells and driven as an independent cavity. Using this modification we attained results similar to the PARMELA simulations. Although the modified bunching system design performed as required, the modifications are technically challenging to implement

  14. Electronic structure and molecular dynamics of Na2Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Nathaniel O. J.; McDouall, Joseph J. W.

    Following the first report (Mile, B., Sillman, P. D., Yacob, A. R. and Howard, J. A., 1996, J. chem. Soc. Dalton Trans , 653) of the EPR spectrum of the mixed alkali-metal trimer Na2Li a detailed study has been made of the electronic structure and structural dynamics of this species. Two isomeric forms have been found: one of the type, Na-Li-Na, of C , symmetry and another, Li-Na-Na, of C symmetry. Also, there are two linear saddle points which correspond to 'inversion' transition structures, and a saddle point of C symmetry which connects the two minima. A molecular dynamics investigation of these species shows that, at the temperature of the reported experiments (170 K), the C minimum is not 'static', but undergoes quite rapid inversion. At higher temperatures the C minimum converts to the C form, but by a mechanism very different from that suggested by minimum energy path considerations. 2 2v s s 2v 2v s

  15. Molecular bonding in SF6 measured by elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.D.; Fink, M.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic differential cross-section measurements of gaseous SF 6 were made with 30 keV electrons in the range of 0.25 bohrs -1 ≤s≤10 bohrs -1 . Structural parameters derived in this study closely matched those found in an earlier total (elastic plus inelastic) scattering investigation. Multiple-scattering effects were incorporated in the structural refinement. The discrepancies between the independent atom model and the measured differential cross section reproduce earlier total scattering results for momentum transfers of greater than 5 bohrs -1 . By extending the measurements to smaller s values, a closer examination of a Hartree--Fock calculation for SF 6 was possible. It was found that the difference curve obtained from the Hartree--Fock calculation matched the experimental data in this region. A more quantitative analysis was performed using the analytic expressions of Bonham and Fink to compute moments of the molecular charge distribution from the differential cross-section data. Comparison of these results with similar fits to the Hartree--Fock calculation confirmed the good agreement between the Hartree--Fock calculation and the current elastic data

  16. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  17. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π

  18. Dual-comb spectroscopy of molecular electronic transitions in condensed phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byungmoon; Yoon, Tai Hyun; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy (DCS) utilizes two phase-locked optical frequency combs to allow scanless acquisition of spectra using only a single point detector. Although recent DCS measurements demonstrate rapid acquisition of absolutely calibrated spectral lines with unprecedented precision and accuracy, complex phase-locking schemes and multiple coherent averaging present significant challenges for widespread adoption of DCS. Here, we demonstrate Global Positioning System (GPS) disciplined DCS of a molecular electronic transition in solution at around 800 nm, where the absorption spectrum is recovered by using a single time-domain interferogram. We anticipate that this simplified dual-comb technique with absolute time interval measurement and ultrabroad bandwidth will allow adoption of DCS to tackle molecular dynamics investigation through its implementation in time-resolved nonlinear spectroscopic studies and coherent multidimensional spectroscopy of coupled chromophore systems.

  19. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-07

    Hartman, MAJ Roddex Barlow , CPT Christopher Besser and Capt Michael Emerson...thank you I am truly honored to call each of you my friends. Electronic... abnormal findings are addressed. 18 Electronic Medical Record Implementation Barriers of the Electronic Medical Records System There are several...examination findings • Psychological and social assessment findings N. The system provides a flexible mechanism for retrieval of encounter

  20. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Petrov, A.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Syresin, E.; Titkova, I.

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 μA/V 3/2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual)

  1. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Petrov, A; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M; Titkova, I

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 mu A/V sup 3 sup / sup 2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual).

  2. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  3. Electronic Resources Management System: Recommendation Report 2017

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-01-01

    This recommendation report provides an overview of the selection process for the new Electronic Resources Management System. The library has decided to move away from Innovative Interfaces Millennium ERM module. The library reviewed 3 system

  4. Reliability of power electronic converter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Henry Shu-hung; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book outlines current research into the scientific modeling, experimentation, and remedial measures for advancing the reliability, availability, system robustness, and maintainability of Power Electronic Converter Systems (PECS) at different levels of complexity.

  5. Studies of the surface structures of molecular crystals and of adsorbed molecular monolayers on the (111) crystal faces of platinum and silver by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firment, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The structures of molecular crystal surfaces were investigated for the first time by the use of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The experimental results from a variety of molecular crystals were examined and compared as a first step towards understanding the properties of these surfaces on a microscopic level. The method of sample preparation employed, vapor deposition onto metal single-crystal substrates at low temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum, allowed concurrent study of the structures of adsorbed monolayers on metal surfaces and of the growth processes of molecular films on metal substrates. The systems investigated were ice, ammonia, naphthalene, benzene, the n-paraffins (C 3 to C 8 ), cyclohexane, trioxane, acetic acid, propionic acid, methanol, and methylamine adsorbed and condensed on both Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Electron-beam-induced damage of the molecular surfaces was observed after electron exposures of 10 -4 A sec cm -2 at 20 eV. Aromatic molecular crystal samples were more resistant to damage than samples of saturated molecules. The quality and orientation of the grown molecular crystal films were influenced by substrate preparation and growth conditions. Forty ordered monolayer structures were observed. 110 figures, 22 tables, 162 references

  6. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  7. Silicon oxide: a non-innocent surface for molecular electronics and nanoelectronics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Zhong, Lin; Natelson, Douglas; Tour, James M

    2011-02-02

    Silicon oxide (SiO(x)) has been widely used in many electronic systems as a supportive and insulating medium. Here, we demonstrate various electrical phenomena such as resistive switching and related nonlinear conduction, current hysteresis, and negative differential resistance intrinsic to a thin layer of SiO(x). These behaviors can largely mimic numerous electrical phenomena observed in molecules and other nanomaterials, suggesting that substantial caution should be paid when studying conduction in electronic systems with SiO(x) as a component. The actual electrical phenomena can be the result of conduction from SiO(x) at a post soft-breakdown state and not the presumed molecular or nanomaterial component. These electrical properties and the underlying mechanisms are discussed in detail.

  8. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A 1 symmetry on the 9a 1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing

  9. New formula for dependence of molecular electronic energy on internuclear distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    We formulate an integral virial theorem which connects the change in the molecular electronic energy during finite changes in the size of the nuclear core (in the case of a diatomic molecule, during finite changes of the internuclear distance) with a matrix element of the kinetic electronic energy operator and with an overlap integral between wave functions. Our results can be used to calculate the dependence of the molecular electronic energy on the internuclear distance, as well as to check the quality of, and to improve, the approximate electronic wave functions. The theory is illustrated by the simplest example of the approximate MO LCAO wave function for the hydrogen molecular ion

  10. Carbon Electrode-Molecule Junctions: A Reliable Platform for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Xin, Na; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-15

    . At the molecular level, to form robust covalent bonds between electrodes and molecules and improve device stability, we developed a reliable system to immobilize individual molecules within a nanoscale gap of either SWCNTs or graphene through covalent amide bond formation, thus affording two classes of carbon electrode-molecule single-molecule junctions. One unique feature of these devices is the fact that they contain only one or two molecules as conductive elements, thus forming the basis for building new classes of chemo/biosensors with ultrahigh sensitivity. We have used these approaches to reveal the dependence of the charge transport of individual metallo-DNA duplexes on π-stacking integrity, and fabricate molecular devices capable of realizing label-free, real-time electrical detection of biological interactions at the single-event level, or switching their molecular conductance upon exposure to external stimuli, such as ion, pH, and light. These investigations highlight the unique advantages and importance of these universal methodologies to produce functional carbon electrode-molecule junctions in current and future researches toward the development of practical molecular devices, thus offering a reliable platform for molecular electronics and the promise of a new generation of multifunctional integrated circuits and sensors.

  11. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-06

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV-vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films' ability to structurally tune their HOMO-LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO 2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures' plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  12. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M.; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-01

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV–vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films’ ability to structurally tune their HOMO–LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures’ plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  13. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  14. Renormalized molecular levels in a Sc3N@C-80 molecular electronic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larade, Brian; Taylor, Jeremy Philip; Zheng, Q. R.

    2001-01-01

    We address several general questions about quantum transport through molecular systems by an ab initio analysis of a scandium-nitrogen doped C-80 metallofullerene device. Charge transfer from the Sc3N is found to drastically change the current-voltage characteristics: the current through the Sc3N...... levels and main transmission features shift in energy corresponding to half the applied bias voltage. This is also consistent with our finding that the voltage drops by V-b/2 at each molecule/electrode contact....

  15. Effects of electron-phonon interaction on thermal and electrical transport through molecular nano-conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lü, Jing-Tao, E-mail: jtlu@hust.edu.cn [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhou, Hangbo [Department of Physics and Center for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117551 Singapore (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Jiang, Jin-Wu [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Shanghai University, 200072 Shanghai (China); Wang, Jian-Sheng [Department of Physics and Center for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117551 Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-15

    The topic of this review is the effects of electron-phonon interaction (EPI) on the transport properties of molecular nano-conductors. A nano-conductor connects to two electron leads and two phonon leads, possibly at different temperatures or chemical potentials. The EPI appears only in the nano-conductor. We focus on its effects on charge and energy transport. We introduce three approaches. For weak EPI, we use the nonequilibrium Green’s function method to treat it perturbatively. We derive the expressions for the charge and heat currents. For weak system-lead couplings, we use the quantum master equation approach. In both cases, we use a simple single level model to study the effects of EPI on the system’s thermoelectric transport properties. It is also interesting to look at the effect of currents on the dynamics of the phonon system. For this, we derive a semi-classical generalized Langevin equation to describe the nano-conductor’s atomic dynamics, taking the nonequilibrium electron system, as well as the rest of the atomic degrees of freedom as effective baths. We show simple applications of this approach to the problem of energy transfer between electrons and phonons.

  16. Effects of electron-phonon interaction on thermal and electrical transport through molecular nano-conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Zhou, Hangbo; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this review is the effects of electron-phonon interaction (EPI) on the transport properties of molecular nano-conductors. A nano-conductor connects to two electron leads and two phonon leads, possibly at different temperatures or chemical potentials. The EPI appears only in the nano-conductor. We focus on its effects on charge and energy transport. We introduce three approaches. For weak EPI, we use the nonequilibrium Green’s function method to treat it perturbatively. We derive the expressions for the charge and heat currents. For weak system-lead couplings, we use the quantum master equation approach. In both cases, we use a simple single level model to study the effects of EPI on the system’s thermoelectric transport properties. It is also interesting to look at the effect of currents on the dynamics of the phonon system. For this, we derive a semi-classical generalized Langevin equation to describe the nano-conductor’s atomic dynamics, taking the nonequilibrium electron system, as well as the rest of the atomic degrees of freedom as effective baths. We show simple applications of this approach to the problem of energy transfer between electrons and phonons

  17. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Bøggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit...... of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50 x 50 pm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 run. We demonstrate how the EBL system can...... be used to write three-dimensional nanostructures by electron-beam deposition. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  19. Excitation and charge transfer in He+ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-01-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He + + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes

  20. Quantum inelastic electron-vibration scattering in molecular wires: Landauer-like versus Green's function approaches and temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of inelastic electron transport in molecular systems in which both electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom are considered on the quantum level. The electronic transport properties of the corresponding molecular nanojunctions are obtained by means of a non-perturbative Landauer-like multi-channel inelastic scattering technique. The connections between this approach and other Green's function techniques that are useful in particular cases are studied in detail. The validity of the wide-band approximation, the effects of the lead self-energy and the dynamical polaron shift are also studied for a wide range of parameters. As a practical application of the method, we consider the effects of the temperature on the conductance properties of molecular breakjunctions in relation to recent experiments

  1. Structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of laser-heated silicon: An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1997-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystalline silicon. We found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bonding. As a result the system undergoes a melting

  2. Electron capture in pseudo-two-electron systems: Ar8++He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, M.; Olson, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular-structure calculations using the pseudopotential method have been performed on the (ArHe) 8+ system. The cross section for single-electron capture in Ar 8+ +He collisions was calculated for energies from 20 eV to 10 keV/amu. The perturbed-stationary-state method [M. Kimura, H. Sato, and R. E. Olson, Phys. Rev. A 28, 2085 (1983)], modified to include electron translation factors appropriate to two-electron systems, was used. The total cross section is relatively energy independent with a value of approximately 2.5 x 10 -15 cm 2 . The n = 4 level of Ar 7+ is found to be preferentially populated, with the 4f level being dominant

  3. Secondary-electron-production cross sections for electron-impact ionization of molecular nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goruganthu, R.R.; Wilson, W.G.; Bonham, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the double-differential cross section (DDCS), as a function of the ejected energy, angle, and primary energy for electron-impact ionization of molecular nitrogen are reported at incident energies of 200, 500, 1000, and 2000 eV. The ejection angle was varied from 30 0 to 150 0 in steps of 15 0 . The cross sections were obtained by use of a crossed-beam apparatus with an effusive gas source and a pulsed electron beam. Scattered and ejected electrons were energy analyzed by time-of-flight analysis from below 2 eV to the primary energy. The relative measurements were placed on an absolute scale by matching the experimental elastic differential cross sections to absolute measurements at each primary energy. Comparisons of the DDCS with previous reported values revealed significant differences. The DDCS were fitted to a Legendre polynomial expansion as a function of the ejection angle. Platzman plot analysis was carried out on the energy distributions determined from the fit coefficients. The total ionization cross sections at these primary energies were deduced from this plot. An autoionization feature at 2.3 eV was observed for the first time in measurements of this nature and has been assigned as due to a Rydberg state converging to the B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ionic state which decays to the X 2 Σ/sub g/ + ground state of N 2 + . An analysis of the autoionization lines observed in the present work in the range 0.4--2.5 eV is also presented

  4. Continuum multiple-scattering approach to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dill, D.

    1979-01-01

    The multiple-scattering approach to the electronic continuum of molecules is described. The continuum multiple-scattering model (CMSM) was developed as a survey tool and, as such was required to satisfy two requirements. First, it had to have a very broad scope, which means (i) molecules of arbitrary geometry and complexity containing any atom in the periodic system, (ii) continuum electron energies from 0-1000 eV, and (iii) capability to treat a large range of processes involving both photoionization and electron scattering. Second, the structure of the theory was required to lend itself to transparent, physical interpretation of major spectral features such as shape resonances. A comprehensive theoretical framework for the continuum multiple scattering method is presented, as well as its applications to electron-molecule scattering and molecular photoionization. Highlights of recent applications in these two areas are reviewed. The major impact of the resulting studies over the last few years has been to establish the importance of shape resonances in electron collisions and photoionization of practically all (non-hydride) molecules

  5. Synthesis and Studies of Sulfur-Containing Heterocyclic Molecules for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzanti, Virginia

    This work describes the synthesis and studies of sulfur containing π conjugated heterocycles, which are considered interesting motifs in the field of molecular electronics. The first project, which is covered in Chapter 1, concerns the functionalization of tetracycle dibenzo[bc,fg][1,4]dithiapent......This work describes the synthesis and studies of sulfur containing π conjugated heterocycles, which are considered interesting motifs in the field of molecular electronics. The first project, which is covered in Chapter 1, concerns the functionalization of tetracycle dibenzo[bc,fg][1......,4]dithiapentalene (DDP). Attempts to prepare the S-O analog are also discussed. Chapter 2, focuses upon the studies performed on DDP and other sulfur containing π conjugated organic molecules. Organic Field Effect Transistor devices were fabricated and their performances were evaluated. Chapter 3 entails...... the synthesis of dimeric structures of redox active system tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Molecules with different conjugation pathways bridging two TTFs were synthesized and studied using CV and DPV in order to probe the electronic interaction between these two redox units. The last aspect of this thesis, which...

  6. Laboratory Information Systems in Molecular Diagnostics: Why Molecular Diagnostics Data are Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roy E; Henricks, Walter H; Sirintrapun, Sahussapont J

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing presents new challenges to information management that are yet to be sufficiently addressed by currently available information systems for the molecular laboratory. These challenges relate to unique aspects of molecular genetic testing: molecular test ordering, informed consent issues, diverse specimen types that encompass the full breadth of specimens handled by traditional anatomic and clinical pathology information systems, data structures and data elements specific to molecular testing, varied testing workflows and protocols, diverse instrument outputs, unique needs and requirements of molecular test reporting, and nuances related to the dissemination of molecular pathology test reports. By satisfactorily addressing these needs in molecular test data management, a laboratory information system designed for the unique needs of molecular diagnostics presents a compelling reason to migrate away from the current paper and spreadsheet information management that many molecular laboratories currently use. This paper reviews the issues and challenges of information management in the molecular diagnostics laboratory.

  7. Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comes, Ryan; Liu Hongxue; Lu Jiwei; Gu, Man; Khokhlov, Mikhail; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Complex oxide epitaxial film growth is a rich and exciting field, owing to the wide variety of physical properties present in oxides. These properties include ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, spin-polarization, and a variety of other correlated phenomena. Traditionally, high quality epitaxial oxide films have been grown via oxide molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition. Here, we present the growth of high quality epitaxial films using an alternative approach, the pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. We demonstrate all three epitaxial growth modes in different oxide systems: Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer); Stranski-Krastanov (layer-then-island); and Volmer-Weber (island). Analysis of film quality and morphology is presented and techniques to optimize the morphology of films are discussed.

  8. Electronic properties of organic monolayers and molecular devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These devices exhibit a marked current–voltage rectification behavior due to resonant transport between the Si conduction band and the molecule highest occupied molecular orbital of the molecule. We discuss the role of metal Fermi level pinning in the current–voltage behavior of these molecular junctions. We also ...

  9. Charge-transfer collisions involving few-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-atom collision systems that involve more than one electron constitute nonseparable few-body problems, whose full solution is difficult to say the least. At impact energies well below 1 keV/amu an expansion of the stationary scattering wave function in terms of a limited number of products of nuclear and molecular state wave functions (amended to satisfy scattering boundary conditions) is feasible and usually sufficient to obtain accurate charge-transfer cross sections provided the electronic wave functions include configuration interaction. At energies above 1 keV/amu this approach becomes inefficient and close-coupling methods within the semi classical approximation are better suited to treat the problem. For bare-ion collisions from helium target atoms explicit solutions of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation can be achieved, but are computationally costly and cannot be extended to problems which involve more than two electrons.

  10. Design of electron detection system for pulse electron irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjar Anggraini H; Agus Purwadi; Lely Susita RM; Bambang Siswanto; Agus Wijayanto

    2016-01-01

    Design of electron detection system for pulse electron irradiator has been conducted on the Plasma Cathode Electron Source by Rogowski coil technique. Rogowski coil has ability to capture the induced magnetic field of the electric current, subsequent induced magnetic field will provide voltage after passing integrator. This diagnostic used combination of copper wire, ferrite and RC integrator. The design depends on the pulse width and the value of plasma current that passes through the coil, thus the number of windings, coil area and integrator can be designed. For plasma spots current of IDPS expected to be 10 A and pulse width 10 μs the Rogowski coil using MnZn ferrite with inductance L = 0.275 mH and permeability μr = 200 H/m. For the current of plasma arc ADPS expected to be 100 A and pulse width 100 μs by using inductance L=1.9634 mH and permeability μr = 6256 H/m. Electron current in extraction system expected to be 30 A and pulse width 100 μs the Rogowski coil using inductance L=51.749 mH and permeability μr= 4987 H/m. Design integrator used is the type of RC integrator. (author)

  11. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  12. Long-Range Electron Effects upon Irradiation of Molecular Solids and Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    Long-range electron effects are responsible for specific localization and selectivity of the radiation-induced chemical transformations occurring in molecular solids and polymers, when the classic diffusion mobility is essentially restricted. In particullar, understanding of the effects of this kind may be of key significance for establishing new ways to control the radiation sensitivity of macromolecules and organized polymeric systems, nanomaterials and biopolymers. This talk will present an overview of model studies of the long-range electron effects with the characteristic scale from several angstroms to ten nanometers. The following aspects of the problem will be analyzed: (1) Positive hole delocalization in ionized molecules. This phenomenon has been demonstrated experimentally and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a number of various-type molecules (alkanes, conjugated polyenes, bifunctional compounds). The effective delocalization length was found to be up to 2 nm (or even larger). The role of this effect in site-selective radiation chemistry will be discussed in the frame of concepts of distributed reactivity and 'switching' between delocalized and localized states. (2) Trap-to-trap positive hole and electron migration between isolated molecules or functional groups. The characteristic distance for this process was estimated to be 2 to 4 nm. Special impact will be made on the possible role of this process in selection of specific isomers or conformers upon irradiation of complex systems and macromolecules. (3) The effects of long-range scavenging of low-energy secondary electrons in polymers and organized polymeric systems. As revealed by model experiments, the radius of electron capture in solid polymers may be in the range of 1 to 10 nm. Possible implications of scavenging effects for controlling the radiation chemistry of polymers and organized polymeric systems will be considered

  13. Electronic construction collaboration system : phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This phase of the electronic collaboration project involved two major efforts: 1) implementation of AEC Sync (formerly known as Attolist), a web-based project management system (WPMS), on the Broadway Viaduct Bridge Project and the Iowa Falls Arch Br...

  14. Electronic states in systems of reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: magnetically modulated systems, inelastic magnetotunneling, ballistic transport review, screening in reduced dimensions, raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy; and ballistic quantum interference effects. (LSP)

  15. Preparation of targets using electron gun systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Komor, P.

    1975-01-01

    Most targets of isotopes with very low vapor pressure can only be fabricated by vacuum deposition using an electron gun system or a heavy ion sputtering system. Heavy ion sputtering is a very new technique with many unsolved problems. Therefore it seems to be easier to work with an electron gun. Different commercially available electron guns, which are all designed for the high evaporation rates used in industry, are examined for their qualification in processing small amounts of material as used in fabrication of isotope targets. Electron backscattering and the associated efficiency of the electron beam power is strongly dependent on the atomic number Z of the evaporant and the incident angle of the electron beam on the surface of the evaporant. This dependence leads also to the undesired effects to the target layers from electrons and ions. Some precautions are necessary against the effects of the electrons and ions, which are formed in the plasma directly over the beam impact point. Beam power and beam density have to be chosen to get a constant evaporation rate and a low enough condensation rate in order not to overheat the target substrates. To evaporate some metals it may be helpful to pulse the electron beam

  16. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamism in Electronic Performance Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James

    1995-01-01

    Describes a model for dynamic electronic performance support systems based on NNAble, a system developed by the training group at Apple Computer. Principles for designing dynamic performance support are discussed, including a systems approach, performer-centered design, awareness of situated cognition, organizational memory, and technology use.…

  18. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems includin...... molecular scale metal and semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and other nanostructures, e.g. nanotubes, “nanoflowers” etc.. The new structures offer both new electronic properties and highly confined novel charge transfer environments....

  19. The Role of Molecular Structure and Conformation in Polymer Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Hauff, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conjugated polymers have unique material properties that make them promising for a wide range of applications. The potential lies in the virtually infinite possibilities for creating new materials for specific applications by simply chemically tuning the molecular structure. Conjugated

  20. Jahn-Teller effect in molecular electronics: quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerblat, B.; Palii, A.; Clemente-Juan, J. M.; Coronado, E.

    2017-05-01

    The article summarizes the main results of application of the theory of the Jahn-Teller (JT) and pseudo JT effects to the description of molecular quantum dot cellular automata (QCA), a new paradigm of quantum computing. The following issues are discussed: 1) QCA as a new paradigm of quantum computing, principles and advantages; 2) molecular implementation of QCA; 3) role of the JT effect in charge trapping, encoding of binary information in the quantum cell and non-linear cell-cell response; 4) spin-switching in molecular QCA based on mixed-valence cell; 5) intervalence optical absorption in tetrameric molecular mixed-valence cell through the symmetry assisted approach to the multimode/multilevel JT and pseudo JT problems.

  1. Molecular orientation and electronic structure at organic heterojunction interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Zhong, Jian Qiang; Wee, Andrew T.S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Wei, E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, Suzhou (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Molecular orientation at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Energy level alignments at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Gap-states mediated interfacial energy level alignment. - Abstract: Due to the highly anisotropic nature of π-conjugated molecules, the molecular orientation in organic thin films can significantly affect light absorption, charge transport, energy level alignment (ELA) and hence device performance. Synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for probing molecular orientation. The aim of this review paper is to provide a balanced assessment on the investigation of molecular orientation at the organic–organic heterojunction (OOH) interface by NEXAFS, as well as the gap-states mediated orientation dependent energy level alignment at OOH interfaces. We highlight recent progress in elucidating molecular orientation at OOH interfaces dominated by various interfacial interactions, gap-states controlled orientation dependent energy level alignments at OOH interfaces, and the manipulations of molecular orientation and ELA in OOH.

  2. Electron correlation energy in confined two-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.L. [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Montgomery, H.E., E-mail: ed.montgomery@centre.ed [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Sen, K.D. [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Thompson, D.C. [Chemistry Systems and High Performance Computing, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharamaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States)

    2010-09-27

    Radial, angular and total correlation energies are calculated for four two-electron systems with atomic numbers Z=0-3 confined within an impenetrable sphere of radius R. We report accurate results for the non-relativistic, restricted Hartree-Fock and radial limit energies over a range of confinement radii from 0.05-10a{sub 0}. At small R, the correlation energies approach limiting values that are independent of Z while at intermediate R, systems with Z{>=}1 exhibit a characteristic maximum in the correlation energy resulting from an increase in the angular correlation energy which is offset by a decrease in the radial correlation energy.

  3. Unravelling the pH-dependence of a molecular photocatalytic system for hydrogen production† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc01349f Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Ernest; Gross, Manuela A.; Selim, Shababa

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalytic systems for the reduction of aqueous protons are strongly pH-dependent, but the origin of this dependency is still not fully understood. We have studied the effect of different degrees of acidity on the electron transfer dynamics and catalysis taking place in a homogeneous photocatalytic system composed of a phosphonated ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dye (RuP) and a nickel bis(diphosphine) electrocatalyst (NiP) in an aqueous ascorbic acid solution. Our approach is based on transient absorption spectroscopy studies of the efficiency of photo-reduction of RuP and NiP correlated with pH-dependent photocatalytic H2 production and the degree of catalyst protonation. The influence of these factors results in an observed optimum photoactivity at pH 4.5 for the RuP–NiP system. The electron transfer from photo-reduced RuP to NiP is efficient and independent of the pH value of the medium. At pH RuP photo-reduction by the sacrificial electron donor, ascorbic acid. At pH >4.5, the efficiency of the system is limited by the poor protonation of NiP, which inhibits its ability to reduce protons to hydrogen. We have therefore developed a rational strategy utilising transient absorption spectroscopy combined with bulk pH titration, electrocatalytic and photocatalytic experiments to disentangle the complex pH-dependent activity of the homogenous RuP–NiP photocatalytic system, which can be widely applied to other photocatalytic systems. PMID:28717491

  4. Design for Reliability of Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Sangwongwanich, Ariya

    2018-01-01

    Power density, efficiency, cost, and reliability are the major challenges when designing a power electronic system. Latest advancements in power semiconductor devices (e.g., silicon carbide devices) and topological innovations have vital contributions to power density and efficiency. Nevertheless......, dedicated heat sink systems for thermal management are required to dissipate the power losses in power electronic systems; otherwise, the power devices will be heated up and eventually fail to operate. In addition, in many mission critical applications (e.g., marine systems), the operating condition (i...

  5. Data base systems in electronic design engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of an integrated design data base system (DBMS) as it might apply to an electronic design company are discussed. Data elements of documentation, project specifications, project tracking, firmware, software, electronic and mechanical design can be integrated and managed through a single DBMS. Combining the attributes of a DBMS data handler with specialized systems and functional data can provide users with maximum flexibility, reduced redundancy, and increased overall systems performance. Although some system overhead is lost due to redundancy in transitory data, it is believed the combination of the two data types is advisable rather than trying to do all data handling through a single DBMS.

  6. Design for Reliability of Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    Advances in power electronics enable efficient and flexible processing of electric power in the application of renewable energy sources, electric vehicles, adjustable-speed drives, etc. More and more efforts are devoted to better power electronic systems in terms of reliability to ensure high......). A collection of methodologies based on Physics-of-Failure (PoF) approach and mission profile analysis are presented in this paper to perform reliability-oriented design of power electronic systems. The corresponding design procedures and reliability prediction models are provided. Further on, a case study...... on a 2.3 MW wind power converter is discussed with emphasis on the reliability critical components IGBTs. Different aspects of improving the reliability of the power converter are mapped. Finally, the challenges and opportunities to achieve more reliable power electronic systems are addressed....

  7. Electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions in high energy collisions with molecular oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, P; Nielsen, SB; Sørensen, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions Lys-Hn(n)+ (n = 7 - 17) and the concomitant formation of Lys-Hn(n+1)+. in high-energy collisions with molecular oxygen (laboratory kinetic energy = 50 x n keV). The cross section for electron loss increases with the charge state...... of the precursor from n = 7 to n = 11 and then remains constant when n increases further. The absolute size of the cross section ranges from 100 to 200 A2. The electron loss is modeled as an electron transfer process between lysozyme cations and molecular oxygen....

  8. Electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams--the new concept, benefits and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Boaz; Alon, Tal; Tsizin, Svetlana; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2015-11-01

    A new type of electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (EI-LC-MS with SMB) is described. This system and its operational methods are based on pneumatic spray formation of the LC liquid flow in a heated spray vaporization chamber, full sample thermal vaporization and subsequent electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams. The vaporized sample compounds are transferred into a supersonic nozzle via a flow restrictor capillary. Consequently, while the pneumatic spray is formed and vaporized at above atmospheric pressure the supersonic nozzle backing pressure is about 0.15 Bar for the formation of supersonic molecular beams with vibrationally cold sample molecules without cluster formation with the solvent vapor. The sample compounds are ionized in a fly-though EI ion source as vibrationally cold molecules in the SMB, resulting in 'Cold EI' (EI of vibrationally cold molecules) mass spectra that exhibit the standard EI fragments combined with enhanced molecular ions. We evaluated the EI-LC-MS with SMB system and demonstrated its effectiveness in NIST library sample identification which is complemented with the availability of enhanced molecular ions. The EI-LC-MS with SMB system is characterized by linear response of five orders of magnitude and uniform compound independent response including for non-polar compounds. This feature improves sample quantitation that can be approximated without compound specific calibration. Cold EI, like EI, is free from ion suppression and/or enhancement effects (that plague ESI and/or APCI) which facilitate faster LC separation because full separation is not essential. The absence of ion suppression effects enables the exploration of fast flow injection MS-MS as an alternative to lengthy LC-MS analysis. These features are demonstrated in a few examples, and the analysis of the main ingredients of Cannabis on a few Cannabis flower extracts is demonstrated. Finally, the advantages of

  9. Nuclear molecular structure in heavy mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctaedius, T.; Bargholtz, C.

    1989-04-01

    A study is made of nuclear molecular configurations involving one heavy mass partner. The stability of these configurations to mass flow and to fission is investigated as well as their population in fusion reactions. It is concluded that shell effects in combination with the effects of angular momentum may be important in stabilizing certain configurations. A possible relation of these configurations to the so called superdeformed states is pointed out. The spectrum of rotational and vibrational trasitions within molecular configurations is investigated. For sufficiently mass-asymmetric systems the engergies of vibrational transitions are comparable to the neutron separation energy. Gamma radiation from such transitions may then be observable above the background of statistical transitions. The gamma spectrum and the directional distribution of the radioation following fusion reactions with 12 C and 16 O are calculated. (authors)

  10. Molecular Simulation of Reacting Systems; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THOMPSON, AIDAN P.

    2002-01-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled, Molecular Simulation of Reacting Systems is presented. It describes efforts to incorporate chemical reaction events into the LAMMPS massively parallel molecular dynamics code. This was accomplished using a scheme in which several classes of reactions are allowed to occur in a probabilistic fashion at specified times during the MD simulation. Three classes of reaction were implemented: addition, chain transfer and scission. A fully parallel implementation was achieved using a checkerboarding scheme, which avoids conflicts due to reactions occurring on neighboring processors. The observed chemical evolution is independent of the number of processors used. The code was applied to two test applications: irreversible linear polymerization and thermal degradation chemistry

  11. Characterization of the Structural, Mechanical, and Electronic Properties of Fullerene Mixtures: A Molecular Simulations Description

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Aziz, Saadullah; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We investigate mixtures of fullerenes and fullerene derivatives, the most commonly used electron accepting materials in organic solar cells, by using a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. Our goal is to describe

  12. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT, is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT, the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  13. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  14. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ......Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  15. Control system in the technological electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boriskin, V.N.; Akchurin, Yu.I.; Bahmetev, N.N.; Gurin, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The special system has been developed for linac control.It controls the electron beam current,the energy and the position,protects the accelerating and scanning systems from the damage caused by the beam;blocks the modulator and the klystron amplifier in the case of intolerable operating modes;regulates the phase and power of the HF signals in the injecting system and also regulates the source power currents in the magnetic system

  16. The Intelligent Technologies of Electronic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianyu

    2017-08-01

    Based upon the synopsis of system intelligence and information services, this paper puts forward the attributes and the logic structure of information service, sets forth intelligent technology framework of electronic information system, and presents a series of measures, such as optimizing business information flow, advancing data decision capability, improving information fusion precision, strengthening deep learning application and enhancing prognostic and health management, and demonstrates system operation effectiveness. This will benefit the enhancement of system intelligence.

  17. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  18. Power Electronics in Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Teodorescu, Remus

    2006-01-01

    the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power systems, power production and end-user application. This paper discuss the most emerging renewable energy source, wind energy, which by means of power...... electronics is changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. By that wind power is also getting an added value in the power system operation....

  19. Electronic ignition system for internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowder, L W

    1980-11-20

    Mechanical ignition adjustment devices are sensitive to many effects, for example breakage, faults due to manufacturing tolerances, play in the linkage and the effect of a dirty or corrosive environment. It is therefore the purpose of the invention to provide an electronic ignition system which avoids the disadvantages of a mechanical system. The invention provides adjustment of the ignition point, which gives advance of the ignition timing with increasing speed. An output signal is formed, which supersedes the signal supplied by the electronic control system, so that the ignition is advanced. This also occurs with a larger crankshaft angle before top dead centre of the engine. The electronic control system combines with a source of AC time signals which has a generator as electrical transmitter and a DC battery and ignition coil. The rotor of the electrical generator is driven synchronised with the engine. Structural and functional details of the transistor control circuits are given in 5 patent claims.

  20. Polymeric and Molecular Materials for Advanced Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    we were able to substantially lower the HOMOs while preserving excellent TFT hole transport, and investigated their use in bulk- hetero - junction ...metal oxide semiconductors, which are prepared by a low-temperature “combustion synthesis” route invented at NU under AFOSR support and published...98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Introduction. CMOS, p/n- Junction Devices, and Flexible Electronics Flexible/printed electronics is a

  1. Electron-optical systems for Mott polarimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishkova, T.Ya.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikova, I.P.; Petrov, V.N.; Shpak, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Electron-optical systems, forming polarized electron beams from solid and gaseous sources at a Mott detector with operating potentials of 20 and 50 kV, have been theoretically investigated. The integral EOS creates a beam <2.6 nm in diameter at the target of the Mott detector for secondary electrons with energies of 1-20 eV and exit angles of 0 -60 . The differential EOS provides an energy resolution of 2-6% within the range of 3-2000 eV, the illumination being 5-13% for a 4π angle; at the target of the Mott detector it creates a beam of 1-6 mm in diameter. Both systems have been constructed at the laboratory of Spin-polarized Electron Spectroscopy (Department of Experimental Physics) at St. Petersburg State Technical University. ((orig.))

  2. Sensor Arrays and Electronic Tongue Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel del Valle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent work performed with electronic tongue systems utilizing electrochemical sensors. The electronic tongues concept is a new trend in sensors that uses arrays of sensors together with chemometric tools to unravel the complex information generated. Initial contributions and also the most used variant employ conventional ion selective electrodes, in which it is named potentiometric electronic tongue. The second important variant is the one that employs voltammetry for its operation. As chemometric processing tool, the use of artificial neural networks as the preferred data processing variant will be described. The use of the sensor arrays inserted in flow injection or sequential injection systems will exemplify attempts made to automate the operation of electronic tongues. Significant use of biosensors, mainly enzyme-based, to form what is already named bioelectronic tongue will be also presented. Application examples will be illustrated with selected study cases from the Sensors and Biosensors Group at the Autonomous University of Barcelona.

  3. On the theory of a dissociative recombination of electrons and molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubkov, G.V.; Drygin, S.V.; Ivanov, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper deals with a detailed description of molecular recombination of the electron and two-atom molecular ion, as well as with consideration of the this complex quantum-mechanical process. It is shown that this relationship results in a displacement of vibrational resonance levels and deformation of line contour

  4. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  5. Proceedings of the 2. Latin American Meeting on Atomic, Molecular and Electronic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, E.C.; Pinho, A.G. de; Souza, G.G.B. de.

    1988-01-01

    Annals of the II Latin American Meeting on Atomic, Molecular and Electronic Collisions. Over than 50 people from Latin America participated on this meeting giving talks on different subjects (theoretical and experimental), related to atomic and molecular physics, as well as, nuclear physics. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Programmable electronic system design & verification utilizing DFM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtermans, M.J.M.; Apostolakis, G.E.; Brombacher, A.C.; Karydas, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DIM) during the design and verification of programmable electronic safety-related systems. The safety system consists of hardware as well as software. This paper explains and demonstrates the use of DIM to

  7. Design management of electronic data interchange systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, van H.W.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    This study deals with the management of the design process of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) systems. Its objectives are (1) to investigate the design process of EDI systems from a practical and theoretical perspective; (2) to develop a model to describe factors relevant to EDI

  8. Geometric and electronic structures of molecular ions from high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, K.O.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the characteristics of heavy ion collision and of beam foil spectroscopy. It discusses the kinematic consequences of the high energies and presents results from ''Coulomb explosion'' and structure determination of molecular ions. It demonstrates that studies of molecular ions with accelerators can provide electronic and geometric structure information of molecules or molecular ions and points out that the understanding of the microscopic processes at such high energies is incomplete and needs further experimental and theoretical efforts

  9. Electron-phonon interactions in correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysokinski, K.I.

    1996-01-01

    There exist attempts to describe the superconducting mechanism operating in HTS as based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations. It is not our intention to dwell on the superconducting mechanism, even though this is very a important issue. The main aim is to discuss the problem of interplay between electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions in correlated systems. We believe such analysis can be of importance for various materials and not only HTS'S. We shall however mainly refer to experiments on this last class of superconductors. Severe complications are to be expected by studying the problem. As is well known electron correlations are very important in narrow band systems, where the relevant electronic scale E F is quite small. In those circumstances, the phonon energy scale ω D is of comparable magnitude, with the ratio ω D /E F of order 1 signalling a possible break down of the Migdal - Eliashberg description of the electron-phonon interaction in metals. Here we shall assume the validity of the Migdal-Eliashberg approximation and concentrate on the mutual influence of electron and phonon subsystems. In the next section we shall discuss experimental motivation for and theoretical work related to the present problem. Section 3 contains a brief discussion of our theory. It is a self-consistent theory a la Migdal with strong correlations treated with an auxiliary boson technique. We conclude with results and their discussion. (orig.)

  10. Superluminescence from an optically pumped molecular tunneling junction by injection of plasmon induced hot electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Braun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate a bias-driven superluminescent point light-source based on an optically pumped molecular junction (gold substrate/self-assembled molecular monolayer/gold tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, operating at ambient conditions and providing almost three orders of magnitude higher electron-to-photon conversion efficiency than electroluminescence induced by inelastic tunneling without optical pumping. A positive, steadily increasing bias voltage induces a step-like rise of the Stokes shifted optical signal emitted from the junction. This emission is strongly attenuated by reversing the applied bias voltage. At high bias voltage, the emission intensity depends non-linearly on the optical pump power. The enhanced emission can be modelled by rate equations taking into account hole injection from the tip (anode into the highest occupied orbital of the closest substrate-bound molecule (lower level and radiative recombination with an electron from above the Fermi level (upper level, hence feeding photons back by stimulated emission resonant with the gap mode. The system reflects many essential features of a superluminescent light emitting diode.

  11. Electron-ion-x-ray spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; Deslattes, R.D.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a spectrometer system developed for electron, ion, and x-ray spectroscopy of gas-phase atoms and molecules following inner-shell excitation by tunable synchrotron radiation. The spectrometer has been used on beamline X-24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source for excitation-dependent studies of Ar L-shell and K-shell photoexcitation and vacancy decay processes. The instrumentation and experimental methods are discussed, and examples are given of electron spectra and coincidence spectra between electrons and fluorescent x-rays

  12. Electron localization in one-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The pure regional localization and the global localization have been investigated via the inverse participation ratio and te moment analysis. If the envelop function of a localized state is more complicated than the simple exponential function e sup(-r/xi), the inverse participation ratio is inadequate to describe the localization properties of an electron. This is the case discovered recently in a stereo-irregular chain fo atoms including the electron-electron interaction and the structure disorder. The localization properties in this system are analysed in terms of the moments. (Author) [pt

  13. Power electronics for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources......, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics are changing from being minor energy sources to be acting as important power sources in the energy system....

  14. Microelectromechanical systems integrating molecular spin crossover actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique-Juarez, Maria D. [LCC, CNRS and Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, F-31077 Toulouse (France); LAAS, CNRS and Université de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Rat, Sylvain; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine, E-mail: liviu.nicu@laas.fr, E-mail: azzedine.bousseksou@lcc-toulouse.fr [LCC, CNRS and Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Mathieu, Fabrice; Saya, Daisuke; Séguy, Isabelle; Leïchlé, Thierry; Nicu, Liviu, E-mail: liviu.nicu@laas.fr, E-mail: azzedine.bousseksou@lcc-toulouse.fr [LAAS, CNRS and Université de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2016-08-08

    Silicon MEMS cantilevers coated with a 200 nm thin layer of the molecular spin crossover complex [Fe(H{sub 2}B(pz){sub 2}){sub 2}(phen)] (H{sub 2}B(pz){sub 2} = dihydrobis(pyrazolyl)borate and phen = 1,10-phenantroline) were actuated using an external magnetic field and their resonance frequency was tracked by means of integrated piezoresistive detection. The light-induced spin-state switching of the molecules from the ground low spin to the metastable high spin state at 10 K led to a well-reproducible shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency (Δf{sub r} = −0.52 Hz). Control experiments at different temperatures using coated as well as uncoated devices along with simple calculations support the assignment of this effect to the spin transition. This latter translates into changes in mechanical behavior of the cantilever due to the strong spin-state/lattice coupling. A guideline for the optimization of device parameters is proposed so as to efficiently harness molecular scale movements for large-scale mechanical work, thus paving the road for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) actuators based on molecular materials.

  15. The Optical Bichromatic Force in Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Leland; Galica, Scott; Eyler, E. E.

    2015-05-01

    The optical bichromatic force has been demonstrated to be useful for slowing atomic beams much more rapidly than radiative forces. Through numerical simulations, we examine several aspects of applying the bichromatic force to molecular beams. One is the unavoidable existence of out-of-system radiative decay, requiring one or more repumping beams. We find that the average deceleration varies strongly with the repumping intensity, but when using optimal parameters, the force approaches the limiting value allowed by population statistics. Another consideration is the effect of fine and hyperfine structure. We examine a simplified multlevel model based on the B X transition in calcium monofluoride. To circumvent optical pumping into coherent dark states, we include two possible schemes: (1) a skewed dc magnetic field, and (2) rapid optical polarization switching. Our results indicate that the bichromatic force remains a viable option for creating large forces in molecular beams, with a reduction in the peak force by approximately an order of magnitude compared to a two-level atom, but little effect on the velocity range over which the force is effective. We also describe our progress towards experimental tests of the bichromatic force on a molecular beam of CaF. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Molecular marker systems for Oenothera genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome-genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9.8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed.

  17. Bio-integrated electronics and sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Webb, R. Chad; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sungyoung; Rogers, John A.

    2013-05-01

    Skin-mounted epidermal electronics, a strategy for bio-integrated electronics, provide an avenue to non-invasive monitoring of clinically relevant physiological signals for healthcare applications. Current conventional systems consist of single-point sensors fastened to the skin with adhesives, and sometimes with conducting gels, which limits their use outside of clinical settings due to loss of adhesion and irritation to the user. In order to facilitate extended use of skin-mounted healthcare sensors without disrupting everyday life, we envision electronic monitoring systems that integrate seamlessly with the skin below the notice of the user. This manuscript reviews recent significant results towards our goal of wearable electronic sensor systems for long-term monitoring of physiological signals. Ultra-thin epidermal electronic systems (EES) are demonstrated for extended use on the skin, in a conformal manner, including during everyday bathing and sleeping activities. We describe the assessment of clinically relevant physiological parameters, such as electrocardiograms (ECG), electromyograms (EMG), electroencephalograms (EEG), temperature, mechanical strain and thermal conductivity, using examples of multifunctional EES devices. Additionally, we demonstrate capability for real life application of EES by monitoring the system functionality, which has no discernible change, during cyclic fatigue testing.

  18. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  19. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  20. Doping Phosphorene with Holes and Electrons through Molecular Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Rajesh, S; Manjunatha, S; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, C N R

    2017-11-03

    An important aspect of phosphorene, the novel two-dimensional semiconductor, is whether holes and electrons can both be doped in this material. Some reports found that only electrons can be preferentially doped into phosphorene. There are some theoretical calculations showing charge-transfer interaction with both tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). We have carried out an investigation of chemical doping of phosphorene by a variety of electron donor and acceptor molecules, employing both experiment and theory, Raman scattering being a crucial aspect of the study. We find that both electron acceptors and donors interact with phosphorene by charge-transfer, with the acceptors having more marked effects. All the three Raman bands of phosphorene soften and exhibit band broadening on interaction with both donor and acceptor molecules. First-principles calculations establish the occurrence of charge-transfer between phosphorene with donors as well as acceptors. The absence of electron-hole asymmetry is noteworthy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Communication: Electronic and transport properties of molecular junctions under a finite bias: A dual mean field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuanglong; Feng, Yuan Ping; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We show that when a molecular junction is under an external bias, its properties cannot be uniquely determined by the total electron density in the same manner as the density functional theory for ground state properties. In order to correctly incorporate bias-induced nonequilibrium effects, we present a dual mean field (DMF) approach. The key idea is that the total electron density together with the density of current-carrying electrons are sufficient to determine the properties of the system. Two mean fields, one for current-carrying electrons and the other one for equilibrium electrons can then be derived. Calculations for a graphene nanoribbon junction show that compared with the commonly used ab initio transport theory, the DMF approach could significantly reduce the electric current at low biases due to the non-equilibrium corrections to the mean field potential in the scattering region

  2. A Flexible Electronic Commerce Recommendation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Songjie

    Recommendation systems have become very popular in E-commerce websites. Many of the largest commerce websites are already using recommender technologies to help their customers find products to purchase. An electronic commerce recommendation system learns from a customer and recommends products that the customer will find most valuable from among the available products. But most recommendation methods are hard-wired into the system and they support only fixed recommendations. This paper presented a framework of flexible electronic commerce recommendation system. The framework is composed by user model interface, recommendation engine, recommendation strategy model, recommendation technology group, user interest model and database interface. In the recommender strategy model, the method can be collaborative filtering, content-based filtering, mining associate rules method, knowledge-based filtering method or the mixed method. The system mapped the implementation and demand through strategy model, and the whole system would be design as standard parts to adapt to the change of the recommendation strategy.

  3. Collimation system for electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, R.J.; Carter, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An electron collimation system for electron arc therapy treatments consists of a slit collimation system which is movable with the electron beam applicator and is designed to allow for dose compensation in the sagittal direction and a hoop-and-clamp assembly for final field shaping. By correctly designing the shape of the slit in the former and properly adjusting the components of the latter, it is possible to accomplish quite uniform shielding without causing any weight of the shielding material to rest on the patient. The slit collimation system has a specially shaped aperture for confining the radiation beam. The hoop-and-clamp assembly has hoops and clamps which locate shielding over the patient's body. The shielding locating clamps are adjustably movable radially with respect to the hoops. (author)

  4. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnig, C.B.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of solvent reorganization in the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction, i.e. O2+e-¿O2-, modeled as taking place in the outer Helmholtz plane. The first electron transfer step is usually considered the rate-determining step from many

  6. Electron and phonon drag in thermoelectric transport through coherent molecular conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per

    2016-01-01

    We study thermoelectric transport through a coherent molecular conductor connected to two electron and two phonon baths using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We focus on the mutual drag between electron and phonon transport as a result of ‘momentum’ transfer, which happens only when...

  7. Electronic Resources Management System: Recommendation Report 2017

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-05-01

    This recommendation report provides an overview of the selection process for the new Electronic Resources Management System. The library has decided to move away from Innovative Interfaces Millennium ERM module. The library reviewed 3 system as potential replacements namely: Proquest 360 Resource Manager, Ex Libris Alma and Open Source CORAL ERMS. After comparing and trialling the systems, it was decided to go for Proquest 360 Resource Manager.

  8. Electronic instrumentation system for pulsed neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, J.; Igielski, A.; Kowalik, W.

    1982-01-01

    An essential point of pulsed neutron measurement of thermal neutron parameters for different materials is the registration of the thermal neutron die-away curve after a fast neutron bursts have been injected into the system. An electronic instrumentation system which is successfully applied for pulsed neutron measurements is presented. An important part of the system is the control unit which has been designed and built in the Laboratory of Neutron Parameters of Materials. (author)

  9. The second generation of electronic blasting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammelmann, F.; Petzold, J. [Dynamit Nobel GmbH (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    8 years after the market introduction of the first commercial electronic detonator - DYNATRONIC - the paper describes a new area of electronic blasting systems Made in Germany: i-kon. The results of a joint development between Dynamit Nobel and Orica is a unique universal electronic detonator, which is as simple to use as a standard non-electric detonator. The delay time or delay interval is not factory preprogrammed and the system is not based on a numbered system like conventional detonators. The miner or Blaster decides on site which delay timing he likes to use and is programming the whole blast on site. The new i-kon system allows delay times between 0 and 8000 ms by increments of 1 ms. With the control equipment it is possible to blast up to 1600 detonators in a single blast. The paper describes the construction and functionality of this new electronic blasting system - manufactured and developed by Precision Blasting Systems, a joint venture between Orica and Dynamic Nobel. (orig.)

  10. Versatile Molecular Silver Ink Platform for Printed Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Arnold J; Paquet, Chantal; Mozenson, Olga; Djavani-Tabrizi, Iden; Deore, Bhavana; Liu, Xiangyang; Lopinski, Gregory P; James, Robert; Hettak, Khelifa; Shaker, Jafar; Momciu, Adrian; Ferrigno, Julie; Ferrand, Olivier; Hu, Jian Xiong; Lafrenière, Sylvie; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-05-24

    A silver molecular ink platform formulated for screen, inkjet, and aerosol jet printing is presented. A simple formulation comprising silver neodecanoate, ethyl cellulose, and solvent provides improved performance versus that of established inks, yet with improved economics. Thin, screen-printed traces with exceptional electrical (molecular ink platform enables an aerosol jet-compatible ink that yields conductive features on glass with 2× bulk resistivity and strong adhesion to various plastic substrates. An inkjet formulation is also used to print top source/drain contacts and demonstrate printed high-mobility thin film transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. TFTs with mobility values of ∼25 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and current on/off ratios >10 4 were obtained, performance similar to that of evaporated metal contacts in analogous devices.

  11. Classical electron ionization mass spectra in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Alexander; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-09-01

    A major benefit of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and its fly-through ion source is the ability to obtain electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules (cold EI), which show enhanced molecular ions. However, GC/MS with an SMB also has the flexibility to perform 'classical EI' mode of operation which provides mass spectra to mimic those in commercial 70 eV electron ionization MS libraries. Classical EI in SMB is obtained through simple reduction of the helium make-up gas flow rate, which reduces the SMB cooling efficiency; hence the vibrational temperatures of the molecules are similar to those in traditional EI ion sources. In classical EI-SMB mode, the relative abundance of the molecular ion can be tuned and, as a result, excellent identification probabilities and very good matching factors to the NIST MS library are obtained. Classical EI-SMB with the fly-through dual cage ion source has analyte sensitivity similar to that of the standard EI ion source of a basic GC/MS system. The fly-through EI ion source in combination with the SMB interface can serve for cold EI, classical EI-SMB, and cluster chemical ionization (CCI) modes of operation, all easily exchangeable through a simple and quick change (not involving hardware). Furthermore, the fly-through ion source eliminates sample scattering from the walls of the ion source, and thus it offers full sample inertness, tailing-free operation, and no ion-molecule reaction interferences. It is also robust and enables increased column flow rate capability without affecting the sensitivity.

  12. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, U. M.; Lee, K. B.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The use of renewable energy sources are increased because of the depletion of natural resources and the increasing pollution level from energy production. The wind energy and the solar energy are most widely used among the renewable energy sources. Power electronics is needed in almost all kinds...... of renewable energy system. It controls the renewable source and interfaces with the load effectively, which can be grid-connected or van work in stand-alone mode. In this presentation, overview of wind and photovoltaic energy systems are introduced. Next, the power electronic circuits behind the most common...

  13. Electronic system of TBR tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.P. da.

    1980-01-01

    The electronics developed as a part of the TBR project, which involves the construction of a small tokamak at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo, is described. On the basis of tokamak parameter values, the electronics for the toroidal field, ohmic/heating and vertical field systems is presented, including capacitors bank, switches, triggering circuits and power supplies. A controlled power oscilator used in discharge cleaning and pre-ionization is also described. The performance of the system as a function of the desired plasma parameters is discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  15. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  16. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  17. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  18. Characterization of the Structural, Mechanical, and Electronic Properties of Fullerene Mixtures: A Molecular Simulations Description

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2017-10-06

    We investigate mixtures of fullerenes and fullerene derivatives, the most commonly used electron accepting materials in organic solar cells, by using a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. Our goal is to describe how mixing affects the molecular packing, mechanical properties, and electronic parameters (site energy disorder, electronic couplings) of interest for solar-cell applications. Specifically, we consider mixtures of: (i) C60 and C70; (ii) C60, C70, and C84, and (iii) PC61BM and PC71BM.

  19. Investigation of the molecular conformations of ethanol using electron momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, C G; Luo, Z H; Huang, Y R; Liu, K; Zhang, S F; Deng, J K; Hajgato, B; Morini, F; Deleuze, M S

    2008-01-01

    The valence electronic structure and momentum-space electron density distributions of ethanol have been investigated with our newly constructed high-resolution electron momentum spectrometer. The measurements are compared to thermally averaged simulations based on Kohn-Sham (B3LYP) orbital densities as well as one-particle Green's function calculations of ionization spectra and Dyson orbital densities, assuming Boltzmann's statistical distribution of the molecular structure over the two energy minima defining the anti and gauche conformers. One-electron ionization energies and momentum distributions in the outer-valence region were found to be highly dependent upon the molecular conformation. Calculated momentum distributions indeed very sensitively reflect the distortions and topological changes that molecular orbitals undergo due to the internal rotation of the hydroxyl group, and thereby exhibit variations which can be traced experimentally. The B3LYP model Kohn-Sham orbital densities are overall in good agreement with the experimental distributions, and closely resemble benchmark ADC(3) Dyson orbital densities. Both approaches fail to quantitatively reproduce the experimental momentum distributions characterizing the highest occupied molecular orbital. Since electron momentum spectroscopy measurements at various electron impact energies indicate that the plane wave impulse approximation is valid, this discrepancy between theory and experiment is tentatively ascribed to thermal disorder, i.e. large-amplitude and thermally induced dynamical distortions of the molecular structure in the gas phase

  20. A Decaheme Cytochrome as a Molecular Electron Conduit in Dye-Sensitized Photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ee Taek; Sheikh, Khizar; Orchard, Katherine L; Hojo, Daisuke; Radu, Valentin; Lee, Chong-Yong; Ainsworth, Emma; Lockwood, Colin; Gross, Manuela A; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2015-01-01

    In nature, charge recombination in light-harvesting reaction centers is minimized by efficient charge separation. Here, it is aimed to mimic this by coupling dye-sensitized TiO2 nanocrystals to a decaheme protein, MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, where the 10 hemes of MtrC form a ≈7-nm-long molecular wire between the TiO2 and the underlying electrode. The system is assembled by forming a densely packed MtrC film on an ultra-flat gold electrode, followed by the adsorption of approximately 7 nm TiO2 nanocrystals that are modified with a phosphonated bipyridine Ru(II) dye (RuP). The step-by-step construction of the MtrC/TiO2 system is monitored with (photo)electrochemistry, quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Photocurrents are dependent on the redox state of the MtrC, confirming that electrons are transferred from the TiO2 nanocrystals to the surface via the MtrC conduit. In other words, in these TiO2/MtrC hybrid photodiodes, MtrC traps the conduction-band electrons from TiO2 before transferring them to the electrode, creating a photobioelectrochemical system in which a redox protein is used to mimic the efficient charge separation found in biological photosystems. PMID:26180522

  1. Automatic control variac system for electronic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuocheng; Wang Dan; Jing Lan; Qiao Weimin; Ma Yunhai

    2006-01-01

    An automatic control variac system is designed in order to satisfy the controlling requirement of the electronic accelerator developed by the Institute. Both design and operational principles, structure of the system as well as the software of industrial PC and micro controller unit are described. The interfaces of the control module are RS232 and RS485. A fiber optical interface (FOC) could be set up if an industrial FOC network is necessary, which will extend the filed of its application and make the communication of the system better. It is shown in practice that the system can adjust the variac output voltage automatically and assure the accurate and automatic control of the electronic accelerator. The system is designed in accordance with the general design principles and possesses the merits such as easy operation and maintenance, good expansibility, and low cost, thus it could also be used in other industrial branches. (authors)

  2. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  3. Critical issues in an electronic documentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Charlene R; Nebeker, Jonathan R

    2007-10-11

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA), of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs has instituted a medical record (EMR) that includes electronic documentation of all narrative components of the medical record. To support clinicians using the system, multiple efforts have been instituted to ease the creation of narrative reports. Although electronic documentation is easier to read and improves access to information, it also may create new and additional hazards for users. This study is the first step in a series of studies to evaluate the issues surrounding the creation and use of electronic documentation. Eighty-eight providers across multiple clinical roles were interviewed in 10 primary care sites in the VA system. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and qualitatively analyzed for themes. In addition, specific questions were asked about perceived harm due to electronic documentation practices. Five themes relating to difficulties with electronic documentation were identified: 1) information overload; 2) hidden information; 3) lack of trust; 4) communication; 5) decision-making. Three providers reported that they knew of an incident where current documentation practices had caused patient harm and over 75% of respondents reported significant mis-trust of the system.

  4. Multiple-electron removal and molecular fragmentation of CO by fast F4+ impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Ginther, S.G.; Carnes, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple-electron removal from and molecular fragmentation of carbon monoxide molecules caused by collisions with 1-MeV/amu F 4+ ions were studied using the coincidence time-of-flight technique. In these collisions, multiple-electron removal of the target molecule is a dominant process. Cross sections for the different levels of ionization of the CO molecule during the collision were determined. The relative cross sections of ionization decrease with increasing number of electrons removed in a similar way as seen in atomic targets. This behavior is in agreement with a two-step mechanism, where first the molecule is ionized by a Franck-Condon ionization and then the molecular ion dissociates. Most of the highly charged intermediate states of the molecule dissociate rapidly. Only CO + and CO 2+ molecular ions have been seen to survive long enough to be detected as molecular ions. The relative cross sections for the different breakup channels were evaluated for collisions in which the molecule broke into two charged fragments as well as for collisions where only a single charged molecular ion or fragment were produced. The average charge state of each fragment resulting from CO Q+ →C i+ +O j+ breakup increases with the number of electrons removed from the molecule approximately following the relationship bar i=bar j=Q/2 as long as K-shell electrons are not removed. This does not mean that the charge-state distribution is exactly symmetric, as, in general, removing electrons from the carbon fragment is slightly more likely than removing electrons from the oxygen due to the difference in binding energy. The cross sections for molecular breakup into a charged fragment and a neutral fragment drop rapidly with an increasing number of electrons removed

  5. A parity function for studying the molecular electronic structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmider, Hartmut

    1996-01-01

    Sections through the molecular Wigner function with zero momentum variable are shown to provide important information about the off-diagonal regions of the spinless one-particle reduced density matrix. Since these regions are characteristic for the bonding situation in molecules, the sections...... are qualitatively even more affected by the presence of chemical bonds than a complementary projection, the reciprocal form factor. In this paper we discuss, on the grounds of a variety of examples, how this rather simple function may aid the understanding of the chemical bond on a one-particle level. (C) 1996...

  6. From Molecular Electronics to Solar Thermal Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine Tetzschner

    The Sun's signicant resource potential provides a solution for the world's increasing energy demand in a sustainable and responsible manner. However, the intrinsic property of the on-o cycles of the solar irradiation, i.e. daynight, sunny-cloudy, and summer-winter, constitutes a signicant challenge...... for the utilization of solar energy. An eective technology for storing the solar energy is required. This thesis focuses on solar thermal energy storage in molecules, since it oers a very compact and eective storage method. The rst chapter after the introduction of the thesis, chapter two, introduces the fundamental...... properties of the molecule, i.e. the electronic behaviour of the molecule in dierent environments, which is a key property for investigations of solar energy storage. The main focus of the research is on the electron transport in the Coulomb blockade regime. The third chapter goes into the challenge...

  7. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  8. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A micro seismometer based on molecular electronic transducer technology for planetary exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Rui; Carande, Bryce; Oiler, Jonathan; Zaitsev, Dmitri; Agafonov, Vadim; Yu, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    This letter describes an implementation of micromachined seismometer based on molecular electronic transducer (MET) technology. As opposed to a solid inertial mass, MET seismometer senses the movement of liquid electrolyte relative to fixed electrodes. The employment of micro-electro-mechanical systems techniques reduces the internal size of the sensing cell to 1μm and improves the reproducibility of the device. For operating bias of 600 mV, a sensitivity of 809 V/(m/s 2 ) was measured under acceleration of 400μg(g≡9.81m/s 2 ) at 0.32 Hz. A −115 dB (relative to (m/s 2 )/√(Hz)) noise level at 1 Hz was achieved. This work develops an alternative paradigm of seismic sensing device with small size, high sensitivity, low noise floor, high shock tolerance, and independence of installation angle, which is promising for next generation seismometers for planetary exploration.

  10. ELECTRONIC PAYMENT SYSTEM AND ITS PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Milutinovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All developed countries are in transition from the IT economy to a web economy - the biggest technological innovation that will have a long-term positive effect on the formation of the economic growth rate, the major structural changes and on the differentiated effects on the economic areas that are, at a faster or a slower rate, being included in this technological change. The electronic commerce or e-commerce has a huge potential for development. The electronic commerce between the companies (B-2-B is significantly greater compared to retail electronic commerce (B-2-C. In both spheres of trade, the Internet is used as a platform for the transfer of information and for concluding business deals. Market economy requires Accelerated Payment Processing which is achieved by introducing and improving the electronic payment procedures. There is an emphasized dichotomy between the two spheres of the payment system: large-value and small-value payments. The large value payment systems can be described as the arteries of the payment system, and the small-value transfer systems as a complex network of veins that bind the entire economy.

  11. Accounting Systems and the Electronic Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a systems approach to accounting instruction and examines it from the viewpoint of four components: people (titles and responsibilities, importance of interaction), forms (nonpaper records such as microfiche, floppy disks, hard disks), procedures (for example, electronic funds transfer), and technology (for example, electronic…

  12. Support system of electronic health cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Nechiporenko

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Made the survey online sources regarding the specification of functions of systems support electronic medical records. Given the tendency to attract mobile devices to conduct an array of medical data expedient development of EHR, which can be installed on a personal mobile device.

  13. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  14. Radiation from systems with relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Khalilov, V.R.; Bagrov, V.G.; Nikitin, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Different methods of generation of electromagnetic radiation in the course of electron motion in external electromagnetic fields are considered. Singularities of ''free electron lasers'' (FEL), synchrotronous, ondulator and Compton radiation sources are discussed. The effect of induced radiation of electrons moving in a magnetic field is studied on the basis of the quantum theory methods. The results obtained are compared with the results of the classical theory. The theoretical and experimental results of the main singularities of the ondulator radiation (OR) are presented. It is shown that when the recoil effects are negligible and nonequidistancy of the energy spectrum of an electron in a magnetic field is of an error character, the results for the dose rate calculated by the quantum and classical theory methods completely coincide in the range of great filling numbers. Both in the quantum and classical theories the effects of the induced radiation of electrons moving in external electromagnetic fields (nonstationary in a general case) of a rather general type depend on two main mechanisms, which are nonequidistancy of the energy spectrum and the recoil effect (the quantum theory); appearance of phase and longitudinal electron bunching under the effect of an alternating radiation field (the classical theory). On the basis of the investigations the conclusion is made that OR can be successfully used for measuring the charged particle beam parameters (dispersion of angular spread and the absolute energy), as well as for measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field intensity in a space-periodic system

  15. Soft errors in modern electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaidis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive presentation of the most advanced research results and technological developments enabling understanding, qualifying and mitigating the soft errors effect in advanced electronics, including the fundamental physical mechanisms of radiation induced soft errors, the various steps that lead to a system failure, the modelling and simulation of soft error at various levels (including physical, electrical, netlist, event driven, RTL, and system level modelling and simulation), hardware fault injection, accelerated radiation testing and natural environment testing, s

  16. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  17. Molecular materials and devices: developing new functional systems based on the coordination chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Henrique E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available At the onset of the nanotechnology age, molecular designing of materials and single molecule studies are opening wide possibilities of using molecular systems in electronic and photonic devices, as well as in technological applications based on molecular switching or molecular recognition. In this sense, inorganic chemists are privileged by the possibility of using the basic strategies of coordination chemistry to build up functional supramolecular materials, conveying the remarkable chemical properties of the metal centers and the characteristics of the ancillary ligands. Coordination chemistry also provides effective self-assembly strategies based on specific metal-ligand affinity and stereochemistry. Several molecular based materials, derived from inorganic and metal-organic compounds are focused on this article, with emphasis on new supramolecular porphyrins and porphyrazines, metal-clusters and metal-polyimine complexes. Such systems are also discussed in terms of their applications in catalysis, sensors and molecular devices.

  18. Electron and nuclear spin system polarization in semiconductors by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharchenya, B; Flejsher, V

    1981-02-01

    Discussed are the principles of optical electron spin orientation, dynamic polarization and cooling of nuclear spin systems in optical electron orientation, and behavioural characteristics of bound electron and nuclear spin systems of a semiconductor in the optical orientation situation.

  19. Charge migration and charge transfer in molecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jakob Wörner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of charge at the molecular level plays a fundamental role in many areas of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science. Today, more than 60 years after the seminal work of R. A. Marcus, charge transfer is still a very active field of research. An important recent impetus comes from the ability to resolve ever faster temporal events, down to the attosecond time scale. Such a high temporal resolution now offers the possibility to unravel the most elementary quantum dynamics of both electrons and nuclei that participate in the complex process of charge transfer. This review covers recent research that addresses the following questions. Can we reconstruct the migration of charge across a molecule on the atomic length and electronic time scales? Can we use strong laser fields to control charge migration? Can we temporally resolve and understand intramolecular charge transfer in dissociative ionization of small molecules, in transition-metal complexes and in conjugated polymers? Can we tailor molecular systems towards specific charge-transfer processes? What are the time scales of the elementary steps of charge transfer in liquids and nanoparticles? Important new insights into each of these topics, obtained from state-of-the-art ultrafast spectroscopy and/or theoretical methods, are summarized in this review.

  20. A Strategy to Suppress Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions Using pi-Stacked Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian; Strange, Mikkel; Duchemin, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    to suppress phonon transport in graphene-based molecular junctions preserving high electronic power factor, using nonbonded pi-stackal systems. Using first-principles calculations, we find that the thermal conductance of pi-stacked systems can be reduced by about 95%, compared with that of a covalently bonded...

  1. Polymeric and Molecular Materials for Advanced Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    C8H17) films on SiO2 exhibit electron mobilities in air > 0.2 cm 2 /Vs. Electrochemistry reveals reduction potentials ~ 0.0 V vs. S.C.E.; hence...enable low-voltage single-walled carbon nanotube and ZnO nanowire transistors, and can be integrated with GaAs JFETs (Fig. 9). Because of the very...large mobilities achieved in such devices (e ~ 3000 cm 2 V -1 s -1 for ZnO Figure 9. Top. Schematic representation of the TFT components of an

  2. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions

  3. Electron dynamics inside short-coherence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Giulio; Bordone, Paolo; Jacoboni, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical results on electron dynamics inside nanometric systems, where the coherence of the electron ensemble is maintained in a very short region. The contacts are supposed to spoil such a coherence, therefore the interference processes between the carrier wavefunction and the internal potential profile can be affected by the proximity of the contacts. The problem has been analysed by using the Wigner-function formalism. For very short devices, transport properties, such as tunnelling through potential barriers, are significantly influenced by the distance between the contacts

  4. The electron-neutrino system, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic kinetic gas theory is applied to a mixture of electrons and electronic neutrinos. The phenomena of diffusion are especially studied in this system, assuming properties comparable to those of the universe in the lepton era as assumed in the hot big bang theory: a hot (Tapproximately 10 12 K), dense (n = 10 38 ) mixture, colliding elastically. An expression for the diffusion coefficient is derived and numerical values are computed as a function of the reduced temperature z -1 = kT/mc 2 , assuming equal number densities

  5. Development of time-resolved electron momentum spectroscopy. Toward real-time imaging of frontier electrons in molecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2016-01-01

    This report will introduce a new experimental technique to readers, which we would like to propose towards advances in the field of molecular reaction dynamics. It is time-resolved electron momentum spectroscopy and aims to take in momentum space snapshots of the rapid change of molecular orbitals, which is the driving force behind any structural changes occurring in transient molecules. Following a description of the working principle of the technique, some preliminary result will be presented in order to illustrate the current performance of the apparatus. (author)

  6. Shuttlecock-Shaped Molecular Rectifier: Asymmetric Electron Transport Coupled with Controlled Molecular Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taekhee; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee

    2017-07-12

    A fullerene derivative with five hydroxyphenyl groups attached around a pentagon, (4-HOC 6 H 4 ) 5 HC 60 (1), has shown an asymmetric current-voltage (I-V) curve in a conducting atomic force microscopy experiment on gold. Such molecular rectification has been ascribed to the asymmetric distribution of frontier molecular orbitals over its shuttlecock-shaped structure. Our nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) indeed exhibit an asymmetric I-V curve for 1 standing up between two Au(111) electrodes, but the resulting rectification ratio (RR ∼ 3) is insufficient to explain the wide range of RR observed in experiments performed under a high bias voltage. Therefore, we formulate a hypothesis that high RR (>10) may come from molecular orientation switching induced by a strong electric field applied between two electrodes. Indeed, molecular dynamics simulations of a self-assembled monolayer of 1 on Au(111) show that the orientation of 1 can be switched between standing-up and lying-on-the-side configurations in a manner to align its molecular dipole moment with the direction of the applied electric field. The DFT-NEGF calculations taking into account such field-induced reorientation between up and side configurations indeed yield RR of ∼13, which agrees well with the experimental value obtained under a high bias voltage.

  7. The effects of radiation on electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messenger, G.C.; Ash, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the first unified treatment of the analysis and design methods for protection of principally electronic systems from the deleterious effects of nuclear and electro-magnetic radiation. Coverage spans from a detailed description of the nuclear radiation sources to pertinent semiconductor physics, then to hardness assurance. This work combines the disciplines of solid state physics, semiconductor physics, circuit engineering, nuclear physics, together with electronics and electromagnetic theory into a book that can be used as a text with problems at the end of the majority of the chapters. Written by veterans in the field, the most significant feature of this book is its comprehensive treatment of the phenomena involved. This treatment includes the analysis and design of the effect of nuclear radiation on electronic systems from the experimental, theoretical, and engineering viewpoints. Unique pedagogical attempts are employed to make the material more understandable from the position of an enlightened engineering and scientific readership whose task is the design and analysis of radiation hardened electronic systems

  8. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J., E-mail: fwilliams@qi.fcen.uba.ar [INQUIMAE-CONICET, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  9. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT.

  10. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-28

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT.

  11. Can Excited State Electronic Coherence Be Tuned via Molecular Structural Modification? A First-Principles Quantum Electronic Dynamics Study of Pyrazolate-Bridged Pt(II) Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingerfelt, David B.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Radler, Joseph J.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Kim, Pyosang; Castellano, Felix N.; Chen, Lin X.; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-02-24

    Materials and molecular systems exhibiting long-lived electronic coherence can facilitate coherent transport, opening the door to efficient charge and energy transport beyond traditional methods. Recently, signatures of a possible coherent, recurrent electronic motion were identified in femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy experiments on a binuclear platinum complex, where a persistent periodic beating in the transient absorption signal’s anisotropy was observed. In this study, we investigate the excitonic dynamics that underlie the suspected electronic coherence for a series of binuclear platinum complexes exhibiting a range of interplatinum distances. Results suggest that the long-lived coherence can only result when competitive electronic couplings are in balance. At longer Pt-Pt distances, the electronic couplings between the two halves of the binuclear system weaken, and exciton localization and recombination is favored on short time scales. For short Pt-Pt distances, electronic couplings between the states in the coherent superposition are stronger than the coupling with other excitonic states, leading to long-lived coherence.

  12. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta......- (28kDa) subunits encoded by the ETFA and ETFB genes, respectively. In the present study, we have analysed tissue samples from 16 unrelated patients with ETF deficiency, and we report the results of ETF activity, Western blot analysis and mutation analysis. The ETF assay provides a reliable diagnostic...... tool to confirm ETF deficiency in patients suspected to suffer from MADD. Activity ranged from less than 1 to 16% of controls with the most severely affected patients disclosing the lowest activity values. The majority of patients had mutations in the ETFA gene while only two of them harboured...

  13. Test software for BESIII MDC electronics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongyu; Sheng Huayi; Zhu Haitao; Ji Xiaolu; Zhao Dongxu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Test System Software for BESIII MDC Electronics. Two kinds of test systems, SBS VP7 based and PowerPC based systems, and their corresponding test software are introduced. The software is developed in LabVIEW 7.1 and Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0, some test functions of the software, as well as their user interfaces, are described in detail. The software has been applied in hardware debugging, performance test and long term stability test. (authors)

  14. System for Cooling of Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, L. L.; Grakovich, L. P.; Dragun, L. A.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Olekhnovich, V. A.; Rabetskii, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    Results of computational and experimental investigations of heat pipes having a predetermined thermal resistance and a system based on these pipes for air cooling of electronic components and diode assemblies of lasers are presented. An efficient compact cooling system comprising heat pipes with an evaporator having a capillary coating of a caked copper powder and a condenser having a developed outer finning, has been deviced. This system makes it possible to remove, to the ambient air, a heat flow of power more than 300 W at a temperature of 40-50°C.

  15. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  16. Zope based electronic operation log system - Zlog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, K.; Satoh, Y.; Kitabayashi, T.

    2004-01-01

    Since January 2004, the Zope based electronic operation logging system, named Zlog, has been running at the KEKB and AR accelerator facilities. Since Zope is the python based open source web application server software and python language is familiar for the members in the KEKB accelerator control group, we have developed the Zlog system rapidly. In this paper, we report the development history and the present status of Zlog system. Also we show some general plug-in components, called Zope products, have been useful for our Zlog development. (author)

  17. Electron correlations in narrow band systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the electron correlations in narrow bands, such as d(f) bands in the transition (rare earth) metals and their compounds and the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is studied. The narrow band systems is described, by the Hubbard Hamiltonian. By proposing a local self-energy for the interacting electron, it is found that the results are exact in both atomic and band limits and reduce to the Hartree Fock results for U/Δ → 0, where U is the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction and Δ is the bandwidth of the noninteracting electrons. For the Lorentzian form of the density of states of the noninteracting electrons, this approximation turns out to be equivalent to the third Hubbard approximation. A simple argument, based on the mean free path obtained from the imaginary part of the self energy, shows how the electron correlations can give rise to a discontinous metal-nonmetal transition as proposed by Mott. The band narrowing and the existence of the satellite below the Fermi energy in Ni, found in photoemission experiments, can also be understood. (Author) [pt

  18. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage

    2017-01-01

    with spatially localized, high-resolution information. To survey the factors relating the molecular and electronic structure to the NSCD signal, we theoretically investigate NSCD of twenty structures of the four most common nucleic acid bases (adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine). The NSCD signal correlates...... with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state....... The calculated NSCD spectra are rationalized by means of changes in the electronic density and by a sum-over-states approach, which allows to identify the contributions of the individual excited states. Two separate contributions to NSCD are identified and their physical origins and relative magnitudes...

  19. Bottom-up, Robust Graphene Ribbon Electronics in All-Carbon Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supur, Mustafa; Van Dyck, Colin; Bergren, Adam J; McCreery, Richard L

    2018-02-21

    Large-area molecular electronic junctions consisting of 5-carbon wide graphene ribbons (GR) with lengths of 2-12 nm between carbon electrodes were fabricated by electrochemical reduction of diazotized 1,8-diaminonaphthalene. Their conductance greatly exceeds that observed for other molecular junctions of similar thicknesses, by a factor of >1 × 10 4 compared to polyphenylenes and >1 × 10 7 compared to alkane chains. The remarkable increase of conductance of the GR nanolayer results from (i) uninterrupted planarity of fused-arene structure affording extensive π-electron delocalization and (ii) enhanced electronic coupling of molecular layer with the carbon bottom contact by two-point covalent bonding, in agreement with DFT-based simulations.

  20. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Vectorization of Advanced Methods for Molecular Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    That there have been remarkable advances in the field of molecular electronic structure during the last decade is clear not only to those working in the field but also to anyone else who has used quantum chemical results to guide their own investiga­ tions. The progress in calculating the electronic structures of molecules has occurred through the truly ingenious theoretical and methodological developments that have made computationally tractable the underlying physics of electron distributions around a collection of nuclei. At the same time there has been consider­ able benefit from the great advances in computer technology. The growing sophistication, declining costs and increasing accessibi­ lity of computers have let theorists apply their methods to prob­ lems in virtually all areas of molecular science. Consequently, each year witnesses calculations on larger molecules than in the year before and calculations with greater accuracy and more com­ plete information on molecular properties. We can surel...

  1. Probing a molecular electronic transition by two-colour sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, C.; Dreesen, L.; Nihonyanagi, S.; Masuda, T.; Kondo, T.; Mani, A.A.; Uosaki, K.; Thiry, P.A.; Peremans, A.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a new emerging technique, two-colour sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, can be used to probe the molecular electronic properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In the CH spectral range (2800-3200 cm -1 ), we show that the sum-frequency generation signal of a porphyrin alkanethiol derivative adsorbed on Pt(1 1 1) reaches a maximum intensity at ∼435 nm SFG wavelength. This wavelength corresponds to the porphyrin moiety specific π-π* molecular electronic transition which is called the Soret or B band. This resonant behaviour is not observed for 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, which are devoid of molecular electronic transition in the investigated visible spectral range

  2. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  3. Electron Radiation Belts of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola

    To address the question of what factors dictate similarities and differences between radiation belts, we present comparisons between the electron radiation belt spectra of all five strongly magnetized planets within the solar system: Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. We choose the highest intensity observed electron spectrum within each system (highest specifically near 1 MeV) and compare them against expectations based on the so-called Kennel-Petschek limit (KP; 1966) for each system. For evaluating the KP limit, we begin with the new relativis-tically correct formulation of Summers et al. (2009) but then add several refinements of our own. Specifically, we: 1) utilized a much more flexible analytic spectral shape that allows us to accurately fit observed radiation belt spectra; 2) adopt the point of view that the anisotropy parameter is not a free parameter but must take on a minimal value, as originally proposed by Kennel and Petschek (1966); and 3) examine the differential characteristics of the KP limit along the lines of what Schulz and Davidson (1988) performed for the non-relativistic formula-tion. We find that three factors limit the highest electron radiation belt intensities within solar system planetary magnetospheres: a) whistler mode interactions that limit spectral intensities to a differential Kennel-Petschek limit (3 planets); b) the absence of robust acceleration pro-cesses associated with injection dynamics (1 planet); and c) material interactions between the radiation particles and clouds of gas and dust (1 planet).

  4. Quantum frustrated and correlated electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Thalmeier

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available  Quantum phases and fluctuations in correlated electron systems with frustration and competing interactions are reviewed. In the localized moment case the S=1/2 J1 - J2 - model on a square lattice exhibits a rich phase diagram with magnetic as well as exotic hidden order phases due to the interplay of frustration and quantum fluctuations. Their signature in magnetocaloric quantities and the high field magnetization are surveyed. The possible quantum phase transitions are discussed and applied to layered vanadium oxides. In itinerant electron systems frustration is an emergent property caused by electron correlations. It leads to enhanced spin fluctuations in a very large region of momentum space and therefore may cause heavy fermion type low temperature anomalies as in the 3d spinel compound LiV2O4 . Competing on-site and inter-site electronic interactions in Kondo compounds are responsible for the quantum phase transition between nonmagnetic Kondo singlet phase and magnetic phase such as observed in many 4f compounds. They may be described by Kondo lattice and simplified Kondo necklace type models. Their quantum phase transitions are investigated by numerical exact diagonalization and analytical bond operator methods respectively.

  5. Bicanonical ab Initio Molecular Dynamics for Open Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Johannes; Meyer, Bernd; Marx, Dominik

    2017-08-08

    Performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of open systems, where the chemical potential rather than the number of both nuclei and electrons is fixed, still is a challenge. Here, drawing on bicanonical sampling ideas introduced two decades ago by Swope and Andersen [ J. Chem. Phys. 1995 , 102 , 2851 - 2863 ] to calculate chemical potentials of liquids and solids, an ab initio simulation technique is devised, which introduces a fictitious dynamics of two superimposed but otherwise independent periodic systems including full electronic structure, such that either the chemical potential or the average fractional particle number of a specific chemical species can be kept constant. As proof of concept, we demonstrate that solvation free energies can be computed from these bicanonical ab initio simulations upon directly superimposing pure bulk water and the respective aqueous solution being the two limiting systems. The method is useful in many circumstances, for instance for studying heterogeneous catalytic processes taking place on surfaces where the chemical potential of reactants rather than their number is controlled and opens a pathway toward ab initio simulations at constant electrochemical potential.

  6. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  7. Decal Electronics: Printable Packaged with 3D Printing High-Performance Flexible CMOS Electronic Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-10-14

    High-performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics are flexed, packaged using 3D printing as decal electronics, and then printed in roll-to-roll fashion for highly manufacturable printed flexible high-performance electronic systems.

  8. Decal Electronics: Printable Packaged with 3D Printing High-Performance Flexible CMOS Electronic Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.; Cordero, Marlon D.; Nassar, Joanna M.; Hanna, Amir; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    High-performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics are flexed, packaged using 3D printing as decal electronics, and then printed in roll-to-roll fashion for highly manufacturable printed flexible high-performance electronic systems.

  9. Electronic Document Management Using Inverted Files System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Derwin; Setiawan, Erwin; Irwanto, Djon

    2014-03-01

    The amount of documents increases so fast. Those documents exist not only in a paper based but also in an electronic based. It can be seen from the data sample taken by the SpringerLink publisher in 2010, which showed an increase in the number of digital document collections from 2003 to mid of 2010. Then, how to manage them well becomes an important need. This paper describes a new method in managing documents called as inverted files system. Related with the electronic based document, the inverted files system will closely used in term of its usage to document so that it can be searched over the Internet using the Search Engine. It can improve document search mechanism and document save mechanism.

  10. Electronic Document Management Using Inverted Files System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartono Derwin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The amount of documents increases so fast. Those documents exist not only in a paper based but also in an electronic based. It can be seen from the data sample taken by the SpringerLink publisher in 2010, which showed an increase in the number of digital document collections from 2003 to mid of 2010. Then, how to manage them well becomes an important need. This paper describes a new method in managing documents called as inverted files system. Related with the electronic based document, the inverted files system will closely used in term of its usage to document so that it can be searched over the Internet using the Search Engine. It can improve document search mechanism and document save mechanism.

  11. Assessment of a nanoparticle bridge platform for molecular electronics measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafri, S H M; Blom, T; Leifer, K; Stroemme, M; Welch, K; Loefaas, H; Grigoriev, A; Ahuja, R

    2010-01-01

    A combination of electron beam lithography, photolithography and focused ion beam milling was used to create a nanogap platform, which was bridged by gold nanoparticles in order to make electrical measurements and assess the platform under ambient conditions. Non-functionalized electrodes were tested to determine the intrinsic response of the platform and it was found that creating devices in ambient conditions requires careful cleaning and awareness of the contributions contaminants may make to measurements. The platform was then used to make measurements on octanethiol (OT) and biphenyldithiol (BPDT) molecules by functionalizing the nanoelectrodes with the molecules prior to bridging the nanogap with nanoparticles. Measurements on OT show that it is possible to make measurements on relatively small numbers of molecules, but that a large variation in response can be expected when one of the metal-molecule junctions is physisorbed, which was partially explained by attachment of OT molecules to different sites on the surface of the Au electrode using a density functional theory calculation. On the other hand, when dealing with BPDT, high yields for device creation are very difficult to achieve under ambient conditions. Significant hysteresis in the I-V curves of BPDT was also observed, which was attributed primarily to voltage induced changes at the interface between the molecule and the metal.

  12. A comprehensive study of extended tetrathiafulvalene cruciform molecules for molecular electronics: synthesis and electrical transport measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Christian R; Leary, Edmund; Frisenda, Riccardo; Wei, Zhongming; Jennum, Karsten S; Glibstrup, Emil; Abrahamsen, Peter Bæch; Santella, Marco; Christensen, Mikkel A; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Li, Tao; Gonzalez, Maria Teresa; Jiang, Xingbin; Morsing, Thorbjørn J; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Laursen, Bo W; Nørgaard, Kasper; van der Zant, Herre; Agrait, Nicolas; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2014-11-26

    Cruciform-like molecules with two orthogonally placed π-conjugated systems have in recent years attracted significant interest for their potential use as molecular wires in molecular electronics. Here we present synthetic protocols for a large selection of cruciform molecules based on oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) scaffolds, end-capped with acetyl-protected thiolates as electrode anchoring groups. The molecules were subjected to a comprehensive study of their conducting properties as well as their photophysical and electrochemical properties in solution. The complex nature of the molecules and their possible binding in different configurations in junctions called for different techniques of conductance measurements: (1) conducting-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) measurements on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (2) mechanically controlled break-junction (MCBJ) measurements, and (3) scanning tunneling microscopy break-junction (STM-BJ) measurements. The CP-AFM measurements showed structure-property relationships from SAMs of series of OPE3 and OPE5 cruciform molecules; the conductance of the SAM increased with the number of dithiafulvene (DTF) units (0, 1, 2) along the wire, and it increased when substituting two arylethynyl end groups of the OPE3 backbone with two DTF units. The MCBJ and STM-BJ studies on single molecules both showed that DTFs decreased the junction formation probability, but, in contrast, no significant influence on the single-molecule conductance was observed. We suggest that the origins of the difference between SAM and single-molecule measurements lie in the nature of the molecule-electrode interface as well as in effects arising from molecular packing in the SAMs. This comprehensive study shows that for complex molecules care should be taken when directly comparing single-molecule measurements and measurements of SAMs and solid-state devices thereof.

  13. Structure impact on the thermal and electronic properties of bismuth telluride by ab-initio and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termentzidis, K; Pokropivny, A; Xiong, S-Y; Chumakov, Y; Volz, S; Woda, M; Cortona, P

    2012-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics and ab-initio methods to predict the thermal and electronic properties of new materials with high figures of merit. The simulated systems are bulk bismuth tellurides with antisite and vacancy defects. Optimizations of the materials under investigation are performed by the SIESTA code for subsequent calculations of force constants, electronic properties, and Seebeck coefficients. The prediction of the thermal conductivity is made by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) using the LAMMPS code. The thermal conductivity of bulk bismuth telluride with different stoichiometry and with a number of substitution defects is calculated. We have found that the thermal conductivity can be decreased by 60% by introducing vacancy defects. The calculated thermal conductivities for the different structures are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  14. Electronic circuits for communications systems: A compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The compilation of electronic circuits for communications systems is divided into thirteen basic categories, each representing an area of circuit design and application. The compilation items are moderately complex and, as such, would appeal to the applications engineer. However, the rationale for the selection criteria was tailored so that the circuits would reflect fundamental design principles and applications, with an additional requirement for simplicity whenever possible.

  15. Electronic structure and partial charge distribution of Doxorubicin in different molecular environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Lokendra; Wen, Amy M; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2015-05-18

    The electronic structure and partial charge of doxorubicin (DOX) in three different molecular environments-isolated, solvated, and intercalated in a DNA complex-are studied by first-principles density functional methods. It is shown that the addition of solvating water molecules to DOX, together with the proximity to and interaction with DNA, has a significant impact on the electronic structure as well as on the partial charge distribution. Significant improvement in estimating the DOX-DNA interaction energy is achieved. The results are further elucidated by resolving the total density of states and surface charge density into different functional groups. It is concluded that the presence of the solvent and the details of the interaction geometry matter greatly in determining the stability of DOX complexation. Ab initio calculations on realistic models are an important step toward a more accurate description of the long-range interactions in biomolecular systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the role of electronic losses in damage creation of ion irradiated Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, P.N.; Deshpande, S.P

    2014-01-01

    Damage creation due to the irradiation of 14 MeV fusion neutrons and the subsequent mechanical failure and alteration of the fuel retention properties of tungsten plasma-facing materials is one of the major concerns of the fusion reactors. In addition to nuclear reactions and the subsequent transmutations, the energetic neutron impars its kinetic energy either partly or completely to a lattice tungsten atom thereby creating a primary knock-on atom (PKA) which, is considered as the onset of damage creation in the lattice. The PKA continues to undergo collisions with the lattice atoms which eventually leads to a collision cascade. In order to understand the collision process, one often simulates such systems using surrogate ions, such as energetic W ions itself, in particle accelerators and due to the experimental constraints (such as the stability of the beam) one often has to opt for high energetic ion beams (∼ 30 MeV) which surpasses the PKA energies created by neutron (∼100s of KeV) in W. Hence it is important to distinguish how the very high energetic tungsten atoms interact with the lattice atoms in comparison with the low energy PKA created by the neutron. One of the key difference is that at higher energies the electronic losses become important which decides the collision dynamics. In this presentation the effect of electronic losses in the damage creation using molecular dynamics simulations have been discussed

  17. Advanced electronics for the CTF MEG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, J; Vrba, J; Spear, P; McKenzie, D; Willis, R; Loewen, R; Robinson, S E; Fife, A A

    2004-11-30

    Development of the CTF MEG system has been advanced with the introduction of a computer processing cluster between the data acquisition electronics and the host computer. The advent of fast processors, memory, and network interfaces has made this innovation feasible for large data streams at high sampling rates. We have implemented tasks including anti-alias filter, sample rate decimation, higher gradient balancing, crosstalk correction, and optional filters with a cluster consisting of 4 dual Intel Xeon processors operating on up to 275 channel MEG systems at 12 kHz sample rate. The architecture is expandable with additional processors to implement advanced processing tasks which may include e.g., continuous head localization/motion correction, optional display filters, coherence calculations, or real time synthetic channels (via beamformer). We also describe an electronics configuration upgrade to provide operator console access to the peripheral interface features such as analog signal and trigger I/O. This allows remote location of the acoustically noisy electronics cabinet and fitting of the cabinet with doors for improved EMI shielding. Finally, we present the latest performance results available for the CTF 275 channel MEG system including an unshielded SEF (median nerve electrical stimulation) measurement enhanced by application of an adaptive beamformer technique (SAM) which allows recognition of the nominal 20-ms response in the unaveraged signal.

  18. Design of the BEPCII electron gun system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Gu Mengping; Chi Yunlong

    2006-01-01

    BEPCII upgrading project needs a new high current electron gun. The design stage such as physical design, mechanical design and control system design of this new electron gun is described. The emission current is designed to be higher than 10 A for the pulse width of 1 ns with repetition rate of 50 Hz. The gun will operate with a pulsed high voltage power supply which can provide up to 200 kV high voltage. Computer simulations and optimizations have been carried out in the design stage, including the gun geometry and beam transport. EGUN and DGUN codes are used to simulate the gun geometry, and the results show that the perveance is about 0.22 μA·V -3/2 , and the emittance at gun exit is about 16 π·mm·mrad. PARMELA code shows that the electron beam can be easily transported to the end of the first accelerating tube with a capture efficiency of 67% and root mean square emittance of 25 mm·mrad. New scheme of the gun control system based on EPICS is also presented. Two-bunch operation mode and 2.5 μs long pulse operation mode are available in the control system. (authors)

  19. Isolating strong-field dynamics in molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Gal; Pedatzur, Oren; Uzan, Ayelet J.; Bruner, Barry D.; Mairesse, Yann; Dudovich, Nirit

    2017-05-01

    Strong-field ionization followed by recollision provides a unique pump-probe measurement which reveals a range of electronic processes, combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution. A major limitation of this approach is imposed by the coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom. In this paper we focus on the study of high harmonic generation and demonstrate the ability to isolate the internal dynamics—decoupling the temporal information from the spatial one. By applying an in situ approach we reveal the universality of the intrinsic pump-probe measurement and establish its validity in molecular systems. When several orbitals are involved we identify the fingerprint of the transition from the single-channel case into the multiple-channel dynamics, where complex multielectron phenomena are expected to be observed.

  20. Rate coefficients for low-energy electron dissociative attachment to molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, J.; Houfek, K.; Cizek, M.; Murakami, I.; Kato, T.

    2003-02-01

    Calculation of rate constants for dissociative electron attachment to molecular hydrogen is reported. The calculation is based on an improved nonlocal resonance model of Cizek, Horacek and Domcke which takes fully into account the nonlocality of the resonance dynamics and uses potentials with correct asymptotic forms. The rate constants are calculated for all quantum numbers v and J of the target molecules and for electron temperature in the range 0-30000 K. (author)

  1. Atomic and molecular photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were also measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the ejected electrons. The double-angle-TOF method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collection efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. An electron spectroscopy study of inner-shell photoexcitation and ionization of Xe, photoelectron angular distributions from H 2 and D 2 , and photoionization cross sections and photoelectron asymmetries of the valence orbitals of NO are reported

  2. Computer modeling of properties of complex molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkova, E.Yu. [Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per., 1, Moscow 101472 (Russian Federation); Khrenova, M.G.; Polyakov, I.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nemukhin, A.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); N.M. Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygina 4, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Large molecular aggregates present important examples of strongly nonhomogeneous systems. We apply combined quantum mechanics / molecular mechanics approaches that assume treatment of a part of the system by quantum-based methods and the rest of the system with conventional force fields. Herein we illustrate these computational approaches by two different examples: (1) large-scale molecular systems mimicking natural photosynthetic centers, and (2) components of prospective solar cells containing titan dioxide and organic dye molecules. We demonstrate that modern computational tools are capable to predict structures and spectra of such complex molecular aggregates.

  3. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  4. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES OF ELECTRONIC EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shishkina

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Actual problems and contradictions of electronic educational systems development are described: availability of education, quality of educational services; individualization of education; exposures and advantages in using of computer technology; standardization of technologies and resources. Tendencies of their solution in the view of development of new advanced technologies of e-education are specified. The essence and advantages of using the cloud computing technologies as a new platform of distributed learning are specified. Advanced directions of cloud-based data usage in executive system of education are declared: access management, content management, asset management, communications management.

  5. Electronic document management systems: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Deborah

    2002-08-01

    For over a decade, most health care information technology (IT) professionals erroneously learned that document imaging, which is one of the many component technologies of an electronic document management system (EDMS), is the only technology of an EDMS. In addition, many health care IT professionals erroneously believed that EDMSs have either a limited role or no place in IT environments. As a result, most health care IT professionals do not understand documents and unstructured data and their value as structured data partners in most aspects of transaction and information processing systems.

  6. Development of HF-systems for electron storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Reva, S.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1999-01-01

    Development of HF systems for electron storages is described. Its final task is construction of 100 kW HF station at 699,3 MHz frequency consisting from low-power HF system, klystron amplifier, wave line for HF power transmission and accelerating section. Functional parameters of HF station are given

  7. EDF: Computing electron number probability distribution functions in real space from molecular wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, E.; Pendás, A. Martín; Blanco, M. A.

    2008-04-01

    : 2.80 GHz Intel Pentium IV CPU Operating system: GNU/Linux RAM: 55 992 KB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 2.7 External routines: Netlib Nature of problem: Let us have an N-electron molecule and define an exhaustive partition of the physical space into m three-dimensional regions. The edf program computes the probabilities P(n,n,…,n)≡P({n}) of all possible allocations of n electrons to Ω, n electrons to Ω,…, and n electrons to Ω,{n} being integers. Solution method: Let us assume that the N-electron molecular wave function, Ψ(1,N), is a linear combination of M Slater determinants, Ψ(1,N)=∑rMCψ(1,N). Calling SΩrs the overlap matrix over the 3D region Ω between the (real) molecular spin-orbitals (MSO) in ψ(χ1r,…χNr) and the MSOs in ψ,(χ1s,…,χNs), edf finds all the P({n})'s by solving the linear system ∑{n}{∏kmtkn}P({n})=∑r,sMCCdet[∑kmtSΩrs], where t=1 and t,…,t are arbitrary real numbers. Restrictions: The number of {n} sets grows very fast with m and N, so that the dimension of the linear system (1) soon becomes very large. Moreover, the computer time required to obtain the determinants in the second member of Eq. (1) scales quadratically with M. These two facts limit the applicability of the method to relatively small molecules. Unusual features: Most of the real variables are of precision real*16. Running time: 0.030, 2.010, and 0.620 seconds for Test examples 1, 2, and 3, respectively. References: [1] A. Martín Pendás, E. Francisco, M.A. Blanco, Faraday Discuss. 135 (2007) 423-438. [2] A. Martín Pendás, E. Francisco, M.A. Blanco, J. Phys. Chem. A 111 (2007) 1084-1090. [3] A. Martín Pendás, E. Francisco, M.A. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9 (2007) 1087-1092. [4] E. Francisco, A. Martín Pendás, M.A. Blanco, J. Chem. Phys. 126 (2007) 094102. [5] A. Martín Pendás, E. Francisco, M.A. Blanco, C. Gatti, Chemistry: A European Journal 113 (2007) 9362-9371.

  8. Effects of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Simon Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems. We first consider a novel non-linear sigma model in order to microscopically treat the effects of disorder and electronic interaction. We successfully reproduce the perturbative results for the zero-bias anomaly and the interaction correction to the conductivity in a weakly disordered system, and discuss possible directions for future work. Secondly we consider the fluctuations of the dephasing rate for a closed diffusive and quantum dot system. Using the Keldysh technique we derive an expression for the inelastic scattering rate with which we self-consistently obtain the fluctuations in the dephasing rate. For the diffusive regime we find the relative fluctuations is given by F ∼ (L φ /L) 2 /g 2 , where g is the dimensionless conductance, L φ is the dephasing length and L is the sample size. For the quantum dot regime we find a perturbative divergence due to the presence of the zero mode. By mapping divergent diagrams to those for the two-level correlation function, we conjecture the existence of an exact relation between the two. Finally we discuss the consequences of this relation. (author)

  9. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-01-01

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  10. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  11. 42 CFR 456.722 - Electronic claims management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.722 Electronic claims management system...'s Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) applicable to prescription drugs. (ii) Notifying the... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic claims management system. 456.722...

  12. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and Pathogen Asset Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G. Wahl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS. Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA.

  13. Electronic integrated disease surveillance system and pathogen asset control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Tom G; Burdakov, Aleksey V; Oukharov, Andrey O; Zhilokov, Azamat K

    2012-06-20

    Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS) has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO) data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS) has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS.Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA).

  14. Electron density profile in multilayer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toekesi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been used extensively to study the multilayer systems, where the thickness of layers are in the nanometer range. These studies has received considerable attention because of its technological interest, for example in the nanotechnology. On the most fundamental level, its importance is derived from the basic physics that is involved. One key quantities of interest is the response of a many-body system to an external perturbation: How act and how modify the interface between the solid-solid or solid-vacuum the excitations in the solid and in the vicinity of the interfaces. In this work, as a starting point of such investigations we calculated the electron density profile for multilayer systems. Our approach employs the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), that is, the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the potential and forces are determined selfconsistently from the dynamics governed by the Schroedinger equation. We treat the problem in TDDFT at the level of the local-density approximation (LDA). Later, the comparison of experimentally obtained loss functions and the theory, based on our TDDFT calculations can provide deeper understanding of surface physics. We performed the calculations for half-infinite samples characterized by r s =1.642 and r s =1.997. We also performed the calculations for double layer systems. The substrate was characterized by r s =1.997 and the coverage by r s =1.642. Fig. 1. shows the obtained electron density profile in LDA approximation. Because of the sharp cutoff of electronic wave vectors at the Fermi surface, the densities in the interior exhibit slowly decaying Friedel oscillations. To highlight the Friedel oscillation we enlarged the electron density profile in Fig. 1a. and Fig. 1b. The work was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Found: OTKA No. T038016, the grant 'Bolyai' from the Hungarian Academy of

  15. Emission spectroscopic studies on dynamics of molecular excitation and dissociation by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Emission spectrum by controlled electron impact has been a successful technique for the investigation of molecular dynamics. (1) Molecular excitation. Aromatic molecules give an optical emission similar to fluorescence. However, as is shown by the vibrational structure and the electron energy dependence of benzene emission, its excitation process is not necessarily optical. Some aliphatic molecules also exhibit an emission band at the ultraviolet region. (2) Molecular dissociation. Analysis of the Doppler profile, the threshold energy, the excitation function and the isotope effect of the atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions has clarified the dynamics of the molecular dissociation. Especially the Doppler profile has given the translational energy distribution of the fragment atom, which is very useful to disclose the potential energy curve. Its angular dependence has recently found to allow determination of the symmetry of the intermediate excited state and the magnetic sublevel distribution of the fragment atom. These finding has revealed detailed state-to-state dynamics of the molecular dissociation. (author)

  16. Strongly Correlated Electron Systems: An Operatorial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciolo, Andrea; Avella, Adolfo

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the operatorial approach to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and show how the exact solution of target models on small clusters chosen ad-hoc (minimal models) can suggest very efficient bulk approximations. We use the Hubbard model as case study (target model) and we analyze and discuss the crucial role of spin fluctuations in its 2-site realization (minimal model). Accordingly, we devise a novel three-pole approximation for the 2D case, including in the basic field an operator describing the dressing of the electronic one by the nearest-neighbor spin-fluctuations. Such a solution is in very good agreement with the exact one in the minimal model (2-site case) and performs very well once compared to advanced (semi-)numerical methods in the 2D case, being by far less computational-resource demanding.

  17. Molecular effects in ion-electron emission from clean metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Alonso, E.V.; Auciello, O.; Ferron, J.; Lantschner, G.; Oliva Florio, A.

    1978-01-01

    The authors have measured electron emission yields from clean Al, Cu and Ag under 2-50 keV H + , D + , H 2 + impact. It is found that molecular ion yields are lower than twice the yield of atomic ions. No isotope effects are observed for equal-velocity ions. (Auth.)

  18. Reduction of the Glauber amplitude for electron impact rotational excitation of quadrupolar molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, K.C.; Gupta, G.P.; Pundir, R.S.

    1981-06-01

    A reduction of the Glauber amplitude for the rotational excitation of pure quadrupolar molecular ions by electron impact is presented in a form suitable for numerical evaluation. The differential cross-section is expressed in terms of one dimensional integrals over impact parameter. (author)

  19. Interface Engineering for Organic Electronics; Manufacturing of Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Molecular Crystal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veen, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are at the basis of Organic Electronics. Objective of this dissertation is “to fabricate high-quality organic molecular single-crystal devices”, to explore the intrinsic properties of organic semiconductors. To achieve this, the in situ fabrication of complete field-effect

  20. Molecular communications and nanonetworks from nature to practical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Atakan, Barış

    2014-01-01

    In this book, the concepts of molecular communications and nanonetworks are introduced. Throughout the book, the existing molecular communication paradigms are categorized into two main groups. The first group includes the Passive Molecular Communication (PMC) paradigms in which molecules freely diffuse to transfer information from a transmitter to a receiver. The second group includes the Active Molecular Communication (AMC) paradigms in which molecules are carried or guided by some mediators such as molecular motors, gap junction channels and bacteria. In the book, after briefly discussing why molecular communication is needed for the sophisticated nano and biotechnology applications, the existing molecular communication systems are first presented. Then, the principles of diffusion phenomena and molecular reception with absorbers and the ligand-receptor binding mechanism are introduced. Based on these principles, the communication theories and techniques are given for the PMC. Then, the physical dynamics o...

  1. Secondary electron emission from Au by medium energy atomic and molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, A; Obata, F; Hamamoto, Y; Yogo, A

    2002-01-01

    Number distributions of secondary electrons emitted from a Au metal surface have been measured for atomic and molecular ions of H sup + , He sup + , C sup + , N sup + , O sup + , H sup + sub 2 , H sup + sub 3 , HeH sup + , CO sup + and O sup + sub 2 in the energy range 0.3-2.0 MeV. The emission statistics obtained are described fairly well by a Polya function. The Polya parameter b, determining the distribution shape, is found to decrease monotonously with increasing emission yield gamma, revealing a surprising relationship of b gamma approx 1 over the different projectile species and impact energies. This finding supports certainly the electron cascading model. Also we find a strong negative molecular effect for heavier molecular ions, showing a significant reduction of gamma compared to the estimated values using constituent atomic projectile data.

  2. Full two-electron calculations of antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Total cross sections for single ionization and excitation of molecular hydrogen by antiproton impact are presented over a wide range of impact energies from 1 keV to 6.5 MeV. A nonperturbative time-dependent close-coupling method is applied to fully treat the correlated dynamics of the electrons....... Good agreement is obtained between the present calculations and experimental measurements of single-ionization cross sections at high energies, whereas some discrepancies with the experiment are found around the maximum. The importance of the molecular geometry and a full two-electron description...... is demonstrated. The present findings provide benchmark results which might be useful for the development of molecular models....

  3. Photoelectron and UV absorption spectroscopy for determination of electronic configurations of negative molecular ions: Chlorophenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseplin, E.E.; Tseplina, S.N.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khvostenko, O.G.

    2009-01-01

    The photoelectron and UV absorption spectra of p-, m-, and o-chlorophenols in the gas phase have been obtained. On the basis of DFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations, the photoelectron bands have been assigned to occupied molecular orbitals. From the TDDFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculation results, the UV absorption bands have been assigned to excited singlet states of the molecules under investigation. For each excited state a dominant transition was found. It has been shown that the energies of these singlet transitions correlate with the energy differences between the ground-state molecular orbitals participating in them. Using the UV spectra interpretation, the electronic states of molecular anions detected earlier for the same compounds by means of the resonant electron capture mass-spectrometry have been determined.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  5. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  6. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do-Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  7. Structure and properties of simple molecular systems at very high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSar, R.

    1989-01-01

    The use of computer simulations in the study of molecular systems at very high density is reviewed. Applications to the thermodynamics of dense fluid nitrogen and phase transitions in solid oxygen are presented. The effects of changes in the atomic electronic structure on the equation of state of very dense helium are discussed. 19 refs., 2 figs

  8. New Electron Gun System for BEPCII

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bo; Long Chi, Yun; Zhang, Chuang

    2005-01-01

    The new electron gun system for BEPCII has been put into operation since Nov. 2004. The article describes the design, experiment and operation of this new system. The design current of the gun is 10 A for the pulse lengths of 1 ns, 2.5 ns and 1 μs with repetition rate of 50 Hz. The gun is operated with a pulsed high voltage power supply which can provide up to 200 kV high voltage. Computer simulations have been carried out in the design stage, including simulation of the gun geometry and beam transportation. Some important relation curves are obtained during the experiment. Two-bunch operation is available and some elementary tests have been performed. New scheme of the gun control system based on EPICS is also presented. The real operation shows that the design and manufacturing is basically successful.

  9. Static structure, microscopic dynamics and electronic properties of the liquid Bi–Li alloy. An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, J; Alemany, M M G; Gallego, L J; González, L E; González, D J

    2013-01-01

    We report an ab initio molecular dynamics study of the static, dynamic and electronic properties of the liquid Bi x Li 1−x alloy, which is a complex binary system with a marked tendency to heterocoordination. The calculated total static structure factors are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The partial dynamic structure factors exhibit side peaks indicative of propagating density fluctuations, and for some concentrations we have found a density fluctuation mode with phase velocity greater than the hydrodynamic sound velocity. We have also evaluated other dynamical properties such as the diffusion coefficients, the shear viscosity and the adiabatic sound velocity. The electronic density of states show that the liquid Bi x Li 1−x alloy has a metallic character, although with strong deviations from the free-electron parabolic curve. The results reported improve the understanding of binary liquid alloys with both fast and slow propagating collective modes. (paper)

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  11. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  12. Molecular Computational Investigation of Electron Transfer Kinetics across Cytochrome-Iron Oxide Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    The interface between electron transfer proteins such as cytochromes and solid phase mineral oxides is central to the activity of dissimilatory-metal reducing bacteria. A combination of potential-based molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used in the framework of Marcus' electron transfer theory to compute elementary electron transfer rates from a well-defined cytochrome model, namely the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis, to surfaces of the iron oxide mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3). Room temperature molecular dynamics simulations show that an isolated STC molecule favors surface attachment via direct contact of hemes I and IV at the poles of the elongated axis, with electron transfer distances as small as 9 Angstroms. The cytochrome remains attached to the mineral surface in the presence of water and shows limited surface diffusion at the interface. Ab initio electronic coupling matrix element (VAB) calculations of configurations excised from the molecular dynamics simulations reveal VAB values ranging from 1 to 20 cm-1, consistent with nonadiabaticity. Using these results, together with experimental data on the redox potential of hematite and hemes in relevant cytochromes and calculations of the reorganization energy from cluster models, we estimate the rate of electron transfer across this model interface to range from 1 to 1000 s-1 for the most exothermic driving force considered in this work, and from 0.01 to 20 s-1 for the most endothermic. This fairly large range of electron transfer rates highlights the sensitivity of the rate upon the electronic coupling matrix element, which is in turn dependent on the fluctuations of the heme configuration at the interface. We characterize this dependence using an idealized bis-imidazole heme to compute from first principles the VAB variation due to porphyrin ring orientation, electron transfer distance, and mineral surface termination. The electronic

  13. Atomic spectral-product representations of molecular electronic structure: metric matrices and atomic-product composition of molecular eigenfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, M; Mills, J D; Hinde, R J; Winstead, C L; Boatz, J A; Gallup, G A; Langhoff, P W

    2009-07-02

    Recent progress is reported in development of ab initio computational methods for the electronic structures of molecules employing the many-electron eigenstates of constituent atoms in spectral-product forms. The approach provides a universal atomic-product description of the electronic structure of matter as an alternative to more commonly employed valence-bond- or molecular-orbital-based representations. The Hamiltonian matrix in this representation is seen to comprise a sum over atomic energies and a pairwise sum over Coulombic interaction terms that depend only on the separations of the individual atomic pairs. Overall electron antisymmetry can be enforced by unitary transformation when appropriate, rather than as a possibly encumbering or unnecessary global constraint. The matrix representative of the antisymmetrizer in the spectral-product basis, which is equivalent to the metric matrix of the corresponding explicitly antisymmetric basis, provides the required transformation to antisymmetric or linearly independent states after Hamiltonian evaluation. Particular attention is focused in the present report on properties of the metric matrix and on the atomic-product compositions of molecular eigenstates as described in the spectral-product representations. Illustrative calculations are reported for simple but prototypically important diatomic (H(2), CH) and triatomic (H(3), CH(2)) molecules employing algorithms and computer codes devised recently for this purpose. This particular implementation of the approach combines Slater-orbital-based one- and two-electron integral evaluations, valence-bond constructions of standard tableau functions and matrices, and transformations to atomic eigenstate-product representations. The calculated metric matrices and corresponding potential energy surfaces obtained in this way elucidate a number of aspects of the spectral-product development, including the nature of closure in the representation, the general redundancy or

  14. Controlling Underwater Robots with Electronic Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We are developing robot controllers based on biomimetic design principles. The goal is to realise the adaptive capabilities of the animal models in natural environments. We report feasibility studies of a hybrid architecture that instantiates a command and coordinating level with computed discrete-time map-based (DTM neuronal networks and the central pattern generators with analogue VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration electronic neuron (aVLSI networks. DTM networks are realised using neurons based on a 1-D or 2-D Map with two additional parameters that define silent, spiking and bursting regimes. Electronic neurons (ENs based on Hindmarsh–Rose (HR dynamics can be instantiated in analogue VLSI and exhibit similar behaviour to those based on discrete components. We have constructed locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs with aVLSI networks that can be modulated to select different behaviours on the basis of selective command input. The two technologies can be fused by interfacing the signals from the DTM circuits directly to the aVLSI CPGs. Using DTMs, we have been able to simulate complex sensory fusion for rheotaxic behaviour based on both hydrodynamic and optical flow senses. We will illustrate aspects of controllers for ambulatory biomimetic robots. These studies indicate that it is feasible to fabricate an electronic nervous system controller integrating both aVLSI CPGs and layered DTM exteroceptive reflexes.

  15. Electron scattering and few nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1983-08-01

    Recent result obtained by electron scattering in the few-nucleon systems (A 3 He charge and magnetic form factors are discussed. New theoretical results indicate that three body forces improve considerably the saturation properties of 3 He, 4 He and nuclear matter, but are not able to reconcile experiment and theory for the charge form factors of 3 He and 4 He. Calculations of meson exchange effects with different theoretical approaches bring the theory into reasonable agreement with the experimental charge and magnetic form factor fo 3 He. Recent results of the measurements of the two and three body break-up of 3 He are discussed

  16. Electronic resource management systems a workflow approach

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Elsa K

    2014-01-01

    To get to the bottom of a successful approach to Electronic Resource Management (ERM), Anderson interviewed staff at 11 institutions about their ERM implementations. Among her conclusions, presented in this issue of Library Technology Reports, is that grasping the intricacies of your workflow-analyzing each step to reveal the gaps and problems-at the beginning is crucial to selecting and implementing an ERM. Whether the system will be used to fill a gap, aggregate critical data, or replace a tedious manual process, the best solution for your library depends on factors such as your current soft

  17. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  18. Agent-Based Modeling in Molecular Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2018-06-08

    Molecular systems orchestrating the biology of the cell typically involve a complex web of interactions among various components and span a vast range of spatial and temporal scales. Computational methods have advanced our understanding of the behavior of molecular systems by enabling us to test assumptions and hypotheses, explore the effect of different parameters on the outcome, and eventually guide experiments. While several different mathematical and computational methods are developed to study molecular systems at different spatiotemporal scales, there is still a need for methods that bridge the gap between spatially-detailed and computationally-efficient approaches. In this review, we summarize the capabilities of agent-based modeling (ABM) as an emerging molecular systems biology technique that provides researchers with a new tool in exploring the dynamics of molecular systems/pathways in health and disease. © 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Remote Laser Evaporative Molecular Absorption Spectroscopy Sensor System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a sensor system capable of remotely probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets (asteroids, comets, planets, moons), such as from a...

  20. Molecular photoionization studies of nucleobases and correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poliakoff, Erwin D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    We proposed molecular photoionization studies in order to probe correlated events in fundamental scattering phenomena. In particular, we suggested that joint theoretical-experimental studies would provide a window into the microscopic aspects that are of central importance in AMO and chemical physics generally, and would generate useful data for wide array of important DOE topics, such as ultrafast dynamics, high harmonic generation, and probes of nonadiabatic processes. The unifying theme is that correlations between electron scattering dynamics and molecular geometry highlight inherently molecular aspects of the photoelectron behavior.

  1. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    CERN Document Server

    Slutskin, A A; Pepper, M

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the res...

  2. Superconductivity in strongly correlated electron systems: successes and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shastry, B. Sriram

    2000-01-01

    Correlated electronic systems and superconductivity is a field which has unique track record of producing exciting new phases of matter. The article gives an overview of trends in solving the problems of superconductivity and correlated electronic systems

  3. Complexity in electronic negotiation support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessmair, Michele; Strunk, Guido; Vetschera, Rudolf; Koeszegi, Sabine T

    2011-10-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the medium influences the way we communicate and negotiation research directs considerable attention to the impact of different electronic communication modes on the negotiation process and outcomes. Complexity theories offer models and methods that allow the investigation of how pattern and temporal sequences unfold over time in negotiation interactions. By focusing on the dynamic and interactive quality of negotiations as well as the information, choice, and uncertainty contained in the negotiation process, the complexity perspective addresses several issues of central interest in classical negotiation research. In the present study we compare the complexity of the negotiation communication process among synchronous and asynchronous negotiations (IM vs. e-mail) as well as an electronic negotiation support system including a decision support system (DSS). For this purpose, transcripts of 145 negotiations have been coded and analyzed with the Shannon entropy and the grammar complexity. Our results show that negotiating asynchronically via e-mail as well as including a DSS significantly reduces the complexity of the negotiation process. Furthermore, a reduction of the complexity increases the probability of reaching an agreement.

  4. Electron stimulated molecular desorption of a non-evaporable Zr-V-Fe alloy getter at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, Frederic; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2002-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a non-evaporable getters (NEG) St 707 registered trademark (SAES Getters trademark ) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide (cf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, 1994), **1**3C**1**8O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 multiplied by 10**1**5 electrons s**-**1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm **2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields eta (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with **1**3C**1**8O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120 degree C. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be ...

  5. Prototype readout electronics for the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sielewicz, K. M.; Rinella, G. A.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, Jozef; Giubilato, P.; Rossewij, M. J.; Schambach, J.; Vaňát, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, JAN (2017), č. článku C01008. ISSN 1748-0221. [Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics. Karlsruhe, 26.09.2016-30.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056; GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052; GA MŠk LM2015058 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : digital electronic circuits * electronic detector readout concepts * modlar electronics * radiation-hard electronics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  6. Logic circuits based on molecular spider systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Dandan; Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko

    2016-08-01

    Spatial locality brings the advantages of computation speed-up and sequence reuse to molecular computing. In particular, molecular walkers that undergo localized reactions are of interest for implementing logic computations at the nanoscale. We use molecular spider walkers to implement logic circuits. We develop an extended multi-spider model with a dynamic environment wherein signal transmission is triggered via localized reactions, and use this model to implement three basic gates (AND, OR, NOT) and a cascading mechanism. We develop an algorithm to automatically generate the layout of the circuit. We use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate circuit computations, and we analyze circuit complexity: our design scales linearly with formula size and has a logarithmic time complexity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of multiple scattering contributions in electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueguang; Hossen, Khokon; Wang, Enliang; Pindzola, M. S.; Dorn, Alexander; Colgan, James

    2017-10-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the low-energy (E 0 = 31.5 eV) electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen (H2). Triple differential cross sections are measured for a range of fixed emission angles of one outgoing electron between {θ }1=-70^\\circ and -130° covering the full 4π solid angle of the second electron. The energy sharing of the outgoing electrons varies from symmetric ({E}1={E}2=8 eV) to highly asymmetric (E 1 = 1 eV and E 2 = 15 eV). In addition to the binary and recoil lobes, a structure is observed perpendicular to the incoming beam direction which is due to multiple scattering of the projectile inside the molecular potential. The absolutely normalized experimental cross sections are compared with results from the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations. Molecular alignment dependent TDCC results demonstrate that these structures are only present if the molecule axis is lying in the scattering plane.

  8. Superatom spectroscopy and the electronic state correlation between elements and isoelectronic molecular counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppernick, Samuel J; Gunaratne, K D Dasitha; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-19

    Detailed in the present investigation are results pertaining to the photoelectron spectroscopy of negatively charged atomic ions and their isoelectronic molecular counterparts. Experiments utilizing the photoelectron imaging technique are performed on the negative ions of the group 10 noble metal block (i.e. Ni-, Pd-, and Pt-) of the periodic table at a photon energy of 2.33 eV (532 nm). The accessible electronic transitions, term energies, and orbital angular momentum components of the bound electronic states in the atom are then compared with photoelectron images collected for isoelectronic early transition metal heterogeneous diatomic molecules, M-X- (M = Ti,Zr,W; X = O or C). A superposition principle connecting the spectroscopy between the atomic and molecular species is observed, wherein the electronic structure of the diatomic is observed to mimic that present in the isoelectronic atom. The molecular ions studied in this work, TiO-, ZrO-, and WC- can then be interpreted as possessing superatomic electronic structures reminiscent of the isoelectronic elements appearing on the periodic table, thereby quantifying the superatom concept.

  9. Educational Systems Design Implications of Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiszowski, Alexander J.

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of electronic publishing focuses on the four main purposes of media in general: communication, entertainment, motivation, and education. Highlights include electronic journals and books; hypertext; user control; computer graphics and animation; electronic games; virtual reality; multimedia; electronic performance support;…

  10. Measurements of secondary electron cross sections by the pulsed electron beam time-of-flight method. I. Molecular nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goruganthu, R.R.; Wilson, W.G.; Bonham, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The secondary electron cross sections for gaseous molecular nitrogen are reported at ejection angles of 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135 and 150 0 , for the energy range 1.5 eV to 20 eV and incident electron energy of 1 keV. The pulsed electron beam time-of-flight methd was employed. The results were placed on an absolute scale by normalization to the elastic scattering. They were compared, where possible, with those reported by Opal, Beaty, and Peterson (OBP). The agreement is somewhat better when the OBP data are divided by 0.53 + 0.47 sintheta as suggested by Rudd and DuBois. Fits of our data by Legendre-polynomial expansions are used to estimate the low-energy portion of the cross-section, dsigma/dE. This work suggests that existing experimental cross sections for secondary electron ejection as a function of angle and ejected energy may be no better known than +-40%, especially in the low energy region. 7 references, 14 figures, 2 tables

  11. A Molecular Electronic Transducer based Low-Frequency Accelerometer with Electrolyte Droplet Sensing Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mengbing

    "Sensor Decade" has been labeled on the first decade of the 21st century. Similar to the revolution of micro-computer in 1980s, sensor R&D developed rapidly during the past 20 years. Hard workings were mainly made to minimize the size of devices with optimal the performance. Efforts to develop the small size devices are mainly concentrated around Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) technology. MEMS accelerometers are widely published and used in consumer electronics, such as smart phones, gaming consoles, anti-shake camera and vibration detectors. This study represents liquid-state low frequency micro-accelerometer based on molecular electronic transducer (MET), in which inertial mass is not the only but also the conversion of mechanical movement to electric current signal is the main utilization of the ionic liquid. With silicon-based planar micro-fabrication, the device uses a sub-micron liter electrolyte droplet sealed in oil as the sensing body and a MET electrode arrangement which is the anode-cathode-cathode-anode (ACCA) in parallel as the read-out sensing part. In order to sensing the movement of ionic liquid, an imposed electric potential was applied between the anode and the cathode. The electrode reaction, I3-- + 2e-- ↔ 3I --, occurs around the cathode which is reverse at the anodes. Obviously, the current magnitude varies with the concentration of ionic liquid, which will be effected by the movement of liquid droplet as the inertial mass. With such structure, the promising performance of the MET device design is to achieve 10.8 V/G (G=9.81 m/s2) sensitivity at 20 Hz with the bandwidth from 1 Hz to 50 Hz, and a low noise floor of 100 microg/sqrt(Hz) at 20 Hz.

  12. Molecular structure determination of cyclooctane by Ab Initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase; Determinacao da estrutura molecular do ciclooctano por metodos Ab Initio e difracao de eletrons na fase gasosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Wagner B. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2000-10-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can make a significant contribution for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination of the molecular structure of the cyclooctane molecule by electron diffraction in the gas phase an initio calculations will be addressed, providing an example of a comparative analysis of theoretical and experimental predictions. (author)

  13. Disintegration of Ar2+ molecular ions under collisions with electrons in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A spectroscopic experiment is carried out for investigation of disintegration of Ar 2 + ions by plasma electrons. For the first time in the wide electron temperature range from the room one up to T e ∼ 2 eV is measured the process rate constant. At temperatures lower 0.4 eV the obtained values agree well with published data on the value and temperature dependence of the coefficient of dissociative recombination of Ar 2 + with electrons. When temperature increasing in the range of T e =0.5-2 eV is found substantial rise of the rate of molecular ions disintegration, conditioned by starting dissociation mechanism under collicions with plasma electrons

  14. Complete chemical transformation of a molecular film by subexcitation electrons (<3 eV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Richard; Illenberger, Eugen

    2003-11-21

    The potential of slow electrons to act as a soft tool to control a chemical reaction in the condensed phase is demonstrated. By setting the energy of a well defined electron beam to values below 3 eV, the surface of a thin film of 1,2-C(2)F(4)C(l2) molecules can completely be transformed into molecular chlorine (and by-products, possibly perfluorinated polymers). At higher energies (>6 eV) some equilibrium state between product and educt composition can be achieved, however, accompanied by a gradual overall degradation of the film. The effect of complete transformation is based on both the selectivity and particular energy dependence of the initial step of the reaction which is dissociative electron attachment to C(2)F(4)C(l2), but also the fact that the initial molecule is efficiently decomposed by subexcitation electrons while the product C(l2) is virtually unaffected.

  15. Correlation between electron-irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Shogo; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Masaaki, E-mail: yasuda@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tada, Kazuhiro [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the correlation between electron irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene. The electron irradiation effect is introduced by the binary collision model in the MD simulation. By applying a tensile stress to graphene, the number of adatom-vacancy (AV) and Stone–Wales (SW) defects increase under electron irradiation, while the number of single-vacancy defects is not noticeably affected by the applied stress. Both the activation and formation energies of an AV defect and the activation energy of an SW defect decrease when a tensile stress is applied to graphene. Applying tensile stress also relaxes the compression stress associated with SW defect formation. These effects induced by the applied stress cause the increase in AV and SW defect formation under electron irradiation.

  16. Chemical models of chains electron transfer in hydroxylating ferment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhrem, A.A.; Kiselev, P.A.; Metelitsa, D.I.

    1977-01-01

    The rate constants are measured of consumption of nicotineamidedinucleotide (NAD-N) during its oxidation by molecular oxygen with the participation of Ti 4+ , Sn 4+ , Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ , VO 2+ , and Ce 4+ ions in mixtures of acetonitrile with water and of dioxane with water taken in a volume ratio of 1:1 (46 deg C). The kinetics of oxidation of NAD-N with the participation of Ti 4+ at 37 deg C in a water-acetonitrile medium is studied in detail. The hydroxylating capacity of the system NAD-N - Ti 4+ - O 2 with respect to naphthalene is proved. The reaction mechanism and its relationship with the microsomal chains of electron transport are discussed

  17. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François; Bullen, Chris; Flouris, Andreas D; Laugesen, Murray; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, also called electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes) are marketed to deliver nicotine and sometimes other substances by inhalation. Some tobacco smokers report that they used ENDS as a smoking cessation aid. Whether sold as tobacco products or drug delivery devices, these products need to be regulated, and thus far, across countries and states, there has been a wide range of regulatory responses ranging from no regulation to complete bans. The empirical basis for these regulatory decisions is uncertain, and more research on ENDS must be conducted in order to ensure that the decisions of regulators, health care providers and consumers are based on science. However, there is a dearth of scientific research on these products, including safety, abuse liability and efficacy for smoking cessation. The authors, who cover a broad range of scientific expertise, from basic science to public health, suggest research priorities for non-clinical, clinical and public health studies. They conclude that the first priority is to characterize the safety profile of these products, including in long-term users. If these products are demonstrated to be safe, their efficacy as smoking cessation aids should then be tested in appropriately designed trials. Until these studies are conducted, continued marketing constitutes an uncontrolled experiment and the primary outcome measure, poorly assessed, is user health. Potentially, this research effort, contributing to the safety and efficacy of new smoking cessation devices and to the withdrawal of dangerous products, could save many lives.

  18. Charge transfer in quasi-one-electron systems at 'high' energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, T.J.; Redd, E.; Blankenship, D.M.; Park, J.T.; Peacher, J.L.; Seeley, D.G.

    1988-08-14

    We have made absolute and relative measurements of differential cross sections for single-electron transfer in collisions between Mg/sup +/ (30-150 keV) and Be/sup +/ (56.25 keV) ions and He atoms. The behaviour of transfer probability as a function of impact parameter can be understood qualitatively from recent molecular orbital calculations of quasi-one-electron systems.

  19. From electron microscopy to X-ray crystallography: molecular-replacement case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Test studies have been conducted on five crystal structures of large molecular assemblies, in which EM maps are used as models for structure solution by molecular replacement using various standard MR packages such as AMoRe, MOLREP and Phaser. Multi-component molecular complexes are increasingly being tackled by structural biology, bringing X-ray crystallography into the purview of electron-microscopy (EM) studies. X-ray crystallography can utilize a low-resolution EM map for structure determination followed by phase extension to high resolution. Test studies have been conducted on five crystal structures of large molecular assemblies, in which EM maps are used as models for structure solution by molecular replacement (MR) using various standard MR packages such as AMoRe, MOLREP and Phaser. The results demonstrate that EM maps are viable models for molecular replacement. Possible difficulties in data analysis, such as the effects of the EM magnification error, and the effect of MR positional/rotational errors on phase extension are discussed

  20. Fabrication of tunnel junction-based molecular electronics and spintronics devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Tunnel junction-based molecular devices (TJMDs) are highly promising for realizing futuristic electronics and spintronics devices for advanced logic and memory operations. Under this approach, ∼2.5 nm molecular device elements bridge across the ∼2-nm thick insulator of a tunnel junction along the exposed side edge(s). This paper details the efforts and insights for producing a variety of TJMDs by resolving multiple device fabrication and characterization issues. This study specifically discusses (i) compatibility between tunnel junction test bed and molecular solutions, (ii) optimization of the exposed side edge profile and insulator thickness for enhancing the probability of molecular bridging, (iii) effect of fabrication process-induced mechanical stresses, and (iv) minimizing electrical bias-induced instability after the device fabrication. This research will benefit other researchers interested in producing TJMDs efficiently. TJMD approach offers an open platform to test virtually any combination of magnetic and nonmagnetic electrodes, and promising molecules such as single molecular magnets, porphyrin, DNA, and molecular complexes.