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Sample records for molecular dynamics dissipation

  1. Chapter 5: Quantum Dynamics in Dissipative Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, J.; Xu, Rui-Xue; Yan, Y. J.

    2014-04-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * HEOM versus Path Integral Formalism: Background * Generic form and terminology of HEOM * Statistical mechanics description of bath influence * Feynman-Vernon influence functional formalism * General comments * Memory-Frequency Decomposition of Bath Correlation Functions * PSD of Bose function * Brownian oscillators decomposition of bath spectral density function * Optimized HEOM Theory With Accuracy Control * Construction of HEOM via path integral formalism * Accuracy control on white-noise residue ansatz * Efficient HEOM propagator: Numerical filtering and indexing algorithm * HEOM in Quantum Mechanics for Open Systems * The HEOM space and the Schrödinger picture * HEOM in the Heisenberg picture * Mixed Heisenberg-Schrödinger block-matrix dynamics in nonlinear optical response functions * Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy: Model Calculations * Concluding Remarks * Acknowledgments * References

  2. Jdpd: an open java simulation kernel for molecular fragment dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Karina; Kuhn, Hubert; Zielesny, Achim

    2018-05-21

    Jdpd is an open Java simulation kernel for Molecular Fragment Dissipative Particle Dynamics with parallelizable force calculation, efficient caching options and fast property calculations. It is characterized by an interface and factory-pattern driven design for simple code changes and may help to avoid problems of polyglot programming. Detailed input/output communication, parallelization and process control as well as internal logging capabilities for debugging purposes are supported. The new kernel may be utilized in different simulation environments ranging from flexible scripting solutions up to fully integrated "all-in-one" simulation systems.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of CO2 hydrate dissociation: Fluctuation-dissipation and non-equilibrium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Clarke, Elaine T

    2013-09-07

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate thermal-driven break-up of planar CO2 hydrate interfaces in liquid water at 300-320 K. Different guest compositions, at 85%, 95%, and 100% of maximum theoretical occupation, led to statistically-significant differences in the observed initial dissociation rates. The melting temperatures of each interface were estimated, and dissociation rates were observed to be strongly dependent on temperature, with higher dissociation rates at larger over-temperatures vis-à-vis melting. A simple coupled mass and heat transfer model developed previously was applied to fit the observed dissociation profiles, and this helps to identify clearly two distinct régimes of break-up; a second well-defined region is essentially independent of composition and temperature, in which the remaining nanoscale, de facto two-dimensional system's lattice framework is intrinsically unstable. From equilibrium MD of the two-phase systems at their melting point, the relaxation times of the auto-correlation functions of fluctuations in number of enclathrated guest molecules were used as a basis for comparison of the variation in the underlying, non-equilibrium, thermal-driven dissociation rates via Onsager's hypothesis, and statistically significant differences were found, confirming the value of a fluctuation-dissipation approach in this case.

  4. Introduction to practice of molecular simulation molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, Brownian dynamics, lattice Boltzmann and dissipative particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Akira

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the most important and main concepts of the molecular and microsimulation techniques. It enables readers to improve their skills in developing simulation programs by providing physical problems and sample simulation programs for them to use. Provides tools to develop skills in developing simulations programs Includes sample simulation programs for the reader to use Appendix explains Fortran and C languages in simple terms to allow the non-expert to use them.

  5. Shock wave energy dissipation behavior (SWED) in Network forming ionic liquids (NILs): A Molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda Vishnu, Karthik; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    SWED materials play a crucial role in protecting both personnel and structures in close proximity to blasts or ballistic impact. Exposure to shock waves with intensities as low as 1 MPa can cause brain injury in personnel and, hence, it is extremely important to understand the mechanisms operating in SWED materials and help design improved formulations. Recent experimental studies show that NILs containing di-ammonium cations and citrate anions with glass transition temperatures (Tg) below room temperature exhibit shockwave absorption characteristics that outperform polyurea (PU), a benchmark SWED assessment material. The experimentalists further hypothesized that the increased SWED ability in NILs with longer side chains (in di-ammonium cation) is due to a permanent structural ordering and nano-scale segregation. We use molecular dynamics simulations with the Dreiding force field to study shock propagation mechanisms in NILs. Shock propagation mechanisms in these materials are explored by performing both Hugoniostat and large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations at 300 K. The simulation results show that the NIL 5-6 (5 C atoms (back bone) and 6 C atoms (side chain)) attenuates shocks better than NIL 5-3 (3 C atoms (side chain) and higher Tg) and PMMA in agreement with experimental observation. The simulations show that under shock loading the structures lose long range order; we find no evidence of nano-segregation nor or permanent structural changes.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong Min; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H.; Lee, Joon Sang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong Min [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kondaraju, Sasidhar [Department of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Lee, Jung Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H. [Samsung Electronics, Mechatronics R& D Center, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Sang, E-mail: joonlee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  8. Molecular-dynamics study of propane-hydrate dissociation: Fluctuation-dissipation and non-equilibrium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaani, Mohammad Reza; English, Niall J

    2018-03-21

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate thermal-driven break-up of planar propane-hydrate interfaces in contact with liquid water over the 260-320 K range. Two types of hydrate-surface water-lattice molecular termination were adopted, at the hydrate edge with water, for comparison: a 001-direct surface cleavage and one with completed cages. Statistically significant differences in melting temperatures and initial break-up rates were observed between both interface types. Dissociation rates were observed to be strongly dependent on temperature, with higher rates at larger over-temperatures vis-à-vis melting. A simple coupled mass and heat transfer model, developed previously, was applied to fit the observed dissociation profiles, and this helps us to identify clearly two distinct hydrate-decomposition régimes; following a highly temperature-dependent break-up phase, a second well-defined stage is essentially independent of temperature, in which the remaining nanoscale, de facto two-dimensional system's lattice framework is intrinsically unstable. Further equilibrium MD-analysis of the two-phase systems at their melting point, with consideration of the relaxation times gleaned from the auto-correlation functions of fluctuations in a number of enclathrated guest molecules, led to statistically significant differences between the two surface-termination cases; a consistent correlation emerged in both cases between the underlying, non-equilibrium, thermal-driven dissociation rates sampled directly from melting with that from an equilibrium-MD fluctuation-dissipation approach.

  9. Dissipation enhanced vibrational sensing in an olfactory molecular switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chęcińska, Agata; Heaney, Libby; Pollock, Felix A.; Nazir, Ahsan

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a proposed olfactory mechanism based on a vibrationally activated molecular switch, we study electron transport within a donor-acceptor pair that is coupled to a vibrational mode and embedded in a surrounding environment. We derive a polaron master equation with which we study the dynamics of both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom beyond previously employed semiclassical (Marcus-Jortner) rate analyses. We show (i) that in the absence of explicit dissipation of the vibrational mode, the semiclassical approach is generally unable to capture the dynamics predicted by our master equation due to both its assumption of one-way (exponential) electron transfer from donor to acceptor and its neglect of the spectral details of the environment; (ii) that by additionally allowing strong dissipation to act on the odorant vibrational mode, we can recover exponential electron transfer, though typically at a rate that differs from that given by the Marcus-Jortner expression; (iii) that the ability of the molecular switch to discriminate between the presence and absence of the odorant, and its sensitivity to the odorant vibrational frequency, is enhanced significantly in this strong dissipation regime, when compared to the case without mode dissipation; and (iv) that details of the environment absent from previous Marcus-Jortner analyses can also dramatically alter the sensitivity of the molecular switch, in particular, allowing its frequency resolution to be improved. Our results thus demonstrate the constructive role dissipation can play in facilitating sensitive and selective operation in molecular switch devices, as well as the inadequacy of semiclassical rate equations in analysing such behaviour over a wide range of parameters

  10. New derivation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Bhalerao, Rajeev S.; Pal, Subrata

    2012-01-01

    Relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics has been quite successful in explaining the spectra and azimuthal anisotropy of particles produced in heavy-ion collisions at the RHIC and recently at the LHC. The first-order dissipative fluid dynamics or the relativistic Navier-Stokes (NS) theory involves parabolic differential equations and suffers from a causality and instability. The second-order or Israel-Stewart (IS) theory with its hyperbolic equations restores causality but may not guarantee stability. The correct formulation of relativistic viscous fluid dynamics is far from settled and is under intense investigation

  11. Dynamics of quasi-stable dissipative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chueshov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This book is  devoted to background material and recently developed mathematical methods in the study of infinite-dimensional dissipative systems. The theory of such systems is motivated by the long-term goal to establish rigorous mathematical models for turbulent and chaotic phenomena. The aim here is to offer general methods and abstract results pertaining to fundamental dynamical systems properties related to dissipative long-time behavior. The book systematically presents, develops and uses the quasi-stability method while substantially extending it by including for consideration new classes of models and PDE systems arising in Continuum Mechanics. The book can be used as a textbook in dissipative dynamics at the graduate level.   Igor Chueshov is a Professor of Mathematics at Karazin Kharkov National University in Kharkov, Ukraine.

  12. Effect of dissipation on dynamical fusion thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierk, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of dynamical thresholds to fusion in heavy nuclei (A greater than or equal to 200) due to the nature of the potential-energy surface is shown. These thresholds exist even in the absence of dissipative forces, due to the coupling between the various collective deformation degrees of freedom. Using a macroscopic model of nuclear shape dynamics, It is shown how three different suggested dissipation mechanisms increase by varying amounts the excitation energy over the one-dimensional barrier required to cause compound-nucleus formation. The recently introduced surface-plus-window dissipation may give a reasonable representation of experimental data on fusion thresholds, in addition to properly describing fission-fragment kinetic energies and isoscalar giant multipole widths. Scaling of threshold results to asymmetric systems is discussed. 48 refs., 10 figs

  13. On multi-dissipative dynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    1999-01-01

    We consider deterministic dynamic systems with state space representations which are dissipative in the sense of Willems (1972) with respect to several supply rates. This property is of interest in robustness analysis and in multi-objective control. We give conditions under which the convex cone...

  14. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  15. Dynamical properties of dissipative XYZ Heisenberg lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, R.; Minganti, F.; Biella, A.; Ciuti, C.

    2018-04-01

    We study dynamical properties of dissipative XYZ Heisenberg lattices where anisotropic spin-spin coupling competes with local incoherent spin flip processes. In particular, we explore a region of the parameter space where dissipative magnetic phase transitions for the steady state have been recently predicted by mean-field theories and exact numerical methods. We investigate the asymptotic decay rate towards the steady state both in 1D (up to the thermodynamical limit) and in finite-size 2D lattices, showing that critical dynamics does not occur in 1D, but it can emerge in 2D. We also analyze the behavior of individual homodyne quantum trajectories, which reveal the nature of the transition.

  16. Hydrodynamic relaxations in dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J. S.; Greenfield, Michael L.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of relaxation phenomena in the standard dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model [R. D. Groot and P. B. Warren, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)]. Using fluctuating hydrodynamics as the framework of the investigation, we focus on the collective transverse and longitudinal dynamics. It is shown that classical hydrodynamic theory predicts the transverse dynamics at relatively low temperatures very well when compared to simulation data; however, the theory predictions are, on the same length scale, less accurate for higher temperatures. The agreement with hydrodynamics depends on the definition of the viscosity, and here we find that the transverse dynamics are independent of the dissipative and random shear force contributions to the stress. For high temperatures, the spectrum for the longitudinal dynamics is dominated by the Brillouin peak for large length scales and the relaxation is therefore governed by sound wave propagation and is athermal. This contrasts the results at lower temperatures and small length scale, where the thermal process is clearly present in the spectra. The DPD model, at least qualitatively, re-captures the underlying hydrodynamical mechanisms, and quantitative agreement is excellent at intermediate temperatures for the transverse dynamics.

  17. Patterns and Interfaces in Dissipative Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pismen, L.M

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pattern formation in nonlinear dissipative systems far from equilibrium is a paradigmatic case of emergent behaviour associated with complex systems. It is encountered in a great variety of settings, both in nature and technology, and has numerous applications ranging from nonlinear optics through solid and fluid mechanics, physical chemistry and chemical engineering to biology. Nature creates its variety of forms through spontaneous pattern formation and self-assembly, and this strategy is likely to be imitated by future biomorphic technologies. This book is a first-hand account by one of the leading players in this field, which gives in-depth descriptions of analytical methods elucidating the complex evolution of nonlinear dissipative systems, and brings the reader to the forefront of current research. The introductory chapter on the theory of dynamical systems is written with a view to applications of its powerful methods to spatial and spatio-temporal patterns. It is followed by two chapters t...

  18. Correlated Photon Dynamics in Dissipative Rydberg Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuthen, Emil; Gullans, Michael J.; Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2017-07-01

    Rydberg blockade physics in optically dense atomic media under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) leads to strong dissipative interactions between single photons. We introduce a new approach to analyzing this challenging many-body problem in the limit of a large optical depth per blockade radius. In our approach, we separate the single-polariton EIT physics from Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in a serialized manner while using a hard-sphere model for the latter, thus capturing the dualistic particle-wave nature of light as it manifests itself in dissipative Rydberg-EIT media. Using this approach, we analyze the saturation behavior of the transmission through one-dimensional Rydberg-EIT media in the regime of nonperturbative dissipative interactions relevant to current experiments. Our model is able to capture the many-body dynamics of bright, coherent pulses through these strongly interacting media. We compare our model with available experimental data in this regime and find good agreement. We also analyze a scheme for generating regular trains of single photons from continuous-wave input and derive its scaling behavior in the presence of imperfect single-photon EIT.

  19. Dynamics of dissipative systems and computational physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Gh.; Scutaru, H.; Ixaru, L.; Adam, S.; Rizea, M.; Stefanescu, E.; Mihalache, D.; Mazilu, D.; Crasovan, L.

    2002-01-01

    During the first year of research activity in the frame of this project there have been investigated two main topics: I. Dynamics of systems of fermions in complex dissipative media; II. Solitons with topologic charge in dissipative systems. An essential problem of the quantum information systems is the controllability and observability of the quantum states, generally described by Lindblad's master equation with phenomenological coefficients. In its usual form, this equation describes a decay of the mean-values, but not necessarily the expected decaying transitions. The basic and very difficult problem of a dissipative quantum theory is to project the evolution of the total system (the system of interest + the environment) on the space of the system of interest. In this case, one obtains a quantum master equation where the system evolution is described by two terms: 1) a Hamiltonian term for the processes with energy conservation, and 2) a non-Hamiltonian term with coefficients depending on the dissipative coupling. That means that a master equation is based on some approximations enabling the replacement of the operators of the dissipative environment with average value coefficients. It is often assumed that the evolution operators of the dissipative system define a semigroup, not a group as in the case of an isolated system. In this framework, Lindblad obtained a quantum master equation in agreement with all the quantum-mechanical principles. However, the Lindblad master equation was unable to secure a correct description of the decaying states. To do that, one has to take into account the transition operators between the system eigenstates with appropriate coefficients. Within this investigation, we have obtained an equation obeying to this requirement, giving the ρ(t) time derivative in terms of creation-annihilation operators of the single-particle states |i>, and λ ij , representing the dissipative coefficients, the microscopic expressions of which are

  20. Deterministic constant-temperature dynamics for dissipative quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    A novel method is introduced in order to treat the dissipative dynamics of quantum systems interacting with a bath of classical degrees of freedom. The method is based upon an extension of the Nose-Hoover chain (constant temperature) dynamics to quantum-classical systems. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic numerical calculations on the relaxation dynamics of the spin-boson model show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics represents the thermal noise of the bath in an accurate and simple way. Numerical comparisons, both with the constant-energy calculation and with the quantum-classical Brownian motion treatment of the bath, show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics can be used to introduce dissipation in the evolution of a quantum subsystem even with just one degree of freedom for the bath. The algorithm can be computationally advantageous in modelling, within computer simulation, the dynamics of a quantum subsystem interacting with complex molecular environments. (fast track communication)

  1. An extended dissipative particle dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, C J

    2003-01-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was introduced by Hoogerbrugge & Koelman to study meso-scale material processes. The theoretical investigation of the DPD method was initiated by Espanol who used a Fokker-Planck formulation of the DPD method and applied the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator calculus to obtain the equations of hydrodynamics for DPD. A current limitation of DPD is that it requires a clear separation of scales between the resolved and unresolved processes. In this note, we suggest a simple extension of DPD that allows for inclusion of unresolved processes with exponentially decaying variance for any value of the decay rate. The main point of the extension is that it is as easy to implement as DPD in a numerical algorithm.

  2. Dissipative dynamics of superconducting hybrid qubit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Enrique; Calero, Jesus M; Reina, John H

    2009-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study of composed superconducting qubit systems for the case of a coupled qubit configuration based on a hybrid qubit circuit made of both charge and phase qubits, which are coupled via a σ x x σ z interaction. We compute the system's eigen-energies in terms of the qubit transition frequencies and the strength of the inter-qubit coupling, and describe the sensitivity of the energy crossing/anti-crossing features to such coupling. We compute the hybrid system's dissipative dynamics for the cases of i) collective and ii) independent decoherence, whereby the system interacts with one common and two different baths of harmonic oscillators, respectively. The calculations have been performed within the Bloch-Redfield formalism and we report the solutions for the populations and the coherences of the system's reduced density matrix. The dephasing and relaxation rates are explicitly calculated as a function of the heat bath temperature.

  3. Dissipative quantum dynamics and nonlinear sigma-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    Sedov variational principle which is the generalization of the least action principle for the dissipative and irreversible processes and the classical dissipative mechanics in the phase space is considered. Quantum dynamics for the dissipative and irreversible processes is constructed. As an example of the dissipative quantum theory the nonlinear two-dimensional sigma-model is considered. The conformal anomaly of the energy momentum tensor trace for closed bosonic string on the affine-metric manifold is investigated. The two-loop metric beta-function for nonlinear dissipative sigma-model was calculated. The results are compared with the ultraviolet two-loop conterterms for affine-metric sigma model. 71 refs

  4. Multiscale methods framework: self-consistent coupling of molecular theory of solvation with quantum chemistry, molecular simulations, and dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Andriy; Gusarov, Sergey

    2018-01-31

    In this work, we will address different aspects of self-consistent field coupling of computational chemistry methods at different time and length scales in modern materials and biomolecular science. Multiscale methods framework yields dramatically improved accuracy, efficiency, and applicability by coupling models and methods on different scales. This field benefits many areas of research and applications by providing fundamental understanding and predictions. It could also play a particular role in commercialization by guiding new developments and by allowing quick evaluation of prospective research projects. We employ molecular theory of solvation which allows us to accurately introduce the effect of the environment on complex nano-, macro-, and biomolecular systems. The uniqueness of this method is that it can be naturally coupled with the whole range of computational chemistry approaches, including QM, MM, and coarse graining.

  5. Dissipative dynamics of superconducting hybrid qubit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Enrique; Calero, Jesus M; Reina, John H, E-mail: enriquem@univalle.edu.c, E-mail: j.reina-estupinan@physics.ox.ac.u [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    We perform a theoretical study of composed superconducting qubit systems for the case of a coupled qubit configuration based on a hybrid qubit circuit made of both charge and phase qubits, which are coupled via a sigma{sub x} x sigma{sub z} interaction. We compute the system's eigen-energies in terms of the qubit transition frequencies and the strength of the inter-qubit coupling, and describe the sensitivity of the energy crossing/anti-crossing features to such coupling. We compute the hybrid system's dissipative dynamics for the cases of i) collective and ii) independent decoherence, whereby the system interacts with one common and two different baths of harmonic oscillators, respectively. The calculations have been performed within the Bloch-Redfield formalism and we report the solutions for the populations and the coherences of the system's reduced density matrix. The dephasing and relaxation rates are explicitly calculated as a function of the heat bath temperature.

  6. Micellar polymerization: Computer simulations by dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupanov, Ruslan; Chertovich, Alexander; Kos, Pavel

    2018-07-15

    Nowadays, micellar polymerization is widely used in different fields of industry and research, including modern living polymerization technique. However, this process has many variables and there is no comprehensive model to describe all features. This research presents simulation methodology which describes key properties of such reactions to take a guide through a variety of their modifications. Dissipative particle dynamics is used in addition to Monte Carlo scheme to simulate initiation, propagation, and termination events. Influence of initiation probability and different termination processes on final conversion and molecular-weight distribution are presented. We demonstrate that prolonged initiation leads to increasing in polymer average molecular weight, and surface termination events play major role in conversion limitation, in comparison with recombination. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quantum dynamics in nanoscale magnets in dissipative environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyashita, S; Saito, K; Kobayashi, H.; de Raedt, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    In discrete energy structure of nanoscale magnets, nonadiabatic transitions at avoided level crossings lead to fundamental processes of dynamics of magnetizations. The thermal environment causes dissipative effects on these processes. In this paper we review the features of the nonadiabatic

  8. New results from dissipative diabatic dynamics and nuclear elastoplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1986-10-01

    I present new results about dissipative diabatic dynamics and nuclear elastoplasticity, in particular on a self-consistent diabatic formulation, on first numerical calculations of dissipative diabatic dynamics in two collective degrees of freedom, on quasi-elastic recoil in central nucleus-nucleus collisions, on the diabatic hindrance of fusion reactions and on the diabatic emission of nucleons in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. (orig./HSI)

  9. Quench dynamics of a disordered array of dissipative coupled cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creatore, C; Fazio, R; Keeling, J; Türeci, H E

    2014-09-08

    We investigate the mean-field dynamics of a system of interacting photons in an array of coupled cavities in the presence of dissipation and disorder. We follow the evolution of an initially prepared Fock state, and show how the interplay between dissipation and disorder affects the coherence properties of the cavity emission, and show that these properties can be used as signatures of the many-body phase of the whole array.

  10. Stable schemes for dissipative particle dynamics with conserved energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltz, Gabriel, E-mail: stoltz@cermics.enpc.fr

    2017-07-01

    This article presents a new numerical scheme for the discretization of dissipative particle dynamics with conserved energy. The key idea is to reduce elementary pairwise stochastic dynamics (either fluctuation/dissipation or thermal conduction) to effective single-variable dynamics, and to approximate the solution of these dynamics with one step of a Metropolis–Hastings algorithm. This ensures by construction that no negative internal energies are encountered during the simulation, and hence allows to increase the admissible timesteps to integrate the dynamics, even for systems with small heat capacities. Stability is only limited by the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which suggests resorting to multiple timestep strategies where the stochastic part is integrated less frequently than the Hamiltonian one.

  11. Static and dynamic properties of smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadehrad, Davod; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, static and dynamic properties of the smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) method are investigated. We study the effect of method parameters on SDPD fluid properties, such as structure, speed of sound, and transport coefficients, and show that a proper choice of parameters leads to a well-behaved and accurate fluid model. In particular, the speed of sound, the radial distribution function (RDF), shear-thinning of viscosity, the mean-squared displacement (〈R2 〉 ∝ t), and the Schmidt number (Sc ∼ O (103) - O (104)) can be controlled, such that the model exhibits a fluid-like behavior for a wide range of temperatures in simulations. Furthermore, in addition to the consideration of fluid density variations for fluid compressibility, a more challenging test of incompressibility is performed by considering the Poisson ratio and divergence of velocity field in an elongational flow. Finally, as an example of complex-fluid flow, we present the applicability and validity of the SDPD method with an appropriate choice of parameters for the simulation of cellular blood flow in irregular geometries. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the SDPD method is able to approximate well a nearly incompressible fluid behavior, which includes hydrodynamic interactions and consistent thermal fluctuations, thereby providing, a powerful approach for simulations of complex mesoscopic systems.

  12. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. → Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. → We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. → With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  13. Dynamic response function and large-amplitude dissipative collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizhen; Zhuo Yizhong; Li Zhuxia; Sakata, Fumihiko.

    1993-05-01

    Aiming at exploring microscopic dynamics responsible for the dissipative large-amplitude collective motion, the dynamic response and correlation functions are introduced within the general theory of nuclear coupled-master equations. The theory is based on the microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics which has been developed within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory for disclosing complex structure of the TDHF-manifold. A systematic numerical method for calculating the dynamic response and correlation functions is proposed. By performing numerical calculation for a simple model Hamiltonian, it is pointed out that the dynamic response function gives an important information in understanding the large-amplitude dissipative collective motion which is described by an ensemble of trajectories within the TDHF-manifold. (author)

  14. Towards better integrators for dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besold, Gerhard; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Karttunen, Mikko

    2000-01-01

    Coarse-grained models that preserve hydrodynamics provide a natural approach to study collective properties of soft-matter systems. Here, we demonstrate that commonly used integration schemes in dissipative particle dynamics give rise to pronounced artifacts in physical quantities such as the com...

  15. Diffusion in randomly perturbed dissipative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Christian S.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Grebogi, Celso; Klages, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    Dynamical systems having many coexisting attractors present interesting properties from both fundamental theoretical and modelling points of view. When such dynamics is under bounded random perturbations, the basins of attraction are no longer invariant and there is the possibility of transport among them. Here we introduce a basic theoretical setting which enables us to study this hopping process from the perspective of anomalous transport using the concept of a random dynamical system with holes. We apply it to a simple model by investigating the role of hyperbolicity for the transport among basins. We show numerically that our system exhibits non-Gaussian position distributions, power-law escape times, and subdiffusion. Our simulation results are reproduced consistently from stochastic continuous time random walk theory.

  16. Measurement fidelity in the presence of coherent dynamics or dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jian-Qiang; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the problem of a charge qubit probed by a quantum point contact when the measurement is concurrent with Hamiltonian-induced coherent dynamics or dissipation. This additional dynamics changes the state of the qubit before the measurement is completed. As a result, the measurement fidelity is reduced. We calculate the reduction in measurement fidelity in these cases. References: S. Ashhab, J. Q. You, and F. Nori, New J. Phys. 11, 083017 (2009); Phys. Scr. T137, 014005 (2009).

  17. Dynamics of the conservative and dissipative spin-orbit problem

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, A; Lega, E

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the spin--orbit coupling under different settings. First we consider the conservative problem, and then we add a dissipative torque as provided by MacDonald's or Darwin's models. By means of frequency analysis and of the computation of the maximum Lyapunov indicator we explore the different dynamical behaviors associated to the main resonances. In particular we focus on the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances in which the Moon and Mercury are actually trapped.

  18. Dissipation and energy balance in electronic dynamics of Na clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, Marc; Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the impact of dissipation on the energy balance in the electron dynamics of metal clusters excited by strong electro-magnetic pulses. The dynamics is described theoretically by Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) at the level of Local Density Approximation (LDA) augmented by a self interaction correction term and a quantum collision term in Relaxation-Time Approximation (RTA). We evaluate the separate contributions to the total excitation energy, namely energy exported by electron emission, potential energy due to changing charge state, intrinsic kinetic and potential energy, and collective flow energy. The balance of these energies is studied as function of the laser parameters (frequency, intensity, pulse length) and as function of system size and charge. We also look at collisions with a highly charged ion and here at the dependence on the impact parameter (close versus distant collisions). Dissipation turns out to be small where direct electron emission prevails namely for laser frequencies above any ionization threshold and for slow electron extraction in distant collisions. Dissipation is large for fast collisions and at low laser frequencies, particularly at resonances. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  19. Dynamically controlled energy dissipation for fast magnetic vortex switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2017-09-01

    Manipulation of vortex states in magnetic media provides new routes towards information storage and processing technology. The typical slow relaxation times (˜100 ns) of magnetic vortex dynamics may present an obstacle to the realization of these applications. Here, we investigate how a vortex state in a ferromagnetic microdisk can be manipulated in a way that translates the vortex core while enhancing energy dissipation to rapidly damp the vortex dynamics. We use time-resolved differential magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy to measure the motion of the vortex core in response to applied magnetic fields. We first map out how the vortex core becomes sequentially trapped by pinning sites as it translates across the disk. After applying a fast magnetic field step to translate the vortex from one pinning site to another, we observe long-lived dynamics of the vortex as it settles to the new equilibrium. We then demonstrate how the addition of a short (<10 ns) magnetic field pulse can induce additional energy dissipation, strongly damping the long-lived dynamics. A model of the vortex dynamics using the Thiele equation of motion explains the mechanism behind this effect.

  20. Causal dissipation for the relativistic dynamics of ideal gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Temple, Blake

    2017-05-01

    We derive a general class of relativistic dissipation tensors by requiring that, combined with the relativistic Euler equations, they form a second-order system of partial differential equations which is symmetric hyperbolic in a second-order sense when written in the natural Godunov variables that make the Euler equations symmetric hyperbolic in the first-order sense. We show that this class contains a unique element representing a causal formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics which (i) is equivalent to the classical descriptions by Eckart and Landau to first order in the coefficients of viscosity and heat conduction and (ii) has its signal speeds bounded sharply by the speed of light. Based on these properties, we propose this system as a natural candidate for the relativistic counterpart of the classical Navier-Stokes equations.

  1. Quantum dissipative dynamics and decoherence of dimers on helium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, quantum dynamical simulations are performed in order to describe the vibrational motion of diatomic molecules in a highly quantum environment, so-called helium droplets. We aim to reproduce and explain experimental findings which were obtained from dimers on helium droplets. Nanometer-sized helium droplets contain several thousands of 4 He atoms. They serve as a host for embedded atoms or molecules and provide an ultracold ''refrigerator'' for them. Spectroscopy of molecules in or on these droplets reveals information on both the molecule and the helium environment. The droplets are known to be in the superfluid He II phase. Superfluidity in nanoscale systems is a steadily growing field of research. Spectra obtained from full quantum simulations for the unperturbed dimer show deviations from measurements with dimers on helium droplets. These deviations result from the influence of the helium environment on the dimer dynamics. In this work, a well-established quantum optical master equation is used in order to describe the dimer dynamics effectively. The master equation allows to describe damping fully quantum mechanically. By employing that equation in the quantum dynamical simulation, one can study the role of dissipation and decoherence in dimers on helium droplets. The effective description allows to explain experiments with Rb 2 dimers on helium droplets. Here, we identify vibrational damping and associated decoherence as the main explanation for the experimental results. The relation between decoherence and dissipation in Morse-like systems at zero temperature is studied in more detail. The dissipative model is also used to investigate experiments with K 2 dimers on helium droplets. However, by comparing numerical simulations with experimental data, one finds that further mechanisms are active. Here, a good agreement is obtained through accounting for rapid desorption of dimers. We find that decoherence occurs in the electronic manifold of the

  2. Statistical and dynamical properties of a dissipative kicked rotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Diego F. M.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2014-11-01

    Some dynamical and statistical properties for a conservative as well as the dissipative problem of relativistic particles in a waveguide are considered. For the first time, two different types of dissipation namely: (i) due to viscosity and; (ii) due to inelastic collision (upon the kick) are considered individually and acting together. For the first case, and contrary to what is expected for the original Zaslavsky’s relativistic model, we show there is a critical parameter where a transition from local to global chaos occurs. On the other hand, after considering the introduction of dissipation also on the kick, the structure of the phase space changes in the sense that chaotic and periodic attractors appear. We study also the chaotic sea by using scaling arguments and we proposed an analytical argument to reinforce the validity of the scaling exponents obtained numerically. In principle such an approach can be extended to any two-dimensional map. Finally, based on the Lyapunov exponent, we show that the parameter space exhibits infinite families of self-similar shrimp-shape structures, corresponding to periodic attractors, embedded in a large region corresponding to chaotic attractors.

  3. Influence of Dissipative Particle Dynamics parameters and wall models on planar micro-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyi; She, Jiangwei; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; microflow Group Team

    2017-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a very effective approach in simulating mesoscale hydrodynamics. The influence of solid boundaries and DPD parameters are typically very strong in DPD simulations. The present work studies a micro-channel Poisseuille flow. Taking the neutron scattering experiment and molecular dynamics simulation result as bench mark, the DPD results of density distribution and velocity profile are systematically studied. The influence of different levels of coarse-graining, the number densities of wall and fluid, conservative force coefficients, random and dissipative force coefficients, different wall model and reflective boundary conditions are discussed. Some mechanisms behind such influences are discussed and the artifacts in the simulation are identified with the bench mark. Chinese natural science foundation (A020405).

  4. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Kathrin, E-mail: k.mueller@fz-juelich.de; Fedosov, Dmitry A., E-mail: d.fedosov@fz-juelich.de; Gompper, Gerhard, E-mail: g.gompper@fz-juelich.de

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  5. Exact solution for a non-Markovian dissipative quantum dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferialdi, Luca; Bassi, Angelo

    2012-04-27

    We provide the exact analytic solution of the stochastic Schrödinger equation describing a harmonic oscillator interacting with a non-Markovian and dissipative environment. This result represents an arrival point in the study of non-Markovian dynamics via stochastic differential equations. It is also one of the few exactly solvable models for infinite-dimensional systems. We compute the Green's function; in the case of a free particle and with an exponentially correlated noise, we discuss the evolution of Gaussian wave functions.

  6. Real-time dynamics of dissipative quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The first part of this thesis motivates a real time approach to the dynamics of dissipative quantum systems. We review previous imaginary time methods for calculating escape rates and discuss their applications to the analysis of data in macroscopic quantum tunneling experiments. In tunneling experiments on heavily damped Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, the instanton method gave results that compare reasonably well with data. In tunneling experiments on weakly damped Current Biased Josephson Junctions, two problems arise. First, the classical limit of the instanton result disagrees with the classical rate of thermal activation. Second, the instanton method cannot predict the microwave enhancement of escape rates. In the third chapter, we discuss our real time approach to the dynamics of dissipative systems in terms of a kinetic equation for the reduced density matrix. We demonstrate some known equilibrium properties of dissipative systems through the kinetic equation and derived the bath induced widths and energy shifts. In the low damping limit, the kinetic equation reduces to a much simpler master equation. The classical limit of the master equation is completely equivalent to the Fokker-Planck equation that describes thermal activation. In the fourth chapter, we apply the master equation to the problem of tunneling and resonance enhancement of tunneling in weakly damped current biased Josephson junctions. In the classical regime, microwaves of the appropriate frequency induce resonances between many neighboring levels and an asymmetrical resonance peak is measured. We can calibrate the junction parameters by fitting the stationary solution of the master equation to the classical resonance data. In the quantum regime, the stationary solution of the master equation, predicts well-resolved resonance peaks which agree very well with the observed data

  7. Nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics including dissipation and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Herold, Christoph; Bleicher, Marcus; Leupold, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We present a consistent theoretical approach for the study of nonequilibrium effects in chiral fluid dynamics within the framework of the linear σ model with constituent quarks. Treating the quarks as an equilibrated heat bath, we use the influence functional formalism to obtain a Langevin equation for the σ field. This allows us to calculate the explicit form of the damping coefficient and the noise correlators. For a self-consistent derivation of both the dynamics of the σ field and the quark fluid, we have to employ the 2PI (two-particle irreducible) effective action formalism. The energy dissipation from the field to the fluid is treated in the exact formalism of the 2PI effective action where a conserved energy-momentum tensor can be constructed. We derive its form and comment on approximations generating additional terms in the energy-momentum balance of the entire system.

  8. Quantum dynamics of the driven and dissipative Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Loïc; Ristivojevic, Zoran; Orth, Peter P.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2014-08-01

    The Rabi model considers a two-level system (or spin 1/2) coupled to a quantized harmonic oscillator and describes the simplest interaction between matter and light. The recent experimental progress in solid-state circuit quantum electrodynamics has engendered theoretical efforts to quantitatively describe the mathematical and physical aspects of the light-matter interaction beyond the rotating-wave approximation. We develop a stochastic Schrödinger equation approach which enables us to access the strong-coupling limit of the Rabi model and study the effects of dissipation and ac drive in an exact manner. We include the effect of Ohmic noise on the non-Markovian spin dynamics, resulting in Kondo-type correlations, as well as cavity losses. We compute the time evolution of spin variables in various conditions. As a consideration for future work, we discuss the possibility of reaching a steady state with one polariton in realistic experimental conditions.

  9. Universal shape characteristics for the mesoscopic star-shaped polymer via dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, O.; Ilnytskyi, J. M.; Holovatch, Yu; von Ferber, C.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we study the shape characteristics of star-like polymers in various solvent quality using a mesoscopic level of modeling. The dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed for the homogeneous and four different heterogeneous star polymers with the same molecular weight. We analyse the gyration radius and asphericity at the poor, good and θ-solvent regimes. Detailed explanation based on interplay between enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy and analyses on of the asphericity of individual branches are provided to explain the increase of the apsphericity in θ-solvent regime.

  10. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2014-06-06

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  11. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Calo, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  12. CECAM Workshop: Dissipative Particle Dynamics: Addressing Deficiencies and Establishing NewFrontiers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brennan, J.K.; Lísal, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 9 (2009), s. 766-769 ISSN 0892-7022. [CECAM Worskhop on the Dissipative Particle Dynamic Method (DPD). Lausanne, 16.07.2008-18.07.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : mesoscale * simulation * dissipative particle dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.028, year: 2009

  13. Quantal and dissipative aspects in nuclear structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, Denis

    1999-01-01

    This work is devoted to the description of both quantal and statistical aspects in a coherent theoretical framework that goes beyond a mean-field approximation. It is shown that among the possible methods, the Extended mean-field theory (ETDHF) is able to describe relaxation by including correlation effects. This theory is first applied to cold and hot giant resonances. After having developed a extended version of the linear response theory the effect of collisions on the response of 40 Ca is studied. It is shown that collisions contribute to the spreading width of giant resonances and become a dominant decay channel at high temperature. The generalization of these methods through the modelization of the Hamiltonian as a series of couplings in cascade has enabled to go beyond ETDHF. Thus, phenomena as multi-scale Ericson fluctuations and interferences in the nuclear response are predicted. The study of larger amplitudes requires the introduction of transport theories for the nuclear dynamics. Thus the deexcitation of hot and compressed nuclei has been studied with mean-field theories. This analysis has clarified the link between the equation of state and the dynamical expansion in finite Systems. A comparison with semi-classical has further shown the importance of quantum effects and has demonstrated the necessity to take into account nucleon collisions in a quantum framework. The possibility to apply ETDHF to nuclear dynamics in the general case is then discussed. A rapid and reliable method, tested on a schematic model is proposed to solve the extended mean-field. The application of ETDHF to the monopolar expansion of 16 O has finally demonstrated the interesting perspectives of this theory for describing dissipative aspects in quantum dynamics. Finally, the introduction of quantum stochastic approaches is discussed. (author) [fr

  14. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of drift structures in a magnetized dissipative plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Rogava, D. L.; Kharshiladze, O. A.

    2011-01-01

    A study is made of the nonlinear dynamics of solitary vortex structures in an inhomogeneous magnetized dissipative plasma. A nonlinear transport equation for long-wavelength drift wave structures is derived with allowance for the nonuniformity of the plasma density and temperature equilibria, as well as the magnetic and collisional viscosity of the medium and its friction. The dynamic equation describes two types of nonlinearity: scalar (due to the temperature inhomogeneity) and vector (due to the convectively polarized motion of the particles of the medium). The equation is fourth order in the spatial derivatives, in contrast to the second-order Hasegawa-Mima equations. An analytic steady solution to the nonlinear equation is obtained that describes a new type of solitary dipole vortex. The nonlinear dynamic equation is integrated numerically. A new algorithm and a new finite difference scheme for solving the equation are proposed, and it is proved that the solution so obtained is unique. The equation is used to investigate how the initially steady dipole vortex constructed here behaves unsteadily under the action of the factors just mentioned. Numerical simulations revealed that the role of the vector nonlinearity is twofold: it helps the dispersion or the scalar nonlinearity (depending on their magnitude) to ensure the mutual equilibrium and, thereby, promote self-organization of the vortical structures. It is shown that dispersion breaks the initial dipole vortex into a set of tightly packed, smaller scale, less intense monopole vortices-alternating cyclones and anticyclones. When the dispersion of the evolving initial dipole vortex is weak, the scalar nonlinearity symmetrically breaks a cyclone-anticyclone pair into a cyclone and an anticyclone, which are independent of one another and have essentially the same intensity, shape, and size. The stronger the dispersion, the more anisotropic the process whereby the structures break: the anticyclone is more intense

  16. A dissipative particle dynamics method for arbitrarily complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bian, Xin; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-02-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective Lagrangian method for modeling complex fluids in the mesoscale regime but so far it has been limited to relatively simple geometries. Here, we formulate a local detection method for DPD involving arbitrarily shaped geometric three-dimensional domains. By introducing an indicator variable of boundary volume fraction (BVF) for each fluid particle, the boundary of arbitrary-shape objects is detected on-the-fly for the moving fluid particles using only the local particle configuration. Therefore, this approach eliminates the need of an analytical description of the boundary and geometry of objects in DPD simulations and makes it possible to load the geometry of a system directly from experimental images or computer-aided designs/drawings. More specifically, the BVF of a fluid particle is defined by the weighted summation over its neighboring particles within a cutoff distance. Wall penetration is inferred from the value of the BVF and prevented by a predictor-corrector algorithm. The no-slip boundary condition is achieved by employing effective dissipative coefficients for liquid-solid interactions. Quantitative evaluations of the new method are performed for the plane Poiseuille flow, the plane Couette flow and the Wannier flow in a cylindrical domain and compared with their corresponding analytical solutions and (high-order) spectral element solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. We verify that the proposed method yields correct no-slip boundary conditions for velocity and generates negligible fluctuations of density and temperature in the vicinity of the wall surface. Moreover, we construct a very complex 3D geometry - the "Brown Pacman" microfluidic device - to explicitly demonstrate how to construct a DPD system with complex geometry directly from loading a graphical image. Subsequently, we simulate the flow of a surfactant solution through this complex microfluidic device using the new method. Its

  17. Bottom-up derivation of conservative and dissipative interactions for coarse-grained molecular liquids with the conditional reversible work method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichmann, Gregor; Marcon, Valentina; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2014-01-01

    Molecular simulations of soft matter systems have been performed in recent years using a variety of systematically coarse-grained models. With these models, structural or thermodynamic properties can be quite accurately represented while the prediction of dynamic properties remains difficult, especially for multi-component systems. In this work, we use constraint molecular dynamics simulations for calculating dissipative pair forces which are used together with conditional reversible work (CRW) conservative forces in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The combined CRW-DPD approach aims to extend the representability of CRW models to dynamic properties and uses a bottom-up approach. Dissipative pair forces are derived from fluctuations of the direct atomistic forces between mapped groups. The conservative CRW potential is obtained from a similar series of constraint dynamics simulations and represents the reversible work performed to couple the direct atomistic interactions between the mapped atom groups. Neopentane, tetrachloromethane, cyclohexane, and n-hexane have been considered as model systems. These molecular liquids are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics, coarse-grained molecular dynamics, and DPD. We find that the CRW-DPD models reproduce the liquid structure and diffusive dynamics of the liquid systems in reasonable agreement with the atomistic models when using single-site mapping schemes with beads containing five or six heavy atoms. For a two-site representation of n-hexane (3 carbons per bead), time scale separation can no longer be assumed and the DPD approach consequently fails to reproduce the atomistic dynamics

  18. Bottom-up derivation of conservative and dissipative interactions for coarse-grained molecular liquids with the conditional reversible work method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichmann, Gregor; Marcon, Valentina; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der, E-mail: vandervegt@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-14

    Molecular simulations of soft matter systems have been performed in recent years using a variety of systematically coarse-grained models. With these models, structural or thermodynamic properties can be quite accurately represented while the prediction of dynamic properties remains difficult, especially for multi-component systems. In this work, we use constraint molecular dynamics simulations for calculating dissipative pair forces which are used together with conditional reversible work (CRW) conservative forces in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The combined CRW-DPD approach aims to extend the representability of CRW models to dynamic properties and uses a bottom-up approach. Dissipative pair forces are derived from fluctuations of the direct atomistic forces between mapped groups. The conservative CRW potential is obtained from a similar series of constraint dynamics simulations and represents the reversible work performed to couple the direct atomistic interactions between the mapped atom groups. Neopentane, tetrachloromethane, cyclohexane, and n-hexane have been considered as model systems. These molecular liquids are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics, coarse-grained molecular dynamics, and DPD. We find that the CRW-DPD models reproduce the liquid structure and diffusive dynamics of the liquid systems in reasonable agreement with the atomistic models when using single-site mapping schemes with beads containing five or six heavy atoms. For a two-site representation of n-hexane (3 carbons per bead), time scale separation can no longer be assumed and the DPD approach consequently fails to reproduce the atomistic dynamics.

  19. Velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in isothermal dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2010-02-01

    The velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in a dissipative particle dynamics ideal fluid model is analyzed in this paper. The autocorrelation functions are calculated at three different friction parameters and three different time steps using the well-known Groot/Warren algorithm and newer algorithms including self-consistent leap-frog, self-consistent velocity Verlet and Shardlow first and second order integrators. At low friction values, the velocity autocorrelation function decays exponentially at short times, shows slower-than exponential decay at intermediate times, and approaches zero at long times for all five integrators. As friction value increases, the deviation from exponential behavior occurs earlier and is more pronounced. At small time steps, all the integrators give identical decay profiles. As time step increases, there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the integrators. The stress correlation behavior is markedly different for the algorithms. The self-consistent velocity Verlet and the Shardlow algorithms show very similar stress autocorrelation decay with change in friction parameter, whereas the Groot/Warren and leap-frog schemes show variations at higher friction factors. Diffusion coefficients and shear viscosities are calculated using Green-Kubo integration of the velocity and stress autocorrelation functions. The diffusion coefficients match well-known theoretical results at low friction limits. Although the stress autocorrelation function is different for each integrator, fluctuates rapidly, and gives poor statistics for most of the cases, the calculated shear viscosities still fall within range of theoretical predictions and nonequilibrium studies.

  20. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations for biological tissues: rheology and competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basan, Markus; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Elgeti, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we model biological tissues using a simple, mechanistic simulation based on dissipative particle dynamics. We investigate the continuum behavior of the simulated tissue and determine its dependence on the properties of the individual cell. Cells in our simulation adhere to each other, expand in volume, divide after reaching a specific size checkpoint and undergo apoptosis at a constant rate, leading to a steady-state homeostatic pressure in the tissue. We measure the dependence of the homeostatic state on the microscopic parameters of our model and show that homeostatic pressure, rather than the unconfined rate of cell division, determines the outcome of tissue competitions. Simulated cell aggregates are cohesive and round up due to the effect of tissue surface tension, which we measure for different tissues. Furthermore, mixtures of different cells unmix according to their adhesive properties. Using a variety of shear and creep simulations, we study tissue rheology by measuring yield stresses, shear viscosities, complex viscosities as well as the loss tangents as a function of model parameters. We find that cell division and apoptosis lead to a vanishing yield stress and fluid-like tissues. The effects of different adhesion strengths and levels of noise on the rheology of the tissue are also measured. In addition, we find that the level of cell division and apoptosis drives the diffusion of cells in the tissue. Finally, we present a method for measuring the compressibility of the tissue and its response to external stress via cell division and apoptosis

  1. Artificial biomembrane morphology: a dissipative particle dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becton, Matthew; Averett, Rodney; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-09-18

    Artificial membranes mimicking biological structures are rapidly breaking new ground in the areas of medicine and soft-matter physics. In this endeavor, we use dissipative particle dynamics simulation to investigate the morphology and behavior of lipid-based biomembranes under conditions of varied lipid density and self-interaction. Our results show that a less-than-normal initial lipid density does not create the traditional membrane; but instead results in the formation of a 'net', or at very low densities, a series of disparate 'clumps' similar to the micelles formed by lipids in nature. When the initial lipid density is high, a membrane forms, but due to the large number of lipids, the naturally formed membrane would be larger than the simulation box, leading to 'rippling' behavior as the excess repulsive force of the membrane interior overcomes the bending energy of the membrane. Once the density reaches a certain point however, 'bubbles' appear inside the membrane, reducing the rippling behavior and eventually generating a relatively flat, but thick, structure with micelles of water inside the membrane itself. Our simulations also demonstrate that the interaction parameter between individual lipids plays a significant role in the formation and behavior of lipid membrane assemblies, creating similar structures as the initial lipid density distribution. This work provides a comprehensive approach to the intricacies of lipid membranes, and offers a guideline to design biological or polymeric membranes through self-assembly processes as well as develop novel cellular manipulation and destruction techniques.

  2. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  3. Dissipation and spontaneous symmetry breaking in brain dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compare the predictions of the dissipative quantum model of the brain with neurophysiological data collected from electroencephalograms resulting from high-density arrays fixed on the surfaces of primary sensory and limbic areas of trained rabbits and cats. Functional brain imaging in relation to behavior reveals the formation of coherent domains of synchronized neuronal oscillatory activity and phase transitions predicted by the dissipative model

  4. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  5. Molecular dynamics for fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Schnack, J.

    2000-02-01

    The time-dependent variational principle for many-body trial states is used to discuss the relation between the approaches of different molecular dynamics models to describe indistinguishable fermions. Early attempts to include effects of the Pauli principle by means of nonlocal potentials as well as more recent models which work with antisymmetrized many-body states are reviewed under these premises. (orig.)

  6. Dissipative tunneling and orthogonality catastrophe in molecular transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braig, S.; Flensberg, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Transport through molecular devices with weak tunnel coupling to the leads but with strong coupling to a single vibrational mode is considered in the case where the vibration is damped by coupling to the environment. In particular, we investigate what influence the electrostatic coupling of the c......Transport through molecular devices with weak tunnel coupling to the leads but with strong coupling to a single vibrational mode is considered in the case where the vibration is damped by coupling to the environment. In particular, we investigate what influence the electrostatic coupling...

  7. Invariant Measures for Dissipative Dynamical Systems: Abstract Results and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan E.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we study certain invariant measures that can be associated to the time averaged observation of a broad class of dissipative semigroups via the notion of a generalized Banach limit. Consider an arbitrary complete separable metric space X which is acted on by any continuous semigroup { S( t)} t ≥ 0. Suppose that { S( t)} t ≥ 0 possesses a global attractor {{A}}. We show that, for any generalized Banach limit LIM T → ∞ and any probability distribution of initial conditions {{m}_0}, that there exists an invariant probability measure {{m}}, whose support is contained in {{A}}, such that intX \\varphi(x) d{m}(x) = \\underset{t rightarrow infty}LIM1/T int_0^T int_X \\varphi(S(t) x) d{m}_0(x) dt, for all observables φ living in a suitable function space of continuous mappings on X. This work is based on the framework of Foias et al. (Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications, vol 83. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001); it generalizes and simplifies the proofs of more recent works (Wang in Disc Cont Dyn Syst 23(1-2):521-540, 2009; Lukaszewicz et al. in J Dyn Diff Eq 23(2):225-250, 2011). In particular our results rely on the novel use of a general but elementary topological observation, valid in any metric space, which concerns the growth of continuous functions in the neighborhood of compact sets. In the case when { S( t)} t ≥ 0 does not possess a compact absorbing set, this lemma allows us to sidestep the use of weak compactness arguments which require the imposition of cumbersome weak continuity conditions and thus restricts the phase space X to the case of a reflexive Banach space. Two examples of concrete dynamical systems where the semigroup is known to be non-compact are examined in detail. We first consider the Navier-Stokes equations with memory in the diffusion terms. This is the so called Jeffery's model which describes certain classes of viscoelastic fluids. We then consider a family of neutral delay differential

  8. Josephson current through a molecular transistor in a dissipative environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, T; Rossini, Gianpaolo; Flensberg, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We study the Josephson coupling between two superconductors through a single correlated molecular level, including Coulomb interaction on the level and coupling to a bosonic environment. All calculations are done to the lowest, i.e., the fourth, order in the tunneling coupling and we find...

  9. Relaxation dynamics in quantum dissipative systems: The microscopic effect of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga-Piña, L. [Facultad de Física, Universidad de la Habana, San Lázaro y L, Vedado, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Tremblay, J. C., E-mail: jean.c.tremblay@gmail.com [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-21

    We investigate the effect of inter-mode coupling on the vibrational relaxation dynamics of molecules in weak dissipative environments. The simulations are performed within the reduced density matrix formalism in the Markovian regime, assuming a Lindblad form for the system-bath interaction. The prototypical two-dimensional model system representing two CO molecules approaching a Cu(100) surface is adapted from an ab initio potential, while the diatom-diatom vibrational coupling strength is systematically varied. In the weak system-bath coupling limit and at low temperatures, only first order non-adiabatic uni-modal coupling terms contribute to surface-mediated vibrational relaxation. Since dissipative dynamics is non-unitary, the choice of representation will affect the evolution of the reduced density matrix. Two alternative representations for computing the relaxation rates and the associated operators are thus compared: the fully coupled spectral basis, and a factorizable ansatz. The former is well-established and serves as a benchmark for the solution of Liouville-von Neumann equation. In the latter, a contracted grid basis of potential-optimized discrete variable representation is tailored to incorporate most of the inter-mode coupling, while the Lindblad operators are represented as tensor products of one-dimensional operators, for consistency. This procedure results in a marked reduction of the grid size and in a much more advantageous scaling of the computational cost with respect to the increase of the dimensionality of the system. The factorizable method is found to provide an accurate description of the dissipative quantum dynamics of the model system, specifically of the time evolution of the state populations and of the probability density distribution of the molecular wave packet. The influence of intra-molecular vibrational energy redistribution appears to be properly taken into account by the new model on the whole range of coupling strengths. It

  10. Relationship between dynamical entropy and energy dissipation far from thermodynamic equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jason R.; Costa, Anthony B.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Connections between microscopic dynamical observables and macroscopic nonequilibrium (NE) properties have been pursued in statistical physics since Boltzmann, Gibbs, and Maxwell. The simulations we describe here establish a relationship between the Kolmogorov–Sinai entropy and the energy dissipated as heat from a NE system to its environment. First, we show that the Kolmogorov–Sinai or dynamical entropy can be separated into system and bath components and that the entropy of the system characterizes the dynamics of energy dissipation. Second, we find that the average change in the system dynamical entropy is linearly related to the average change in the energy dissipated to the bath. The constant energy and time scales of the bath fix the dynamical relationship between these two quantities. These results provide a link between microscopic dynamical variables and the macroscopic energetics of NE processes. PMID:24065832

  11. Analytical description of critical dynamics for two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J.A.; Oliveira, Juliano A. de; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-01-01

    The critical dynamics near the transition from unlimited to limited action diffusion for two families of well known dissipative nonlinear maps, namely the dissipative standard and dissipative discontinuous maps, is characterized by the use of an analytical approach. The approach is applied to explicitly obtain the average squared action as a function of the (discrete) time and the parameters controlling nonlinearity and dissipation. This allows to obtain a set of critical exponents so far obtained numerically in the literature. The theoretical predictions are verified by extensive numerical simulations. We conclude that all possible dynamical cases, independently on the map parameter values and initial conditions, collapse into the universal exponential decay of the properly normalized average squared action as a function of a normalized time. The formalism developed here can be extended to many other different types of mappings therefore making the methodology generic and robust. - Highlights: • We analytically approach scaling properties of a family of two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps. • We derive universal scaling functions that were obtained before only approximately. • We predict the unexpected condition where diffusion and dissipation compensate each other exactly. • We find a new universal scaling function that embraces all possible dissipative behaviors.

  12. Dynamics of charged viscous dissipative cylindrical collapse with full causal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S.M.; Abbas, G. [The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Department of Mathematics, Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamical aspects of a charged viscous cylindrical source by using the Misner approach. To this end, we have considered the more general charged dissipative fluid enclosed by the cylindrical symmetric spacetime. The dissipative nature of the source is due to the presence of dissipative variables in the stress-energy tensor. The dynamical equations resulting from such charged cylindrical dissipative source have been coupled with the causal transport equations for heat flux, shear and bulk viscosity, in the context of the Israel-Steward theory. In this case, we have the considered Israel-Steward transportation equations without excluding the thermodynamics viscous/heat coupling coefficients. The results are compared with the previous works in which such coefficients were excluded and viscosity variables do not satisfy the casual transportation equations. (orig.)

  13. Noise Induced Dissipation in Discrete-Time Classical and Quantum Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wolowski, Lech

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new characteristics of chaoticity of classical and quantum dynamical systems by defining the notion of the dissipation time which enables us to test how the system responds to the noise and in particular to measure the speed at which an initially closed, conservative system converges to the equilibrium when subjected to noisy (stochastic) perturbations. We prove fast dissipation result for classical Anosov systems and ...

  14. The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-03-01

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS has been generalized in order to simulate a variety of NONEQUILIBRIUM systems. This generalization has been achieved by adopting microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress. Some of the problems already treated include rapid plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, strong shockwaves simulation, and far-from-equilibrium phase transformations. Continuing advances in technique and in the modeling of interatomic forces, coupled with qualitative improvements in computer hardware, are enabling such simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  15. Entanglement dynamics of a pure bipartite system in dissipative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Azim, Tasnim; Suhail Zubairy, M [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-10-28

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two atoms. We find that in a vacuum reservoir the presence of the state where both atoms are in excited states is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for an infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure 2-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that the sudden death of entanglement always happens. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  16. Entanglement dynamics of a pure bipartite system in dissipative environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Azim, Tasnim; Suhail Zubairy, M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two atoms. We find that in a vacuum reservoir the presence of the state where both atoms are in excited states is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for an infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure 2-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that the sudden death of entanglement always happens. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  17. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2015-06-30

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e., ≥200≥200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e., ≥20≥20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  18. Molecular dissipation phenomena of nanoscopic friction in the heterogeneous relaxation regime of a glass former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Scott; Gray, Tomoko; Overney, René M

    2005-10-01

    Nanoscale sliding friction involving a polystyrene melt near its glass transition temperature Tg (373 K) exhibited dissipation phenomena that provide insight into the underlying molecular relaxation processes. A dissipative length scale that shows significant parallelism with the size of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRRs) could be experimentally deduced from friction-velocity isotherms, combined with dielectric loss analysis. Upon cooling to approximately 10 K above Tg, the dissipation length Xd grew from a segmental scale of approximately 3 A to 2.1 nm, following a power-law relationship with the reduced temperature Xd approximately TR-phi. The resulting phi=1.89+/-0.08 is consistent with growth predictions for the length scale of CRRs in the heterogeneous regime of fragile glass formers. Deviations from the power-law behavior closer to Tg suggest that long-range processes, e.g., the normal mode or ultraslow Fischer modes, may couple with the alpha relaxation, leading to energy dissipation in domains of tens of nanometers.

  19. Dynamical critical phenomena in driven-dissipative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, L M; Huber, S D; Altman, E; Diehl, S

    2013-05-10

    We explore the nature of the Bose condensation transition in driven open quantum systems, such as exciton-polariton condensates. Using a functional renormalization group approach formulated in the Keldysh framework, we characterize the dynamical critical behavior that governs decoherence and an effective thermalization of the low frequency dynamics. We identify a critical exponent special to the driven system, showing that it defines a new dynamical universality class. Hence critical points in driven systems lie beyond the standard classification of equilibrium dynamical phase transitions. We show how the new critical exponent can be probed in experiments with driven cold atomic systems and exciton-polariton condensates.

  20. Causal dissipation and shock profiles in the relativistic fluid dynamics of pure radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Temple, Blake

    2014-06-08

    CURRENT THEORIES OF DISSIPATION IN THE RELATIVISTIC REGIME SUFFER FROM ONE OF TWO DEFICITS: either their dissipation is not causal or no profiles for strong shock waves exist. This paper proposes a relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier-type viscosity and heat conduction tensor such that the resulting second-order system of partial differential equations for the fluid dynamics of pure radiation is symmetric hyperbolic. This system has causal dissipation as well as the property that all shock waves of arbitrary strength have smooth profiles. Entropy production is positive both on gradients near those of solutions to the dissipation-free equations and on gradients of shock profiles. This shows that the new dissipation stress tensor complies to leading order with the principles of thermodynamics. Whether higher order modifications of the ansatz are required to obtain full compatibility with the second law far from the zero-dissipation equilibrium is left to further investigations. The system has exactly three a priori free parameters χ , η , ζ , corresponding physically to heat conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity. If the bulk viscosity is zero (as is stated in the literature) and the total stress-energy tensor is trace free, the entire viscosity and heat conduction tensor is determined to within a constant factor.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs

  2. Non-equilibrium dynamics of open systems and fluctuation-dissipation theorems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špička, Václav; Velický, B.; Kalvová, Anděla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, 6-8 (2017), s. 1-23, č. článku 1700032. ISSN 0015-8208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-equilibrium * fluctuation-dissipation theorems * non-equilibrium Greens function * transient and steady state magnetic current * molecular bridge Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics ( physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 2.434, year: 2016

  3. A mesoscopic simulation of static and dynamic wetting using many-body dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Najmeh; Pishevar, Ahmadreza

    2018-01-01

    A many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation is applied here to pave the way for investigating the behavior of mesoscale droplets after impact on horizontal solid substrates. First, hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates are simulated through tuning the solid-liquid interfacial interaction parameters of an innovative conservative force model. The static contact angles are calculated on homogeneous and several patterned surfaces and compared with the predicted values by the Cassie's law in order to verify the model. The results properly evaluate the amount of increase in surface superhydrophobicity as a result of surface patterning. Then drop impact phenomenon is studied by calculating the spreading factor and dimensionless height versus dimensionless time and the comparisons made between the results and the experimental values for three different static contact angles. The results show the capability of the procedure in calculating the amount of maximum spreading factor, which is a significant concept in ink-jet printing and coating process.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtíková, J.; Kalvoda, L.; Sedlák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 637-639 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : molecular dynamics * poly(dimethylsiloxane) * dissipative particle dynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/PDF/128/a128z4p40.pdf

  5. Dissipative particle dynamics of triblock copolymer melts: A midblock conformational study at moderate segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallury, Syamal S.; Spontak, Richard J.; Pasquinelli, Melissa A.

    2014-12-01

    As thermoplastic elastomers, triblock copolymers constitute an immensely important class of shape-memory soft materials due to their unique ability to form molecular networks stabilized by physical, rather than chemical, cross-links. The extent to which such networks develop in triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymers is sensitive to the formation of midblock bridges, which serve to connect neighboring microdomains. In addition to bridges, copolymer molecules can likewise form loops and dangling ends upon microphase separation or they can remain unsegregated. While prior theoretical and simulation studies have elucidated the midblock bridging fraction in triblock copolymer melts, most have only considered strongly segregated systems wherein dangling ends and unsegregated chains become relatively insignificant. In this study, simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics are performed to examine the self-assembly and networkability of moderately segregated triblock copolymers. Utilizing a density-based cluster-recognition algorithm, we demonstrate how the simulations can be analyzed to extract information about microdomain formation and permit explicit quantitation of the midblock bridging, looping, dangling, and unsegregated fractions for linear triblock copolymers varying in chain length, molecular composition, and segregation level. We show that midblock conformations can be sensitive to variations in chain length, molecular composition, and bead repulsion, and that a systematic investigation can be used to identify the onset of strong segregation where the presence of dangling and unsegregated fractions are minimal. In addition, because this clustering approach is robust, it can be used with any particle-based simulation method to quantify network formation of different morphologies for a wide range of triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymer systems.

  6. Parallel Implementation of Isothermal and Isoenergetic Dissipative Particle Dynamics using Shardlow-like Splitting Algorithms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Larentzos, J.P.; Brennan, J.K.; Moore, J.D.; Lísal, Martin; Mattson, w.D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 7 (2014), s. 1987-1998 ISSN 0010-4655 Grant - others:ARL(US) W911NF-10-2-0039 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : dissipative particle dynamics * shardlow splitting algorithm * numerical integration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2014

  7. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  8. Influence of nuclear dissipation on fission dynamics of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A stochastic approach to fission dynamics based on two-dimensional Langevin equations was applied to calculate the anisotropy of the fission fragments angular distribution and average pre-scission neutron multiplicities for the compound nucleus 248Cf formed in the $${16}$O+$^{232}$Th reactions. Postsaddle nuclear ...

  9. Microscopic description of dissipative dynamics of a level-crossing transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, M.; Militello, B.; Messina, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Vitanov, N. V. [Department of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Boulevard, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-08-15

    We analyze the effect of a dissipative bosonic environment on the Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg-Majorana (LZSM) level crossing model by using a microscopic approach to derive the relevant master equation. For an environment at zero temperature and weak dissipation, our microscopic approach confirms the independence of the survival probability on the decay rate that has been predicted earlier by the simple phenomenological LZSM model. For strong decay the microscopic approach predicts a notable increase of the survival probability, which signals dynamical decoupling of the initial state. Unlike the phenomenological model, our approach makes it possible to study the dependence of the system dynamics on the temperature of the environment. In the limit of very high temperature we find that the dynamics is characterized by a very strong dynamical decoupling of the initial state--the temperature-induced quantum Zeno effect.

  10. Stability and Control of Large-Scale Dynamical Systems A Vector Dissipative Systems Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Wassim M

    2011-01-01

    Modern complex large-scale dynamical systems exist in virtually every aspect of science and engineering, and are associated with a wide variety of physical, technological, environmental, and social phenomena, including aerospace, power, communications, and network systems, to name just a few. This book develops a general stability analysis and control design framework for nonlinear large-scale interconnected dynamical systems, and presents the most complete treatment on vector Lyapunov function methods, vector dissipativity theory, and decentralized control architectures. Large-scale dynami

  11. Copolymer natural latex in concrete: Dynamic evaluation through energy dissipation of polymer modified concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andayani, Sih Wuri; Suratman, Rochim; Imran, Iswandi; Mardiyati

    2018-05-01

    Portland cement concrete have been used in construction due to its strength and ecomical value. But it has some limitations, such low flexural strength, low tensile strength, low chemical resistant and etc. Due to its limitations in flexural and tensile strength, Portland cement concrete more susceptible by seismic force. There are some methods for improving its limitations. Polymer addition into concrete mixture could be one of solution for improving the flexural and tensile strength, in aiming to get erthquake resistant properties. Also, the eartquake resistant could be achieved by improving energy dissipation capacity. In this research, the earthquake resistant evalution was approached from dynamic evaluation through energy dissipation capacity, after polymer addition as concrete additives. The polymers were natural latex (Indonesian naural resource) grafted with styrene and methacrylate, forming copolymer - natural latex methacrylate (KOLAM) and copolymer - natural latex styrene (KOLAS). They were added into concrete mixture resulting polymer modified concrete. The composition of polymer are 1%, 5% and 10% weight/weight of cement. The higher capacity of energy dissipation will give more capability in either absorbing or dissipating energy, and it was predicted would give better earthquake resistant.. The use of KOLAM gave better performance than KOLAS in energy dissipation capacity. It gave about 46% for addition of 1% w/w compared to Portland cement concrete. But for addition 5% w/w and 10% w/w, they gave about 7% and 5% higher energy dissipation capacity. The KOLAM addition into concrete mixture would reduce the maximum impact load with maximumabout 35% impact load reducing after 1% w/w addition. The higher concentration of KOLAM in concrete mixture, lower reducing of impact load, they were about 4% and 3% for KOLAM 5% and 10%. For KOLAS addition in any compositions, there were no positive trend either in energy dissipation capacity or impact load properties

  12. Considering human exposure to pesticides in food products: Importance of dissipation dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Juraske, Ronnie; Jolliet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The general public is continuously concerned about effects from pesticide exposure via residues in food crops. However, impacts from pesticide exposure are mostly neglected in food product-related LCAs. Time-to-harvest and dissipation from crops mainly drive residue dynamics with dissipation...... as most uncertain aspect in characterization modeling. We analyzed measured half-lives (n=4513) with 95% falling between 0.6 and 29 days. With ~500 pesticides authorized alone in the EU for several hundred crops, however, experimental stud-ies only cover few possible pesticide-crop combinations. Therefore......, we estimated dissipation from measured data and provide reference half-lives for 333 pesticides applied at 20°C under field conditions. Our framework allows for detailed explorations of dietary choices in LCA with respect to human health impacts from pesticide exposure via crop consumption. The next...

  13. Molecular dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, J A; Pachter, R

    1997-02-01

    A model of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), with a retinal chromophore attached, has been derived for a molecular dynamics simulation. A method for determining atomic coordinates of several ill-defined strands was developed using a structure prediction algorithm based on a sequential Kalman filter technique. The completed structure was minimized using the GROMOS force field. The structure was then heated to 293 K and run for 500 ps at constant temperature. A comparison with the energy-minimized structure showed a slow increase in the all-atom RMS deviation over the first 200 ps, leveling off to approximately 2.4 A relative to the starting structure. The final structure yielded a backbone-atom RMS deviation from the crystallographic structure of 2.8 A. The residue neighbors of the chromophore atoms were followed as a function of time. The set of persistent near-residue neighbors supports the theory that differences in pKa values control access to the Schiff base proton, rather than formation of a counterion complex.

  14. Dynamic load mitigation using dissipative elastic metamaterials with multiple Maxwell-type oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sagr; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2018-03-01

    Dissipative elastic metamaterials have attracted increased attention in recent times. This paper presents the development of a dissipative elastic metamaterial with multiple Maxwell-type resonators for stress wave attenuation. The mechanism of the dissipation effect on the vibration characteristics is systematically investigated by mass-spring-damper models with single and dual resonators. Based on the parameter optimization, it is revealed that a broadband wave attenuation region (stopping band) can be obtained by properly utilizing interactions from resonant motions and viscoelastic effects of the Maxwell-type oscillators. The relevant numerical verifications are conducted for various cases, and excellent agreement between the numerical and theoretical frequency response functions is shown. The design of this dissipative metamaterial system is further applied for dynamic load mitigation and blast wave attenuation. Moreover, the transient response in the continuum model is designed and analyzed for more robust design. By virtue of the bandgap merging effect induced by the Maxwell-type damper, the transient blast wave can be almost completely suppressed in the low frequency range. A significantly improved performance of the proposed dissipative metamaterials for stress wave mitigation is verified in both time and frequency domains.

  15. Optimal control of quantum dissipative dynamics: Analytic solution for cooling the three-level Λ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Tannor, David J.; Khaneja, Navin

    2004-01-01

    We study the problem of optimal control of dissipative quantum dynamics. Although under most circumstances dissipation leads to an increase in entropy (or a decrease in purity) of the system, there is an important class of problems for which dissipation with external control can decrease the entropy (or increase the purity) of the system. An important example is laser cooling. In such systems, there is an interplay of the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which is controllable, and the dissipative part of the dynamics, which is uncontrollable. The strategy is to control the Hamiltonian portion of the evolution in such a way that the dissipation causes the purity of the system to increase rather than decrease. The goal of this paper is to find the strategy that leads to maximal purity at the final time. Under the assumption that Hamiltonian control is complete and arbitrarily fast, we provide a general framework by which to calculate optimal cooling strategies. These assumptions lead to a great simplification, in which the control problem can be reformulated in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of ρ, rather than ρ itself. By combining this formulation with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theorem we are able to obtain an equation for the globally optimal cooling strategy in terms of the spectrum of the density matrix. For the three-level Λ system, we provide a complete analytic solution for the optimal cooling strategy. For this system it is found that the optimal strategy does not exploit system coherences and is a 'greedy' strategy, in which the purity is increased maximally at each instant

  16. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed

  17. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohan, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.) [pt

  18. Scaling Behaviour of Different Polymer Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics of Unentangled Melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Posel, Zbyšek; Rousseau, B.; Lísal, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 15 (2014), s. 1274-1289 ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02938S Grant - others:GA UJEP(CZ) 53222 15 0008 01; CNRS-ASRT(FR) 20206 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : coarse-grain potential * dissipative particle dynamics * rouse model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2014

  19. General conditions for the existence of non-standard Lagrangians for dissipative dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musielak, Z.E.

    2009-01-01

    Equations of motion describing dissipative dynamical systems with coefficients varying either in time or in space are considered. To identify the equations that admit a Lagrangian description, two classes of non-standard Lagrangians are introduced and general conditions required for the existence of these Lagrangians are determined. The conditions are used to obtain some non-standard Lagrangians and derive equations of motion resulting from these Lagrangians.

  20. Dissipation dynamics of terbuthylazine in soil during the maize growing season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipičević, Sanja; Mendaš, Gordana; Dvoršćak, Marija; Fingler, Sanja; Galzina, Natalija; Barić, Klara

    2017-12-20

    Ever since terbuthylazine (TBA) replaced atrazine in herbicide crop treatment, its much greater persistence has raised considerable environmental concern. The aim of our field experiment was to establish the dissipation dynamics of TBA and its degradation product desethylterbuthylazine (DET) in soil over five months of maize growth. We applied TBA as part of pre-emergent treatment in the regular and double-the-regular amounts. Soil samples were collected periodically at the following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, and 30-50 cm. For TBA and DET soil residue analysis we used microwave-assisted extraction with methanol, followed by HPLC-UV/DAD. Regardless of the application rate, more than 80 % of the applied TBA dissipated from the first 50 cm of soil in the two months after herbicide application and 120 mm of rainfall. Three months later (at maize harvest), less than 4 % of total TBA remained in the soil, mostly in the top 20 cm rich with organic carbon on which TBA is likelier to adsorb. The loss of TBA from soil coincided with the rise in DET, especially the top soil layers, during the periods of low rainfall and highest soil temperatures. This points to biodegradation as the main route of TBA dissipation in humic soils. The applied amount had no significant effect on TBA dissipation in the top (humic) layers, but in the layers with less than 1 % of organic carbon, it was higher when the doublethe- regular dose was applied.

  1. Impact of generalized dissipative coefficient on warm inflationary dynamics in the light of latest Planck data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Hussain, Shahzad [Aspire College, Department of Mathematics, Hafizabad (Pakistan); Videla, Nelson [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-10-15

    The warm inflation scenario in view of the modified Chaplygin gas is studied. We consider the inflationary expansion to be driven by a standard scalar field whose decay ratio Γ has a generic power-law dependence with the scalar field φ and the temperature of the thermal bath T. By assuming an exponential power-law dependence in the cosmic time for the scale factor a(t), corresponding to the intermediate inflation model, we solve the background and perturbative dynamics considering our model to evolve according to (1) weak dissipative regime and (2) strong dissipative regime. Specifically, we find explicit expressions for the dissipative coefficient, scalar potential, and the relevant inflationary observables like the scalar power spectrum, scalar spectral index, and tensor-to-scalar ratio. The free parameters characterizing our model are constrained by considering the essential condition for warm inflation, the conditions for the model evolves according to weak or strong dissipative regime, and the 2015 Planck results through the n{sub s}-r plane. (orig.)

  2. Molecular quantum cellular automata cell design trade-offs: latching vs. power dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2018-06-20

    The use of molecules to enact quantum cellular automata (QCA) cells has been proposed as a new way for performing electronic logic operations at sub-nm dimensions. A key question that arises concerns whether chemical or physical processes are to be exploited. The use of chemical reactions allows the state of a switch element to be latched in molecular form, making the output of a cell independent of its inputs, but costs energy to do the reaction. Alternatively, if purely electronic polarization is manipulated then no internal latching occurs, but no power is dissipated provided the fields from the inputs change slowly compared to the molecular response times. How these scenarios pan out is discussed by considering calculated properties of the 1,4-diallylbutane cation, a species often used as a paradigm for molecular electronic switching. Utilized are results from different calculation approaches that depict the ion either as a charge-localized mixed-valence compound functioning as a bistable switch, or else as an extremely polarizable molecule with a delocalized electronic structure. Practical schemes for using molecular cells in QCA and other devices emerge.

  3. Molecular dynamics with deterministic and stochastic numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Leimkuhler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical underpinnings of algorithms used for molecular dynamics simulation, including both deterministic and stochastic numerical methods. Molecular dynamics is one of the most versatile and powerful methods of modern computational science and engineering and is used widely in chemistry, physics, materials science and biology. Understanding the foundations of numerical methods means knowing how to select the best one for a given problem (from the wide range of techniques on offer) and how to create new, efficient methods to address particular challenges as they arise in complex applications.  Aimed at a broad audience, this book presents the basic theory of Hamiltonian mechanics and stochastic differential equations, as well as topics including symplectic numerical methods, the handling of constraints and rigid bodies, the efficient treatment of Langevin dynamics, thermostats to control the molecular ensemble, multiple time-stepping, and the dissipative particle dynamics method...

  4. Energy Dissipation and Dynamics in Large Guide Field Turbulence Driven Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Shay, M. A.; Sharma, P.; Juno, J.; Haggerty, C. C.; Drake, J. F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hakim, A.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence and magnetic reconnection are the primary mechanisms responsible for the conversion of stored magnetic energy into particle energy in many space and astrophysical plasmas. The magnetospheric multiscale mission (MMS) has given us unprecedented access to high cadence particle and field data of turbulence and magnetic reconnection at earth's magnetopause. The observations include large guide field reconnection events generated within the turbulent magnetopause. Motivated by these observations, we present a study of large guide reconnection using the fully kinetic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell component of the Gkeyll simulation framework, and we also employ and compare with gyrokinetics to explore the asymptotically large guide field limit. In addition to studying the configuration space dynamics, we leverage the recently developed field-particle correlations to diagnose the dominant sources of dissipation and compare the results of the field-particle correlation to other energy dissipation measures.

  5. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of flow generated by two rotating concentric cylinders: II. Lateral dissipative and random forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipovic, N; Haber, S; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2008-01-01

    Traditional DPD methods address dissipative and random forces exerted along the line connecting neighbouring particles. Espanol (1998 Phys. Rev. E 57 2930-48) suggested adding dissipative and random force components in a direction perpendicular to this line. This paper focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of such an addition as compared with the traditional DPD method. Our benchmark system comprises fluid initially at rest occupying the space between two concentric cylinders rotating with various angular velocities. The effect of the lateral force components on the time evolution of the simulated velocity profile was also compared with that of the known analytical solution. The results show that (i) the solution accuracy at steady state has improved and the error has been reduced by at least 30% (in one case by 75%), (ii) the DPD time to reach steady state has been halved, (iii) the CPU time has increased by only 30%, and (iv) no significant differences exist in density and temperature distributions

  6. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wave packet calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule

  7. Effect of immobilization of a bacterial consortium on diuron dissipation and community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazot, Stéphane; Lebeau, Thierry

    2009-09-01

    This work intended to study the relationship between diuron herbicide dissipation and the population dynamics of co-cultivated Delftia acidovorans WDL34 (WDL34) and Arthrobacter sp. N4 (N4) for different cell formulations: free cells or immobilization in Ca-alginate beads of one or both strains. GFP-tagged WDL34 and N4 Gram staining allowed analyzing the cell growth and distribution of each strain in both beads and culture medium in the course of the time. Compared to the free cell co-culture of WDL34 and N4, immobilization of WDL34 in Ca-alginate beads co-cultivated with free N4 increased the dissipation rate of diuron by 53% (0.141 mg ml(-1) h(-1)). In that case, immobilization strongly modified the final equilibrium among both strains (highest total N4 to WDL34 ratio). Our results demonstrated that the inoculant formulation played a major role in the cell growth of each cultivated strain possibly increasing diuron dissipation. This optimized cell formulation may allow improving water and soil treatment.

  8. Field dissipation of oxyfluorfen in onion and its dynamics in soil under Indian tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki, P; Sathya Priya, R; Chinnusamy, C

    2013-01-01

    Oxyfluorfen, a diphenyl-ether herbicide is being used to control annual and perennial broad-leaved weeds and sedges in a variety of field crops including onion. The present study was aimed to investigate the dynamics and field persistence of oxyfluorfen in onion plant, bulb and soil under Indian tropical conditions. Application of four rates of oxyfluorfen viz., 200, 250, 300 and 400 g AI ha(-1) as pre-emergence gave good weed control in field experiment with onion. The oxyfluorfen residue dissipated faster in plant than in soil respectively, with a mean half-life of 6.1 and 11.2 days. Dissipation followed first-order kinetics. In laboratory column leaching experiments, 17 percent of the applied oxyfluorfen was recovered from the soil and indicates its solubility in water and mobility in sandy clay loam soil was low. A sorption study revealed that the adsorption of oxyfluorfen to the soil was highly influenced by the soil organic carbon with the Koc value of 5450. The study concludes that the dissipation of oxyfluorfen in soil and onion was dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the soil and environmental conditions.

  9. Experimental constraints on dynamic fragmentation as a dissipative process during seismic slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Troy; Griffith, W Ashley

    2017-09-28

    Various fault damage fabrics, from gouge in the principal slip zone to fragmented and pulverized rocks in the fault damage zone, have been attributed to brittle deformation at high strain rates during earthquake rupture. Past experimental work has shown that there exists a critical threshold in stress-strain rate space through which rock failure transitions from failure along a few discrete fracture planes to intense fragmentation. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite (AN) and Westerly Granite (WG) in which we quantify fracture surface area produced by dynamic fragmentation under uniaxial compressive loading and examine the controls of pre-existing mineral anisotropy on dissipative processes at the microscale. Tests on AN produced substantially greater new fracture surface area (approx. 6.0 m 2  g -1 ) than those on WG (0.07 m 2  g -1 ). Estimates of the portion of energy dissipated into brittle fracture were significant for WG (approx. 5%), but appeared substantial in AN (10% to as much as 40%). The results have important implications for the partitioning of dissipated energy under extreme loading conditions expected during earthquakes and the scaling of high-speed laboratory rock mechanics experiments to natural fault zones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Faulting, friction and weakening: from slow to fast motion'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. The dynamic tidal response of a subsurface ocean on Titan and the associated dissipative heat generated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert

    2012-04-01

    The tidal flow response and associated dissipative heat generated in a satellite ocean depends strongly on the ocean configuration parameters as these parameters control the form and frequencies of the ocean's natural modes of oscillation; if there is a near match between the form and frequency of one of these natural modes and that of one of the available tidal forcing constituents, the ocean can be resonantly excited, producing strong tidal flow and appreciable dissipative heat. Of primary interest in this study are the ocean parameters that can be expected to evolve (notably, the ocean depth in an ocean attempting to freeze, and the stratification in an ocean attempting to cool) because this evolution can cause an ocean to be pushed into a resonant configuration where the increased dissipative heat of the resonant response halts further evolution and a liquid ocean can be maintained by ocean tidal heat. In this case the resonant ocean tidal response is not only allowed but may be inevitable. Previous work on this topic is extended to describe the resonant configurations in both unstratified and stratified cases for an assumed global ocean on Titan subject to both obliquity and eccentricity tidal forces. Results indicate first that the assumption of an equilibrium tidal response is not justified and the correct dynamical response must be considered. Second, the ocean tidal dissipation will be appreciable if the ocean configuration is near that producing a resonant state. The parameters values required for this resonance are provided in this study, and examples/movies of calculated ocean tidal flow are also presented.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Vignal, Philippe; Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  13. Dynamical Origin of Highly Efficient Energy Dissipation in Soft Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Sim, Jaegun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2018-05-01

    We explore robust magnetization-dynamic behaviors in soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-domain states and find their related high-efficiency energy-dissipation mechanism using finite-element micromagnetic simulations. We also make analytical derivations that provide deeper physical insights into the magnetization dynamics associated with Gilbert damping parameters under applications of time-varying rotating magnetic fields of different strengths and frequencies and static magnetic fields. Furthermore, we find that the mass-specific energy-dissipation rate at resonance in the steady-state regime changes remarkably with the strength of rotating fields and static fields for given damping constants. The associated magnetization dynamics are well interpreted with the help of the numerical calculation of analytically derived explicit forms. The high-efficiency energy-loss power can be obtained using soft magnetic nanoparticles in the single-domain state by tuning the frequency of rotating fields to the resonance frequency; what is more, it is controllable via the rotating and static field strengths for a given intrinsic damping constant. We provide a better and more efficient means of achieving specific loss power that can be implemented in magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  14. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of fluid motion through an unsaturated fracture and fracture junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Moubin; Meakin, Paul; Huang Hai

    2007-01-01

    Multiphase fluid motion in unsaturated fractures and fracture networks involves complicated fluid dynamics, which is difficult to model using grid-based continuum methods. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively new mesoscale method to simulate fluid motion in unsaturated fractures is described. Unlike the conventional DPD method that employs a purely repulsive conservative (non-dissipative) particle-particle interaction to simulate the behavior of gases, we used conservative particle-particle interactions that combine short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions. This new conservative particle-particle interaction allows the behavior of multiphase systems consisting of gases, liquids and solids to be simulated. Our simulation results demonstrate that, for a fracture with flat parallel walls, the DPD method with the new interaction potential function is able to reproduce the hydrodynamic behavior of fully saturated flow, and various unsaturated flow modes including thin film flow, wetting and non-wetting flow. During simulations of flow through a fracture junction, the fracture junction can be fully or partially saturated depending on the wetting property of the fluid, the injection rate and the geometry of the fracture junction. Flow mode switching from a fully saturated flow to a thin film flow can also be observed in the fracture junction

  15. Nano-colloid electrophoretic transport: Fully explicit modelling via dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh; Moshfegh, Abouzar

    2018-02-01

    In present study, a novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced for modelling electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Moreover, capability of different thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field in nano scale application (0.072 600 in DPD units regardless of electric field intensity. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0.145 [ v / nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the radial distribution function with available electrolyte structure modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  16. Dynamical entanglement formation and dissipation effects in two double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Pulido, L D [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Rojas, F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)

    2006-11-01

    We study the static and dynamic formation of entanglement in charge states of a two double quantum dot array with two mobile electrons under the effect of an external driving field. We include dissipation via contact with a phonon bath. By using the density matrix formalism and an open quantum system approach, we describe the dynamical behaviour of the charge distribution (polarization), concurrence (measure of the degree of entanglement) and Bell state probabilities (two qubit states with maximum entanglement) of such a system, including the role of dot asymmetry and temperature effects. Our results show that it is possible to obtain entangled states as well as a most probable Bell state, which can be controlled by the driving field. We also evaluate how the entanglement formation based on charge states deteriorates as the temperature or asymmetry increases.

  17. Thomas-Fermi molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerouin, J.; Pollock, E.L.; Zerah, G.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional density-functional molecular-dynamics code is developed for the Thomas-Fermi density functional as a prototype for density functionals using only the density. Following Car and Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)], the electronic density is treated as a dynamical variable. The electronic densities are verified against a multi-ion Thomas-Fermi algorithm due to Parker [Phys. Rev. A 38, 2205 (1988)]. As an initial application, the effect of electronic polarization in enhancing ionic diffusion in strongly coupled plasmas is demonstrated

  18. Symmetry of quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the current state-of-art in describing quantum molecular dynamics based on symmetry principles alone. This qualitative approach is of particular interest as the only method currently available for a broad and topical class of problems in the internal dynamics of molecules. Besides, a molecule is a physical system whose collective internal motions are geometrically structured, and its perturbation theory description requires a symmetry analysis of this structure. The nature of the geometrical symmetry groups crucial for the closed formulation of the qualitative approach is discussed [ru

  19. Conformation analysis of trehalose. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnamaira, M.C.; Howard, E.I.; Grigera, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Conformational analysis of the disaccharide trehalose is done by molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics. In spite of the different force fields used in each case, comparison between the molecular dynamics trajectories of the torsional angles of glycosidic linkage and energy conformational map shows a good agreement between both methods. By molecular dynamics it is observed a moderate mobility of the glycosidic linkage. The demands of computer time is comparable in both cases. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  20. Dynamical Properties of Two Coupled Dissipative QED Cavities Driven by Coherent Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Bangpin; Sun Weili; Wang Shunjin; Wang Gang

    2007-01-01

    When two identical QED cavities driven by the coherent fields are located in a uniform environment, in addition to dissipation, there appears an indirect coupling between the two cavities induced by the background fields. We investigate the effects of the coherent fields, the dissipation as well as the incoherent coupling on the following dynamical properties of the system: photon transfer, reversible decoherence, and quantum state transfer, etc. We find that the photons in the cavities do not leak completely into the environment due to the collective coupling between the cavities and the environment, and the photons are transferred irreversibly from the cavity with more photons to the cavity with less ones due to the incoherent coupling so that they are equally distributed among the two cavities. The coherent field pumping on the two cavities increases the mean photons, complements the revived magnitude of the reversible decoherence, but hinders the quantum state transfer between the two cavities. The above phenomena may find applications in quantum communication and other basic fields.

  1. Continuum kinetic methods for analyzing wave physics and distribution function dynamics in the turbulence dissipation challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juno, J.; Hakim, A.; TenBarge, J.; Dorland, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present for the first time results for the turbulence dissipation challenge, with specific focus on the linear wave portion of the challenge, using a variety of continuum kinetic models: hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell, gyrokinetic, and full Vlasov-Maxwell. As one of the goals of the wave problem as it is outlined is to identify how well various models capture linear physics, we compare our results to linear Vlasov and gyrokinetic theory. Preliminary gyrokinetic results match linear theory extremely well due to the geometry of the problem, which eliminates the dominant nonlinearity. With the non-reduced models, we explore how the subdominant nonlinearities manifest and affect the evolution of the turbulence and the energy budget. We also take advantage of employing continuum methods to study the dynamics of the distribution function, with particular emphasis on the full Vlasov results where a basic collision operator has been implemented. As the community prepares for the next stage of the turbulence dissipation challenge, where we hope to do large 3D simulations to inform the next generation of observational missions such as THOR (Turbulence Heating ObserveR), we argue for the consideration of hybrid Vlasov and full Vlasov as candidate models for these critical simulations. With the use of modern numerical algorithms, we demonstrate the competitiveness of our code with traditional particle-in-cell algorithms, with a clear plan for continued improvements and optimizations to further strengthen the code's viability as an option for the next stage of the challenge.

  2. Dissipative preparation of steady Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states for Rydberg atoms with quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X. Q.; Wu, J. H.; Yi, X. X.; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-12-01

    Inspired by a recent work [F. Reiter, D. Reeb, and A. S. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 040501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.040501], we present a simplified proposal for dissipatively preparing a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of three Rydberg atoms in a cavity. The Z pumping is implemented under the action of the spontaneous emission of Λ -type atoms and the quantum Zeno dynamics induced by strong continuous coupling. In the meantime, a dissipative Rydberg pumping breaks up the stability of the state | GHZ+〉 in the process of Z pumping, making | GHZ-〉 the unique steady state of the system. Compared with the former scheme, the number of driving fields acting on atoms is greatly reduced and only a single-mode cavity is required. The numerical simulation of the full master equation reveals that a high fidelity ˜98 % can be obtained with the currently achievable parameters in the Rydberg-atom-cavity system.

  3. Dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdussalam, Wildan

    2017-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation concerns dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation. Rydberg atoms possess a number of exaggerated properties, such as a strong van der Waals interaction. The interplay of that interaction, coherent driving and decoherence leads to intriguing non-equilibrium phenomena. Here, we study the non-equilibrium physics of driven atom lattices in the presence of decoherence caused by either laser phase noise or strong decay. In the first case, we compare between global and local noise and explore their effect on the number of excitations and the full counting statistics. We find that both types of noise give rise to a characteristic distribution of the Rydberg excitation number. The main method employed is the Langevin equation but for the sake of efficiency in certain regimes, we use a Markovian master equation and Monte Carlo rate equations, respectively. In the second case, we consider dissipative systems with more general power-law interactions. We determine the phase diagram in the steady state and analyse its generation dynamics using Monte Carlo rate equations. In contrast to nearest-neighbour models, there is no transition to long-range-ordered phases for realistic interactions and resonant driving. Yet, for finite laser detunings, we show that Rydberg atom lattices can undergo a dissipative phase transition to a long-range-ordered antiferromagnetic phase. We identify the advantages of Monte Carlo rate equations over mean field predictions. Having studied the dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices, we study an application of the strong interactions in such systems for quantum information processing. We investigate the coherent exchange of a single photon between a superconducting microwave cavity and a lattice of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms in the presence of local electric field fluctuations plaguing the cavity surface. We show that despite the increased sensitivity of Rydberg states to

  4. Dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdussalam, Wildan

    2017-08-07

    The work presented in this dissertation concerns dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices in the presence of noise and dissipation. Rydberg atoms possess a number of exaggerated properties, such as a strong van der Waals interaction. The interplay of that interaction, coherent driving and decoherence leads to intriguing non-equilibrium phenomena. Here, we study the non-equilibrium physics of driven atom lattices in the presence of decoherence caused by either laser phase noise or strong decay. In the first case, we compare between global and local noise and explore their effect on the number of excitations and the full counting statistics. We find that both types of noise give rise to a characteristic distribution of the Rydberg excitation number. The main method employed is the Langevin equation but for the sake of efficiency in certain regimes, we use a Markovian master equation and Monte Carlo rate equations, respectively. In the second case, we consider dissipative systems with more general power-law interactions. We determine the phase diagram in the steady state and analyse its generation dynamics using Monte Carlo rate equations. In contrast to nearest-neighbour models, there is no transition to long-range-ordered phases for realistic interactions and resonant driving. Yet, for finite laser detunings, we show that Rydberg atom lattices can undergo a dissipative phase transition to a long-range-ordered antiferromagnetic phase. We identify the advantages of Monte Carlo rate equations over mean field predictions. Having studied the dynamics of Rydberg atom lattices, we study an application of the strong interactions in such systems for quantum information processing. We investigate the coherent exchange of a single photon between a superconducting microwave cavity and a lattice of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms in the presence of local electric field fluctuations plaguing the cavity surface. We show that despite the increased sensitivity of Rydberg states to

  5. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2012-01-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear “pasta”, i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid–gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures. (author)

  6. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Gentaro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid-gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures.

  7. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  8. Introduction to Molecular Dynamics and Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Danny

    2012-01-01

    We first introduce classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We discuss their main constituents - the interatomic potentials, the boundary conditions, and the integrators - and the discuss the various ensembles that can be sampled. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of MD, specifically in terms of time and length-scales. We then move on to discuss accelerated MD (AMD) methods, techniques that were designed to circumvent the timescale limitations of MD for rare event systems. The different methods are introduced and examples of use given.

  9. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Korvink, Jan G., E-mail: jan.korvink@kit.edu, E-mail: david.kauzlaric@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kauzlarić, David, E-mail: jan.korvink@kit.edu, E-mail: david.kauzlaric@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 19, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered.

  10. Dissipative particle dynamics: Systematic parametrization using water-octanol partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard L.; Bray, David J.; Ferrante, Andrea S.; Noro, Massimo G.; Stott, Ian P.; Warren, Patrick B.

    2017-09-01

    We present a systematic, top-down, thermodynamic parametrization scheme for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) using water-octanol partition coefficients, supplemented by water-octanol phase equilibria and pure liquid phase density data. We demonstrate the feasibility of computing the required partition coefficients in DPD using brute-force simulation, within an adaptive semi-automatic staged optimization scheme. We test the methodology by fitting to experimental partition coefficient data for twenty one small molecules in five classes comprising alcohols and poly-alcohols, amines, ethers and simple aromatics, and alkanes (i.e., hexane). Finally, we illustrate the transferability of a subset of the determined parameters by calculating the critical micelle concentrations and mean aggregation numbers of selected alkyl ethoxylate surfactants, in good agreement with reported experimental values.

  11. Modeling non-linear micromechanics of hydrogels using dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Alexeev, Alexander

    In response to an appropriate external stimulus microgels are capable of undergoing large and reversible changes in volume (10-20 times) which has made them attractive as microscopic actuators and drug delivery agents. However, the mechanics of microgels is not well understood in part due to inhomogeneities within the network. Full-scale atomistic modeling of micrometer-sized gel networks is currently not possible due to the large length and time scales involved. We develop a mesoscale model based on dissipative particle dynamics to examine the mechanics of microgels in solvent. By varying the osmotic pressure of the gels we probe the changes in bulk modulus for different values of the Flory-Huggins parameter. We examine how the bulk modulus depends on inhomogeneities we introduce within the gel structure by altering the crosslink density and by embedding rigid nanoparticles. Financial support provided by NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) and NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Grant No. DGE-1650044.

  12. Dynamical aspects of particle emission in binary dissipative collisions -effects on hot-nuclei formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eudes, Ph.; Basrak, Z.; Sebille, F.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristics of charged-particle emission in heavy-ion reactions have been studied in the framework of the semiclassical Landau-Vlasov approach for the 40 Ar + 27 Al collisions at 65 MeV/u. The reaction mechanism is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. After an abundant prompt emission coming from the overlapping region between the target and the projectile, two excited nuclei, the quasi-target and the quasi-projectile, emerge from the collision. To shed some light on the role played by dynamical effects, light-charged particle observables, which are currently used as an experimental signature a of hot equilibrated nucleus, have been carefully investigated. (K.A.)

  13. A hybrid parallel architecture for electrostatic interactions in the simulation of dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Chun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Qian, Hu-Jun; Wang, Yong-Lei; Han, Jie-Ping

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we upgraded the electrostatic interaction method of CU-ENUF (Yang, et al., 2016) which first applied CUNFFT (nonequispaced Fourier transforms based on CUDA) to the reciprocal-space electrostatic computation and made the computation of electrostatic interaction done thoroughly in GPU. The upgraded edition of CU-ENUF runs concurrently in a hybrid parallel way that enables the computation parallelizing on multiple computer nodes firstly, then further on the installed GPU in each computer. By this parallel strategy, the size of simulation system will be never restricted to the throughput of a single CPU or GPU. The most critical technical problem is how to parallelize a CUNFFT in the parallel strategy, which is conquered effectively by deep-seated research of basic principles and some algorithm skills. Furthermore, the upgraded method is capable of computing electrostatic interactions for both the atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Finally, the benchmarks conducted for validation and performance indicate that the upgraded method is able to not only present a good precision when setting suitable parameters, but also give an efficient way to compute electrostatic interactions for huge simulation systems. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/zncf24fhpv.1 Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License 3 (GPL) Programming language: C, C++, and CUDA C Supplementary material: The program is designed for effective electrostatic interactions of large-scale simulation systems, which runs on particular computers equipped with NVIDIA GPUs. It has been tested on (a) single computer node with Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770@ 3.40 GHz (CPU) and GTX 980 Ti (GPU), and (b) MPI parallel computer nodes with the same configurations. Nature of problem: For molecular dynamics simulation, the electrostatic interaction is the most time-consuming computation because of its long-range feature and slow convergence in simulation space

  14. Laser Controlled Molecular Orientation Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, O.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular orientation is a challenging control issue covering a wide range of applications from reactive collisions, high order harmonic generation, surface processing and catalysis, to nanotechnologies. The laser control scenario rests on the following three steps: (i) depict some basic mechanisms producing dynamical orientation; (ii) use them both as computational and interpretative tools in optimal control schemes involving genetic algorithms; (iii) apply what is learnt from optimal control to improve the basic mechanisms. The existence of a target molecular rotational state combining the advantages of efficient and post-pulse long duration orientation is shown. A strategy is developed for reaching such a target in terms of a train of successive short laser pulses applied at predicted time intervals. Each individual pulse imparts a kick to the molecule which orients. Transposition of such strategies to generic systems is now under investigation

  15. Molecular dynamics study of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Yaldram, K.; Ahmad, W.; Khan, M.K.; Rehman, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics study using the embedded atom potential to examine the equilibrium bulk properties of Ag. We calculate the total energy and the lattice parameters as a function of temperature. From these we determine the specific heat and linear coefficient of thermal expansion. The comparison with experimental results of these two quantities is found to be excellent. We have also calculated the mean square displacement of the atoms in the three directions. As expected because of symmetry the displacements in the three directions are comparable and increase with increasing temperature. (author) 5 figs

  16. Fractional action-like variational problems in holonomic, non-holonomic and semi-holonomic constrained and dissipative dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Cheju National University, Ara-dong 1, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nabulsiahmadrami@yahoo.fr

    2009-10-15

    We communicate through this work the fractional calculus of variations and its corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations in 1D constrained holonomic, non-holonomic, and semi-holonomic dissipative dynamical system. The extension of the laws obtained to the 2D space state is done. Some interesting consequences are revealed.

  17. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500 0 K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  18. Real-time full-field characterization of transient dissipative soliton dynamics in a mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczkowski, P.; Närhi, M.; Billet, C.; Merolla, J.-M.; Genty, G.; Dudley, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Dissipative solitons are remarkably localized states of a physical system that arise from the dynamical balance between nonlinearity, dispersion and environmental energy exchange. They are the most universal form of soliton that can exist, and are seen in far-from-equilibrium systems in many fields, including chemistry, biology and physics. There has been particular interest in studying their properties in mode-locked lasers, but experiments have been limited by the inability to track the dynamical soliton evolution in real time. Here, we use simultaneous dispersive Fourier transform and time-lens measurements to completely characterize the spectral and temporal evolution of ultrashort dissipative solitons as their dynamics pass through a transient unstable regime with complex break-up and collisions before stabilization. Further insight is obtained from reconstruction of the soliton amplitude and phase and calculation of the corresponding complex-valued eigenvalue spectrum. These findings show how real-time measurements provide new insights into ultrafast transient dynamics in optics.

  19. Dynamic coherence in excitonic molecular complexes under various excitation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenu, Aurélia; Malý, Pavel; Mančal, Tomáš, E-mail: mancal@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Dynamic coherence does not improve energy transfer efficiency in natural conditions. • Photo-induced quantum jumps are discussed in classical context. • Natural time scale of a light excitation event is identified. • Coherence in FMO complex averages out under excitation by neighboring antenna. • This result is valid even in absence of dissipation. - Abstract: We investigate the relevance of dynamic quantum coherence in the energy transfer efficiency of molecular aggregates. We derive the time evolution of the density matrix for an open quantum system excited by light or by a neighboring antenna. Unlike in the classical case, the quantum description does not allow for a formal decomposition of the dynamics into sudden jumps in an observable quantity – an expectation value. Rather, there is a natural finite time-scale associated with the excitation process. We propose a simple experiment to test the influence of this time scale on the yield of photosynthesis. We demonstrate, using typical parameters of the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) complex and a typical energy transfer rate from the chlorosome baseplate, that dynamic coherences are averaged out in the complex even when the FMO model is completely free of all dissipation and dephasing.

  20. Trajectory approach to dissipative quantum phase space dynamics: Application to barrier scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Keith H.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The Caldeira-Leggett master equation, expressed in Lindblad form, has been used in the numerical study of the effect of a thermal environment on the dynamics of the scattering of a wave packet from a repulsive Eckart barrier. The dynamics are studied in terms of phase space trajectories associated with the distribution function, W(q,p,t). The equations of motion for the trajectories include quantum terms that introduce nonlocality into the motion, which imply that an ensemble of correlated trajectories needs to be propagated. However, use of the derivative propagation method (DPM) allows each trajectory to be propagated individually. This is achieved by deriving equations of motion for the partial derivatives of W(q,p,t) that appear in the master equation. The effects of dissipation on the trajectories are studied and results are shown for the transmission probability. On short time scales, decoherence is demonstrated by a swelling of trajectories into momentum space. For a nondissipative system, a comparison is made of the DPM with the 'exact' transmission probability calculated from a fixed grid calculation

  1. Dissipative particle dynamics: Effects of thermostating schemes on nano-colloid electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Moshfegh, Abouzar; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh

    2018-05-01

    A novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced in the present study to model the electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Performance of various thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field (0 . 072 relationships respectively with electric field and colloidal repulsion; although they each respectively behave direct and inverse trends with salt concentration under various thermostats. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0 . 145[v/nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the system radial distribution function with available EW3D modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  2. Time Dependence of Entropy Flux and Entropy Production of a Dissipative Dynamical System Driven by Non-Gaussian Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yongfeng; Xu Wei; Li Dongxi; Xie Wenxian

    2008-01-01

    A stochastic dissipative dynamical system driven by non-Gaussian noise is investigated. A general approximate Fokker-Planck equation of the system is derived through a path-integral approach. Based on the definition of Shannon's information entropy, the exact time dependence of entropy flux and entropy production of the system is calculated both in the absence and in the presence of non-equilibrium constraint. The present calculation can be used to interpret the interplay of the dissipative constant and non-Gaussian noise on the entropy flux and entropy production

  3. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaofan; Tong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation

  4. Color molecular dynamics for dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    We propose a microscopic approach for quark many-body system based on molecular dynamics. Using color confinement and one-gluon exchange potentials together with meson exchange potentials between quarks, we construct nucleons and nuclear/quark matter. Dynamical transition between confinement and deconfinement phases are studied at high baryon density with this molecular dynamics simulation. (author)

  5. Molecular dynamics of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-02-01

    We derive Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities of a nematic liquid crystal. The derivation is based on the application of a Gaussian constraint algorithm that makes the director angular velocity of a liquid crystal a constant of motion. Setting this velocity equal to zero means that a director-based coordinate system becomes an inertial frame and that the constraint torques do not do any work on the system. The system consequently remains in equilibrium. However, one generates a different equilibrium ensemble. The great advantage of this ensemble is that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals, whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. This facilitates the numerical evaluation of the viscosities by molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic...

  7. Non-linear quantum critical dynamics and fluctuation-dissipation ratios far from equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Farzaneh [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Str. 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Ribeiro, Pedro [CeFEMA, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Russian Quantum Center, Novaya Street 100 A, Skolkovo, Moscow Area, 143025 (Russian Federation); Kirchner, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kirchner@correlated-matter.com [Center for Correlated Matter, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Non-thermal correlations of strongly correlated electron systems and the far-from-equilibrium properties of phases of condensed matter have become a topical research area. Here, an overview of the non-linear dynamics found near continuous zero-temperature phase transitions within the context of effective temperatures is presented. In particular, we focus on models of critical Kondo destruction. Such a quantum critical state, where Kondo screening is destroyed in a critical fashion, is realized in a number of rare earth intermetallics. This raises the possibility of experimentally testing for the existence of fluctuation-dissipation relations far from equilibrium in terms of effective temperatures. Finally, we present an analysis of a non-interacting, critical reference system, the pseudogap resonant level model, in terms of effective temperatures and contrast these results with those obtained near interacting quantum critical points. - Highlights: • Critical Kondo destruction explains the unusual properties of quantum critical heavy fermion compounds. • We review the concept of effective temperatures in models of critical Kondo destruction. • We compare effective temperatures found near non-interacting and fully interacting fixed points. • A comparison with non-interacting quantum impurity models is presented.

  8. Osmotic pressure and virial coefficients of star and comb polymer solutions: dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yu; Fang, Che-Ming; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-03-28

    The effects of macromolecular architecture on the osmotic pressure pi and virial coefficients (B(2) and B(3)) of star and comb polymers in good solvents are studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for both dilute and semiconcentrated regimes. The dependence of the osmotic pressure on polymer concentration is directly calculated by considering two reservoirs separated by a semipermeable, fictitious membrane. Our simulation results show that the ratios A(n+1) identical with B(n+1)/R(g)(3n) are essentially constant and A(2) and A(3) are arm number (f) dependent, where R(g) is zero-density radius of gyration. The value of dimensionless virial ratio g = A(3)/A(2)(2) increases with arm number of stars whereas it is essentially arm number independent for comb polymers. In semiconcentrated regime the scaling relation between osmotic pressure and volume fraction, pi proportional to phi(lambda), still holds for both star and comb polymers. For comb polymers, the exponent lambda is close to lambda(*) (approximately = 2.73 for linear chains) and is independent of the arm number. However, for star polymers, the exponent lambda deviates from lambda(*) and actually grows with increasing the arm number. This may be attributed to the significant ternary interactions near the star core in the many-arm systems.

  9. Calculations of critical micelle concentration by dissipative particle dynamics simulations: the role of chain rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-09-05

    Micelle formation in surfactant solutions is a self-assembly process governed by complex interplay of solvent-mediated interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which are commonly called heads and tails. However, the head-tail repulsion is not the only factor affecting the micelle formation. For the first time, we present a systematic study of the effect of chain rigidity on critical micelle concentration and micelle size, which is performed with the dissipative particle dynamics simulation method. Rigidity of the coarse-grained surfactant molecule was controlled by the harmonic bonds set between the second-neighbor beads. Compared to flexible molecules with the nearest-neighbor bonds being the only type of bonded interactions, rigid molecules exhibited a lower critical micelle concentration and formed larger and better-defined micelles. By varying the strength of head-tail repulsion and the chain rigidity, we constructed two-dimensional diagrams presenting how the critical micelle concentration and aggregation number depend on these parameters. We found that the solutions of flexible and rigid molecules that exhibited approximately the same critical micelle concentration could differ substantially in the micelle size and shape depending on the chain rigidity. With the increase of surfactant concentration, primary micelles of more rigid molecules were found less keen to agglomeration and formation of nonspherical aggregates characteristic of flexible molecules.

  10. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  11. Non-Markovian electron dynamics in nanostructures coupled to dissipative contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, B.; Knezevic, I.

    2013-02-01

    In quasiballistic semiconductor nanostructures, carrier exchange between the active region and dissipative contacts is the mechanism that governs relaxation. In this paper, we present a theoretical treatment of transient quantum transport in quasiballistic semiconductor nanostructures, which is based on the open system theory and valid on timescales much longer than the characteristic relaxation time in the contacts. The approach relies on a model interaction between the current-limiting active region and the contacts, given in the scattering-state basis. We derive a non-Markovian master equation for the irreversible evolution of the active region's many-body statistical operator by coarse-graining the exact dynamical map over the contact relaxation time. In order to obtain the response quantities of a nanostructure under bias, such as the potential and the charge and current densities, the non-Markovian master equation must be solved numerically together with the Schr\\"{o}dinger, Poisson, and continuity equations. We discuss how to numerically solve this coupled system of equations and illustrate the approach on the example of a silicon nin diode.

  12. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Michael; Kuettel, Donald H.; Stebler, Shane T.; Udrea, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    To date, we have discovered a total of 2,729 planetary systems that contain more than 3,639 known exoplanets [1]. A majority of these are defined as compact systems, containing multiple exoplanets within 0.25 AU of the central star. It has been shown that tightly packed exoplanets avoid colliding due to long-term resonance-induced orbit stability [2]. However, due to extreme proximity, these planets experience intense gravitational forces from each other that are unprecedented within our own solar system, which makes the existence of exomoons doubtful. We present the results of an initial study evaluating dynamical stability of potential exomoons within such highly compact systems.This work is baselined around TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star that hosts seven temperate terrestrial planets, three of which are in the habitable zone, orbiting within 0.06 AU [3]. N-body simulations place a grid of test particles varying semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination around the three habitable zone planets. We find that most exomoons with semi-major axes less than half the Hill sphere of their respective planet are stable over 10 kyrs, with several stable over 300 kyrs.However, in compact systems, tidal influences from other planets can compete with tidal effects from the primary planet, resulting in possible instabilities and massive amounts of tidal dissipation. We investigate these effects with a large grid search that incorporates exomoon radius, tidal quality factor and a range of planet rigidities. Results of simulations that combine n-body gravity effects with both planetary and satellite tides are presented and contrasted with n-body results. Finally, we examine long-term stability (> 1Myrs) of the stable subset of test particles from the n-body simulation with the addition of tidal dissipation, to determine if exomoons can survive around planets e, f, and g in the TRAPPIST-1 system.[1] Schneider (2017). The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia. http

  13. Artifact-free dynamic atomic force microscopy reveals monotonic dissipation for a simple confined liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaggwa, G. B.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Sader, J. E.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2008-07-01

    We present definitive interaction measurements of a simple confined liquid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) using artifact-free frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. We use existing theory to decouple the conservative and dissipative components of the interaction, for a known phase offset from resonance (90° phase shift), that has been deliberately introduced into the experiment. Further we show the qualitative influence on the conservative and dissipative components of the interaction of a phase error deliberately introduced into the measurement, highlighting that artifacts, such as oscillatory dissipation, can be readily observed when the phase error is not compensated for in the force analysis.

  14. Molecular dynamics for irradiation driven chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    A new molecular dynamics (MD) approach for computer simulations of irradiation driven chemical transformations of complex molecular systems is suggested. The approach is based on the fact that irradiation induced quantum transformations can often be treated as random, fast and local processes...... that describe the classical MD of complex molecular systems under irradiation. The proposed irradiation driven molecular dynamics (IDMD) methodology is designed for the molecular level description of the irradiation driven chemistry. The IDMD approach is implemented into the MBN Explorer software package...... involving small molecules or molecular fragments. We advocate that the quantum transformations, such as molecular bond breaks, creation and annihilation of dangling bonds, electronic charge redistributions, changes in molecular topologies, etc., could be incorporated locally into the molecular force fields...

  15. Coherence-enhanced phase-dependent dissipation in long SNS Josephson junctions: Revealing Andreev bound state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassonneville, B.; Murani, A.; Ferrier, M.; Guéron, S.; Bouchiat, H.

    2018-05-01

    One of the best known causes of dissipation in ac-driven quantum systems stems from photon absorption causing transitions between levels. Dissipation can also be caused by the retarded response to the time-dependent excitation, and in general gives insight into the system's relaxation times and mechanisms. Here we address the dissipation in a mesoscopic normal wire with superconducting contacts, that sustains a dissipationless supercurrent at zero frequency and that may therefore naively be expected to remain dissipationless at a frequency lower than the superconducting gap. We probe the high-frequency linear response of such a normal metal/superconductor (NS) ring to a time-dependent flux by coupling it to a highly sensitive multimode microwave resonator. Far from being the simple, dissipationless derivative of the supercurrent-versus-phase relation, the ring's ac susceptibility also displays a dissipative component whose phase dependence is a signature of the dynamical processes occurring within the Andreev spectrum. We show how dissipation is driven by the competition between two mechanisms. The first is the relaxation of the Andreev level distribution function, while the second corresponds to microwave-induced transitions within the spectrum. Depending on the relative strength of those contributions, dissipation can be maximal at π , a phase at which the proximity-induced minigap closes, or can be maximal near π /2 , a phase at which the dc supercurrent is maximal. We also find that the dissipative response paradoxically increases at low temperature and can even exceed the normal-state conductance. The results are successfully confronted with theoretical predictions of the Kubo linear response and time-dependent Usadel equations, derived from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian describing the SNS junction. These experiments thus demonstrate the power of the ac susceptibility measurement of individual hybrid mesoscopic systems in probing in a controlled way

  16. Dynamic shear-lag model for understanding the role of matrix in energy dissipation in fiber-reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Wenqing; Yu, Zhongliang; Wei, Xiaoding

    2018-07-01

    Lightweight and high impact performance composite design is a big challenge for scientists and engineers. Inspired from well-known biological materials, e.g., the bones, spider silk, and claws of mantis shrimp, artificial composites have been synthesized for engineering applications. Presently, the design of ballistic resistant composites mainly emphasizes the utilization of light and high-strength fibers, whereas the contribution from matrix materials receives less attention. However, recent ballistic experiments on fiber-reinforced composites challenge our common sense. The use of matrix with "low-grade" properties enhances effectively the impact performance. In this study, we establish a dynamic shear-lag model to explore the energy dissipation through viscous matrix materials in fiber-reinforced composites and the associations of energy dissipation characteristics with the properties and geometries of constituents. The model suggests that an enhancement in energy dissipation before the material integrity is lost can be achieved by tuning the shear modulus and viscosity of a matrix. Furthermore, our model implies that an appropriately designed staggered microstructure, adopted by many natural composites, can repeatedly activate the energy dissipation process and thus improve dramatically the impact performance. This model demonstrates the role of matrix in energy dissipation, and stimulates new advanced material design concepts for ballistic applications. Biological composites found in nature often possess exceptional mechanical properties that man-made materials haven't be able to achieve. For example, it is predicted that a pencil thick spider silk thread can stop a flying Boeing airplane. Here, by proposing a dynamic shear-lag model, we investigate the relationships between the impact performance of a composite with the dimensions and properties of its constituents. Our analysis suggests that the impact performance of fiber-reinforced composites could improve

  17. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled by th...

  18. I. Advances in NMR Signal Processing. II. Spin Dynamics in Quantum Dissipative Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yung-Ya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Part I. Advances in IVMR Signal Processing. Improvements of sensitivity and resolution are two major objects in the development of NMR/MRI. A signal enhancement method is first presented which recovers signal from noise by a judicious combination of a priordmowledge to define the desired feasible solutions and a set theoretic estimation for restoring signal properties that have been lost due to noise contamination. The effect of noise can be significantly mitigated through the process of iteratively modifying the noisy data set to the smallest degree necessary so that it possesses a collection of prescribed properties and also lies closest to the original data set. A novel detection-estimation scheme is then introduced to analyze noisy and/or strongly damped or truncated FIDs. Based on exponential modeling, the number of signals is detected based on information estimated using the matrix pencil method. theory and the spectral parameters are Part II. Spin Dynamics in body dipole-coupled systems Quantum Dissipative Systems. Spin dynamics in manyconstitutes one of the most fundamental problems in magnetic resonance and condensed-matter physics. Its many-spin nature precludes any rigorous treatment. ‘Therefore, the spin-boson model is adopted to describe in the rotating frame the influence of the dipolar local fields on a tagged spin. Based on the polaronic transform and a perturbation treatment, an analytical solution is derived, suggesting the existence of self-trapped states in the. strong coupling limit, i.e., when transverse local field >> longitudinal local field. Such nonlinear phenomena originate from the joint action of the lattice fluctuations and the reaction field. Under semiclassical approximation, it is found that the main effect of the reaction field is the renormalization of the Hamiltonian of interest. Its direct consequence is the two-step relaxation process: the spin is initially localized in a quasiequilibrium state, which is later detrapped by

  19. Dissipative Bohmian mechanics within the Caldirola–Kanai framework: A trajectory analysis of wave-packet dynamics in viscid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, A.S., E-mail: asanz@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Casado, R. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Peñate-Rodríguez, H.C.; Rojas-Lorenzo, G. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza, La Habana 10600 (Cuba); Miret-Artés, S. [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Classical viscid media are quite common in our everyday life. However, we are not used to find such media in quantum mechanics, and much less to analyze their effects on the dynamics of quantum systems. In this regard, the Caldirola–Kanai time-dependent Hamiltonian constitutes an appealing model, accounting for friction without including environmental fluctuations (as it happens, for example, with quantum Brownian motion). Here, a Bohmian analysis of the associated friction dynamics is provided in order to understand how a hypothetical, purely quantum viscid medium would act on a wave packet from a (quantum) hydrodynamic viewpoint. To this purpose, a series of paradigmatic contexts have been chosen, such as the free particle, the motion under the action of a linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, or the superposition of two coherent wave packets. Apart from their analyticity, these examples illustrate interesting emerging behaviors, such as localization by “quantum freezing” or a particular type of quantum–classical correspondence. The reliability of the results analytically determined has been checked by means of numerical simulations, which has served to investigate other problems lacking of such analyticity (e.g., the coherent superpositions). - Highlights: • A dissipative Bohmian approach is developed within the Caldirola–Kanai model. • Some simple yet physically insightful systems are then studied analytically. • Dissipation leads to spatial localization in free-force regimes. • Under the action of linear forces, dissipation leads to uniform motion. • In harmonic potentials, the system decays unavoidable to the well minimum.

  20. Dissipative Bohmian mechanics within the Caldirola–Kanai framework: A trajectory analysis of wave-packet dynamics in viscid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, A.S.; Martínez-Casado, R.; Peñate-Rodríguez, H.C.; Rojas-Lorenzo, G.; Miret-Artés, S.

    2014-01-01

    Classical viscid media are quite common in our everyday life. However, we are not used to find such media in quantum mechanics, and much less to analyze their effects on the dynamics of quantum systems. In this regard, the Caldirola–Kanai time-dependent Hamiltonian constitutes an appealing model, accounting for friction without including environmental fluctuations (as it happens, for example, with quantum Brownian motion). Here, a Bohmian analysis of the associated friction dynamics is provided in order to understand how a hypothetical, purely quantum viscid medium would act on a wave packet from a (quantum) hydrodynamic viewpoint. To this purpose, a series of paradigmatic contexts have been chosen, such as the free particle, the motion under the action of a linear potential, the harmonic oscillator, or the superposition of two coherent wave packets. Apart from their analyticity, these examples illustrate interesting emerging behaviors, such as localization by “quantum freezing” or a particular type of quantum–classical correspondence. The reliability of the results analytically determined has been checked by means of numerical simulations, which has served to investigate other problems lacking of such analyticity (e.g., the coherent superpositions). - Highlights: • A dissipative Bohmian approach is developed within the Caldirola–Kanai model. • Some simple yet physically insightful systems are then studied analytically. • Dissipation leads to spatial localization in free-force regimes. • Under the action of linear forces, dissipation leads to uniform motion. • In harmonic potentials, the system decays unavoidable to the well minimum

  1. From dissipative dynamics to studies of heat transfer at the nanoscale: analysis of the spin-boson model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Nazim; Segal, Dvira

    2014-11-26

    We study in a unified manner the dissipative dynamics and the transfer of heat in the two-bath spin-boson model. We use the Bloch-Redfield (BR) formalism, valid in the very weak system-bath coupling limit, the noninteracting-blip approximation (NIBA), applicable in the nonadiabatic limit, and iterative, numerically exact path integral tools. These methodologies were originally developed for the description of the dissipative dynamics of a quantum system, and here they are applied to explore the problem of quantum energy transport in a nonequilibrium setting. Specifically, we study the weak-to-intermediate system-bath coupling regime at high temperatures kBT/ħ > ε, with ε as the characteristic frequency of the two-state system. The BR formalism and NIBA can lead to close results for the dynamics of the reduced density matrix (RDM) in a certain range of parameters. However, relatively small deviations in the RDM dynamics propagate into significant qualitative discrepancies in the transport behavior. Similarly, beyond the strict nonadiabatic limit NIBA's prediction for the heat current is qualitatively incorrect: It fails to capture the turnover behavior of the current with tunneling energy and temperature. Thus, techniques that proved meaningful for describing the RDM dynamics, to some extent even beyond their rigorous range of validity, should be used with great caution in heat transfer calculations, because qualitative-serious failures develop once parameters are mildly stretched beyond the techniques' working assumptions.

  2. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Lunasin | Singh | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Molecular Dynamics Study of Lunasin. ... profile of lunasin,using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the time scale of 300 ns. ... Keywords: Lunasin, molecular dynamics, amber, CLASICO, α-helix, β-turn, PTRAJ, RGD, RMSD ...

  3. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Martini, Ashlie; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip–substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip–sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement. (paper)

  5. Molecular dynamics for reactions of heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.P.J.; Brongersma, H.H.; Santen, van R.A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of Molecular Dynamics, and numerical integration techniques, system initialization, boundary conditions, force representation, statistics, system size, and simulations duration are discussed. Examples from surface science are used to illustrate the pros and cons of the method.

  6. molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and quantum chemical calculations for the adsorption of [2-(2-Henicos-10- .... electronic properties of molecule clusters, surfaces and ... The local reactivity was analyzed by determining the.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori; Takagi, Fumiko; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We

  8. Dynamical processes in atomic and molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogurtsov, Gennadi

    2012-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics underlie a basis for our knowledge of fundamental processes in nature and technology and in such applications as solid state physics, chemistry and biology. In recent years, atomic and molecular physics has undergone a revolutionary change due to great achievements in computing and experimental techniques. As a result, it has become possible to obtain information both on atomic and molecular characteristics and on dynamics of atomic and molecular processes. This e-book highlights the present state of investigations in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Rece

  9. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-TR-8234 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations by DeCarlos E...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8234● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2015–30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualizing Energy on Target

  10. Molecular dynamics of nanodroplet impact: The effect of the projectile’s molecular mass on sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Fernan [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, South Kensington, London, SW7 2A7 (United Kingdom); Gamero-Castaño, Manuel, E-mail: mgameroc@uci.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California, 92697 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on ceramics at several km/s alters the atomic order of the target, causing sputtering, surface amorphization and cratering. The molecular mass of the projectile is known to have a strong effect on the impact phenomenology, and this article aims to rationalize this dependency using molecular dynamics. To achieve this goal, the article models the impact of four projectiles with molecular masses between 45 and 391 amu, and identical diameters and kinetic energies, 10 nm and 63 keV, striking a silicon target. In agreement with experiments, the simulations show that the number of sputtered atoms strongly increases with molecular mass. This is due to the increasing intensity of collision cascades with molecular mass: when the fixed kinetic energy of the projectile is distributed among fewer, more massive molecules, their collisions with the target produce knock-on atoms with higher energies, which in turn generate more energetic and larger numbers of secondary and tertiary knock-on atoms. The more energetic collision cascades intensify both knock-on sputtering and, upon thermalization, thermal sputtering. Besides enhancing sputtering, heavier molecules also increase the fraction of the projectile’s energy that is transferred to the target, as well as the fraction of this energy that is dissipated.

  11. Molecular dynamics of nanodroplet impact: The effect of the projectile’s molecular mass on sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on ceramics at several km/s alters the atomic order of the target, causing sputtering, surface amorphization and cratering. The molecular mass of the projectile is known to have a strong effect on the impact phenomenology, and this article aims to rationalize this dependency using molecular dynamics. To achieve this goal, the article models the impact of four projectiles with molecular masses between 45 and 391 amu, and identical diameters and kinetic energies, 10 nm and 63 keV, striking a silicon target. In agreement with experiments, the simulations show that the number of sputtered atoms strongly increases with molecular mass. This is due to the increasing intensity of collision cascades with molecular mass: when the fixed kinetic energy of the projectile is distributed among fewer, more massive molecules, their collisions with the target produce knock-on atoms with higher energies, which in turn generate more energetic and larger numbers of secondary and tertiary knock-on atoms. The more energetic collision cascades intensify both knock-on sputtering and, upon thermalization, thermal sputtering. Besides enhancing sputtering, heavier molecules also increase the fraction of the projectile’s energy that is transferred to the target, as well as the fraction of this energy that is dissipated.

  12. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  13. Pattern recognition in molecular dynamics. [FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, W H; Schieve, W C [Texas Univ., Austin (USA)

    1977-07-01

    An algorithm for the recognition of the formation of bound molecular states in the computer simulation of a dilute gas is presented. Applications to various related problems in physics and chemistry are pointed out. Data structure and decision processes are described. Performance of the FORTRAN program based on the algorithm in cooperation with the molecular dynamics program is described and the results are presented.

  14. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungen, Ch. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  15. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Fisher, L W; Hansma, P K

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface, and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence. PMID:18843380

  16. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of dentin matrix protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Hansma, P K; Fisher, L W

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence

  17. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of dentin matrix protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Hansma, P K [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Fisher, L W [Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, NIDCR, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)], E-mail: adams@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: fantner@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: lfisher@dir.nidcr.nih.gov, E-mail: prasant@physics.ucsb.edu

    2008-09-24

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence.

  18. Lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation of complex materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplot, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we briefly review the lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation techniques, as used for complex ionic and molecular solids, and demonstrate a number of applications through examples of our work. These computational studies, along with experiments, have provided microscopic insight into the structure and dynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamical properties of a variety of materials including fullerene, high temperature superconducting oxides and geological minerals as a function of pressure and temperature. The computational techniques also allow the study of the structures and dynamics associated with disorder, defects, surfaces, interfaces etc. (author)

  19. Analyzing the Molecular Kinetics of Water Spreading on Hydrophobic Surfaces via Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2017-09-07

    In this paper, we report molecular kinetic analyses of water spreading on hydrophobic surfaces via molecular dynamics simulation. The hydrophobic surfaces are composed of amorphous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with a static contact angle of ~112.4° for water. On the basis of the molecular kinetic theory (MKT), the influences of both viscous damping and solid-liquid retarding were analyzed in evaluating contact line friction, which characterizes the frictional force on the contact line. The unit displacement length on PTFE was estimated to be ~0.621 nm and is ~4 times as long as the bond length of C-C backbone. The static friction coefficient was found to be ~[Formula: see text] Pa·s, which is on the same order of magnitude as the dynamic viscosity of water, and increases with the droplet size. A nondimensional number defined by the ratio of the standard deviation of wetting velocity to the characteristic wetting velocity was put forward to signify the strength of the inherent contact line fluctuation and unveil the mechanism of enhanced energy dissipation in nanoscale, whereas such effect would become insignificant in macroscale. Moreover, regarding a liquid droplet on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces, an approximate solution to the base radius development was derived by an asymptotic expansion approach.

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissipation in rhizosphere based on molecular structure and effect size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Bin; Chen Huaihai; Xu Minmin; Hayat, Tahir; He Yan; Xu Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Rhizoremediation is a significant form of bioremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study examined the role of molecular structure in determining the rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. Effect size in meta-analysis was employed as activity dataset for building quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and accumulative effect sizes of 16 PAHs were used for validation of these models. Based on the genetic algorithm combined with partial least square regression, models for comprehensive dataset, Poaceae dataset, and Fabaceae dataset were built. The results showed that information indices, calculated as information content of molecules based on the calculation of equivalence classes from the molecular graph, were the most important molecular structural indices for QSAR models of rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. The QSAR model, based on the molecular structure indices and effect size, has potential to be used in studying and predicting the rhizosphere effect of PAHs dissipation. - Effect size based on meta-analysis was used for building PAHs dissipation quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models.

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissipation in rhizosphere based on molecular structure and effect size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Bin; Chen Huaihai; Xu Minmin; Hayat, Tahir [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); He Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.c [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.c [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Rhizoremediation is a significant form of bioremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study examined the role of molecular structure in determining the rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. Effect size in meta-analysis was employed as activity dataset for building quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and accumulative effect sizes of 16 PAHs were used for validation of these models. Based on the genetic algorithm combined with partial least square regression, models for comprehensive dataset, Poaceae dataset, and Fabaceae dataset were built. The results showed that information indices, calculated as information content of molecules based on the calculation of equivalence classes from the molecular graph, were the most important molecular structural indices for QSAR models of rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. The QSAR model, based on the molecular structure indices and effect size, has potential to be used in studying and predicting the rhizosphere effect of PAHs dissipation. - Effect size based on meta-analysis was used for building PAHs dissipation quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models.

  2. Investigation of the dynamics of dissipative U+Au collisions with δ-electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroth, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Konen, W.; Stiebing, K.

    1997-01-01

    δ-electron emission in elastic and dissipative collisions of U+Au at E/A=8.65 MeV has been investigated. The velocity vectors of the reaction products were measured in coincidence with electrons of energies up to 3.2 MeV. The δ-electron yield measured for elastic collisions is in good agreement with coupled-channel calculations. The δ-electron spectra of dissipative reactions show a clear dependence on the violence of the collision, i.e. the total kinetic energy loss (TKEL). The shape of the spectra are analysed with an atomic model by a fitting procedure using phenomenological trajectories. The results indicate an increasing contact time of the united system with increasing total kinetic energy loss reaching 1.16(4) x 10 -21 s at left angle TKEL right angle =375 MeV. (orig.). With 2 figs

  3. Dynamical tides in highly eccentric binaries: chaos, dissipation, and quasi-steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Michelle; Lai, Dong

    2018-05-01

    Highly eccentric binary systems appear in many astrophysical contexts, ranging from tidal capture in dense star clusters, precursors of stellar disruption by massive black holes, to high-eccentricity migration of giant planets. In a highly eccentric binary, the tidal potential of one body can excite oscillatory modes in the other during a pericentre passage, resulting in energy exchange between the modes and the binary orbit. These modes exhibit one of three behaviours over multiple passages: low-amplitude oscillations, large-amplitude oscillations corresponding to a resonance between the orbital frequency and the mode frequency, and chaotic growth, with the mode energy reaching a level comparable to the orbital binding energy. We study these phenomena with an iterative map that includes mode dissipation, fully exploring how the mode evolution depends on the orbital and mode properties of the system. The dissipation of mode energy drives the system towards a quasi-steady state, with gradual orbital decay punctuated by resonances. We quantify the quasi-steady state and the long-term evolution of the system. A newly captured star around a black hole can experience significant orbital decay and heating due to the chaotic growth of the mode amplitude and dissipation. A giant planet pushed into a high-eccentricity orbit may experience a similar effect and become a hot or warm Jupiter.

  4. Wavelet Analysis for Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Our method takes as input the topology and sparsity of the bonding structure of a molecular system, and returns a hierarchical set of system-specific...problems, such as modeling crack initiation and propagation, or interfacial phenomena. In the present work, we introduce a wavelet-based approach to extend...Several functional forms are common for angle poten- tials complicating not only implementation but also choice of approximation. In all cases, the

  5. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical......Molecular machines, or molecular motors, are small biophysical devices that perform a variety of essential metabolic processes such as DNA replication, protein synthesis and intracellular transport. Typically, these machines operate by converting chemical energy into motion and mechanical work. Due...... mechanics. The first part focuses on noninteracting molecular machines described by a paradigmatic continuum model with the aim of comparing and contrasting such a description to the one offered by the widely used discrete models. Many molecular motors, for example, kinesin involved in cellular cargo...

  6. A Fokker-Planck approach to canonical-dissipative Nambu systems: With an application to human motor control during dynamic haptic perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    We formulate Markov diffusion processes for canonical-dissipative systems exhibiting Nambu mechanics. Analytical expressions for stationary canonical-dissipative distributions are obtained. Nambu-Boltzmann distributions are derived as special cases for systems without energy pumping. The Markov short-time propagator is used to derive maximum likelihood estimators for parameters of a model that describes a particular dynamic motor pattern providing haptic cues.

  7. Explicit dissipative structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, O.E.

    1987-01-01

    Dissipative structures consisting of a few macrovariables arise out of a sea of reversible microvariables. Unexpected residual effects of the massive underlying reversibility, on the macrolevel, cannot therefore be excluded. In the age of molecular-dynamics simulations, explicit dissipative structures like excitable systems (explicit observers) can be generated in a computer from first reversible principles. A class of classical, 1-D Hamiltonian systems of chaotic type is considered which has the asset that the trajectorial behavior in phase space can be understood geometrically. If, as nuatural, the number of particle types is much smaller than that of particles, the Gibbs symmetry must be taken into account. The permutation invariance drastically changes the behavior in phase space (quasi-periodization). The explicity observer becomes effectively reversible on a short time scale. In consequence, his ability to measure microscopic motions is suspended in a characteristic fashion. Unlike quantum mechanics whose holistic nature cannot be transcended, the present holistic (internal-interface) effects - mimicking the former to some extent - can be understood fully in principle

  8. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  9. Molecular dynamics and diffusion a compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David

    2013-01-01

    The molecular dynamics technique was developed in the 1960s as the outgrowth of attempts to model complicated systems by using either a) direct physical simulation or (following the great success of Monte Carlo methods) by b) using computer techniques. Computer simulation soon won out over clumsy physical simulation, and the ever-increasing speed and sophistication of computers has naturally made molecular dynamics simulation into a more and more successful technique. One of its most popular applications is the study of diffusion, and some experts now even claim that molecular dynamics simulation is, in the case of situations involving well-characterised elements and structures, more accurate than experimental measurement. The present double volume includes a compilation (over 600 items) of predicted solid-state diffusion data, for all of the major materials groups, dating back nearly four decades. The double volume also includes some original papers: "Determination of the Activation Energy for Formation and ...

  10. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Nanofluidic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano Rodriguez, Harvey Alexander

    of such devices. Computational nanofluidics complements experimental studies by providing detailed spatial and temporal information of the nanosystem. In this thesis, we conduct molecular dynamics simulations to study basic nanoscale devices. We focus our studies on the understanding of transport mechanism...... to drive fluids and solids at the nanoscale. Specifically, we present the results of three different research projects. Throughout the first part of this thesis, we include a comprenhensive introduction to computational nanofluidics and to molecular simulations, and describe the molecular dynamics...... in opposite direction to the imposed thermal gradient also we measure higher velocities as higher thermal gradients are imposed. Secondly, we present an atomistic analysis of a molecular linear motor fabricated of coaxial carbon nanotubes and powered by thermal gradients. The MD simulation results indicate...

  11. Modeling heat dissipation at the nanoscale: an embedding approach for chemical reaction dynamics on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-04-25

    We present an embedding technique for metallic systems that makes it possible to model energy dissipation into substrate phonons during surface chemical reactions from first principles. The separation of chemical and elastic contributions to the interaction potential provides a quantitative description of both electronic and phononic band structure. Application to the dissociation of O2 at Pd(100) predicts translationally "hot" oxygen adsorbates as a consequence of the released adsorption energy (ca. 2.6 eV). This finding questions the instant thermalization of reaction enthalpies generally assumed in models of heterogeneous catalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of polymer flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyden, M.R.; Brown, J.E.; Lomakin, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were used to identify factors which promote char formation during the thermal degradation of polymers. Computer movies based on these simulations, indicate that cross-linked model polymers tend to undergo further cross-linking when burned, eventually forming a high molecular weight, thermally stable char. This paper reports that the prediction was confirmed by char yield measurements made on γ and e - -irradiated polyethylene and chemically cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate)

  13. Bead-bead interaction parameters in dissipative particle dynamics: Relation to bead-size, solubility parameter, and surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Amitesh; McGrother, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a mesoscale modeling method for simulating equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers in solution. The basic idea has been around for several decades in the form of bead-spring models. A few years ago, Groot and Warren [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)] established an important link between DPD and the Flory-Huggins χ-parameter theory for polymer solutions. We revisit the Groot-Warren theory and investigate the DPD interaction parameters as a function of bead size. In particular, we show a consistent scheme of computing the interfacial tension in a segregated binary mixture. Results for three systems chosen for illustration are in excellent agreement with experimental results. This opens the door for determining DPD interactions using interfacial tension as a fitting parameter.

  14. Dissipative dynamics with the corrected propagator method. Numerical comparison between fully quantum and mixed quantum/classical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed quantum-classical method has been applied to the study of dissipative dynamics in multidimensional systems. The method is designed to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum part coupled to a classical bath. Assuming the approximate zeroth order evolution rule, the corrections to the quantum propagator are defined in terms of the total Hamiltonian and the zeroth order propagator. Then the corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The evolution of the primary part is governed by the corrected propagator yielding the exact quantum dynamics. The method has been tested on two model systems coupled to a harmonic bath: (i) an anharmonic (Morse) oscillator and (ii) a double-well potential. The simulations have been performed at zero temperature. The results have been compared to the exact quantum simulations using the surrogate Hamiltonian approach.

  15. First-principles molecular dynamics for metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, G.W.; Qian, G.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    A Car-Parrinello-type first-principles molecular-dynamics approach capable of treating the partial occupancy of electronic states that occurs at the Fermi level in a metal is presented. The algorithms used to study metals are both simple and computationally efficient. We also discuss the connection between ordinary electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations as well as the role of Brillouin-zone sampling. This extension should be useful not only for metallic solids but also for solids that become metals in their liquid and/or amorphous phases

  16. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  17. Theory and application of quantum molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng Hui Zhang, John

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a detailed presentation of modern quantum theories for treating the reaction dynamics of small molecular systems. Its main focus is on the recent development of successful quantum dynamics theories and computational methods for studying the molecular reactive scattering process, with specific applications given in detail for a number of benchmark chemical reaction systems in the gas phase and the gas surface. In contrast to traditional books on collision in physics focusing on abstract theory for nonreactive scattering, this book deals with both the development and the appli

  18. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  19. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  20. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.; Self, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD 3 OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  1. Cavity-assisted mesoscopic transport of fermions: Coherent and dissipative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmüller, David; Schütz, Stefan; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido

    2018-05-01

    We study the interplay between charge transport and light-matter interactions in a confined geometry by considering an open, mesoscopic chain of two-orbital systems resonantly coupled to a single bosonic mode close to its vacuum state. We introduce and benchmark different methods based on self-consistent solutions of nonequilibrium Green's functions and numerical simulations of the quantum master equation, and derive both analytical and numerical results. It is shown that in the dissipative regime where the cavity photon decay rate is the largest parameter, the light-matter coupling is responsible for a steady-state current enhancement scaling with the cooperativity parameter. We further identify different regimes of interest depending on the ratio between the cavity decay rate and the electronic bandwidth. Considering the situation where the lower band has a vanishing bandwidth, we show that for a high-finesse cavity, the properties of the resonant Bloch state in the upper band are transferred to the lower one, giving rise to a delocalized state along the chain. Conversely, in the dissipative regime with low-cavity quality factors, we find that the current enhancement is due to a collective decay of populations from the upper to the lower band.

  2. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Bougouffa, Smail [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, PO Box 30002, Madinah (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-02-14

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  3. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail; Bougouffa, Smail

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahoshi, Y.; Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  5. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of RNA motifs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csaszar, K.; Špačková, Naďa; Šponer, Jiří; Leontis, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 223, - (2002), s. 154 ISSN 0065-7727. [Annual Meeting of the American Chemistry Society /223./. 07.04.2002-11.04.2002, Orlando ] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : molecular dynamics * RNA * hydration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of a phospholipid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberts, Egbert; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a phospholipid membrane in water, including full atomic detail. The goal of the simulations was twofold: first we wanted to set up a simulation system which is able to reproduce experimental results and can serve as a model membrane in

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that the imidazoline derivative molecules uses the imidazoline ring to effectively adsorb on the surface of iron, with the alkyl hydrophobic tail forming an n shape (canopy like covering) at geometry optimization and at 353 K. The n shape canopy like covering to a large extent may ...

  10. Nanotribology investigations with classical molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of nanotribological problems investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, within the context of the applicability of continuum mechanics contact theories at the atomic scale. Along these lines, three different themes can be recognized herein:

  11. Catalysis and communication in dynamic molecular networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanlo Virgos, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of a Dynamic Combinatorial Library (DCL) of molecules with specific targets leads to composition changes of the library which can reveal potential guests and / or catalysts. In this thesis some chemical systems have been proposed to achieve a certain level of molecular complexity

  12. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  13. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  14. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  15. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  16. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  17. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  18. From microscopic to macroscopic dynamics in mean-field theory: effect of neutron skin on fusion barrier and dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D

    2001-07-01

    In this work, we introduce a method to reduce the microscopic mean-field theory to a classical macroscopic dynamics at the initial stage of fusion reaction. We show that TDHF (Time-dependent Hartree-Fock) could be a useful tool to infer information on the fusion barrier as well as on one-body dissipation effect. We apply the reduction of information to the case of head-on reaction between a {sup 16}O and {sup 16,22,24,28}O in order to quantify the effect of neutron skin on fusion. We show that the precise determination of fusion barrier requires, in addition to the relative distance between center of mass, the introduction of an additional collective coordinate that explicitly breaks the neutron-proton symmetry. With this additional collective variable, we obtain a rather precise determination of the barrier position, height and diffuseness as well as one-body friction. (author)

  19. Attractors of dissipative structure in three dissipative fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi

    1993-10-01

    A general theory with use of auto-correlations for distributions is presented to derive that realization of coherent structures in general dissipative dynamic systems is equivalent to that of self-organized states with the minimum dissipation rate for instantaneously contained energy. Attractors of dissipative structure are shown to be given by eigenfunctions for dissipative dynamic operators of the dynamic system and to constitute the self-organized and self-similar decay phase. Three typical examples applied to incompressible viscous fluids, to incompressible viscous and resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluids and to compressible resistive MHD plasmas are presented to lead to attractors in the three dissipative fluids and to describe a common physical picture of self-organization and bifurcation of the dissipative structure. (author)

  20. Molecular-scale noncontact atomic force microscopy contrasts in topography and energy dissipation on c(4x2) superlattice structures of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Ichii, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2004-01-01

    Alkanethiol self-assembledmonolayers formed on Au(111) surfaces were investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Dodecanethiol monolayers prepared at 78 °C were imaged by NC-AFM, which revealed that the film is composed predominantly of two different phases of c(4×2)superlattice structures. The obtained molecular-scale NC-AFM contrasts are discussed in comparison with previously reported scanning tunneling microscopy images. We found that the energy dissipation image exhibits...

  1. Heralded quantum controlled-phase gates with dissipative dynamics in macroscopically distant resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Zhong, Zhirong; Nori, Franco

    2017-07-01

    Heralded near-deterministic multiqubit controlled-phase gates with integrated error detection have recently been proposed by Borregaard et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 110502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.110502]. This protocol is based on a single four-level atom (a heralding quartit) and N three-level atoms (operational qutrits) coupled to a single-resonator mode acting as a cavity bus. Here we generalize this method for two distant resonators without the cavity bus between the heralding and operational atoms. Specifically, we analyze the two-qubit controlled-Z gate and its multiqubit-controlled generalization (i.e., a Toffoli-like gate) acting on the two-lowest levels of N qutrits inside one resonator, with their successful actions being heralded by an auxiliary microwave-driven quartit inside the other resonator. Moreover, we propose a circuit-quantum-electrodynamics realization of the protocol with flux and phase qudits in linearly coupled transmission-line resonators with dissipation. These methods offer a quadratic fidelity improvement compared to cavity-assisted deterministic gates.

  2. Orthonormal Wavelet Bases for Quantum Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tymczak, C.; Wang, X.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the use of compactly supported, orthonormal wavelet bases for quantum molecular-dynamics (Car-Parrinello) algorithms. A wavelet selection scheme is developed and tested for prototypical problems, such as the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and the local density approximation to atomic and molecular systems. Our method shows systematic convergence with increased grid size, along with improvement on compression rates, thereby yielding an optimal grid for self-consistent electronic structure calculations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  4. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1991-03-01

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (r f ) and RNA polymerase (r t ). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking r f and r t suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin r t may depend on the length (λ t ) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  5. Electron-nuclear dynamics of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diz, A.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The content of an ab initio time-dependent theory of quantum molecular dynamics of electrons and atomic nuclei is presented. Employing the time-dependent variational principle and a family of approximate state vectors yields a set of dynamical equations approximating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. These equations govern the time evolution of the relevant state vector parameters as molecular orbital coefficients, nuclear positions, and momenta. This approach does not impose the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, does not use potential energy surfaces, and takes into account electron-nuclear coupling. Basic conservation laws are fully obeyed. The simplest model of the theory employs a single determinantal state for the electrons and classical nuclei and is implemented in the computer code ENDyne. Results from this ab-initio theory are reported for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions

  6. Optimal control of dissipative nonlinear dynamical systems with triggers of coupled singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrih, K

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the controllability of motion of nonconservative nonlinear dynamical systems in which triggers of coupled singularities exist or appear. It is shown that the phase plane method is useful for the analysis of nonlinear dynamics of nonconservative systems with one degree of freedom of control strategies and also shows the way it can be used for controlling the relative motion in rheonomic systems having equivalent scleronomic conservative or nonconservative system For the system with one generalized coordinate described by nonlinear differential equation of nonlinear dynamics with trigger of coupled singularities, the functions of system potential energy and conservative force must satisfy some conditions defined by a Theorem on the existence of a trigger of coupled singularities and the separatrix in the form of 'an open a spiral form' of number eight. Task of the defined dynamical nonconservative system optimal control is: by using controlling force acting to the system, transfer initial state of the nonlinear dynamics of the system into the final state of the nonlinear dynamics in the minimal time for that optimal control task

  7. Optimal control of dissipative nonlinear dynamical systems with triggers of coupled singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović Hedrih, K.

    2008-02-01

    This paper analyses the controllability of motion of nonconservative nonlinear dynamical systems in which triggers of coupled singularities exist or appear. It is shown that the phase plane method is useful for the analysis of nonlinear dynamics of nonconservative systems with one degree of freedom of control strategies and also shows the way it can be used for controlling the relative motion in rheonomic systems having equivalent scleronomic conservative or nonconservative system For the system with one generalized coordinate described by nonlinear differential equation of nonlinear dynamics with trigger of coupled singularities, the functions of system potential energy and conservative force must satisfy some conditions defined by a Theorem on the existence of a trigger of coupled singularities and the separatrix in the form of "an open a spiral form" of number eight. Task of the defined dynamical nonconservative system optimal control is: by using controlling force acting to the system, transfer initial state of the nonlinear dynamics of the system into the final state of the nonlinear dynamics in the minimal time for that optimal control task

  8. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible introduction. Although the

  9. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, Fabien (ed.) [Montpellier 2 Univ. (France). Inst. Charles Gerhardt - CNRS 5253

    2014-09-01

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible

  10. Automatic characterization of sleep need dissipation dynamics using a single EEG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Molina, Gary; Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady; Pastoor, Sander; Pfundtner, Stefan; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    In the two-process model of sleep regulation, slow-wave activity (SWA, i.e. the EEG power in the 0.5-4 Hz frequency band) is considered a direct indicator of sleep need. SWA builds up during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, declines before the onset of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, remains low during REM and the level of increase in successive NREM episodes gets progressively lower. Sleep need dissipates with a speed that is proportional to SWA and can be characterized in terms of the initial sleep need, and the decay rate. The goal in this paper is to automatically characterize sleep need from a single EEG signal acquired at a frontal location. To achieve this, a highly specific and reasonably sensitive NREM detection algorithm is proposed that leverages the concept of a single-class Kernel-based classifier. Using automatic NREM detection, we propose a method to estimate the decay rate and the initial sleep need. This method was tested on experimental data from 8 subjects who recorded EEG during three nights at home. We found that on average the estimates of the decay rate and the initial sleep need have higher values when automatic NREM detection was used as compared to manual NREM annotation. However, the average variability of these estimates across multiple nights of the same subject was lower when the automatic NREM detection classifier was used. While this method slightly over estimates the sleep need parameters, the reduced variability across subjects makes it more effective for within subject statistical comparisons of a given sleep intervention.

  11. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics theory, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Billy D

    2017-01-01

    Written by two specialists with over twenty-five years of experience in the field, this valuable text presents a wide range of topics within the growing field of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). It introduces theories which are fundamental to the field - namely, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics - and provides state-of-the-art algorithms and advice for designing reliable NEMD code, as well as examining applications for both atomic and molecular fluids. It discusses homogenous and inhomogenous flows and pays considerable attention to highly confined fluids, such as nanofluidics. In addition to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, the book covers the themes of temperature and thermodynamic fluxes and their computation, the theory and algorithms for homogenous shear and elongational flows, response theory and its applications, heat and mass transport algorithms, applications in molecular rheology, highly confined fluids (nanofluidics), the phenomenon of slip and...

  14. Extended Lagrangian Excited State Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J A; Sheppard, D; Tretiak, S; Niklasson, A M N

    2018-02-13

    An extended Lagrangian framework for excited state molecular dynamics (XL-ESMD) using time-dependent self-consistent field theory is proposed. The formulation is a generalization of the extended Lagrangian formulations for ground state Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008 100, 123004]. The theory is implemented, demonstrated, and evaluated using a time-dependent semiempirical model, though it should be generally applicable to ab initio theory. The simulations show enhanced energy stability and a significantly reduced computational cost associated with the iterative solutions of both the ground state and the electronically excited states. Relaxed convergence criteria can therefore be used both for the self-consistent ground state optimization and for the iterative subspace diagonalization of the random phase approximation matrix used to calculate the excited state transitions. The XL-ESMD approach is expected to enable numerically efficient excited state molecular dynamics for such methods as time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), Configuration Interactions Singles (CIS), and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  15. Energy dissipators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vischer, D. L; Hager, Willi H; Hager, W. H

    1995-01-01

    .... the book comprises chapters in farious fields such as hydraulic jump, stilling basins, ski jumps and plunge pools but introduces also a general account on various methods of dissipation, as well...

  16. Dissipation of the tilting degree of freedom in heavy-ion-induced fission from four-dimensional Langevin dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [Omsk State Technical University, Omsk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, E.G.; Cheredov, A.V.; Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    A stochastic approach based on four-dimensional Langevin fission dynamics is applied to the calculation of a wide set of experimental observables of excited compound nuclei from {sup 199}Pb to {sup 248}Cf formed in reactions induced by heavy ions. In the model under investigation, the tilting degree of freedom (K coordinate) representing the projection of the total angular momentum onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus is taken into account in addition to three collective shape coordinates introduced on the basis of {c,h,α} parametrization. The evolution of the K coordinate is described by means of the Langevin equation in the overdamped regime. The friction tensor for the shape collective coordinates is calculated under the assumption of the modified version of the one-body dissipation mechanism, where the reduction coefficient k{sub s} of the contribution from the ''wall'' formula is introduced. The calculations are performed both for the constant values of the coefficient k{sub s} and for the coordinate-dependent reduction coefficient k{sub s}(q) which is found on the basis of the ''chaos-weighted wall formula''. Different possibilities of the deformation-dependent dissipation coefficient (γ{sub K}) for the K coordinate are investigated. The presented results demonstrate that an impact of the k{sub s} and γ{sub K} parameters on the calculated observable fission characteristics can be selectively probed. It was found that it is possible to describe the experimental data consistently with the deformation-dependent γ{sub K}(q) coefficient for shapes featuring a neck, which predicts quite small values of γ{sub K} = 0.0077 (MeV zs){sup -1/2} and constant γ{sub K} = 0.1 -0.4 (MeV zs){sup -1/2} for compact shapes featuring no neck. (orig.)

  17. Coulomb interactions via local dynamics: a molecular-dynamics algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasichnyk, Igor; Duenweg, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    We derive and describe in detail a recently proposed method for obtaining Coulomb interactions as the potential of mean force between charges which are dynamically coupled to a local electromagnetic field. We focus on the molecular dynamics version of the method and show that it is intimately related to the Car-Parrinello approach, while being equivalent to solving Maxwell's equations with a freely adjustable speed of light. Unphysical self-energies arise as a result of the lattice interpolation of charges, and are corrected by a subtraction scheme based on the exact lattice Green function. The method can be straightforwardly parallelized using standard domain decomposition. Some preliminary benchmark results are presented

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Vashishta, P.

    1983-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of superionic conductors AgI and CuI are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The model of these superionic conductors is based on the use of effective pair potentials. To determine the constants in these potentials, cohesive energy and bulk modulus are used as input: in addition one uses notions of ionic size based on the known crystal structure. Salient features of the MD technique are outlined. Methods of treating long range Coulomb forces are discussed in detail. This includes the manner of doing Ewald sum for MD cells of arbitrary shape. Features that can be incorporated to expedite the MD calculations are also discussed. A novel MD technique which allows for a dynamically controlled variation of the shape and size of the MD cell is described briefly. The development of this novel technique has made it possible to study structural phase transitions in superionic conductors. 68 references, 17 figures, 2 tables

  19. Alternating current-driven graphene superlattices: Kinks, dissipative solitons, dynamic chaotization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of the solitary electromagnetic wave formation in graphene superlattice subjected to the electromagnetic radiation is discussed. The chaotic behavior of the electron subsystem in graphene superlattice is studied by Melnikov method. Dynamic chaos of electrons is shown to appear for certain intervals of frequencies of incident electromagnetic radiation. The frequency dependence of the radiation critical amplitude which determines the bound of chaos appearance is investigated. The values of radiation frequency at which the critical amplitude increases indefinitely were found

  20. Quantifying nonergodicity in nonautonomous dissipative dynamical systems: An application to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drótos, Gábor; Bódai, Tamás; Tél, Tamás

    2016-08-01

    In nonautonomous dynamical systems, like in climate dynamics, an ensemble of trajectories initiated in the remote past defines a unique probability distribution, the natural measure of a snapshot attractor, for any instant of time, but this distribution typically changes in time. In cases with an aperiodic driving, temporal averages taken along a single trajectory would differ from the corresponding ensemble averages even in the infinite-time limit: ergodicity does not hold. It is worth considering this difference, which we call the nonergodic mismatch, by taking time windows of finite length for temporal averaging. We point out that the probability distribution of the nonergodic mismatch is qualitatively different in ergodic and nonergodic cases: its average is zero and typically nonzero, respectively. A main conclusion is that the difference of the average from zero, which we call the bias, is a useful measure of nonergodicity, for any window length. In contrast, the standard deviation of the nonergodic mismatch, which characterizes the spread between different realizations, exhibits a power-law decrease with increasing window length in both ergodic and nonergodic cases, and this implies that temporal and ensemble averages differ in dynamical systems with finite window lengths. It is the average modulus of the nonergodic mismatch, which we call the ergodicity deficit, that represents the expected deviation from fulfilling the equality of temporal and ensemble averages. As an important finding, we demonstrate that the ergodicity deficit cannot be reduced arbitrarily in nonergodic systems. We illustrate via a conceptual climate model that the nonergodic framework may be useful in Earth system dynamics, within which we propose the measure of nonergodicity, i.e., the bias, as an order-parameter-like quantifier of climate change.

  1. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: the role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W. Jr.; Stewart, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes

  2. Hydrogen Bond Dynamics in Aqueous Solutions: Ab initio Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rate equation for the decay of CHB(t) · Definition of Hydrogen Bonds · Results of Molecular Dynamics · Dynamics of anion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds · Structural relaxation of anion-water & water-water H-bonds · Ab initio Molecular Dynamics : · Slide 14 · Dynamics of hydrogen bonds : CPMD results · Slide 16.

  3. Wetting kinetics of nanodroplets on lyophilic nanopillar-arrayed surfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Diyuan; Yang, Zhen; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    Wetting kinetics of water droplets on substrates with lyophilic nanopillars was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Early spreading of the droplet is hindered by the nanopillars because of the penetration of the liquid which induce an extra dissipation in the droplet. Droplet spreading is mainly controlled by liquid viscosity and surface tension and not dependent on solid wettability. Propagation of the fringe film is hindered by the enhanced solid wettability because of the energy barrier introduced by the interaction between water molecules and nanopillars which increase with solid wettability.

  4. Dissipation and entanglement dynamics for two interacting qubits coupled to independent reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, M [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Migliore, R [CNR-INFM, CNISM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche dell' Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Messina, A [MIUR and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche dell' Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: matteo.scala@fisica.unipa.it, E-mail: rosanna@fisica.unipa.it, E-mail: messina@fisica.unipa.it

    2008-10-31

    We derive the master equation of a system of two coupled qubits by taking into account their interaction with two independent bosonic baths. Important features of the dynamics are brought to light, such as the structure of the stationary state at general temperatures and the behaviour of the entanglement at zero temperature, showing the phenomena of sudden death and sudden birth as well as the presence of stationary entanglement for long times. The model presented here is quite versatile and can be of interest in the study of both Josephson junction architectures and cavity-QED.

  5. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. On the molecular dynamics in the hurricane interactions with its environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gabriel; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2018-06-01

    By resorting to the Burgers model for hurricanes, we study the molecular motion involved in the hurricane dynamics. We show that the Lagrangian canonical formalism requires the inclusion of the environment degrees of freedom. This also allows the description of the motion of charged particles. In view of the role played by moist convection, cumulus and cloud water droplets in the hurricane dynamics, we discuss on the basis of symmetry considerations the role played by the molecular electrical dipoles and the formation of topologically non-trivial structures. The mechanism of energy storage and dissipation, the non-stationary time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and the vortex equation are studied. Finally, we discuss the fractal self-similarity properties of hurricanes.

  7. Nonreactive spreading at high-temperature revisited for metal systems via molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhassine, M; Saiz, E; Tomsia, A P; De Coninck, J

    2009-10-06

    The spreading for Cu and Ag droplets on top of a rigid solid surface modeling Mo is herewith considered via molecular dynamics. The dynamics of the base radius and the contact angle are recorded and fitted using the molecular-kinetic theory. A method is described to determine for liquid metals at the microscopic level the parameters appearing in this theory. These microscopic parameters are calculated directly in the simulations and compared to the fitted values. The agreement between the fitted values and the calculated ones shows that the dissipation of energy within the drop is caused primarily by the friction of liquid atoms over the substrate. This validation supports the understanding of the mechanisms controlling the spreading of liquid metals which, up to now, were based on experimental data and fitting procedures.

  8. Parallelization of quantum molecular dynamics simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaori; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Shibahara, Masahiko; Kotake, Susumu

    1998-02-01

    A quantum molecular dynamics simulation code has been developed for the analysis of the thermalization of photon energies in the molecule or materials in Kansai Research Establishment. The simulation code is parallelized for both Scalar massively parallel computer (Intel Paragon XP/S75) and Vector parallel computer (Fujitsu VPP300/12). Scalable speed-up has been obtained with a distribution to processor units by division of particle group in both parallel computers. As a result of distribution to processor units not only by particle group but also by the particles calculation that is constructed with fine calculations, highly parallelization performance is achieved in Intel Paragon XP/S75. (author)

  9. Lipid Configurations from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Khandelia, Himanshu; Marsh, Derek

    2018-01-01

    of dihedral angles in palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine from molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated fluid bilayer membranes. We compare results from the widely used lipid force field of Berger et al. with those from the most recent C36 release of the CHARMM force field for lipids. Only the CHARMM force......The extent to which current force fields faithfully reproduce conformational properties of lipids in bilayer membranes, and whether these reflect the structural principles established for phospholipids in bilayer crystals, are central to biomembrane simulations. We determine the distribution...

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  11. Viscosity calculations at molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, E M; Norman, G E

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity and diffusion are chosen as an example to demonstrate the universality of diagnostics methods in the molecular dynamics method. To emphasize the universality, three diverse systems are investigated, which differ from each other drastically: liquids with embedded atom method and pairwise interatomic interaction potentials and dusty plasma with a unique multiparametric interparticle interaction potential. Both the Einstein-Helfand and Green-Kubo relations are used. Such a particular process as glass transition is analysed at the simulation of the aluminium melt. The effect of the dust particle charge fluctuation is considered. The results are compared with the experimental data. (paper)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...... are possible contributors to the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Molecular dynamics simulations using the NAMD2 package were performed for systems containing from one to seven SP-C molecules to study their behavior in water. The results of our simulations show that unfolding of the protein...

  14. Many-body dynamics of driven-dissipative Rydberg cavity polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorius, Tim; Fan, Jingtao; Weimer, Hendrik

    2017-04-01

    The usage of photons as long-range information carriers has greatly increased the interest in systems with nonlinear optical properties in recent years. The nonlinearity is easily achievable in Rydberg mediums through the strong van der Waals interaction which makes them one of the best candidates for such a system. Here, we propose a way to analyze the steady state solutions of a Rydberg medium in a cavity through the combination of the variational principle for open quantum systems and the P-distribution of the density matrix. To get a better understanding of the many-body-dynamics a transformation into the polariton picture is performed and investigated. Volkswagen Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  15. A strongly coupled open system with a non-linear bath: fluctuation-dissipation and Langevin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Chitrak

    2018-03-01

    The study of Langevin dynamics and fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) for a generic probe system (represented by a mass M ), bilinearly coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators, has been a standard paradigm for the microscopic theory of stochastic processes for several decades. The question that we probe in this paper is, how robust the structure of the classical FDR is, when one replaces the harmonic bath by an anharmonic one in the limit of strong system-bath coupling? Such a picture carries the signature of the probe system in the zeroth order through a nonlocal time kernel. We observe that the two-time noise correlations hold a rich structure from which the usual FDR emerges only in the leading order of perturbation. Beyond this order, multiple time scales and nontrivial dependence on the temperature starts to manifest. These new aspects conspire to break the time-translational invariance of the noise-correlations. Several other interesting features show up and we discuss them methodically through rigorous calculations order-by-order in perturbation. This formalistic derivation along with a specific example of non-linearity can be easily applied to a huge range of processes and statistical observables that fall under the purview of a system-reservoir theory.

  16. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of deformation and aggregation of healthy and diseased red blood cells in a tube flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report simulation results assessing the deformation and aggregation of mixed healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow. A three dimensional particle model based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is developed to predict the tube flow containing interacting cells. The cells are also modelled by DPD, with a Morse potential to characterize the cell-cell interaction. As validation tests, a single RBC in a tube flow and two RBCs in a static flow are simulated to examine the cell deformation and intercellular interaction, respectively. The study of two cells, one healthy and the other malaria-infected RBCs in a tube flow demonstrates that the malaria-infected RBC (in the leading position along flow direction) has different effects on the healthy RBC (in the trailing position) at the different stage of parasite development or at the different capillary number. With parasitic development, the malaria-infected RBC gradually loses its deformability, and in turn the corresponding trailing healthy RBC also deforms less due to the intercellular interaction. With increasing capillary number, both the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are likely to undergo an axisymmetric motion. The minimum intercellular distance becomes small enough so that rouleaux is easily formed, i.e., the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are difficultly disaggregated

  17. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of deformation and aggregation of healthy and diseased red blood cells in a tube flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan, E-mail: Nhan@nus.edu.sg; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we report simulation results assessing the deformation and aggregation of mixed healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow. A three dimensional particle model based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is developed to predict the tube flow containing interacting cells. The cells are also modelled by DPD, with a Morse potential to characterize the cell-cell interaction. As validation tests, a single RBC in a tube flow and two RBCs in a static flow are simulated to examine the cell deformation and intercellular interaction, respectively. The study of two cells, one healthy and the other malaria-infected RBCs in a tube flow demonstrates that the malaria-infected RBC (in the leading position along flow direction) has different effects on the healthy RBC (in the trailing position) at the different stage of parasite development or at the different capillary number. With parasitic development, the malaria-infected RBC gradually loses its deformability, and in turn the corresponding trailing healthy RBC also deforms less due to the intercellular interaction. With increasing capillary number, both the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are likely to undergo an axisymmetric motion. The minimum intercellular distance becomes small enough so that rouleaux is easily formed, i.e., the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are difficultly disaggregated.

  18. Effect of surfactants on the deformation of single droplet in shear flow studied by dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Xu, Junbo; He, Xianfeng

    2018-07-01

    The behaviour of a single droplet in shear flow is a fundamental problem in immiscible liquid-liquid multiphase fluid systems. In this article, the deformation and inclination angle of single droplet covered with surfactants in shear flow at moderate Reynolds number, when both the inertial effects and interfacial tension are the key governing factors, were simulated by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Weber number We was adopted to indicate the force state of the droplet and a linear relationship between the deformation parameter D and We was found when Reynolds number Re is about 1-10, which is similar to the relation of D and Capillary number Ca when Re ≪ 1. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the distribution of surfactants, the droplet inclination angle θ and the droplet deformation parameter D were investigated at different surfactant density at interface ds and shear rate ?. When the droplet size is close to the characteristic size of surfactant molecules, phase interfaces of water in oil (W/O) and oil in water (O/W) systems have different microstructures, which result in differences in the surfactant distribution, the droplet inclination angle and deformation of the two systems.

  19. Blood–plasma separation in Y-shaped bifurcating microfluidic channels: a dissipative particle dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George Em; Popel, Aleksander S

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in a Y-shaped bifurcating microfluidic channel is investigated using a validated low-dimensional RBC model based on dissipative particle dynamics. Specifically, the RBC is represented as a closed torus-like ring of ten colloidal particles, which leads to efficient simulations of blood flow in microcirculation over a wide range of hematocrits. Adaptive no-slip wall boundary conditions were implemented to model hydrodynamic flow within a specific wall structure of diverging three-dimensional microfluidic channels, paying attention to controlling density fluctuations. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in a bifurcating microfluidic channel have been investigated in our simulations for healthy and diseased blood, including the size of a cell-free layer on the daughter branches. The feed hematocrit level in the parent channel has considerable influence on blood–plasma separation. Compared to the blood–plasma separation efficiencies of healthy RBCs, malaria-infected stiff RBCs (iRBCs) have a tendency to travel into the low flow-rate daughter branch because of their different initial distribution in the parent channel. Our simulation results are consistent with previously published experimental results and theoretical predictions. (paper)

  20. Topology of a dissipative spin: Dynamical Chern number, bath-induced nonadiabaticity, and a quantum dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Loïc; Sclocchi, Antonio; Orth, Peter P.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the topological deformations of the ground state manifold of a quantum spin-1/2 in a magnetic field H =H (sinθ cosϕ ,sinθ sinϕ ,cosθ ) induced by a coupling to an ohmic quantum dissipative environment at zero temperature. From Bethe ansatz results and a variational approach, we confirm that the Chern number associated with the geometry of the reduced spin ground state manifold is preserved in the delocalized phase for α <1 . We report a divergence of the Berry curvature at αc=1 for magnetic fields aligned along the equator θ =π /2 . This divergence is caused by the complete quenching of the transverse magnetic field by the bath associated with a gap closing that occurs at the localization Kosterlitz-Thouless quantum phase transition in this model. Recent experiments in quantum circuits have engineered nonequilibrium protocols to access topological properties from a measurement of a dynamical Chern number defined via the out-of-equilibrium spin expectation values. Applying a numerically exact stochastic Schrödinger approach we find that, for a fixed field sweep velocity θ (t )=v t , the bath induces a crossover from (quasi)adiabatic to nonadiabatic dynamical behavior when the spin bath coupling α increases. We also investigate the particular regime H /ωc≪v /H ≪1 with large bath cutoff frequency ωc, where the dynamical Chern number vanishes already at α =1 /2 . In this regime, the mapping to an interacting resonance level model enables us to analytically describe the behavior of the dynamical Chern number in the vicinity of α =1 /2 . We further provide an intuitive physical explanation of the bath-induced breakdown of adiabaticity in analogy to the Faraday effect in electromagnetism. We demonstrate that the driving of the spin leads to the production of a large number of bosonic excitations in the bath, which strongly affect the spin dynamics. Finally, we quantify the spin-bath entanglement and formulate an analogy with an effective

  1. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  2. Many-body dynamics of holes in a driven, dissipative spin chain of Rydberg superatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letscher, Fabian; Petrosyan, David; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Strong, long-range interactions between atoms in high-lying Rydberg states can suppress multiple Rydberg excitations within a micron-sized trapping volume and yield sizable Rydberg level shifts at larger distances. Ensembles of atoms in optical microtraps then form Rydberg superatoms with collectively enhanced transition rates to the singly excited state. These superatoms can represent mesoscopic, strongly interacting spins. We study a regular array of such effective spins driven by a laser field tuned to compensate the interaction-induced level shifts between neighboring superatoms. During the initial transient, a few excited superatoms seed a cascade of resonantly facilitated excitation of large clusters of superatoms. Due to spontaneous decay, the system then relaxes to the steady state having nearly universal Rydberg excitation density {ρ }{{R}}=2/3. This state is characterized by highly non-trivial equilibrium dynamics of quasi-particles—excitation holes in the lattice of Rydberg excited superatoms. We derive an effective many-body model that accounts for hole mobility as well as continuous creation and annihilation of holes upon collisions with each other. We find that holes exhibit a nearly incompressible liquid phase with highly sub-Poissonian number statistics and finite-range density-density correlations.

  3. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Krack, M.; Bertolus, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using forces calculated from empirical potentials, commonly called classical molecular dynamics, is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermomechanical properties. This enables one to obtain insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, as well as parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models. The interaction potentials used for the force calculations are generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data and electronic structure calculations (see Chapter 12). We present here the different types of potentials currently available for UO 2 and illustrations of applications to the description of the behaviour of this material under irradiation. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials for UO 2 are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine these existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry, and validate the models and assumptions used. (authors)

  4. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, NIST

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  5. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  6. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp; Tchipev, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm

  7. Hydration dynamics in water clusters via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turi, László, E-mail: turi@chem.elte.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest 112, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 (Hungary)

    2014-05-28

    We have investigated the hydration dynamics in size selected water clusters with n = 66, 104, 200, 500, and 1000 water molecules using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the most fundamental aspects of relaxation phenomena in clusters, we choose one of the simplest, still realistic, quantum mechanically treated test solute, an excess electron. The project focuses on the time evolution of the clusters following two processes, electron attachment to neutral equilibrated water clusters and electron detachment from an equilibrated water cluster anion. The relaxation dynamics is significantly different in the two processes, most notably restoring the equilibrium final state is less effective after electron attachment. Nevertheless, in both scenarios only minor cluster size dependence is observed. Significantly different relaxation patterns characterize electron detachment for interior and surface state clusters, interior state clusters relaxing significantly faster. This observation may indicate a potential way to distinguish surface state and interior state water cluster anion isomers experimentally. A comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium trajectories suggests that linear response theory breaks down for electron attachment at 200 K, but the results converge to reasonable agreement at higher temperatures. Relaxation following electron detachment clearly belongs to the linear regime. Cluster relaxation was also investigated using two different computational models, one preferring cavity type interior states for the excess electron in bulk water, while the other simulating non-cavity structure. While the cavity model predicts appearance of several different hydrated electron isomers in agreement with experiment, the non-cavity model locates only cluster anions with interior excess electron distribution. The present simulations show that surface isomers computed with the cavity predicting potential show similar dynamical behavior to the interior clusters of

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  9. Molecular dynamic simulation study of molten cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganegi Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study thermodynamics and structural properties of expanded caesium fluid. Internal pressure, radial distribution functions (RDFs, coordination numbers and diffusion coefficients have been calculated at temperature range 700–1600 K and pressure range 100–800 bar. We used the internal pressure to predict the metal–non-metal transition occurrence region. RDFs were calculated at wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The coordination numbers decrease and positions of the first peak of RDFs slightly increase as the temperature increases and pressure decreases. The calculated self-diffusion coefficients at various temperatures and pressures show no distinct boundary between Cs metallic fluid and its expanded fluid where it continuously increases with temperature.

  10. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  11. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Transthyretin Association from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedrix J. Dongmo Foumthuim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are used in this work to probe the structural stability and the dynamics of engineered mutants of transthyretin (TTR, i.e., the double mutant F87M/L110M (MT-TTR and the triple mutant F87M/L110M/S117E (3M-TTR, in relation to wild-type. Free energy analysis from end-point simulations and statistical effective energy functions are used to analyze trajectories, revealing that mutations do not have major impact on protein structure but rather on protein association, shifting the equilibria towards dissociated species. The result is confirmed by the analysis of 3M-TTR which shows dissociation within the first 10 ns of the simulation, indicating that contacts are lost at the dimer-dimer interface, whereas dimers (formed by monomers which pair to form two extended β-sheets appear fairly stable. Overall the simulations provide a detailed view of the dynamics and thermodynamics of wild-type and mutant transthyretins and a rationale of the observed effects.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in iron-alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascon, R.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation damage by neutrons or ions in bcc iron has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using an embedded atom type many-body potential (EAM). Displacement cascades with energies of 1 to 30 keV were generated in the microcanonical system where the number of atoms (up to 1.5 million) is chosen high enough to compensate the fact that the dissipation of energy is not taken into account in our model. The defect number at the end of cascade lifetime was found to be 60 percent of the NRT standard value. This tendency is in good agreement with experimental data. However, compared with other simulations in iron, we found significant differences in the defect production and distribution. The comparison with results obtained form simulations of cascades in other metals, leads on the one hand to a higher value of the defect number in bcc iron than in fcc metals like copper or nickel, and on the other hand to a ratio, between the number of replacements and the number of defects, lower in iron ( 100). We observed the transient melting of the core of the cascade during simulations. We showed that a higher value of the initial iron crystal temperature, as the mass difference between the components of an artificial binary alloy Fe-X(X=Al,Sb,Au,U) both produce a 'cascade effect': a decrease of the number of defects and an increase of the number of replacements. We also showed up the quasi-channeling of some atoms in high energy cascades. They are at the origin of sub-cascades formation; as a result they induce an opposite effect to the 'cascade effect'. (author)

  13. An Evaluation of Explicit Receptor Flexibility in Molecular Docking Using Molecular Dynamics and Torsion Angle Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armen, Roger S; Chen, Jianhan; Brooks, Charles L

    2009-10-13

    Incorporating receptor flexibility into molecular docking should improve results for flexible proteins. However, the incorporation of explicit all-atom flexibility with molecular dynamics for the entire protein chain may also introduce significant error and "noise" that could decrease docking accuracy and deteriorate the ability of a scoring function to rank native-like poses. We address this apparent paradox by comparing the success of several flexible receptor models in cross-docking and multiple receptor ensemble docking for p38α mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Explicit all-atom receptor flexibility has been incorporated into a CHARMM-based molecular docking method (CDOCKER) using both molecular dynamics (MD) and torsion angle molecular dynamics (TAMD) for the refinement of predicted protein-ligand binding geometries. These flexible receptor models have been evaluated, and the accuracy and efficiency of TAMD sampling is directly compared to MD sampling. Several flexible receptor models are compared, encompassing flexible side chains, flexible loops, multiple flexible backbone segments, and treatment of the entire chain as flexible. We find that although including side chain and some backbone flexibility is required for improved docking accuracy as expected, docking accuracy also diminishes as additional and unnecessary receptor flexibility is included into the conformational search space. Ensemble docking results demonstrate that including protein flexibility leads to to improved agreement with binding data for 227 active compounds. This comparison also demonstrates that a flexible receptor model enriches high affinity compound identification without significantly increasing the number of false positives from low affinity compounds.

  14. A molecular dynamics simulation study of chloroform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, Ilario G.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    Three different chloroform models have been investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulation. The thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties of the various models were investigated in detail. In particular, the potential energies, diffusion coefficients and rotational correlation times obtained for each model are compared with experiment. It is found that the theory of rotational Brownian motion fails in describing the rotational diffusion of chloroform. The force field of Dietz and Heinzinger was found to give good overall agreement with experiment. An extended investigation of this chloroform model has been performed. Values are reported for the isothermal compressibility, the thermal expansion coefficient and the constant volume heat capacity. The values agree well with experiment. The static and frequency dependent dielectric permittivity were computed from a 1·2 ns simulation conducted under reaction field boundary conditions. Considering the fact that the model is rigid with fixed partial charges, the static dielectric constant and Debye relaxation time compare well with experiment. From the same simulation the shear viscosity was computed using the off-diagonal elements of the pressure tensor, both via an Einstein type relation and via a Green-Kubo equation. The calculated viscosities show good agreement with experimental values. The excess Helmholtz energy is calculated using the thermodynamic integration technique and simulations of 50 and 80 ps. The value obtained for the excess Helmholtz energy matches the theoretical value within a few per cent.

  15. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation

  16. A molecular dynamics approach to barrodiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James; Marciante, Mathieu; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Unexpected phenomena in the reaction rates for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules have led to a renewed interest in the thermo-dynamically driven diffusion process for the past 10 years, often described collectively as barodiffusion. In the current context, barodiffusion would manifest as a process that separates ions of differing mass and charge ratios due to pressure and temperature gradients set-up through shock structures in the capsule core. Barrodiffusion includes additional mass transfer terms that account for the irreversible transport of species due to gradients in the system, both thermodynamic and electric e.g, i = - ρD [ ∇c +kp ∇ln(pi) +kT(i) ∇ln(Ti) +kt(e) ∇ln(Te) +eke/Ti ∇ϕ ] . Several groups have attacked this phenomena using continuum scale models and supplemented with kinetic theory to derive coefficients for the different diffusion terms based on assumptions about the collisional processes. In contrast, we have applied a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to this system to gain a first-principle understanding of the rate kinetics and to assess the accuracy of the differin

  17. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  18. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  19. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-06

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  20. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D., E-mail: sergei.ivanov@uni-rostock.de; Kühn, Oliver [Institute of Physics, Rostock University, Universitätsplatz 3, 18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  1. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom

  2. Higher-Order Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics for Classical Polarizable Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Alex; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2018-02-13

    Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (XLBOMD) methods provide a framework for fast iteration-free simulations of models that normally require expensive electronic ground state optimizations prior to the force evaluations at every time step. XLBOMD uses dynamically driven auxiliary degrees of freedom that fluctuate about a variationally optimized ground state of an approximate "shadow" potential which approximates the true reference potential. While the requirements for such shadow potentials are well understood, constructing such potentials in practice has previously been ad hoc, and in this work, we present a systematic development of XLBOMD shadow potentials that match the reference potential to any order. We also introduce a framework for combining friction-like dissipation for the auxiliary degrees of freedom with general-order integration, a combination that was not previously possible. These developments are demonstrated with a simple fluctuating charge model and point induced dipole polarization models.

  3. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  4. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T, Joe Francis [Computational Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Nano Science and Technology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kozhikode (India); Sathian, Sarith P. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  5. Investigating Ebola virus pathogenicity using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Morena; Collu, Francesca; Macpherson, James; Michaelis, Martin; Fraternali, Franca; Wass, Mark N

    2017-08-11

    Ebolaviruses have been known to cause deadly disease in humans for 40 years and have recently been demonstrated in West Africa to be able to cause large outbreaks. Four Ebolavirus species cause severe disease associated with high mortality in humans. Reston viruses are the only Ebolaviruses that do not cause disease in humans. Conserved amino acid changes in the Reston virus protein VP24 compared to VP24 of other Ebolaviruses have been suggested to alter VP24 binding to host cell karyopherins resulting in impaired inhibition of interferon signalling, which may explain the difference in human pathogenicity. Here we used protein structural analysis and molecular dynamics to further elucidate the interaction between VP24 and KPNA5. As a control experiment, we compared the interaction of wild-type and R137A-mutant (known to affect KPNA5 binding) Ebola virus VP24 with KPNA5. Results confirmed that the R137A mutation weakens direct VP24-KPNA5 binding and enables water molecules to penetrate at the interface. Similarly, Reston virus VP24 displayed a weaker interaction with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is likely to reduce the ability of Reston virus VP24 to prevent host cell interferon signalling. Our results provide novel molecular detail on the interaction of Reston virus VP24 and Ebola virus VP24 with human KPNA5. The results indicate a weaker interaction of Reston virus VP24 with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is probably associated with a decreased ability to interfere with the host cell interferon response. Hence, our study provides further evidence that VP24 is a key player in determining Ebolavirus pathogenicity.

  6. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  7. Molecular beam studies of adsorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumainayagam, C.R.; McMaster, M.C.; Madix, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the trapping dynamics of C 1 -C 3 alkanes and Xe on Pt(111) using supersonic molecular beams and a direct technique to measure trapping probabilities. We have extended a one-dimensional model based on classical mechanics to include trapping and have found semiquantitative agreement with experimental results for the dependence of the initial trapping probability on incident translational energy at normal incidence. Our measurements of the initial trapping probability as a function of incident translational energy at normal incidence are in agreement with previous mean translational energy measurements for Xe and CH 4 desorbing near the surface normal, in accordance with detailed balance. However, the angular dependence of the initial trapping probability shows deviations from normal energy scaling, demonstrating the importance of parallel momentum in the trapping process and the inadequacy of one-dimensional models. The dependence of the initial trapping probability of Xe on incident translational energy and angle is quite well fit by three-dimensional stochastic classical trajectory calculations utilizing a Morse potential. Angular distributions of the scattered molecules indicate that the trapping probability is not a sensitive function of surface temperature. The trapping probability increases with surface coverage in quantitative agreement with a modified Kisliuk model which incorporates enhanced trapping onto the monolayer. We have also used the direct technique to study trapping onto a saturated monolayer state to investigate the dynamics of extrinsic precursor adsorption and find that the initial trapping probability onto the monolayer is higher than on the clean surface. The initial trapping probability onto the monolayer scales with total energy, indicating a highly corrugated interaction potential

  8. Self-assembly and Co-assembly of Block Polyelectrolytes in Aqueous Solutions. Dissipative Particle Dynamics with Explicit Electrostatics.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, K.; Šindelka, K.; Wang, X.; Limpouchová, Z.; Lísal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 21 (2016), s. 3077-3092 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02938S; GA ČR GA15-19542S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : coarse graining * dissipative and random forces * smeared charges Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.870, year: 2016

  9. Folding very short peptides using molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco K Ho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Peptides often have conformational preferences. We simulated 133 peptide 8-mer fragments from six different proteins, sampled by replica-exchange molecular dynamics using Amber7 with a GB/SA (generalized-Born/solvent-accessible electrostatic approximation to water implicit solvent. We found that 85 of the peptides have no preferred structure, while 48 of them converge to a preferred structure. In 85% of the converged cases (41 peptides, the structures found by the simulations bear some resemblance to their native structures, based on a coarse-grained backbone description. In particular, all seven of the beta hairpins in the native structures contain a fragment in the turn that is highly structured. In the eight cases where the bioinformatics-based I-sites library picks out native-like structures, the present simulations are largely in agreement. Such physics-based modeling may be useful for identifying early nuclei in folding kinetics and for assisting in protein-structure prediction methods that utilize the assembly of peptide fragments.

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1990-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of cascades in Cu and Ni with primary-knock-on energies up to 5 keV and lattice temperatures in the range 0 K--700 K are described. Interatomic forces were represented by either the Gibson II (Cu) or Johnson-Erginsoy (Ni) potentials in most of this work, although some simulations using ''Embedded Atom Method'' potentials, e.g., for threshold events in Ni 3 Al, are also presented. The results indicate that the primary state of damage produced by displacement cascades is controlled by two phenomena, replacement collision sequences during the collisional phase of the cascade and local melting during the thermal spike. As expected, the collisional phase is rather similar in Cu and Ni, however, the thermal spike is of longer duration and has a more pronounced influence in Cu than Ni. When the ambient temperature of the lattice is increased, the melt zones are observed to both increase in size and cool more slowly. This has the effect of reducing defect production and enhancing atomic mixing and disordering. The implications of these results for defect production, cascade collapse, atomic disordering will be discussed. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. A molecular dynamics simulation code ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambayashi, Shaw

    1992-06-01

    Computer simulation based on the molecular dynamics (MD) method has become an important tool complementary to experiments and theoretical calculations in a wide range of scientific fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and so on. In the MD method, the Newtonian equations-of-motion of classical particles are integrated numerically to reproduce a phase-space trajectory of the system. In the 1980's, several new techniques have been developed for simulation at constant-temperature and/or constant-pressure in convenient to compare result of computer simulation with experimental results. We first summarize the MD method for both microcanonical and canonical simulations. Then, we present and overview of a newly developed ISIS (Isokinetic Simulation of Soft-spheres) code and its performance on various computers including vector processors. The ISIS code has a capability to make a MD simulation under constant-temperature condition by using the isokinetic constraint method. The equations-of-motion is integrated by a very accurate fifth-order finite differential algorithm. The bookkeeping method is also utilized to reduce the computational time. Furthermore, the ISIS code is well adopted for vector processing: Speedup ratio ranged from 16 to 24 times is obtained on a VP2600/10 vector processor. (author)

  12. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  13. Energy dissipation effects on imaging of soft materials by dynamic atomic force microscopy: A DNA-chip study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaner-Goutorbe, M., E-mail: magali.phaner@ec-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Iazykov, M. [Université de Lyon, laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d' Italie 69364 Lyon cedex 07 (France); Villey, R. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Université de Lyon, laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée et Nanostructures, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sicard, D.; Robach, Y. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL) UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France)

    2013-05-01

    Using amplitude-mode AFM (AM-AFM), we have obtained valuable information during these recent years through the study of amplitude and phase shift dependence on tip–sample separation, leading to a comprehensive understanding of the interaction processes. Two imaging regimes, attractive and repulsive, have been identified and a relationship between phase and dissipative energy was established, providing information on observed material properties. Most of the previous studies have concerned model systems: either hard or soft materials. In this paper, we present the analysis of a mixed system of soft structures on a hard substrate. This is a DNA chip for biological applications consisting of oligonucleotides covalently linked by a layer of silane to a silicon substrate. A detailed study of amplitude-phase curves as a function of the tip–sample separation allowed us to define the best experimental conditions to obtain specific information: we got reliable conditions to minimize noise during topographic imaging and an understanding of the processes of energy dissipation involved in the DNA breaking for DNA arrays. By calculating the energy dissipated as a function of the amplitude of oscillation, we have demonstrated a transition from an energy dissipation process governed by localized viscoelastic interactions (due to the soft layer) to a process governed by extended irreversible deformations (due to the hard substrate). Highlights: ► Amplitude mode AFM analysis of a DNA array is presented. ► Reliable conditions for noise minimization on topographic images are presented. ► Phase, amplitude vs distance curves are analyzed for different setpoint amplitudes. ► Energy dissipation processes are described from viscoelasticity to DNA breaking.

  14. Extended Lagrangian formulation of charge-constrained tight-binding molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, M J; Coe, J D; Yadav, S K; Liu, X-Y; Niklasson, A M N

    2015-06-09

    The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008, 100, 123004] has been applied to a tight-binding model under the constraint of local charge neutrality to yield microcanonical trajectories with both precise, long-term energy conservation and a reduced number of self-consistent field optimizations at each time step. The extended Lagrangian molecular dynamics formalism restores time reversal symmetry in the propagation of the electronic degrees of freedom, and it enables the efficient and accurate self-consistent optimization of the chemical potential and atomwise potential energy shifts in the on-site elements of the tight-binding Hamiltonian that are required when enforcing local charge neutrality. These capabilities are illustrated with microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations of a small metallic cluster using an sd-valent tight-binding model for titanium. The effects of weak dissipation on the propagation of the auxiliary degrees of freedom for the chemical potential and on-site Hamiltonian matrix elements that is used to counteract the accumulation of numerical noise during trajectories was also investigated.

  15. Interplay of single particle and collective response in molecular dynamics simulation of dusty plasma system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Srimanta; Das, Amita; Kumar, Sandeep; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The collective response of the plasma medium is well known and has been explored extensively in the context of dusty plasma medium. On the other hand, the individual particle response associated with the collisional character giving rise to the dissipative phenomena has not been explored adequately. In this paper, two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of dust particles interacting via Yukawa potential has been considered. It has been shown that disturbances induced in a dust crystal elicit both collective and single particle responses. Generation of a few particles moving at speeds considerably higher than acoustic and/or shock speed (excited by the external disturbance) is observed. This is an indication of a single particle response. Furthermore, as these individual energetic particles propagate, the dust crystal is observed to crack along their path. Initially when the energy is high, these particles generate secondary energetic particles by the collisional scattering process. However, ultimately as these particles slow down they excite a collective response in the dust medium at secondary locations in a region which is undisturbed by the primary external disturbance. The condition when the cracking of the crystal stops and collective excitations get initiated has been identified quantitatively. The trailing collective primary disturbances would thus often encounter a disturbed medium with secondary and tertiary collective perturbations, thereby suffering significant modification in its propagation. It is thus clear that there is an interesting interplay (other than mere dissipation) between the single particle and collective response which governs the dynamics of any disturbance introduced in the medium.

  16. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation on tire-aggregate friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyan Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction between tire and road surface is fundamentally depending on the molecular forces. In this paper, the nanoscale 3D contact model is employed to investigate the tire-aggregate friction mechanism. The tire and aggregate micro-structure are both constructed to evaluate the microscopic performance of tire-aggregate friction influence. Simulation results show for a high velocity, the energy dissipation of sliding on crystal structure is small, which results in a small friction coefficient; temperature will have influences on the friction coefficient, and with the increasing of velocity, the effect will gradually reduce. Keywords: Tire, Aggregate, Friction coefficient, Microscopic mechanism, MD simulation

  17. Modeling shockwave deformation via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD), where the equations of motion of up to thousands of interacting atoms are solved on the computer, has proven to be a powerful tool for investigating a wide variety of nonequilibrium processes from the atomistic viewpoint. Simulations of shock waves in three-dimensional (3D) solids and fluids have shown conclusively that shear-stress relaxation is achieved through atomic rearrangement. In the case of fluids, the transverse motion is viscous, and the constitutive model of Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics has been shown to be accurate - even on the time and distance scales of MD experiments. For strong shocks in solids, the plastic flow that leads to shear-stress relaxation in MD is highly localized near the shock front, involving a slippage along close-packed planes. For shocks of intermediate strength, MD calculations exhibit an elastic precursor running out in front of the steady plastic wave, where slippage similar in character to that in the very strong shocks leads to shear-stress relaxation. An interesting correlation between the maximum shear stress and the Hugoniot pressure jump is observed for both 3D and fluid shockwave calculations, which may have some utility in modeling applications. At low shock strengths, the MD simulations show only elastic compression, with no permanent transverse atomic strains. The result for perfect 3D crystals is also seen in calculations for 1D chains. It is speculated that, if it were practical, a very large MD system containing dislocations could be expected to exhibit more realistic plastic flow for weak shock waves, too

  18. Analysis of Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition, as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties, such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamics simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one-dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  19. Dynamics of a Landau-Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateuafack, M. E.; Diffo, J. T.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  20. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ateuafack, M.E., E-mail: esouamath@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Diffo, J.T., E-mail: diffojaures@yahoo.com [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Department of Physics, Higher Teachers' Training College, The University of Maroua, PO Box 55 Maroua (Cameroon); Fai, L.C., E-mail: corneliusfai@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon)

    2016-02-15

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  1. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobač, Vladimír; Lewis, J.P.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 28 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 285202. ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-adiabatic molecular dynamics * molecular junctions * molecular switches * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2016

  2. Memory effects in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics at metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of temporal correlation in a Langevin equation describing nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces. For a harmonic oscillator, the Langevin equation preserves the quantum dynamics exactly and it is demonstrated that memory effects are needed in order to conserve the ground state...... energy of the oscillator. We then compare the result of Langevin dynamics in a harmonic potential with a perturbative master equation approach and show that the Langevin equation gives a better description in the nonperturbative range of high temperatures and large friction. Unlike the master equation......, this approach is readily extended to anharmonic potentials. Using density functional theory, we calculate representative Langevin trajectories for associative desorption of N-2 from Ru(0001) and find that memory effects lower the dissipation of energy. Finally, we propose an ab initio scheme to calculate...

  3. Molecular dynamics using quasielastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, S

    2003-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is well suited to study the molecular motions (rotations and translations) in solids or liquids. It offers a unique possibility of analysing spatial dimensions of atomic or molecular processes in their development over time. We describe here some of the systems studied using the QENS spectrometer, designed, developed and commissioned at Dhruva reactor in Trombay. We have studied a variety of systems to investigate the molecular motion, for example, simple molecular solids, molecules adsorbed in confined medium like porous systems or zeolites, monolayer-protected nano-sized metal clusters, water in Portland cement as it cures with time, etc. (author)

  4. Storage functions for dissipative linear systems are quadratic state functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, Jan C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with dissipative dynamical systems. Dissipative dynamical systems can be used as models for physical phenomena in which energy exchange with their environment plays a role. In a dissipative dynamical system, the book-keeping of energy is done via the supply rate and a storage

  5. Dissipative structures in magnetorotational turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Johnathan; Latter, Henrik N.

    2018-03-01

    Via the process of accretion, magnetorotational turbulence removes energy from a disk's orbital motion and transforms it into heat. Turbulent heating is far from uniform and is usually concentrated in small regions of intense dissipation, characterised by abrupt magnetic reconnection and higher temperatures. These regions are of interest because they might generate non-thermal emission, in the form of flares and energetic particles, or thermally process solids in protoplanetary disks. Moreover, the nature of the dissipation bears on the fundamental dynamics of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) itself: local simulations indicate that the large-scale properties of the turbulence (e.g. saturation levels, the stress-pressure relationship) depend on the short dissipative scales. In this paper we undertake a numerical study of how the MRI dissipates and the small-scale dissipative structures it employs to do so. We use the Godunov code RAMSES and unstratified compressible shearing boxes. Our simulations reveal that dissipation is concentrated in ribbons of strong magnetic reconnection that are significantly elongated in azimuth, up to a scale height. Dissipative structures are hence meso-scale objects, and potentially provide a route by which large scales and small scales interact. We go on to show how these ribbons evolve over time — forming, merging, breaking apart, and disappearing. Finally, we reveal important couplings between the large-scale density waves generated by the MRI and the small-scale structures, which may illuminate the stress-pressure relationship in MRI turbulence.

  6. Density profiles of granular gases studied by molecular dynamics and Brownian bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuñuri, F.; Montoya, J. A.; Carvente, O.

    2018-02-01

    Despite the inherent frictional forces and dissipative collisions, confined granular matter can be regarded as a system in a stationary state if we inject energy continuously. Under these conditions, both the density and the granular temperature are, in general, non-monotonic variables along the height of the container. In consequence, an analytical description of a granular system is hard to conceive. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we measure the packing fraction profiles for a vertically vibrating three-dimensional granular system in several gaseous-like stationary states. We show that by using the Brownian bridge concept, the determined packing fraction profiles can be reproduced accurately and give a complete description of the distribution of the particles inside the simulation box.

  7. Investigations of transport properties of molten sodium fluoride using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattaraj, D.; Dash, Smruti

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and coefficient of shear viscosity of molten sodium fluoride were calculated using Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulation. The Green-Kubo method is an equilibrium technique based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical thermodynamics. The canonical ensemble (N, V, T) was used in the MD simulation to obtain the transport properties of molten NaF. In this simulation, several state points were investigated using the Born-Meyer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi interionic potential model. The electrostatic interactions present in this ionic fluid were calculated through the Ewald method. The results obtained in this study were found to be in good agreement with the reported experimental data. (author)

  8. Crystal structure and pair potentials: A molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1980-10-06

    With use of a Lagrangian which allows for the variation of the shape and size of the periodically repeating molecular-dynamics cell, it is shown that different pair potentials lead to different crystal structures.

  9. Molecular Interactions and Reaction Dynamics in Supercritical Water Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, K

    1998-01-01

    .... From UV-vis spectroscopic measurements and molecular dynamics simulation of chemical equilibria, we have shown that density effects on broad classes of reactions may be explained in terms of changes...

  10. Molecular Dynamics and Bioactivity of a Novel Mutated Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Parathyroid hormone, Mutation prediction, Molecular dynamics, RANKL/OPG, UAMS-32P cell. Tropical .... PTH1R were used as MD simulation starting points. A full-atom ... Values of RMSD, Rg, and potential energy evaluation ...

  11. Olefin Metathesis in Peptidomimetics, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and Molecular Imprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Low, Tammy K

    2006-01-01

    .... Our research goals consisted of employing olefin metathesis in the synthesis of peptidomimetics, and studying the feasibility of this method in dynamic combinatorial chemistry and molecular imprinting of nerve agents...

  12. A molecular dynamics calculation of solid phase of malonic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sathya S R R Perumal

    Keywords. Hydrogen bond chain; elastic constants; molecular dynamics. 1. Introduction ... theory - a probabilistic model to determine the hydro- gen bonds within the .... compares poorly with the experimental value of 108.5. Similarly β and γ ...

  13. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo calculations in statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.W.; Erpenbeck, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics calculations on statistical mechanical systems is reviewed giving some of the more significant recent developments. It is noted that the term molecular dynamics refers to the time-averaging technique for hard-core and square-well interactions and for continuous force-law interactions. Ergodic questions, methodology, quantum mechanical, Lorentz, and one-dimensional, hard-core, and square and triangular-well systems, short-range soft potentials, and other systems are included. 268 references

  14. Next generation extended Lagrangian first principles molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N

    2017-08-07

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] is formulated for general Hohenberg-Kohn density-functional theory and compared with the extended Lagrangian framework of first principles molecular dynamics by Car and Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)]. It is shown how extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics overcomes several shortcomings of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, while improving or maintaining important features of Car-Parrinello simulations. The accuracy of the electronic degrees of freedom in extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, with respect to the exact Born-Oppenheimer solution, is of second-order in the size of the integration time step and of fourth order in the potential energy surface. Improved stability over recent formulations of extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is achieved by generalizing the theory to finite temperature ensembles, using fractional occupation numbers in the calculation of the inner-product kernel of the extended harmonic oscillator that appears as a preconditioner in the electronic equations of motion. Material systems that normally exhibit slow self-consistent field convergence can be simulated using integration time steps of the same order as in direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, but without the requirement of an iterative, non-linear electronic ground-state optimization prior to the force evaluations and without a systematic drift in the total energy. In combination with proposed low-rank and on the fly updates of the kernel, this formulation provides an efficient and general framework for quantum-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  17. A fermionic molecular dynamics technique to model nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vantournhout, K.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At sub-nuclear densities of about 10 14 g/cm 3 , nuclear matter arranges itself in a variety of complex shapes. This can be the case in the crust of neutron stars and in core-collapse supernovae. These slab like and rod like structures, designated as nuclear pasta, have been modelled with classical molecular dynamics techniques. We present a technique, based on fermionic molecular dynamics, to model nuclear matter at sub-nuclear densities in a semi classical framework. The dynamical evolution of an antisymmetric ground state is described making the assumption of periodic boundary conditions. Adding the concepts of antisymmetry, spin and probability distributions to classical molecular dynamics, brings the dynamical description of nuclear matter to a quantum mechanical level. Applications of this model vary from investigation of macroscopic observables and the equation of state to the study of fundamental interactions on the microscopic structure of the matter. (author)

  18. Current-driven dynamics in molecular-scale devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seideman, Tamar

    2003-01-01

    We review recent theoretical work on current-triggered processes in molecular-scale devices - a field at the interface between solid state physics and chemical dynamics with potential applications in diverse areas, including artificial molecular machines, unimolecular transport, surface nanochemistry and nanolithography. The qualitative physics underlying current-triggered dynamics is first discussed and placed in context with several well-studied phenomena with which it shares aspects. A theory for modelling these dynamics is next formulated within a time-dependent scattering approach. Our end result provides useful insight into the system properties that determine the reaction outcome as well as a computationally convenient framework for numerical realization. The theory is applied to study single-molecule surface reactions induced by a scanning tunnelling microscope and current-triggered dynamics in single-molecule transistors. We close with a discussion of several potential applications of current-induced dynamics in molecular devices and several opportunities for future research. (topical review)

  19. Molecular Dynamic Modeling and Simulation for Polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    ... the mechanical properties of polymers. In particular, the goal was to develop insights as to how a molecular level structure is connected to the bulk properties of materials assuming homogeneity...

  20. Molecular dynamics of a proguanil derivative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    Proguanil is a prophylactic antimalarial drug t .... presence of resistance to individual component. ... This is the mathematical ... predicting equilibrium structures of molecular systems ..... for the modeling and subsequent development of.

  1. Visualizing functional motions of membrane transporters with molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saher A; Li, Jing; Enkavi, Giray; Wen, Po-Chao; Huang, Zhijian; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2013-01-29

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins.

  2. Pseudorotational dynamics of small molecular species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelberg, F.

    2002-01-01

    The electron nuclear dynamics (END) theory was designed to provide a full description of the dynamic development of the electronic system. It is independent of any potential energy surface constructions. The dynamic behavior of molecules close to the threshold of dissociation was the objective of this study. Thus, simulations based on END theory were performed with the aim to extend the current understanding of the dynamic features of pseudorotational into a non-adiabatic regime. Electron dynamics of triatomic species (H 3 + and Li 3 + ) in terms of electronic angular momentum expectation values were characterized. Finally, it is shown that the expansion coefficients which carry the information about the excitation content of the electronic system at any stage of the motional process can be calculated. (nevyjel)

  3. Dynamic combinatorial libraries based on hydrogen-bonde molecular boxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, J.M.C.A.; Mateos timoneda, Miguel; Reinhoudt, David; Crego Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    This article describes two different types of dynamic combinatorial libraries of host and guest molecules. The first part of this article describes the encapsulation of alizarin trimer 2 a3 by dynamic mixtures of up to twenty different self-assembled molecular receptors together with the

  4. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...

  5. Invariant molecular-dynamics approach to structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzcovitch, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Two fictitious Lagrangians to be used in molecular-dynamics simulations with variable cell shape and suitable to study problems like structural phase transitions are introduced. Because they are invariant with respect to the choice of the simulation cell edges and eliminate symmetry breaking associated with the fictitious part of the dynamics, they improve the physical content of numerical simulations that up to now have been done by using Parrinello-Rahman dynamics

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics in a finite homogeneous electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2002-10-07

    We treat homogeneous electric fields within density functional calculations with periodic boundary conditions. A nonlocal energy functional depending on the applied field is used within an ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. The reliability of the method is demonstrated in the case of bulk MgO for the Born effective charges, and the high- and low-frequency dielectric constants. We evaluate the static dielectric constant by performing a damped molecular dynamics in an electric field and avoiding the calculation of the dynamical matrix. Application of this method to vitreous silica shows good agreement with experiment and illustrates its potential for systems of large size.

  7. Classical and quantum molecular dynamics in NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Szymański, Sławomir

    2018-01-01

    The book provides a detailed account of how condensed-phase molecular dynamics are reflected in the line shapes of NMR spectra. The theories establishing connections between random, time-dependent molecular processes and lineshape effects are exposed in depth. Special emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects, involving in particular intermolecular processes in solution, and molecular symmetry issues. The Liouville super-operator formalism is briefly introduced and used wherever it is beneficial for the transparency of presentation. The proposed formal descriptions of the discussed problems are sufficiently detailed to be implemented on a computer. Practical applications of the theory in solid- and liquid-phase studies are illustrated with appropriate experimental examples, exposing the potential of the lineshape method in elucidating molecular dynamics NMR-observable molecular phenomena where quantization of the spatial nuclear degrees of freedom is crucial are addressed in the last part of the book. As ...

  8. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  9. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-01-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin–rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation. (paper)

  10. Molecular sieving through a graphene nanopore: non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengzhen Sun; Bofeng Bai

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphene nanopores have shown great promise as ultra-permeable molecular sieves based on their size-sieving effects.We design a nitrogen/hydrogen modified graphene nanopore and conduct a transient non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation on its molecular sieving effects.The distinct time-varying molecular crossing numbers show that this special nanopore can efficiently sieve CO2 and H2S molecules from CH4 molecules with high selectivity.By analyzing the molecular structure and pore functionalization-related molecular orientation and permeable zone in the nanopore,density distribution in the molecular adsorption layer on the graphene surface,as well as other features,the molecular sieving mechanisms of graphene nanopores are revealed.Finally,several implications on the design of highly-efficient graphene nanopores,especially for determining the porosity and chemical functionalization,as gas separation membranes are summarized based on the identified phenomena and mechanisms.

  11. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

  12. Dynamic evolution of temporal dissipative-soliton molecules in large normal path-averaged dispersion fiber lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xueming

    2010-01-01

    The robust dissipative soliton molecules (DSM's) exhibiting as the quasirectangular spectral profile are investigated numerically and observed experimentally in mode-locked fiber lasers with the large normal path-averaged dispersion and the large net cavity dispersion. These DSM's have an independently evolving phase with a pulse duration T 0 of about 20 ps and a peak-to-peak separation of about 8T 0 . Under laboratory conditions, the proposed laser delivers vibrating DSM's with an oscillating amplitude of less than a percent of peak separation. Numerical simulations show that DSM's are characterized by a spectral modulation pattern with about a 3-dB modulation depth measured as an averaged value. The experimental observations are in excellent agreement with the numerical predictions.

  13. Next Generation Extended Lagrangian Quantum-based Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Christian

    2017-06-01

    A new framework for extended Lagrangian first-principles molecular dynamics simulations is presented, which overcomes shortcomings of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, while maintaining important advantages of the unified extended Lagrangian formulation of density functional theory pioneered by Car and Parrinello three decades ago. The new framework allows, for the first time, energy conserving, linear-scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, which is necessary to study larger and more realistic systems over longer simulation times than previously possible. Expensive, self-consinstent-field optimizations are avoided and normal integration time steps of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics can be used. Linear scaling electronic structure theory is presented using a graph-based approach that is ideal for parallel calculations on hybrid computer platforms. For the first time, quantum based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation is becoming a practically feasible approach in simulations of +100,000 atoms-representing a competitive alternative to classical polarizable force field methods. In collaboration with: Anders Niklasson, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Dynamic neutron scattering from conformational dynamics. II. Application using molecular dynamics simulation and Markov modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zheng; Lindner, Benjamin; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Noé, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-11-07

    Neutron scattering experiments directly probe the dynamics of complex molecules on the sub pico- to microsecond time scales. However, the assignment of the relaxations seen experimentally to specific structural rearrangements is difficult, since many of the underlying dynamical processes may exist on similar timescales. In an accompanying article, we present a theoretical approach to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations with a Markov State Model (MSM) that permits the direct identification of structural transitions leading to each contributing relaxation process. Here, we demonstrate the use of the method by applying it to the configurational dynamics of the well-characterized alanine dipeptide. A practical procedure for deriving the MSM from an MD is introduced. The result is a 9-state MSM in the space of the backbone dihedral angles and the side-chain methyl group. The agreement between the quasielastic spectrum calculated directly from the atomic trajectories and that derived from the Markov state model is excellent. The dependence on the wavevector of the individual Markov processes is described. The procedure means that it is now practicable to interpret quasielastic scattering spectra in terms of well-defined intramolecular transitions with minimal a priori assumptions as to the nature of the dynamics taking place.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of atomic displacements in disordered solid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.

    The effects of atomic displacements on the energetics of alloys plays important role in the determining the properties of alloys. We studied the atomic displacements in disordered solid alloys using molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo methods. The diffuse scattering of pure materials, copper, gold, nickel, and palladium was calculated. The experimental data for pure Cu was obtained from diffuse scattering intensity of synchrotron x-ray radiation. The comparison showed the advantages of molecular dynamics method for calculating the atomic displacements in solid alloys. The individual nearest neighbor separations were calculated for Cu 50Au50 alloy and compared to the result of XAFS experiment. The molecular dynamics method provided theoretical predictions of nearest neighbor pair separations in other binary alloys, Cu-Pd and Cu-Al for wide range of the concentrations. We also experimentally recovered the diffuse scattering maps for the Cu47.3Au52.7 and Cu85.2Al14.8 alloy.

  16. Atomistic interactions of clusters on surfaces using molecular dynamics and hyper molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Navarro, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis describes the results of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations applied to the interaction of silver clusters with graphite surfaces and some numerical and theoretical methods concerning the extension of MD simulations to longer time scales (hyper-MD). The first part of this thesis studies the implantation of clusters at normal incidence onto a graphite surface in order to determine the scaling of the penetration depth (PD) against the impact energy. A comparison with experimental results is made with good agreement. The main physical observations of the impact process are described and analysed. It is shown that there is a threshold impact velocity above which the linear dependence on PD on impact energy changes to a linear dependence on velocity. Implantation of silver clusters at oblique incidence is also considered. The second part of this work analyses the validity and feasibility of the three minimisation methods for the hyper-MD simulation method whereby time scales of an MD simulation can be extended. A correct mathematical basis for the iterative method is derived. It is found that one of the iterative methods, upon which hyper-lD is based, is very likely to fail in high-dimensional situations because it requires a too expensive convergence. Two new approximations to the hyper-MD approach are proposed, which reduce the computational effort considerably. Both approaches, although not exact, can help to search for some of the most likely transitions in the system. Some examples are given to illustrate this. (author)

  17. Dynamic molecular oxygen production in cometary comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunxi; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2017-05-01

    Abundant molecular oxygen was discovered in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Its origin was ascribed to primordial gaseous O2 incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation. This thesis was put forward after discounting several O2 production mechanisms in comets, including photolysis and radiolysis of water, solar wind-surface interactions and gas-phase collisions. Here we report an original Eley-Rideal reaction mechanism, which permits direct O2 formation in single collisions of energetic water ions with oxidized cometary surface analogues. The reaction proceeds by H2O+ abstracting a surface O-atom, then forming an excited precursor state, which dissociates to produce O2-. Subsequent photo-detachment leads to molecular O2, whose presence in the coma may thus be linked directly to water molecules and their interaction with the solar wind. This abiotic O2 production mechanism is consistent with reported trends in the 67P coma and raises awareness of the role of energetic negative ions in comets.

  18. Dissipation dynamics of clothianidin and its control efficacy against Bradysia odoriphaga Yang and Zhang in Chinese chive ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; He, Min; Zhao, Yunhe; Ren, Yupeng; Wei, Yan; Mu, Wei; Liu, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Clothianidin is a second-generation neonicotinoid insecticide that is quite effective against Bradysia odoriphaga Yang and Zhang, the major insect pest affecting Chinese chive in northern China. In this study, the dissipation of clothianidin in soil and its residue in leaves and pseudostems/bulbs as well as its control efficacy against B. odoriphaga and two other secondary pests were investigated in Chinese chive fields after soil application of clothianidin by the directional spray-washing method. The half-life of clothianidin was 35.73-36.10 days, and it could be detected in Chinese chive plants in both treatment plots up to 240 days after a single soil application. Clothianidin applied at 3.0 and 6.0 kg AI ha(-1) could suppress B. odoriphaga population growth, achieve satisfactory levels of pest control for almost 10 months and reduce the losses of the yield in winter. Moreover, the treatments also significantly reduced Thrips alliorum and Acrolepia alliella populations up to nearly 180 days after one application. Clothianidin can be considered to show long-lasting efficacy against B. odoriphaga and to be safe for use in Chinese chive at 3.0 and 6.0 kg AI ha(-1) once in the early root-rearing period to control B. odoriphaga in these cultivation ecosystems. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Dynamic Traffic Congestion Simulation and Dissipation Control Based on Traffic Flow Theory Model and Neural Network Data Calibration Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion is a common problem in many countries, especially in big cities. At present, China’s urban road traffic accidents occur frequently, the occurrence frequency is high, the accident causes traffic congestion, and accidents cause traffic congestion and vice versa. The occurrence of traffic accidents usually leads to the reduction of road traffic capacity and the formation of traffic bottlenecks, causing the traffic congestion. In this paper, the formation and propagation of traffic congestion are simulated by using the improved medium traffic model, and the control strategy of congestion dissipation is studied. From the point of view of quantitative traffic congestion, the paper provides the fact that the simulation platform of urban traffic integration is constructed, and a feasible data analysis, learning, and parameter calibration method based on RBF neural network is proposed, which is used to determine the corresponding decision support system. The simulation results prove that the control strategy proposed in this paper is effective and feasible. According to the temporal and spatial evolution of the paper, we can see that the network has been improved on the whole.

  20. Photoconductivities from band states and a dissipative electron dynamics: Si(111) without and with adsorbed Ag clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Hembree, Robert H.; Micha, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A new general computational procedure is presented to obtain photoconductivities starting from atomic structures, combining ab initio electronic energy band states with populations from density matrix theory, and implemented for a specific set of materials based on Si crystalline slabs and their nanostructured surfaces without and with adsorbed Ag clusters. The procedure accounts for charge mobility in semiconductors in photoexcited states, and specifically electron and hole photomobilities at Si(111) surfaces with and without adsorbed Ag clusters using ab initio energy bands and orbitals generated from a generalized gradient functional, however with excited energy levels modified to provide correct bandgaps. Photoexcited state populations for each band and carrier type were generated using steady state solution of a reduced density matrix which includes dissipative medium effects. The present calculations provide photoexcited electronic populations and photoinduced mobilities resulting from applied electric fields and obtained from the change of driven electron energies with their electronic momentum. Extensive results for Si slabs with 8 layers, without and with adsorbed Ag clusters, show that the metal adsorbates lead to substantial increases in the photomobility and photoconductivity of electrons and holes

  1. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-07

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces.

  2. Femtochemistry and femtobiology ultrafast dynamics in molecular science

    CERN Document Server

    Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2002-01-01

    This book contains important contributions from top international scientists on the-state-of-the-art of femtochemistry and femtobiology at the beginning of the new millennium. It consists of reviews and papers on ultrafast dynamics in molecular science.The coverage of topics highlights several important features of molecular science from the viewpoint of structure (space domain) and dynamics (time domain). First of all, the book presents the latest developments, such as experimental techniques for understanding ultrafast processes in gas, condensed and complex systems, including biological mol

  3. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  4. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  5. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  6. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy

  7. Special role of neutron-halo nucleus on the momentum dissipation in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yongzhong; Tianshui Normal Univ., Tianshui; Liu Jianye; Tianshui Normal Univ., Tianshui; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou; Zuo Wei; Li Xiguo; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou

    2005-01-01

    The special role of neutron-halo nucleus 19 B on the momentum dissipation was investigated by using isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics. In order to compare and protrude the special role of neutron-halo-nucleus 19 B, the momentum dissipation induced by a same mass stable nucleus 19 F was investigated under the same incident channel condition. It is found that the weak bound neutron-halo structure of 19 B weakens the momentum dissipation process compared to those induced by stable nucleus 19 F in the lower energy region. However the nuclear stopping of colliding system with the neutron-halo nucleus 19 B decreases gradually with the increasing beam energy. For all of mass targets and impact parameters the neutron-halo nucleus 19 B weakens the momentum dissipation process. (authors)

  8. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-06-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm as well as parallel execution of the hybrid simulation. We describe the implementational concept of the tool and its parallel extensions. We particularly focus on the parallel execution of particle insertions into dense molecular systems and propose a respective parallel algorithm. Our implementations are validated for serial and parallel setups in two and three dimensions. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. Plastic dislocation motion via nonequilibrium molecular and continuum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Hoover, N.E.

    1980-01-01

    The classical two-dimensional close-packed triangular lattice, with nearest-neighbor spring forces, is a convenient standard material for the investigation of dislocation motion and plastic flow. Two kinds of calculations, based on this standard material, are described here: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations, incorporating adiabatic strains described with the help of Doll's Tensor, and (2) Continuum Dynamics simulations, incorporating periodic boundaries and dislocation interaction through stress-field superposition

  10. Investigation of nuclear multifragmentation using molecular dynamics and restructured aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, L. de; Nemeth, J.; Ben-Hao, Sa.; Leray, S.; Ngo, C.; Souza, S.R.; Yu-Ming, Zheng; Paula, L. de; Nemeth, J.; Ben-Hao, Sa.; Yu-Ming, Zheng; Ngo, H.

    1991-01-01

    We study the stability of excited 197 Au nuclei with respect to multifragmentation. For that we use a dynamical simulation based on molecular dynamics and restructured aggregation. A particular attention is paid to check the stability of the ground state nuclei generated by the simulation. Four kinds of excitations are considered: heat, compression, rotation and a geometrical instability created when a projectile drills a hole in a 197 Au nucleus

  11. Theory of multiexciton dynamics in molecular chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast and strong optical excitation of a molecular system is considered which is formed by a regular one-dimensional arrangement of identical molecules. As it is typical for zinc chlorine-type molecules the transition energy from the ground state to the first excited singlet state is assumed to be smaller than the energy difference between the first excited state and the following one. This enables the creation of many excitons without their immediate quenching due to exciton-exciton annihilation. As a first step into the field of dense Frenkel-exciton systems the present approach stays at a mean-field type of description and ignores vibrational contributions. The resulting nonlinear kinetic equations mix Rabi-type oscillations with those caused by energy transfer and suggest an excitation-dependent narrowing of the exciton band. The indication of this effect in the framework of a two-color pump-probe experiment and of the detection of photon emission is discussed.

  12. Isospin effect of coulomb interaction on momentum dissipation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianye; Guo Wenjun; Li Xiguo; Xing Yongzhong

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigate the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation or nuclear stopping in the intermediate energy heavy ion collisions by using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the Coulomb interaction induces obviously the reductions of the momentum dissipation. The authors also find that the variation amplitude of momentum dissipation induced by the Coulomb interaction depends sensitively on the form and strength of symmetry potential. However, the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation is less than that induced by the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section. In this case, Coulomb interaction does not changes obviously the isospin effect of momentum dissipation induced by the in-medium two-body collision. In particular, the Coulomb interaction is preferable for standing up the isospin effect of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section on the momentum dissipation and reducing the isospin effect of symmetry potential on it, which is important for obtaining the feature about the sensitive dependence of momentum dissipation on the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section and weakly on the symmetry potential. (author)

  13. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years computer modeling of liquids and solids has become a useful method of understanding the structural and dynamical correlations in these systems. Some characteristics of the method are presented with an example from work on homogeneous nucleation in monoatomic liquids; the interaction potential determines the structure: a Lennard--Jones system nucleates a close packed structure while an alkali metal potential nucleates a bcc packing. In the study of ionic systems like CaF 2 the Coulomb interaction together with the short range repulsion is enough to produce a satisfactory model for the motion of F - ions in CaF 2 at approx. 1600 0 K. Analysis of this motion shows that F - ions reside at their fluorite sites for about 6 x 10 -12 s and that the diffusion is mainly due to F - jumps in the 100 direction. The motion can be analyzed in terms of the generation and annihilation of anti-Frenkel pairs. The temperature dependence of the F - diffusion constant at two different densities has also been calculated. The computer model does not correspond with experiment in this regard

  14. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  15. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  16. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...

  17. Molecular dynamics of the structure and thermodynamics of dusty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static structure and thermodynamic properties of two-dimensional dusty plasma are analyzed for some typical values of coupling and screening parameters using classical molecular dynamics. Radial distribution function and static structure factor are computed. The radial distribution functions display the typical ...

  18. A MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS STUDY OF LECITHIN MONOLAYERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AHLSTROM, P; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1993-01-01

    Two monolayers of didecanoyllecithin at the air-water interface have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The model system consisted of two monolayers of 42 lecithin molecules each separated by a roughly 4 nm thick slab of SPC water. The area per lecithin molecule was 0.78 nm(2)

  19. Structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, F. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio (USA)); Chiarotti, G.L. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi del Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Padriciano 99, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)); Car, R. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Institut Romard de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Parrinello, M. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1991-09-15

    We have generated a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and provide new insight into the microscopic structure of this material. The calculation lends support to models in which monohydride complexes are prevalent, and indicates a strong tendency of hydrogen to form small clusters.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of laser melting of silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite temperature density functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystal silicon. We have found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bond. As a result, the system undergoes a melting

  1. Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of polyimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyulin, S.V.; Gurtovenko, A.A.; Larin, S.V.; Nazarychev, V.M.; Lyulin, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    We employ microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations to get insight into the structural and thermal properties of heat-resistant bulk polyimides. As electrostatic interactions are essential for the polyimides considered, we propose a two-step equilibration protocol that includes long

  2. Molecular dynamics study of the silica-water-SDA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szyja, B.M.; Jansen, A.P.J.; Verstraelen, T.; Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have applied the molecular dynamics simulations in order to analyse the role of the structure directing tetrapropylammonium ions in the aggregation process that leads to silicalite formation. We address the specific question of how the interactions between silica precursor species

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of ballistic He penetration into W fuzz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Nordlund, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Westerhof, E.; Thijsse, B. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented of large-scale Molecular Dynamics simulations of low-energy He bombardment of W nanorods, or so-called ‘fuzz’ structures. The goal of these simulations is to see if ballistic He penetration through W fuzz offers a more realistic scenario for how He moves through fuzz layers

  4. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata De Paris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand.

  5. Toluene model for molecular dynamics simulations in the ranges 298

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fioroni, M.; Vogt, D.

    2004-01-01

    An all-atom model for toluene is presented in the framework of classical molecular dynamics (MD). The model has been parametrized under the GROMOS96 force field to reproduce the physicochemical properties of the neat liquid. Four new atom types have been introduced, distinguishing between carbons

  6. Young Modulus of Crystalline Polyethylene from ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.C.L.; Meier, Robert J.; Heinemann, M.; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    The Young modulus for crystalline polyethylene is calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics based on density functional theory in the local density approximation (DFT-LDA). This modulus, which can be seen as the ultimate value for the Young modulus of polyethylene fibers, is found to be 334 GPa.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profile of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aDepartment of Chemical Engineering, bDepartment of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology,. 15875-4413 ... Lipid bilayers; Paracetamol; free energy; molecular dynamics simulation; membrane. 1. ..... bilayer is less favourable due to the hydrophobic nature .... Orsi M and Essex J W 2010 Soft Matter 6 3797. 54.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicle fusion in atomic detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knecht, Volker; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    The fusion of a membrane-bounded vesicle with a target membrane is a key step in intracellular trafficking, exocytosis, and drug delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitic

  9. Molecular dynamic analysis of the structure of dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G. E-mail: maino@bologna.enea.it

    2004-01-01

    We present main results of molecular dynamics simulations that we have carried out in order to investigate structural properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. Obtained data confirm the PAMAM dendrimer structure proposed by experiments, performed by means of X-ray scattering (SAXS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) techniques.

  10. Molecular dynamic analysis of the structure of dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G.

    2004-01-01

    We present main results of molecular dynamics simulations that we have carried out in order to investigate structural properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. Obtained data confirm the PAMAM dendrimer structure proposed by experiments, performed by means of X-ray scattering (SAXS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) techniques

  11. Molecular dynamics study on the relaxation properties of bilayered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Abstract. The influence of defects on the relaxation properties of bilayered graphene (BLG) has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation in nanometre sizes. Type and position of defects were taken into account in the calculated model. The results show that great changes begin to occur in the ...

  12. Metal cluster fission: jellium model and Molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2004-01-01

    Fission of doubly charged sodium clusters is studied using the open-shell two-center deformed jellium model approximation and it ab initio molecular dynamic approach accounting for all electrons in the system. Results of calculations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ + Na_3^+ and Na_18...

  13. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Efficient SO₂ Absorption by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ionic liquids are appropriate candidates for the absorption of acid gases such as SO₂. Six anion functionalized ionic liquids with different basicities have been studied for SO₂ absorption capacity by employing quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Gas phase quantum calculations ...

  14. Free energy from molecular dynamics with multiple constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Willem J.

    2000-01-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations of reacting systems, the key step to determining the equilibrium constant and the reaction rate is the calculation of the free energy as a function of the reaction coordinate. Intuitively the derivative of the free energy is equal to the average force needed to

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.sternberg@partner.kit.edu; Witter, Raiker [Tallinn University of Technology, Technomedicum (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  16. Generalized Langevin equation: An efficient approach to nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of open systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2014-04-01

    The generalized Langevin equation (GLE) has been recently suggested to simulate the time evolution of classical solid and molecular systems when considering general nonequilibrium processes. In this approach, a part of the whole system (an open system), which interacts and exchanges energy with its dissipative environment, is studied. Because the GLE is derived by projecting out exactly the harmonic environment, the coupling to it is realistic, while the equations of motion are non-Markovian. Although the GLE formalism has already found promising applications, e.g., in nanotribology and as a powerful thermostat for equilibration in classical molecular dynamics simulations, efficient algorithms to solve the GLE for realistic memory kernels are highly nontrivial, especially if the memory kernels decay nonexponentially. This is due to the fact that one has to generate a colored noise and take account of the memory effects in a consistent manner. In this paper, we present a simple, yet efficient, algorithm for solving the GLE for practical memory kernels and we demonstrate its capability for the exactly solvable case of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a Debye bath.

  17. Multiscale equation-free algorithms for molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Mansour, Andrew

    Molecular dynamics is a physics-based computational tool that has been widely employed to study the dynamics and structure of macromolecules and their assemblies at the atomic scale. However, the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulation is limited because of the broad spectrum of timescales involved. To overcome this limitation, an equation-free algorithm is presented for simulating these systems using a multiscale model cast in terms of atomistic and coarse-grained variables. Both variables are evolved in time in such a way that the cross-talk between short and long scales is preserved. In this way, the coarse-grained variables guide the evolution of the atom-resolved states, while the latter provide the Newtonian physics for the former. While the atomistic variables are evolved using short molecular dynamics runs, time advancement at the coarse-grained level is achieved with a scheme that uses information from past and future states of the system while accounting for both the stochastic and deterministic features of the coarse-grained dynamics. To complete the multiscale cycle, an atom-resolved state consistent with the updated coarse-grained variables is recovered using algorithms from mathematical optimization. This multiscale paradigm is extended to nanofluidics using concepts from hydrodynamics, and it is demonstrated for macromolecular and nanofluidic systems. A toolkit is developed for prototyping these algorithms, which are then implemented within the GROMACS simulation package and released as an open source multiscale simulator.

  18. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The investigation is based on the stability of the shadow energy, obtained by including the first term in the asymptotic expansion, and on the exact solution of discrete dynamics for a single harmonic mode. The exact solution of discrete dynamics for a harmonic potential with frequency ω gives a criterion...... for the limit of stability h ⩽ 2/ω. Simulations of the Lennard-Jones system and the viscous Kob-Andersen system show that one can use the limit of stability of the shadow energy or the stability criterion for a harmonic mode on the spectrum of instantaneous frequencies to determine the limit of stability of MD...

  19. Taming the escape dynamics of nonadiabatic time-periodically driven quantum dissipative system within the frame of Wigner formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, Anindita [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sudip, E-mail: sudip_chattopadhyay@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Ray Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim, E-mail: jprc_8@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Katwa College, Katwa, Burdwan 713130 (India)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Nonadiabatic dynamics of quantum particle under the impact of high-frequency force. • Formulation of time-independent dynamics via Floquet and Kapitza schemes. • Manipulation of external force parameters allows us to control the escape rate. • Increase of (amplitudes/frequency) causes the system to decay faster, in general. • Crossover temperature increases in the presence of the field. - Abstract: Escape under the action of the external modulation constitutes a nontrivial generalization of an conventional Kramers rate because the system is away from thermal equilibrium. A derivation of this result from the point of view of Langevin dynamics in the frame of Floquet theorem in conjunction with the Kapitza–Landau time window (that leads to an attractive description of the time-dependent quantum dynamics in terms of time-independent one) has been provided. The quantum escape rate in the intermediate-to-high and very-high damping regime so obtained analytically using the phase space formalism associated with the Wigner distribution and path-integral formalism bears a quantum correction that depends strongly on the barrier height. It is shown that an increase of (amplitude/frequency) ratio causes the system to decay faster, in general. The crossover temperature between tunneling and thermal activation increases in the presence of field so that quantum effects in the escape are relevant at higher temperatures.

  20. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    of the preexponential factor by about one order of magnitude per lateral degree of freedom. Molecular vibrations have practically no effect on the adsorption/desorption dynamics itself, but lead to vibrational heating in desorption with a strong isotope effect. Ab initio calculations for the H-2 interaction...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective......Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111...

  1. Implementation of surface hopping molecular dynamics using semiempirical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabiano, E.; Keal, T.W.; Thiel, W.

    2008-01-01

    A molecular dynamics driver and surface hopping algorithm for nonadiabatic dynamics has been implemented in a development version of the MNDO semiempirical electronic structure package. The required energies, gradients and nonadiabatic couplings are efficiently evaluated on the fly using semiempirical configuration interaction methods. The choice of algorithms for the time evolution of the nuclear motion and quantum amplitudes is discussed, and different schemes for the computation of nonadiabatic couplings are analysed. The importance of molecular orbital tracking and electronic state following is underlined in the context of configuration interaction calculations. The method is applied to three case studies (ethylene, methaniminium ion, and methanimine) using the orthogonalization corrected OM2 Hamiltonian. In all three cases decay times and dynamics paths similar to high-level ab initio results are obtained

  2. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: from exploring molecular recognition to systems chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a subset of combinatorial chemistry where the library members interconvert continuously by exchanging building blocks with each other. Dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) are powerful tools for discovering the unexpected and have given rise to many fascinating molecules, ranging from interlocked structures to self-replicators. Furthermore, dynamic combinatorial molecular networks can produce emergent properties at systems level, which provide exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this perspective we will highlight some new methodologies in this field and analyze selected examples of DCLs that are under thermodynamic control, leading to synthetic receptors, catalytic systems, and complex self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Also reviewed are extensions of the principles of DCC to systems that are not at equilibrium and may therefore harbor richer functional behavior. Examples include self-replication and molecular machines.

  3. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Sören Lühmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  4. Thermostating extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Enrique; Cawkwell, Marc J; Voter, Arthur F; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2015-04-21

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is developed and analyzed for applications in canonical (NVT) simulations. Three different approaches are considered: the Nosé and Andersen thermostats and Langevin dynamics. We have tested the temperature distribution under different conditions of self-consistent field (SCF) convergence and time step and compared the results to analytical predictions. We find that the simulations based on the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer framework provide accurate canonical distributions even under approximate SCF convergence, often requiring only a single diagonalization per time step, whereas regular Born-Oppenheimer formulations exhibit unphysical fluctuations unless a sufficiently high degree of convergence is reached at each time step. The thermostated extended Lagrangian framework thus offers an accurate approach to sample processes in the canonical ensemble at a fraction of the computational cost of regular Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Employing multi-GPU power for molecular dynamics simulation: an extension of GALAMOST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Liang; Pan, Deng; Li, Zhan-Wei; Liu, Hong; Qian, Hu-Jun; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2018-04-01

    We describe the algorithm of employing multi-GPU power on the basis of Message Passing Interface (MPI) domain decomposition in a molecular dynamics code, GALAMOST, which is designed for the coarse-grained simulation of soft matters. The code of multi-GPU version is developed based on our previous single-GPU version. In multi-GPU runs, one GPU takes charge of one domain and runs single-GPU code path. The communication between neighbouring domains takes a similar algorithm of CPU-based code of LAMMPS, but is optimised specifically for GPUs. We employ a memory-saving design which can enlarge maximum system size at the same device condition. An optimisation algorithm is employed to prolong the update period of neighbour list. We demonstrate good performance of multi-GPU runs on the simulation of Lennard-Jones liquid, dissipative particle dynamics liquid, polymer and nanoparticle composite, and two-patch particles on workstation. A good scaling of many nodes on cluster for two-patch particles is presented.

  6. Vibrational properties of the amide group in acetanilide: A molecular-dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1987-09-01

    A simplified classical model of acetanilide crystal is built in order to study the mechanisms of vibrational energy transduction in a hydrogen-bonded solid. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is modeled by an electrostatic interaction between neighboring excess charges on hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The intramolecular interaction in the peptide group is provided by a dipole-charge interaction. Forces are calculated up to second-order terms in the atomic displacements from equilibrium positions; the model is thus a chain of nonlinear coupled oscillators. Numerical molecular-dynamics experiments are performed on chain segments of five molecules. The dynamics is ordered, at all temperatures. Energy is widely exchanged between the stretching and the bending of the N-H bond, with characteristic times of the order of 0.2 ps. Energy transduction through the H bond is somewhat slower and of smaller amplitude, and is strongly reduced when the energies of the two bound molecules are very different: This could reduce the dissipation of localized energy fluctuations.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of vacancy-like defects in a model glass : static behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaye, J. M.; Limoge, Y.

    1993-10-01

    The possibility of defining vacancy-like defects in a Lennard-Jones glass is searched for in a systematic manner. Considering different relaxation levels of the same system, as well as different external pressures, we use a Molecular Dynamics simulation method, to study at constant volume or external pressure, the relaxation of a “piece” of glass, after the sudden removal of an atom. Three typical kinds of behaviour can be observed: the persistence of the empty volume left by the missing atom, its migration by clearly identifiable atomic jumps and the dissipation “on the spot”. A careful analysis of the probabilities of these three kinds of behaviour shows that a meaningful definition of vacancy-like defects can be given in a Lennard-Jones glass. Dans cet article, nous nous penchons de façon systématique sur la possibilité de définir des défauts de type lacunaire dans un verre de Lennard-Jones, à différents niveaux de relaxation et de pression, par une méthode de simulation numérique en dynamique moléculaire à volume ou à pression constants. Le défaut est créé en supprimant un atome et en suivant la réponse du système. Nous observons trois comportements typiques : la persistance sur place du “trou” laissé par l'atome supprimé, sa migration par des sauts atomiques clairement identifiés et enfin sa dissipation sur place. Une analyse détaillée de ces trois comportements montre qu'il est possible dans un verre de Lennard-Jones de définir des défauts de type lacunaire.

  8. Conservation laws shape dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Riccardo; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-02-01

    Starting from the most general formulation of stochastic thermodynamics—i.e. a thermodynamically consistent nonautonomous stochastic dynamics describing systems in contact with several reservoirs—we define a procedure to identify the conservative and the minimal set of nonconservative contributions in the entropy production. The former is expressed as the difference between changes caused by time-dependent drivings and a generalized potential difference. The latter is a sum over the minimal set of flux-force contributions controlling the dissipative flows across the system. When the system is initially prepared at equilibrium (e.g. by turning off drivings and forces), a finite-time detailed fluctuation theorem holds for the different contributions. Our approach relies on identifying the complete set of conserved quantities and can be viewed as the extension of the theory of generalized Gibbs ensembles to nonequilibrium situations.

  9. Entanglement dynamics of two electron-spin qubits in a strongly detuned and dissipative quantum-dot-cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Shaohua; Deng Xiaopeng; Song Kehui; Wen Wei; Shi Zhengang

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of two electron-spin qubits in the quantum-dot (QD)-microcavity system in the large-detuning limit and subjected to two different noise sources: electron-spin dephasing and relaxation. We show that when one of the two dots is prepared initially in the excited state, the created entanglement exhibits oscillatory behavior at the beginning of evolution and then completely disappears over time. For two QDs that are initially in either the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bell states or the Werner states, their entanglement evolution exhibits the same behavior in the presence of pure dephasing, but is completely different under the relaxation process. We also show that the interdot interaction induced by a single-mode cavity field does not contribute to the dynamics of entanglement for these Bell states and Werner states.

  10. Hamiltonian description and quantization of dissipative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Charles P.

    1994-09-01

    Dissipative systems are described by a Hamiltonian, combined with a “dynamical matrix” which generalizes the simplectic form of the equations of motion. Criteria for dissipation are given and the examples of a particle with friction and of the Lotka-Volterra model are presented. Quantization is first introduced by translating generalized Poisson brackets into commutators and anticommutators. Then a generalized Schrödinger equation expressed by a dynamical matrix is constructed and discussed.

  11. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik; Szepessy, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  12. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  13. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  14. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  15. Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ben; Schmidler, Scott C

    2008-10-28

    We consider the convergence behavior of replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) [Sugita and Okamoto, Chem. Phys. Lett. 314, 141 (1999)] based on properties of the numerical integrators in the underlying isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that a variety of deterministic algorithms favored by molecular dynamics practitioners for constant-temperature simulation of biomolecules fail either to be measure invariant or irreducible, and are therefore not ergodic. We then show that REMD using these algorithms also fails to be ergodic. As a result, the entire configuration space may not be explored even in an infinitely long simulation, and the simulation may not converge to the desired equilibrium Boltzmann ensemble. Moreover, our analysis shows that for initial configurations with unfavorable energy, it may be impossible for the system to reach a region surrounding the minimum energy configuration. We demonstrate these failures of REMD algorithms for three small systems: a Gaussian distribution (simple harmonic oscillator dynamics), a bimodal mixture of Gaussians distribution, and the alanine dipeptide. Examination of the resulting phase plots and equilibrium configuration densities indicates significant errors in the ensemble generated by REMD simulation. We describe a simple modification to address these failures based on a stochastic hybrid Monte Carlo correction, and prove that this is ergodic.

  16. Orbital free molecular dynamics; Approche sans orbitale des plasmas denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, F

    2007-08-15

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  17. Driven-dissipative Euler close-quote s equations for a rigid body: A chaotic system relevant to fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.

    1996-01-01

    Adhering to the lore that vorticity is a critical ingredient of fluid turbulence, a triad of coupled helicity (vorticity) states of the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid are followed. Effects of the remaining states of the fluid on the triad are then modeled as a simple driving term. Numerical solution of the equations yield attractors that seem strange and chaotic. This suggests that the unpredictability of nonlinear fluid dynamics (i.e., turbulence) may be traced back to the most primordial structure of the Navier-Stokes equation; namely, the driven triadic interaction. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Nuclear fluid dynamics with long-mean-free-path dissipation: Multipole vibrations and isoscalar giant resonance widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Ghosh, G.

    1982-01-01

    The long-mean-free-path nuclear fluid dynamics is extended to include damping. First the damping stress is derived from the solution of the Boltzmann equation for a breathing spherical container filled with a Fermi gas. Then the corresponding damping force is incorporated into Euler equations of motion and energies and widths of low lying collective resonances are computed as eigenfrequencies of a vibrating nucleus under surface tension and Coulomb potential as well as the high lying isoscalar giant resonances as eigenfrequencies of an elastic nucleus. Maximum damping is obtained if the particle frequency approximately resonates with the wall frequency. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data and future improvements are indicated

  19. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF MULTIDRUG RND EFFLUX PUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ruggerone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ruggerone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  1. Molecular dynamics of TBP and DBP studied by neutron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles Filho, J.B.V.; Refinetti, M.E.; Fulfaro, R.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1984-04-01

    Differences between the properties of TBP and DBP, concerning the uranium extraction processes, may be related to certain characteristics of the molecular dynamics of each compound. In order to investigate the dynamical behaviour of hydrogen in these molecules, neutron transmission of TBP and DBP has been measured as a function of neutron wavelenght in the range 4.0 - 6.0 A, at room temperature. Scattering cross sections per hydrogen atom have been obtained. From the comparison with results previously obtained for n-butanol, similar dynamical behaviour of butyl radicals in these compounds could be observed. This similarity indicates that the presence of two or three butyl radicals in butylphosphate molecules does not exert influence in the hydrogen motion of methyl and methylene groups. This suggests that the different chemical behaviour between TBP and DBP is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen directly bound to the DBP phosphate group.(Author) [pt

  2. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  3. Spins Dynamics in a Dissipative Environment: Hierarchal Equations of Motion Approach Using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Masashi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-08-11

    A system with many energy states coupled to a harmonic oscillator bath is considered. To study quantum non-Markovian system-bath dynamics numerically rigorously and nonperturbatively, we developed a computer code for the reduced hierarchy equations of motion (HEOM) for a graphics processor unit (GPU) that can treat the system as large as 4096 energy states. The code employs a Padé spectrum decomposition (PSD) for a construction of HEOM and the exponential integrators. Dynamics of a quantum spin glass system are studied by calculating the free induction decay signal for the cases of 3 × 2 to 3 × 4 triangular lattices with antiferromagnetic interactions. We found that spins relax faster at lower temperature due to transitions through a quantum coherent state, as represented by the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix, while it has been known that the spins relax slower due to suppression of thermal activation in a classical case. The decay of the spins are qualitatively similar regardless of the lattice sizes. The pathway of spin relaxation is analyzed under a sudden temperature drop condition. The Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) based source code used in the present calculations is provided as Supporting Information .

  4. Quantum Darwinism and non-Markovian dissipative dynamics from quantum phases of the spin-1/2 X X model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Quantum Darwinism explains the emergence of a classical description of objects in terms of the creation of many redundant registers in an environment containing their classical information. This amplification phenomenon, where only classical information reaches the macroscopic observer and through which different observers can agree on the objective existence of such object, has been revived lately for several types of situations, successfully explaining classicality. We explore quantum Darwinism in the setting of an environment made of two level systems which are initially prepared in the ground state of the XX model, which exhibits different phases; we find that the different phases have different abilities to redundantly acquire classical information about the system, the "ferromagnetic phase" being the only one able to complete quantum Darwinism. At the same time we relate this ability to how non-Markovian the system dynamics is, based on the interpretation that non-Markovian dynamics is associated with backflow of information from environment to system, thus spoiling the information transfer needed for Darwinism. Finally, we explore mixing of bath registers by allowing a small interaction among them, finding that this spoils the stored information as previously found in the literature.

  5. Initial Chemical Events in CL-20 Under Extreme Conditions: An Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaev, Olexandr; Kholod, Yana; Gorb, Leonid; Qasim, Mohammad; Fredrickson, Herb; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    .... In the present study molecular structure, electrostatic potential, vibrational spectrum and dynamics of thermal decomposition of CL-20 have been investigated by static and dynamic methods of ab...

  6. Dissipative fluid mechanics of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, B.

    1987-11-01

    With the aim to describe nucleus-nucleus collisions at low energies in the present thesis for the first time dissipative fluid dynamics for large-amplitude nuclear motion have been formulated. Thereby the collective dynamics are described in a scaling approximation in which the wave function of the system is distorted by a vortex-free velocity field. For infintely extended nuclear matter this scaling of the wave functions leads to a deformation of the Fermi sphere. Two-body collisions destroy the collective deformation of the Fermi sphere and yield so the dissipative contribution of the motion. Equations of motion for a finite set of collective variables and a field equation for the collective velocity potential in the limit of infinitely many degrees of freedom were developed. In the elastic limit oscillations around the equilibrium position are described. For small collective amplitudes and vortex-free velocity fields the integrodifferential equation for the velocity potential in the elastic limit could be transformed to the divergence of the field equation of fluid dynamics. In the dissipative limit an equation results which is similar to the Navier-Stokes equation and transforms to the divergence of the Navier-Stokes equation for vortex-free fields. It was shown that generally the dynamics of the many-body system is described by non-Markovian equations. (orig./HSI) [de

  7. Statistical Measures to Quantify Similarity between Molecular Dynamics Simulation Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Farmer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulation is commonly employed to explore protein dynamics. Despite the disparate timescales between functional mechanisms and molecular dynamics (MD trajectories, functional differences are often inferred from differences in conformational ensembles between two proteins in structure-function studies that investigate the effect of mutations. A common measure to quantify differences in dynamics is the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF about the average position of residues defined by C α -atoms. Using six MD trajectories describing three native/mutant pairs of beta-lactamase, we make comparisons with additional measures that include Jensen-Shannon, modifications of Kullback-Leibler divergence, and local p-values from 1-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. These additional measures require knowing a probability density function, which we estimate by using a nonparametric maximum entropy method that quantifies rare events well. The same measures are applied to distance fluctuations between C α -atom pairs. Results from several implementations for quantitative comparison of a pair of MD trajectories are made based on fluctuations for on-residue and residue-residue local dynamics. We conclude that there is almost always a statistically significant difference between pairs of 100 ns all-atom simulations on moderate-sized proteins as evident from extraordinarily low p-values.

  8. Balancing an accurate representation of the molecular surface in generalized Born formalisms with integrator stability in molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chocholoušová, Jana; Feig, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2006), s. 719-729 ISSN 0192-8651 Keywords : molecular surface * generalized Born formalisms * molecular dynamic simulations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2006

  9. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G.; Arenas, J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  10. Microscopic study of nuclear 'pasta' by quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Gentaro; Sato, Katsuhiko; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    Structure of cold dense matter at subnuclear densities is investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. We succeeded in showing that the phases with slab-like and rod-like nuclei etc. and be formed dynamically from hot uniform nuclear matter without any assumptions on nuclear shape. We also observe intermediate phases, which has complicated nuclear shapes. Geometrical structures of matter are analyzed with Minkowski functionals, and it is found out that intermediate phases can be characterized as ones with negative Euler characteristic. Our result suggests the existence of these kinds of phases in addition to the simple 'pasta' phases in neutron star crusts. (author)

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of zigzag molecular chains (in Russian)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, A. V.; Manevitsch, L. I.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    models (two-dimensional alpha-spiral, polyethylene transzigzag backbone, and the zigzag chain of hydrogen bonds) shows that the zigzag structure essentially limits the soliton dynamics to finite, relatively narrow, supersonic soliton velocity intervals and may also result in that several acoustic soliton......Nonlinear, collective, soliton type excitations in zigzag molecular chains are analyzed. It is shown that the nonlinear dynamics of a chain dramatically changes in passing from the one-dimensional linear chain to the more realistic planar zigzag model-due, in particular, to the geometry...

  12. The chaos and order in nuclear molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of the presented report is role of chaos in scattering processes in the frame of molecular dynamics. In this model, it is assumed that scattering particles (nuclei) consist of not-interacted components as alpha particles or 12 C, 16 O and 20 Ne clusters. The results show such effects as dynamical in stabilities and fractal structure as well as compound nuclei decay and heavy-ion fusion. The goal of the report is to make the reader more familiar with the chaos model and its application to nuclear phenomena. 157 refs, 40 figs

  13. Apparent Violation of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem due to Dynamic Heterogeneity in a Model Glass-Forming Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Here we study the relation between the mobility and the translational diffusion in supercooled two-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids, using numerical simulations. We find an apparent violation of the Einstein-Smoluchowski (ES) relation D=k B Tμ (D: diffusion constant; μ: mobility; k B ; Boltzmann's constant; T: temperature). The violation is a direct consequence of the fact that it is difficult for a driven particle to enter a jammed region with high order due to its yield stress. The degree of this apparent ES violation is controlled solely by the characteristic size of slow jammed regions, ξ. Our finding implies that the characteristic time of this problem is not the structural relaxation time τ α but the lifetime of dynamic heterogeneity, τ ξ . A supercooled liquid can be regarded to be ergodic only over τ ξ , which may be the slowest intrinsic time scale of the system.

  14. Non-dissipative energy capture of confined liquid in nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Baoxing; Chen, Xi [Columbia Nanomechanics Research Center, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Lu, Weiyi; Zhao, Cang [Department of Structural Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0085 (United States); Qiao, Yu, E-mail: yqiao@ucsd.edu [Department of Structural Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0085 (United States); Program of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    In the past, energy absorption of protection/damping materials is mainly based on energy dissipation, which causes a fundamental conflict between the requirements of safety/comfort and efficiency. In the current study, a nanofluidic “energy capture” system is reported, which is based on nanoporous materials and nonwetting liquid. Both molecular dynamics simulations and experiments show that as the liquid overcomes the capillary effect and infiltrates into the nanopores, the mechanical energy of a stress wave could be temporarily stored by the confined liquid phase and isolated from the wave energy transmission path. Such a system can work under a relatively low pressure for mitigating high-pressure stress waves, not necessarily involved in any energy dissipation processes.

  15. Non-dissipative energy capture of confined liquid in nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Chen, Xi; Lu, Weiyi; Zhao, Cang; Qiao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    In the past, energy absorption of protection/damping materials is mainly based on energy dissipation, which causes a fundamental conflict between the requirements of safety/comfort and efficiency. In the current study, a nanofluidic “energy capture” system is reported, which is based on nanoporous materials and nonwetting liquid. Both molecular dynamics simulations and experiments show that as the liquid overcomes the capillary effect and infiltrates into the nanopores, the mechanical energy of a stress wave could be temporarily stored by the confined liquid phase and isolated from the wave energy transmission path. Such a system can work under a relatively low pressure for mitigating high-pressure stress waves, not necessarily involved in any energy dissipation processes.

  16. Statistical ensembles and molecular dynamics studies of anisotropic solids. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.R.; Rahman, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have recently discussed how the Parrinello--Rahman theory can be brought into accord with the theory of the elastic and thermodynamic behavior of anisotropic media. This involves the isoenthalpic--isotension ensemble of statistical mechanics. Nose has developed a canonical ensemble form of molecular dynamics. We combine Nose's ideas with the Parrinello--Rahman theory to obtain a canonical form of molecular dynamics appropriate to the study of anisotropic media subjected to arbitrary external stress. We employ this isothermal--isotension ensemble in a study of a fcc→ close-packed structural phase transformation in a Lennard-Jones solid subjected to uniaxial compression. Our interpretation of the Nose theory does not involve a scaling of the time variable. This latter fact leads to simplifications when studying the time dependence of quantities

  17. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable......DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site...... changes in the enzyme structure, including (1) completion of the DNA-binding channel via a dynamic subdomain, which in the apo form blocks the catalytic site, (2) stabilization of the structure through the distal accessory β-subunit, and (3) formation of a putative transient replisome-binding platform...

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of polyacrylamides in potassium montmorillonite clay hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Junfang [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Rivero, Mayela [CSIRO Petroleum, PO Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia, 6102 (Australia); Choi, S K [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2007-02-14

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for polyacrylamide in potassium montmorillonite clay-aqueous systems. Interlayer molecular structure and dynamics properties are investigated. The number density profile, radial distribution function, root-mean-square deviation (RMSD), mean-square displacement (MSD) and diffusion coefficient are reported. The calculations are conducted in constant NVT ensembles, at T = 300 K and with layer spacing of 40 A. Our simulation results showed that polyacrylamides had little impact on the structure of interlayer water. Density profiles and radial distribution function indicated that hydration shells were formed. In the presence of polyacrylamides more potassium counterions move close to the clay surface while water molecules move away, indicating that potassium counterions are hydrated to a lesser extent than the system in which no polyacrylamides were added. The diffusion coefficients for potassium and water decreased when polyacrylamides were added.

  19. Fermionic molecular dynamics for ground states and collisions of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Bieler, K.; Schnack, J.

    1994-08-01

    The antisymmetric many-body trial state which describes a system of interacting fermions is parametrized in terms of localized wave packets. The equations of motion are derived from the time-dependent quantum variational principle. The resulting Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) equations include a wide range of semi-quantal to classical physics extending from deformed Hartree-Fock theory to Newtonian molecular dynamics. Conservation laws are discussed in connection with the choice of the trial state. The model is applied to heavy-ion collisions with which its basic features are illustrated. The results show a great variety of phenomena including deeply inelastic collisions, fusion, incomplete fusion, fragmentation, neck emission, promptly emitted nucleons and evaporation. (orig.)

  20. Fermionic molecular dynamics for colliding and decaying nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Schnack, J.

    1993-11-01

    Fermionic Molecular Dynamics models a system of fermions by means of a trial many-body state composed of an antisymmetrized product of single-particle states which are localized gaussians in coordinate and momentum space. The parameters specifying them are the analogue to the variables in classical molecular dynamics. The time-dependent variational principle yields the equations of motion which are solved for collisions of 12 C+ 12 C and deexcitations of 12 C. The collisions show a great variety of phenomena including explosion, sequential fragmentation and multifragmentation. The deexcitation for nuclei with E * /A ∼ 5MeV is dominated by particle evaporation on time scales of the order of 10 -20 s or longer. (orig.)

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of displacement cascades in metallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, N.V.; Tietze, H.

    1995-01-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations to investigate defect production induced by energetic displacement cascades up to 10 keV in pure metals (Cu, Ni) and in ordered intermetallic alloys NiAl, Ni 3 Al. Various model potentials were employed to describe the many-body nature of the interactions: the RGL (Rosato-Guillope-Legrand) model was used in pure Cu and Ni simulations; the modified version of the Vitek, Ackland and Cserti potentials (due to Gao, Bacon and Ackland) in Ni 3 Al and the EAM potentials of Foiles and Daw modified by Rubini and Ballone in NiAl, Ni 3 Al were used in alloy simulations. Atomic mixing and disordering were studied into details owing to imaging techniques and determined at different phases of the cascades. Some mixing mechanisms were identified. Our results were compared with existing data and those obtained by similar Molecular Dynamics Simulations available in the literature. (orig.)

  2. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  3. Enhancing protein adsorption simulations by using accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mücksch

    Full Text Available The atomistic modeling of protein adsorption on surfaces is hampered by the different time scales of the simulation ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s and experiment (up to hours, and the accordingly different 'final' adsorption conformations. We provide evidence that the method of accelerated molecular dynamics is an efficient tool to obtain equilibrated adsorption states. As a model system we study the adsorption of the protein BMP-2 on graphite in an explicit salt water environment. We demonstrate that due to the considerably improved sampling of conformational space, accelerated molecular dynamics allows to observe the complete unfolding and spreading of the protein on the hydrophobic graphite surface. This result is in agreement with the general finding of protein denaturation upon contact with hydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Stereochemical errors and their implications for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddolino Peter L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological molecules are often asymmetric with respect to stereochemistry, and correct stereochemistry is essential to their function. Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules have increasingly become an integral part of biophysical research. However, stereochemical errors in biomolecular structures can have a dramatic impact on the results of simulations. Results Here we illustrate the effects that chirality and peptide bond configuration flips may have on the secondary structure of proteins throughout a simulation. We also analyze the most common sources of stereochemical errors in biomolecular structures and present software tools to identify, correct, and prevent stereochemical errors in molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules. Conclusions Use of the tools presented here should become a standard step in the preparation of biomolecular simulations and in the generation of predicted structural models for proteins and nucleic acids.

  5. Ultrafast dissociation: An unexpected tool for probing molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Paul; Miron, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrafast dissociation has been investigated by means of XPS and mass spectrometry. ► The interplay between electron relaxation and molecular dynamics is evidenced. ► Extension toward polyatomics, clusters, adsorbed molecules is considered. ► Quantum effects (spectral hole, angular effects) evidence the molecular field anisotropy. -- Abstract: Ultrafast dissociation following core–shell excitation into an antibonding orbital led to the early observation in HBr of atomic Auger lines associated to the decay of dissociated excited atoms. The purpose of this article is to review the very large variety of systems where such a situation has been encountered, extending from simple diatomic molecules toward more complex systems like polyatomics, clusters, or adsorbed molecules. Interestingly, this phenomenon has revealed an extremely rich and powerful tool for probing nuclear dynamics and its subtle interplay with electron relaxation occurring on a comparable time scale. Consequently this review covers a surprisingly large period, starting in 1986 and still ongoing.

  6. Coarse-graining to the meso and continuum scales with molecular-dynamics-like models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimpton, Steve

    Many engineering-scale problems that industry or the national labs try to address with particle-based simulations occur at length and time scales well beyond the most optimistic hopes of traditional coarse-graining methods for molecular dynamics (MD), which typically start at the atomic scale and build upward. However classical MD can be viewed as an engine for simulating particles at literally any length or time scale, depending on the models used for individual particles and their interactions. To illustrate I'll highlight several coarse-grained (CG) materials models, some of which are likely familiar to molecular-scale modelers, but others probably not. These include models for water droplet freezing on surfaces, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models of explosives where particles have internal state, CG models of nano or colloidal particles in solution, models for aspherical particles, Peridynamics models for fracture, and models of granular materials at the scale of industrial processing. All of these can be implemented as MD-style models for either soft or hard materials; in fact they are all part of our LAMMPS MD package, added either by our group or contributed by collaborators. Unlike most all-atom MD simulations, CG simulations at these scales often involve highly non-uniform particle densities. So I'll also discuss a load-balancing method we've implemented for these kinds of models, which can improve parallel efficiencies. From the physics point-of-view, these models may be viewed as non-traditional or ad hoc. But because they are MD-style simulations, there's an opportunity for physicists to add statistical mechanics rigor to individual models. Or, in keeping with a theme of this session, to devise methods that more accurately bridge models from one scale to the next.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Study of Water Molecules in Interlayer of 14 ^|^Aring; Tobermorite

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure and dynamics of interlayer water of 14 Å tobermorite are investigated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Calculated structural parameters of the interlayer water configuration are in good agreement with current

  8. High-temperature annealing of graphite: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew; Gillette, Victor

    2018-05-01

    A modified AIREBO potential was developed to simulate the effects of thermal annealing on the structure and physical properties of damaged graphite. AIREBO parameter modifications were made to reproduce Density Functional Theory interstitial results. These changes to the potential resulted in high-temperature annealing of the model, as measured by stored-energy reduction. These results show some resemblance to experimental high-temperature annealing results, and show promise that annealing effects in graphite are accessible with molecular dynamics and reactive potentials.

  9. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  11. Incorporation of quantum statistical features in molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Akira; Randrup, J.

    1995-01-01

    We formulate a method for incorporating quantum fluctuations into molecular-dynamics simulations of many-body systems, such as those employed for energetic nuclear collision processes. Based on Fermi's Golden Rule, we allow spontaneous transitions to occur between the wave packets which are not energy eigenstates. The ensuing diffusive evolution in the space of the wave packet parameters exhibits appealing physical properties, including relaxation towards quantum-statistical equilibrium. (author)

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tensile Behavior of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Sainath, G.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Choudhary, B. K.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations on tensile deformation of initially defect free single crystal copper nanowire oriented in {100} has been carried out at 10 K under adiabatic and isothermal loading conditions. The tensile behaviour was characterized by sharp rise in stress in elastic regime followed by sudden drop at the point of dislocation nucleation. The important finding is that the variation in dislocation density is correlated with the observed stress-strain response. Several interesting ...

  13. Automated processing of data generated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato Hoyos, Ivan; Rojas Tapia, Justo; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima

    2008-01-01

    A new integrated tool for automated processing of data generated by molecular dynamics packages and programs have been developed. The program allows to calculate important quantities such as pair correlation function, the analysis of common neighbors, counting nanoparticles and their size distribution, conversion of output files between different formats. The work explains in detail the modules of the tool, the interface between them. The uses of program are illustrated in application examples in the calculation of various properties of silver nanoparticles. (author)

  14. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present new results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swygenhoven, H. van; Caro, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young's modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs

  16. Accelerating Molecular Dynamic Simulation on Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Mark S.; Eastman, Peter; Vaidyanathan, Vishal; Houston, Mike; Legrand, Scott; Beberg, Adam L.; Ensign, Daniel L.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a complete implementation of all-atom protein molecular dynamics running entirely on a graphics processing unit (GPU), including all standard force field terms, integration, constraints, and implicit solvent. We discuss the design of our algorithms and important optimizations needed to fully take advantage of a GPU. We evaluate its performance, and show that it can be more than 700 times faster than a conventional implementation running on a single CPU core. PMID:19191337

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of cascade damage in gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E.; Caturla, M.J.; Tang, M.; Huang, H.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    High-energy cascades have been simulated in gold using molecular dynamics with a modified embedded atom method potential. The results show that both vacancy and interstitial clusters form with high probability as a result of intracascade processes. The formation of clusters has been interpreted in terms of the high pressures generated in the core of the cascade during the early stages. The authors provide evidence that correlation between interstitial and vacancy clustering exists

  18. Thermal conductivity of ZnTe investigated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hanfu; Chu Weiguo

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of ZnTe with zinc-blende structure has been computed by equilibrium molecular dynamics method based on Green-Kubo formalism. A Tersoff's potential is adopted in the simulation to model the atomic interactions. The calculations are performed as a function of temperature up to 800 K. The calculated thermal conductivities are in agreement with the experimental values between 150 K and 300 K, while the results above the room temperature are comparable with the Slack's equation.

  19. Fragmentation dynamics of molecular hydrogen in strong ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, A; Feuerstein, B; Zrost, K; Jesus, V L B de; Ergler, T; Dimopoulou, C; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic experimental study of dissociation and Coulomb explosion of molecular hydrogen induced by intense ultrashort (7-25 fs) laser pulses. Using coincident recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy we can distinguish the contributions from dissociation and double ionization even if they result in the same kinetic energies of the fragments. The dynamics of all fragmentation channels drastically depends on the pulse duration, and for 7 fs pulses becomes extremely sensitive to the pulse shape

  20. Molecular packing in 1-hexanol-DMPC bilayers studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Westh, P.

    2007-01-01

    The structure and molecular packing density of a “mismatched” solute, 1-hexanol, in lipid membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the average location and orientation of the hexanol molecules matched earlier experimental data...... on comparable systems. The local density or molecular packing in DMPC–hexanol was elucidated through the average Voronoi volumes of all heavy (non-hydrogen) atoms. Analogous analysis was conducted on trajectories from simulations of pure 1-hexanol and pure (hydrated) DMPC bilayers. The results suggested...... of the alcohol upon partitioning and an even stronger loosening in the packing of the lipid. Furthermore, analysis of Voronoi volumes along the membrane normal identifies a distinctive depth dependence of the changes in molecular packing. The outer (interfacial) part of the lipid acyl chains (up to C8...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of bubble nucleation in explosive boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yu; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Huai Xiulan; Liang Shiqiang

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is carried out for the bubble nucleation of liquid nitrogen in explosive boiling. The heat is transferred into the simulation system by rescaling the velocity of the molecules. The results indicate that the initial equilibrium temperature of liquid and molecular cluster size affect the energy conversion in the process of bubble nucleation. The potential energy of the system violently varies at the beginning of the bubble nucleation, and then varies around a fixed value. At the end of bubble nucleation, the potential energy of the system slowly increases. In the bubble nucleation of explosive boiling, the lower the initial equilibrium temperature, the larger the size of the molecular cluster, and the more the heat transferred into the system of the simulation cell, causing the increase potential energy in a larger range. (authors)

  2. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets’ spin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar; Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields

  3. Reliable Approximation of Long Relaxation Timescales in Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many interesting rare events in molecular systems, like ligand association, protein folding or conformational changes, occur on timescales that often are not accessible by direct numerical simulation. Therefore, rare event approximation approaches like interface sampling, Markov state model building, or advanced reaction coordinate-based free energy estimation have attracted huge attention recently. In this article we analyze the reliability of such approaches. How precise is an estimate of long relaxation timescales of molecular systems resulting from various forms of rare event approximation methods? Our results give a theoretical answer to this question by relating it with the transfer operator approach to molecular dynamics. By doing so we also allow for understanding deep connections between the different approaches.

  4. Evaluation of uranium dioxide thermal conductivity using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woongkee; Kaviany, Massoud; Shim, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    It can be extended to larger space, time scale and even real reactor situation with fission product as multi-scale formalism. Uranium dioxide is a fluorite structure with Fm3m space group. Since it is insulator, dominant heat carrier is phonon, rather than electrons. So, using equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we present the appropriate calculation parameters in MD simulation by calculating thermal conductivity and application of it to the thermal conductivity of polycrystal. In this work, we investigate thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and optimize the parameters related to its process. In this process, called Green Kubo formula, there are two parameters i.e correlation length and sampling interval, which effect on ensemble integration in order to obtain thermal conductivity. Through several comparisons, long correlation length and short sampling interval give better results. Using this strategy, thermal conductivity of poly crystal is obtained and comparison with that of pure crystal is made. Thermal conductivity of poly crystal show lower value that that of pure crystal. In further study, we broaden the study to transport coefficient of radiation damaged structures using molecular dynamics. Although molecular dynamics is tools for treating microscopic scale, most macroscopic issues related to nuclear materials such as voids in fuel materials and weakened mechanical properties by radiation are based on microscopic basis. Thus, research on microscopic scale would be expanded in this field and many hidden mechanism in atomic scales will be revealed via both atomic scale simulations and experiments

  5. Atomic and Molecular Dynamics on and in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kevin K.

    2003-03-01

    Studies of intramolecular and intermolecular dynamics is at the core of Molecular Spectroscopic research several decades. Gas phase, particularly molecular beam, studies have greatly illuminated these processes in isolated molecules, bimolecular collisions, or small covalent and van der Waals complexes. Parallel to this effort have been studies in condensed phases, but there has unfortunately been little intellectual contact between these. The recent development of Helium Nanodropet Isolation Spectroscopy is providing an intellectual bridge between gas phase and condensed phase spectroscopy. While droplets of 10,000 He atoms are effectively a condensed phase, their low temperature ( 0.4 K) and ultralow heat capacities combined with their superfluid state make them an almost ideal matrix in which to study both molecular dynamics, including solute induced relaxations. The nsec times scales for many of the relaxation events, orders of magnitude slower than in classical liquids, results in spectra with unprecedented resolution for the liquid state. In this talk, studies of the Princeton group will be highlighted, with particular emphasis on those for which a combination of theory and experiment have combined to reveal dynamics in this unique Quantum Fluid.

  6. Excitation dynamics and relaxation in a molecular heterodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balevičius, V.; Gelzinis, A.; Abramavicius, D.; Mančal, T.; Valkunas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dynamics of excitation within a heterogenous molecular dimer. ► Excited states can be swapped due to different reorganization energies of monomers. ► Conventional excitonic basis becomes renormalized due to interaction with the bath. ► Relaxation is independent of mutual positioning of monomeric excited states. -- Abstract: The exciton dynamics in a molecular heterodimer is studied as a function of differences in excitation and reorganization energies, asymmetry in transition dipole moments and excited state lifetimes. The heterodimer is composed of two molecules modeled as two-level systems coupled by the resonance interaction. The system-bath coupling is taken into account as a modulating factor of the molecular excitation energy gap, while the relaxation to the ground state is treated phenomenologically. Comparison of the description of the excitation dynamics modeled using either the Redfield equations (secular and full forms) or the Hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) is demonstrated and discussed. Possible role of the dimer as an excitation quenching center in photosynthesis self-regulation is discussed. It is concluded that the system-bath interaction rather than the excitonic effect determines the excitation quenching ability of such a dimer.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  8. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  9. Electron-nuclear corellations for photoinduced dynamics in molecular dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Dmitri S.; Pereversev, Yuryi V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2003-03-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced dynamics of electronic excitation in molecular dimers is drastically affected by dynamic reorganization of of inter- and intra- molecular nuclear configuration modelled by quantized nuclear degree of freedom [1]. The dynamics of the electronic population and nuclear coherence is analyzed with help of both numerical solution of the chain of coupled differential equations for mean coordinate, population inversion, electronic-vibrational correlation etc.[2] and by propagating the Gaussian wavepackets in relevant adiabatic potentials. Intriguing results were obtained in the approximation of small energy difference and small change of nuclear equilibrium configuration for excited electronic states. In the limiting case of resonance between electronic states energy difference and frequency of the nuclear mode these results have been justified by comparison to exactly solvable Jaynes-Cummings model. It has been found that the photoinduced processes in dimer are arranged according to their time scales:(i) fast scale of nuclear motion,(ii) intermediate scale of dynamical redistribution of electronic population between excited states as well as growth and dynamics of electronic -nuclear correlation,(iii) slow scale of electronic population approaching to the quasiequilibrium distribution, decay of electronic-nuclear correlation, and diminishing the amplitude of mean coordinate oscillations, accompanied by essential growth of the nuclear coordinate dispersion associated with the overall nuclear wavepacket width. Demonstrated quantum-relaxational features of photoinduced vibronic dinamical processess in molecular dimers are obtained by simple method, applicable to large biological systems with many degrees of freedom. [1] J. A. Cina, D. S. Kilin, T. S. Humble, J. Chem. Phys. (2003) in press. [2] O. V. Prezhdo, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2995 (2002).

  10. A Flexible, Grid-Enabled Web Portal for GROMACS Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marc; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming a standard part of workflows in structural biology. They are used for tasks as diverse as assessing molecular flexibility, probing conformational changes, assessing the impact of mutations, or gaining information about molecular interactions. However,

  11. A flexible, grid-enabled web portal for GROMACS molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Wassenaar, T.A.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming a standard part of workflows in structural biology. They are used for tasks as diverse as assessing molecular flexibility, probing conformational changes, assessing the impact of mutations, or gaining information about molecular interactions. However,

  12. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...... relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents...

  13. Dissipative effects in Multilevel Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, A I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schirmer, S G [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Dissipation is sometimes regarded as an inevitable and regrettable presence in the real evolution of a quantum system. However, the effects may not always be malign, although often non-intuitive and may even be beneficial. In this note we we display some of these effects for N-level systems, where N = 2,3,4. We start with an elementary introduction to dissipative effects on the Bloch Sphere, and its interior, the Bloch Ball, for a two-level system. We describe explicitly the hamiltonian evolution as well as the purely dissipative dynamics, in the latter case giving the t {yields} {infinity} limits of the motion. This discussion enables us to provide an intuitive feeling for the measures of control-reachable states. For the three-level case we discuss the impossibility of isolating a two-level (qubit) subsystem; this is a Bohm-Aharonov type consequence of dissipation. We finally exemplify the four-level case by giving constraints on the decay of two-qubit entanglement.

  14. Pitfall in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulation of small solutes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Liu, Haiyan

    2013-05-30

    Developments in computing hardware and algorithms have made direct molecular dynamics simulation with the combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods affordable for small solute molecules in solution, in which much improved accuracy can be obtained via the quantum mechanical treatment of the solute molecule and even sometimes water molecules in the first solvation shell. However, unlike the conventional molecular mechanical simulations of large molecules, e.g., proteins, in solutions, special care must be taken in the technical details of the simulation, including the thermostat of the solute/solvent system, so that the conformational space of the solute molecules can be properly sampled. We show here that the common setup for classical molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations, such as the Berendsen or single Nose-Hoover thermostat, and/or rigid water models could lead to pathological sampling of the solutes' conformation. In the extreme example of a methanol molecule in aqueous solution, improper and sluggish setups could generate two peaks in the distribution of the O-H bond length. We discuss the factors responsible for this somewhat unexpected result and evoke a simple and ancient technical fix-up to resolve this problem.

  15. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome...... with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties...... simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations....

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation of tracer diffusion in a simple liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ould-Kaddour, F.; Barrat, J.L.

    1991-05-01

    Extensive Molecular-Dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out for a model trace-solvent system made up of 100 solvent molecules and 8 tracer molecules interacting through truncated Lennard-Jones potentials. The influence of the size ratio between solute and solvent, of their mass ratio and of the solvent viscosity on the diffusivity of a small tracer were investigated. Positive deviations from a Stokes-Einstein behaviour are observed, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. It was also observed that as tracer and solvent become increasingly dissimilar, their respective dynamics becomes decoupled. We suggest that such decouplings can be interpreted by writing their mobility of the tracer as the sum of two terms, the first one arising from a coupling between tracer dynamics and hydrodynamics modes of the solvent, and the second one describing jump motion in a locally nearly frozen environment. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  17. Molecular dynamics of coalescence and collisions of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara-Chapa, Enrique, E-mail: enrique_guevara@hotmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas (Mexico); Mejía-Rosales, Sergio [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Center for Innovation, Research and Development in Engineering and Technology (CIIDIT), and CICFIM-Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    We study how different relative orientations and impact velocity on the collision of two silver nanoparticles affect the first stages of the formation of a new, larger nanoparticle. In order to do this, we implemented a set of molecular dynamics simulations on the NVE ensemble on pairs of silver icosahedral nanoparticles at several relative orientations, that allowed us to follow the dynamics of the first nanoseconds of the coalescence processes. Using bond angle analysis, we found that the initial relative orientation of the twin planes has a critical role on the final stability of the resulting particle, and on the details of the dynamics itself. When the original particles have their closest twins aligned to each other, the formed nanoparticle will likely stabilize its structure onto a particle with a defined center and a low surface-to-volume ratio, while nanoparticles with misaligned twins will promote the formation of highly defective particles with a high inner energy.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  19. Molecular dynamics of coalescence and collisions of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara-Chapa, Enrique; Mejía-Rosales, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    We study how different relative orientations and impact velocity on the collision of two silver nanoparticles affect the first stages of the formation of a new, larger nanoparticle. In order to do this, we implemented a set of molecular dynamics simulations on the NVE ensemble on pairs of silver icosahedral nanoparticles at several relative orientations, that allowed us to follow the dynamics of the first nanoseconds of the coalescence processes. Using bond angle analysis, we found that the initial relative orientation of the twin planes has a critical role on the final stability of the resulting particle, and on the details of the dynamics itself. When the original particles have their closest twins aligned to each other, the formed nanoparticle will likely stabilize its structure onto a particle with a defined center and a low surface-to-volume ratio, while nanoparticles with misaligned twins will promote the formation of highly defective particles with a high inner energy

  20. Liquid-vapor coexistence by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, Andras; Cummings, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    We present a simple and consistent molecular dynamics algorithm for determining the equilibrium properties of a bulk liquid and its coexisting vapor phase. The simulation follows the dynamics of the two systems simultaneously while maintaining the volume and the number of particles of the composite system fixed. The thermostat can constrain either the total energy or the temperature at a desired value. Division of the extensive properties between the two phases is governed by the difference of the corresponding intensive state variables. Particle numbers are continuous variables and vary only in virtual sense, i.e., the real sizes of the two systems are the same and do not change during the course of the simulation. Calculation of the chemical potential is separate from the dynamics; thus, one can replace the particle exchange step with other method if it improves the efficiency of the code. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

  2. Scalar dissipation rate and dissipative anomaly in isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donzis, D.A.; Sreenivasan, K.R.; Yeung, P.K.

    2006-12-01

    We examine available data from experiment and recent numerical simulations to explore the supposition that the scalar dissipation rate in turbulence becomes independent of the fluid viscosity when the viscosity is small and of scalar diffusivity when the diffusivity is small. The data are interpreted in the context of semi-empirical spectral theory of Obukhov and Corrsin when the Schmidt number, Sc, is below unity, and of Batchelor's theory when Sc is above unity. Practical limits in terms of the Taylor-microscale Reynolds number, R λ , as well as Sc, are deduced for scalar dissipation to become sensibly independent of molecular properties. In particular, we show that such an asymptotic state is reached if R λ Sc 1/2 >> 1 for Sc λ 1. (author)

  3. SELF-HEALING NANOMATERIALS: MULTIMILLION-ATOM REACTIVE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakamata, Tomoya [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan); Shimamura, Kohei [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan); Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kobe Univ., Kobe (Japan); Shimojo, Fuyuki [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan); Kalia, Rajiv K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nakano, Aiichiro [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Vashishta, Priya [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Organometal halide perovskites are attracting great attention as promising material for solar cells because of their high power conversion efficiency. The high performance has been attributed to the existence of free charge carriers and their large diffusion lengths, but the nature of carrier transport at the atomistic level remains elusive. Here, nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanisms underlying the excellent free-carrier transport in CH3NH3PbI3. Pb and I sublattices act as disjunct pathways for rapid and balanced transport of photoexcited electrons and holes, respectively, while minimizing efficiency-degrading charge recombination. On the other hand, CH3NH3 sublattice quickly screens out electrostatic electron-hole attraction to generate free carriers within 1 ps. Together this nano-architecture lets photoexcited electrons and holes dissociate instantaneously and travel far away to be harvested before dissipated as heat. As a result, this work provides much needed structure-property relationships and time-resolved information that potentially lead to rational design of efficient solar cells.

  4. Machine learning molecular dynamics for the simulation of infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastegger, Michael; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    Machine learning has emerged as an invaluable tool in many research areas. In the present work, we harness this power to predict highly accurate molecular infrared spectra with unprecedented computational efficiency. To account for vibrational anharmonic and dynamical effects - typically neglected by conventional quantum chemistry approaches - we base our machine learning strategy on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. While these simulations are usually extremely time consuming even for small molecules, we overcome these limitations by leveraging the power of a variety of machine learning techniques, not only accelerating simulations by several orders of magnitude, but also greatly extending the size of systems that can be treated. To this end, we develop a molecular dipole moment model based on environment dependent neural network charges and combine it with the neural network potential approach of Behler and Parrinello. Contrary to the prevalent big data philosophy, we are able to obtain very accurate machine learning models for the prediction of infrared spectra based on only a few hundreds of electronic structure reference points. This is made possible through the use of molecular forces during neural network potential training and the introduction of a fully automated sampling scheme. We demonstrate the power of our machine learning approach by applying it to model the infrared spectra of a methanol molecule, n -alkanes containing up to 200 atoms and the protonated alanine tripeptide, which at the same time represents the first application of machine learning techniques to simulate the dynamics of a peptide. In all of these case studies we find an excellent agreement between the infrared spectra predicted via machine learning models and the respective theoretical and experimental spectra.

  5. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ePapaleo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y.; Amar, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) (10, 19, 23) to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  7. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shim, Y [UNIV OF TOLEDO; Amar, J G [UNIV OF TOLEDO

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  9. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  10. Dynamics of Oxidation of Aluminum Nanoclusters using Variable Charge Molecular-Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Timothy; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Ogata, Shuji; Rodgers, Stephen

    1999-06-01

    Oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters is investigated with a parallel molecular-dynamics approach based on dynamic charge transfer among atoms. Structural and dynamic correlations reveal that significant charge transfer gives rise to large negative pressure in the oxide which dominates the positive pressure due to steric forces. As a result, aluminum moves outward and oxygen moves towards the interior of the cluster with the aluminum diffusivity 60% higher than that of oxygen. A stable 40 Å thick amorphous oxide is formed; this is in excellent agreement with experiments.

  11. Non-Markovian dynamics, decoherence and entanglement in dissipative quantum systems with applications to quantum information theory of continuous variable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoerhammer, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, non-Markovian dynamics, decoherence and entanglement in dissipative quantum systems are studied. In particular, applications to quantum information theory of continuous variable systems are considered. The non-Markovian dynamics are described by the Hu-Paz-Zhang master equation of quantum Brownian motion. In this context the focus is on non-Markovian effects on decoherence and separability time scales of various single- mode and two-mode continuous variable states. It is verified that moderate non-Markovian influences slow down the decay of interference fringes and quantum correlations, while strong non-Markovian effects resulting from an out-of-resonance bath can even accelerate the loss of coherence, compared to predictions of Markovian approximations. Qualitatively different scenarios including exponential, Gaussian or algebraic decay of the decoherence function are analyzed. It is shown that partial recurrence of coherence can occur in case of non-Lindblad-type dynamics. The time evolution of quantum correlations of entangled two-mode continuous variable states is examined in single-reservoir and two-reservoir models, representing noisy correlated or uncorrelated non-Markovian quantum channels. For this purpose the model of quantum Brownian motion is extended. Various separability criteria for Gaussian and non-Gaussian continuous variable systems are applied. In both types of reservoir models moderate non-Markovian effects prolong the separability time scales. However, in these models the properties of the stationary state may differ. In the two-reservoir model the initial entanglement is completely lost and both modes are finally uncorrelated. In a common reservoir both modes interact indirectly via the coupling to the same bath variables. Therefore, new quantum correlations may emerge between the two modes. Below a critical bath temperature entanglement is preserved even in the steady state. A separability criterion is derived, which depends

  12. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Joshua L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our

  13. DYNAMIC SURFACE BOUNDARY-CONDITIONS - A SIMPLE BOUNDARY MODEL FOR MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JUFFER, AH; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1993-01-01

    A simple model for the treatment of boundaries in molecular dynamics simulations is presented. The method involves the positioning of boundary atoms on a surface that surrounds a system of interest. The boundary atoms interact with the inner region and represent the effect of atoms outside the

  14. Curvature effects on lipid packing and dynamics in liposomes revealed by coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular packing details of lipids in planar bilayers are well characterized. For curved bilayers, however, little data is available. In this paper we study the effect of temperature and membrane composition on the structural and dynamical properties of a liposomal membrane in the limit of high

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, structure, and dynamics of small phospholipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    Here, we use coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the spontaneous aggregation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids into small unilamellar vesicles. We show that the aggregation process occurs on a nanosecond time scale, with bicelles and cuplike vesicles formed at

  16. Reaction Ensemble Molecular Dynamics: Direct Simulation of the Dynamic Equilibrium Properties of Chemically Reacting Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brennan, J.K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, K.E.; Rice, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2004), 0611031-0611034 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1588 Grant - others:NSF(US) CTS-0211792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : reacting systems * simulation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  17. Physical properties of Cu nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, H.H.; Yildirim, H.; Ozdemir Kart, S.; Çağin, T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamical, structural and dynamical properties of Cu nanoparticles are investigated by using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations at various temperatures. In this work, MD simulations of the Cu-nanoparticles are performed by means of the MPiSiM codes by utilizing from Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body force potential to define the interactions between the Cu atoms. The diameters of the copper nanoparticles are varied from 2 nm to 10 nm. MD simulations of Cu nanoparticles are carried out at low and high temperatures to study solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles. Simulation results such as melting point, radial distribution function are compared with the available experimental bulk results. Radial distribution function, mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, Lindemann index and Honeycutt–Andersen index are also calculated for estimating the melting point of the Copper nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles are studied. • Molecular dynamics utilizing the Quantum Sutton Chen potential is used in this work. • Melting temperatures of nanoparticles are strongly depended on nanoparticle sizes. • Heat capacity, radial distribution function and diffusion coefficients are studied. • Structures of nanoparticles are analyzed by Lindemann and Honeycutt–Andersen index

  18. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Model for Heterogeneous Charged Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, L. G.; Glosli, J. N.; Murillo, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    Modeling matter across large length scales and timescales using molecular dynamics simulations poses significant challenges. These challenges are typically addressed through the use of precomputed pair potentials that depend on thermodynamic properties like temperature and density; however, many scenarios of interest involve spatiotemporal variations in these properties, and such variations can violate assumptions made in constructing these potentials, thus precluding their use. In particular, when a system is strongly heterogeneous, most of the usual simplifying assumptions (e.g., spherical potentials) do not apply. Here, we present a multiscale approach to orbital-free density functional theory molecular dynamics (OFDFT-MD) simulations that bridges atomic, interionic, and continuum length scales to allow for variations in hydrodynamic quantities in a consistent way. Our multiscale approach enables simulations on the order of micron length scales and 10's of picosecond timescales, which exceeds current OFDFT-MD simulations by many orders of magnitude. This new capability is then used to study the heterogeneous, nonequilibrium dynamics of a heated interface characteristic of an inertial-confinement-fusion capsule containing a plastic ablator near a fuel layer composed of deuterium-tritium ice. At these scales, fundamental assumptions of continuum models are explored; features such as the separation of the momentum fields among the species and strong hydrogen jetting from the plastic into the fuel region are observed, which had previously not been seen in hydrodynamic simulations.

  19. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip–sample interaction.

  20. Drift bifurcation detection for dissipative solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liehr, A W; Boedeker, H U; Roettger, M C; Frank, T D; Friedrich, R; Purwins, H-G

    2003-01-01

    We report on the experimental detection of a drift bifurcation for dissipative solitons, which we observe in the form of current filaments in a planar semiconductor-gas-discharge system. By introducing a new stochastic data analysis technique we find that due to a change of system parameters the dissipative solitons undergo a transition from purely noise-driven objects with Brownian motion to particles with a dynamically stabilized finite velocity

  1. Molecular stopwatches, cogwheels and ``spinflakes'': studying the dynamics of molecular superrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander; Hepburn, John; Milner, Valery

    2015-05-01

    Using the technique of an optical centrifuge, we excite diatomic molecules to ultrafast synchronous rotation. Femtosecond velocity-map imaging allows us to visualize and study the coherent dynamics of molecular superrotors under field free conditions and in external magnetic field. We demonstrate that when the created rotational wave packet is narrow, its free evolution is nondispersing and follows the motion of a classically rotating dumbbell or a hand of the smallest natural stopwatch. For wider rotational distributions, we observe the breakdown of classical rotation, when a dumbbell shape changes to that of a ``quantum cogwheel'' - a molecular state simultaneously aligned along multiple direction. Our measurements in external magnetic field reveal other peculiar aspects of the rich dynamics of molecular superrotors. The rotation of a non-magnetic molecule interacts with the applied field only weakly, giving rise to slow precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field direction. In contrast, the electronic spin of a paramagnetic superrotor mediates this interaction, causing the initial disk-like angular distribution to split into several spatial components, each precessing with its own frequency determined by the spin projection.

  2. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  3. Structure and dynamics of photosynthetic proteins studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellerue, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Understand the structure-dynamics-function relation in the case of proteins is essential. But few experimental techniques allow to have access to knowledge of fast internal movements of biological macromolecules. With the neutron scattering method, it has been possible to study the reorientation dynamics of side chains and of polypeptide skeleton for two proteins in terms of water or detergent and of temperature. With the use of the molecular dynamics method, essential for completing and interpreting the experimental data, it has been possible to assess the different contributions of the whole structure of proteins to the overall dynamics. It has been shown that the polypeptide skeleton presents an energy relaxation comparable to those of the side chains. Moreover, it has been explained that the protein dynamics can only be understood in terms of relaxation time distribution. (author) [fr

  4. Parallel computing and molecular dynamics of biological membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Penna, G.; Letardi, S.; Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G.C.; Salina, G.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the general question of the portability of molecular dynamics codes for diffusive systems on parallel computers of the APE family. The intrinsic single precision of the today available platforms does not seem to affect the numerical accuracy of the simulations, while the absence of integer addressing from CPU to individual nodes puts strong constraints on possible programming strategies. Liquids can be satisfactorily simulated using the ''systolic'' method. For more complex systems, like the biological ones at which we are ultimately interested in, the ''domain decomposition'' approach is best suited to beat the quadratic growth of the inter-molecular computational time with the number of atoms of the system. The promising perspectives of using this strategy for extensive simulations of lipid bilayers are briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  5. Rheology of liquid n-triacontane: Molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, N D; Norman, G E; Stegailov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is applied to calculate diffusion coefficients of n-triacontane C 30 H 62 using Einstein-Smoluchowski and Green-Kubo relations. The displacement 〈Δr 2 〉( t ) has a subdiffusive part 〈Δr 2 〉 ∼ t α , caused by molecular crowding at low temperatures. Longtime asymptotes of 〈v(0)v(t)〉 are collated with the hydrodynamic tail t -3/2 demonstrated for atomic liquids. The influence of these asymptotes on the compliance of Einstein-Smoluchowski and Green-Kubo methods is analyzed. The effects of the force field parameters on the diffusion process are treated. The results are compared with experimental data. (paper)

  6. Sugar transport across lactose permease probed by steered molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Yin, Ying; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) transports sugar across the inner membrane of the bacterium using the proton motive force to accumulate sugar in the cytosol. We have probed lactose conduction across LacY using steered molecular dynamics, permitting us to follow molecular and energetic...... details of lactose interaction with the lumen of LacY during its permeation. Lactose induces a widening of the narrowest parts of the channel during permeation, the widening being largest within the periplasmic half-channel. During permeation, the water-filled lumen of LacY only partially hydrates lactose......, forcing it to interact with channel lining residues. Lactose forms a multitude of direct sugar-channel hydrogen bonds, predominantly with residues of the flexible N-domain, which is known to contribute a major part of LacY's affinity for lactose. In the periplasmic half-channel lactose predominantly...

  7. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition, that ethane dissociates significantly into molecular and/or atomic hydrogen and some long alkane chains, has been systematically studied by analyzing the optical conductivity spectra, pair correlation functions, electronic density of states, and charge density distribution of fluid ethane.

  8. Molecular Modeling of Enzyme Dynamics Towards Understanding Solvent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar

    This thesis describes the development of a molecular simulation methodology to study properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media at fixed thermodynamic water activities. The methodology is applied in a molecular dynamics study of the industrially important enzyme Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB...... of enzyme kinetics in non-aqueous media, it has been a fruitful approach to fix the enzyme hydration level by controlling the water activity of the medium. In this work, a protocol is therefore developed for determining the water activity in non-aqueous protein simulations. The method relies on determining...... integration, while for small systems, it seems to be even better. The method is applied to compute the excess Gibbs energy of the mixtures of water and organic solvents used in the simulations of CALB. This allows to determine the water activity of the simulated systems and thus to compare protein properties...

  9. Molecular dynamics study of lubricant depletion by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Woo; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Talke, Frank E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to numerically investigate the effect of pulsed laser heating on lubricant depletion. The maximum temperature, the lubricant depletion width, the number of evaporated lubricant beads and the number of fragmented lubricant chains were studied as a function of laser peak power, pulse duration and repetition rate. A continuous-wave laser and a square pulse laser were simulated and compared to a Gaussian pulse laser. With increasing repetition rate, pulsed laser heating was found to approach continuous-wave laser heating.

  10. Thermal conductivity of water: Molecular dynamics and generalized hydrodynamics results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Davide; Tani, Alessandro

    1997-10-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out in the microcanonical ensemble at 300 and 255 K on the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model of water [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)]. In addition to a number of static and dynamic properties, thermal conductivity λ has been calculated via Green-Kubo integration of the heat current time correlation functions (CF's) in the atomic and molecular formalism, at wave number k=0. The calculated values (0.67+/-0.04 W/mK at 300 K and 0.52+/-0.03 W/mK at 255 K) are in good agreement with the experimental data (0.61 W/mK at 300 K and 0.49 W/mK at 255 K). A negative long-time tail of the heat current CF, more apparent at 255 K, is responsible for the anomalous decrease of λ with temperature. An analysis of the dynamical modes contributing to λ has shown that its value is due to two low-frequency exponential-like modes, a faster collisional mode, with positive contribution, and a slower one, which determines the negative long-time tail. A comparison of the molecular and atomic spectra of the heat current CF has suggested that higher-frequency modes should not contribute to λ in this temperature range. Generalized thermal diffusivity DT(k) decreases as a function of k, after an initial minor increase at k=kmin. The k dependence of the generalized thermodynamic properties has been calculated in the atomic and molecular formalisms. The observed differences have been traced back to intramolecular or intermolecular rotational effects and related to the partial structure functions. Finally, from the results we calculated it appears that the SPC/E model gives results in better agreement with experimental data than the transferable intermolecular potential with four points TIP4P water model [Jorgensen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 79, 926 (1983)], with a larger improvement for, e.g., diffusion, viscosities, and dielectric properties and a smaller one for thermal conductivity. The SPC/E model shares

  11. Molecular hydrodynamic approach to dynamical correlations in quantum liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabani, Eran; Reichman, David R.

    2002-01-01

    A quantum molecular hydrodynamic formalism is developed for the study of dynamics in quantum liquids. The method combines exact static input, generated by path-integral Monte Carlo, and an approximate form of the quantum memory function for the solution of the exact quantum generalized Langevin equation under consideration. This methodology is applied to the study of the spectrum of density fluctuations in liquid para-H 2 . Using a physically motivated approximation for the memory function, semiquantitative agreement is obtained for S(k,ω) in comparison to the recent experiments of Bermejo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5359 (2000)]. Improvement of the methodology and future applications are discussed

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Evaporation of Droplets with Dissolved Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Liang Xu; Min Chen; Xiao-Dong Wang; Bing-Bing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the evaporation of water droplets containing either dissolved LiCl, NaCl or KCl salt in a gaseous surrounding (nitrogen) with a constant high temperature of 600 K. The initial droplet has 298 K temperature and contains 1,120 water molecules, 0, 40, 80 or 120 salt molecules. The effects of the salt type and concentration on the evaporation rate are examined. Three stages with different evaporation rates are observed for all cases. In the initial...

  13. Molecular nonlinear dynamics and protein thermal uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND) as a new approach for describing protein folding and aggregation. By using a mode system, we show that the MND of disordered proteins is chaotic while that of folded proteins exhibits intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs). The stability of ILDMs is found to strongly correlate with protein energies. We propose a novel method for protein thermal uncertainty quantification based on persistently invariant ILDMs. Extensive comparison with experimental data and the state-of-the-art methods in the field validate the proposed new method for protein B-factor prediction. PMID:24697365

  14. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide

  15. Full quantum treatment of charge dynamics in amorphous molecular semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Xander; Friederich, Pascal; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Coehoorn, Reinder; Bobbert, Peter A.

    2018-02-01

    We present a treatment of charge dynamics in amorphous molecular semiconductors that accounts for the coupling of charges to all intramolecular phonon modes in a fully quantum mechanical way. Based on ab initio calculations, we derive charge transfer rates that improve on the widely used semiclassical Marcus rate and obtain benchmark results for the mobility and energetic relaxation of electrons and holes in three semiconductors commonly applied in organic light-emitting diodes. Surprisingly, we find very similar results when using the simple Miller-Abrahams rate. We conclude that extracting the disorder strength from temperature-dependent charge transport studies is very possible but extracting the reorganization energy is not.

  16. The density functional theory and the charged fluid molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Zerah, G.

    1993-01-01

    Car and Parrinello had the idea of combining the density functional theory (Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham) to the 'molecular dynamics' numerical modelling method, in order to simulate metallic or co-valent solids and liquids from the first principles. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified version of this method ab initio, applicable to classical and quantal charged systems. The method is illustrated with recent results on charged colloidal suspensions and highly correlated electron-proton plasmas. 1 fig., 21 refs

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    and DNA microarrays technologies.4,5,6,7,8 Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water,2,9-16 at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle...... computations of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems.3,16,17,18 For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence...

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system...

  19. Relaxation Estimation of RMSD in Molecular Dynamics Immunosimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Schreiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations have to be sufficiently long to draw reliable conclusions. However, no method exists to prove that a simulation has converged. We suggest the method of “lagged RMSD-analysis” as a tool to judge if an MD simulation has not yet run long enough. The analysis is based on RMSD values between pairs of configurations separated by variable time intervals Δt. Unless RMSD(Δt has reached a stationary shape, the simulation has not yet converged.

  20. Molecular dynamics computer simulations based on NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieg, J. de.

    1989-01-01

    In the work described in this thesis atom-atom distance information obtained from two-dimensional cuclear magnetic resonance is combined with molecular dynamics simulaitons. The simulation is used to improve the accuracy of a structure model constructed on the basis of NMR data. During the MD refinement the crude NMR structure is simultaneously optimized with respect to the atomic interaction function and to the set of atom-atom distances or other NMR information. This means that insufficient experimental data is completed with theoretical knowledge and the combination will lead to more reliable structures than would be obtained from one technique alone. (author). 191 refs.; 17 figs.; 12 schemes; 22 tabs