WorldWideScience

Sample records for molecular contamination analysis

  1. Molecular activation analysis for organo-halogen contaminants in yogurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Chai Zhifang

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations of total halogen (TX), extractable organo-halogen (EOX), extractable persistent organo-halogen (EPOX), organo-chlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in 18 different yogurt specimens of 14 brands from Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shijiazhuang were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA), molecular activation analysis (MAA) and GC-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results indicated that the halogen in yogurt mainly existed as inorganic species and non-extractable organo-halogen compounds. About 1/3 to 1/4 of EOX was EPOX. Further, EOCl and EPOCl were the main organo-halogen species in yogurt. The average concentration of the unknown organo-chlorine was 96% of the EPOCl. HCHs and DDTs were still the main contaminants of OCPs in the yogurt of interest. Also, PCB202, PCB103 and PCB208 were the main contaminants of PCBs. (authors)

  2. Molecular analysis of cross-bacterial contamination detected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the isolate Delftia acidovorans BP(R2) and it is also coupled to protein with molecular weight 25-26 KDa. As well as, this bacterial contamination was the reason for the false positive results observed during the detection of HCV infections. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 9(1) 2005: 5-10.

  3. Exploring Surface Analysis Techniques for the Detection of Molecular Contaminants on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Gugu N.; Seasly, Elaine; Thornblom, Mark; Baughman, James

    2016-01-01

    Molecular contamination is a known area of concern for spacecraft. To mitigate this risk, projects involving space flight hardware set requirements in a contamination control plan that establishes an allocation budget for the exposure of non-volatile residues (NVR) onto critical surfaces. The purpose of this work will focus on non-contact surface analysis and in situ monitoring to mitigate molecular contamination on space flight hardware. By using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) with Raman Spectroscopy, an unlikely contaminant was identified on space flight hardware. Using traditional and surface analysis methods provided the broader view of the contamination sources allowing for best fit solutions to prevent any future exposure.

  4. Removing external DNA contamination from arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular gut-content analysis enables detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that mass-collection methods, such as sweep-netting, vacuum sampling, and foliage beating, can lead to contamination of fed pred...

  5. Intrinsic bacterial biodegradation of petroleum contamination demonstrated in situ using natural abundance, molecular-level 14C analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.F.; Nelson, R.K.; Kile, B.M.; Reddy, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural abundance, molecular-level C 14 analysis was combined with comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) to investigate, in situ, the role of intrinsic biodegradation in the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons from the rocky, inter-tidal zone impacted by the Bouchard 120 oil spill. GC x GC analysis indicated accelerated losses of n-alkane components of the residual petroleum hydrocarbons between day 40 and day 50 after the spill. 14 C analysis of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) from the impacted zone on day 44 showed that the polyunsaturated fatty acids attributed to the photoautotrophic component of the microbial community had the same ( 14 C as the local dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG), indicating that this DIG was their carbon source. In contrast there was significant (C depletion in the saturated and mono-unsaturated PLFA indicating incorporation of petroleum carbon. This correlation between the observed accelerated n-alkane losses and microbial incorporation of (C-depleted carbon directly demonstrated, in situ, that intrinsic biodegradation was affecting the petroleum. Since the majority of organic contaminants originate from petroleum feed-stocks, in situ molecular-level 14 C analysis of microbial PLFA can provide insights into the occurrence and pathways of biodegradation of a wide range of organic contaminants. (Author)

  6. Molecular Analysis of Microbial Community Structures in Pristine and Contaminated Aquifers: Field and Laboratory Microcosm Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zwolinski, M. D.; Schreiber, M. E.; Bahr, J. M.; Sewell, G. W.; Hickey, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    This study used phylogenetic probes in hybridization analysis to (i) determine in situ microbial community structures in regions of a shallow sand aquifer that were oxygen depleted and fuel contaminated (FC) or aerobic and noncontaminated (NC) and (ii) examine alterations in microbial community structures resulting from exposure to toluene and/or electron acceptor supplementation (nitrate). The latter objective was addressed by using the NC and FC aquifer materials for anaerobic microcosm studies in which phylogenetic probe analysis was complemented by microbial activity assays. Domain probe analysis of the aquifer samples showed that the communities were predominantly Bacteria; Eucarya and Archaea were not detectable. At the phylum and subclass levels, the FC and NC aquifer material had similar relative abundance distributions of 43 to 65% β- and γ-Proteobacteria (B+G), 31 to 35% α-Proteobacteria (ALF), 15 to 18% sulfate-reducing bacteria, and 5 to 10% high G+C gram positive bacteria. Compared to that of the NC region, the community structure of the FC material differed mainly in an increased abundance of B+G relative to that of ALF. The microcosm communities were like those of the field samples in that they were predominantly Bacteria (83 to 101%) and lacked detectable Archaea but differed in that a small fraction (2 to 8%) of Eucarya was detected regardless of the treatment applied. The latter result was hypothesized to reflect enrichment of anaerobic protozoa. Addition of nitrate and/or toluene stimulated microbial activity in the microcosms, but only supplementation of toluene alone significantly altered community structures. For the NC material, the dominant subclass shifted from B+G to ALF, while in the FC microcosms 55 to 65% of the Bacteria community was no longer identifiable by the phylum or subclass probes used. The latter result suggested that toluene exposure fostered the proliferation of phylotype(s) that were otherwise minor constituents of the

  7. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Guessan, L.A.; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, K.P.; Mouser, P.J.; Methe, B.; Woodard, T. L.; Manley, K.; Williams, K. H.; Wilkins, M. J.; Larsen, J.T.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2009-09-01

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  8. Molecular analysis of microbial community structures in pristine and contaminated aquifers--Field and laboratory microcosm experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zwolinski, M.D.; Schreiber, M.E.; Bahr, J.M.; Sewell, G.W.; Hickey, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular Analysis of Microbial Community Structures in Pristine and Contaminated Aquifers: Field and Laboratory Microcosm Experimentsvar callbackToken='531E8ACDB6C8511'; var subCode='asmjournal_sub'; var OAS_sitepage = 'aem.asm.org'; This study used phylogenetic probes in hybridization analysis to (i) determine in situ microbial community structures in regions of a shallow sand aquifer that were oxygen depleted and fuel contaminated (FC) or aerobic and noncontaminated (NC) and (ii) examine alterations in microbial community structures resulting from exposure to toluene and/or electron acceptor supplementation (nitrate). The latter objective was addressed by using the NC and FC aquifer materials for anaerobic microcosm studies in which phylogenetic probe analysis was complemented by microbial activity assays. Domain probe analysis of the aquifer samples showed that the communities were predominantlyBacteria; Eucarya and Archaea were not detectable. At the phylum and subclass levels, the FC and NC aquifer material had similar relative abundance distributions of 43 to 65% β- and γ-Proteobacteria (B+G), 31 to 35% α-Proteobacteria (ALF), 15 to 18% sulfate-reducing bacteria, and 5 to 10% high G+C gram positive bacteria. Compared to that of the NC region, the community structure of the FC material differed mainly in an increased abundance of B+G relative to that of ALF. The microcosm communities were like those of the field samples in that they were predominantly Bacteria (83 to 101%) and lacked detectable Archaea but differed in that a small fraction (2 to 8%) of Eucarya was detected regardless of the treatment applied. The latter result was hypothesized to reflect enrichment of anaerobic protozoa. Addition of nitrate and/or toluene stimulated microbial activity in the microcosms, but only supplementation of toluene alone significantly altered community structures. For the NC material, the dominant subclass shifted from B+G to ALF, while in the FC microcosms 55 to 65

  9. Analysis of food contaminants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbert, John

    1984-01-01

    ... quantification methods used in the analysis of mycotoxins in foods - Confirmation and quantification of trace organic food contaminants by mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring - Chemiluminescence...

  10. Contamination analysis unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig

  11. Assessment of molecular contamination in mask pod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foray, Jean Marie; Dejaune, Patrice; Sergent, Pierre; Gough, Stuart; Cheung, D.; Davenet, Magali; Favre, Arnaud; Rude, C.; Trautmann, T.; Tissier, Michel; Fontaine, H.; Veillerot, M.; Avary, K.; Hollein, I.; Lerit, R.

    2008-04-01

    Context/ study Motivation: Contamination and especially Airbone Molecular Contamination (AMC) is a critical issue for mask material flow with a severe and fairly unpredictable risk of induced contamination and damages especially for 193 nm lithography. It is therefore essential to measure, to understand and then try to reduce AMC in mask environment. Mask material flow was studied in a global approach by a pool of European partners, especially within the frame of European MEDEA+ project, so called "MUSCLE". This paper deals with results and assessment of mask pod environment in term of molecular contamination in a first step, then in a second step preliminary studies to reduce mask pod influence and contamination due to material out gassing. Approach and techniques: A specific assessment of environmental / molecular contamination along the supply chain was performed by all partners. After previous work presented at EMLC 07, further studies were performed on real time contamination measurement pod at different sites locations (including Mask manufacturing site, blank manufacturing sites, IC fab). Studies were linked to the main critical issues: cleaning, storage, handling, materials and processes. Contamination measurement campaigns were carried out along the mask supply chain using specific Adixen analyzer in order to monitor in real time organic contaminants (ppb level) in mask pods. Key results would be presented: VOC, AMC and humidity level on different kinds of mask carriers, impact of basic cleaning on pod outgassing measurement (VOC, NH3), and process influence on pod contamination... In a second step, preliminary specific pod conditioning studies for better pod environment were performed based on Adixen vacuum process. Process influence had been experimentally measured in term of molecular outgassing from mask pods. Different AMC experimental characterization methods had been carried out leading to results on a wide range of organic and inorganic

  12. Molecular contamination math model support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R.

    1983-01-01

    The operation and features of a preprocessor for the Shuttle/Payload Contamination Evaluation Program Version 2) are described. A preliminary preprocessor for SPACE 2 is developed. Further refinements and enhancements of the preprocessor to insure complete user friendly operation, are recommended.

  13. Contamination Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents 3 different tools developed recently for contamination analysis:HTML QCM analyzer: runs in a web browser, and allows for data analysis of QCM log filesJava RGA extractor: can load in multiple SRS.ana files and extract pressure vs. time dataC++ Contamination Simulation code: 3D particle tracing code for modeling transport of dust particulates and molecules. Uses residence time to determine if molecules stick. Particulates can be sampled from IEST-STD-1246 and be accelerated by aerodynamic forces.

  14. Analysis of genetic susceptibility to mercury contamination evaluated through molecular biomarkers in at-risk Amazon Amerindian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Nazare Klautau-Guimarães

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated Individual differences in susceptibility to methylmercury (MeHg contamination and its relationship with polymorphisms of the detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST. In Brazil, some Amerindian tribes from the Amazon region have an increased level of mercury in their hair. Samples of hair and blood were taken from inhabitants of two villages in the Kayabi and Munduruku Amerindian communities to investigate mercury levels in association with genetic polymorphism of GSTs. Other molecular biological markers were also studied, such as hemoglobin, haptoglobin and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH. Higher levels of mercury contamination were found in the Kayabi villagers, who had a null genotype (GSTM1 0/0, also denominated GSTM1 null frequency of 26%, than in the Munduruku villagers, for which the null genotype frequency was 0%. Individuals with the GSTM1 null phenotype had higher concentrations of mercury in their hair than individuals with GSTM1+/+ phenotypes (F = 21.51, p < 0.0001. No association with other markers studied was observed. This study suggests that GSTM1 may be involved in the biotransformation of mercury in humans.

  15. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  16. Integrated metagenomics and molecular ecological network analysis of bacterial community composition during the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaojin; Zheng, Yuan; Ding, Chuanyu; Ren, Xuemin; Yuan, Jian; Sun, Feng; Li, Yuying

    2017-11-01

    Two energy crops (maize and soybean) were used in the remediation of cadmium-contaminated soils. These crops were used because they are fast growing, have a large biomass and are good sources for bioenergy production. The total accumulation of cadmium in maize and soybean plants was 393.01 and 263.24μg pot -1 , respectively. The rhizosphere bacterial community composition was studied by MiSeq sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequences. The rhizosphere bacteria were divided into 33 major phylogenetic groups according to phyla. The dominant phylogenetic groups included Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Bacteroidetes. Based on principal component analysis (PCA) and unweighted pair group with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis, we found that the bacterial community was influenced by cadmium addition and bioenergy cropping. Three molecular ecological networks were constructed for the unplanted, soybean- and maize-planted bacterial communities grown in 50mgkg -1 cadmium-contaminated soils. The results indicated that bioenergy cropping increased the complexity of the bacterial community network as evidenced by a higher total number of nodes, the average geodesic distance (GD), the modularity and a shorter geodesic distance. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were the keystone bacteria connecting different co-expressed operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The results showed that bioenergy cropping altered the topological roles of individual OTUs and keystone populations. This is the first study to reveal the effects of bioenergy cropping on microbial interactions in the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by network reconstruction. This method can greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of plant-microbe-metal interactions in metal-polluted ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Contaminant analysis automation, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.; Ramos, O. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To meet the environmental restoration and waste minimization goals of government and industry, several government laboratories, universities, and private companies have formed the Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) team. The goal of this consortium is to design and fabricate robotics systems that standardize and automate the hardware and software of the most common environmental chemical methods. In essence, the CAA team takes conventional, regulatory- approved (EPA Methods) chemical analysis processes and automates them. The automation consists of standard laboratory modules (SLMs) that perform the work in a much more efficient, accurate, and cost- effective manner

  18. Unnecessary roughness? Testing the hypothesis that predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis must be hand-collected to avoid cross-contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular gut-content analysis enables direct detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of on-going ecosystem processes. Mass-collection methods, such as sweep-netting, vacuum sampling, and foliage beating, could lead to regurgitation or even rupturing of predators along with uneaten ...

  19. Anchoring novel molecular biomarker responses to traditional responses in fish exposed to environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Patricia; Pacheco, Mario; Lourdes Pereira, M.; Mendo, Sonia; Rotchell, Jeanette M.

    2010-01-01

    The responses of Dicentrarchus labrax and Liza aurata to aquatic pollution were assessed in a contaminated coastal lagoon, using both traditional and novel biomarkers combined. DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, was higher in both fish species from the contaminated sites, whereas levels of cytochrome P450 1A1 gene expression were not significantly altered. The liver histopathological analysis also revealed significant lesions in fish from contaminated sites. Alterations in ras and xpf genes were analysed and additional pollutant-responsive genes were identified. While no alterations were found in ras gene, a downregulation of xpf gene was observed in D. labrax from a contaminated site. Suppression subtractive hybridization applied to D. labrax collected at a contaminated site, revealed altered expression in genes involved in energy metabolism, immune system activity and antioxidant response. The approach and results reported herein demonstrate the utility of anchoring traditional biomarker responses alongside novel biomarker responses. - Novel molecular biomarkers of aquatic environmental contamination in fish.

  20. Impact of Laboratory Cross-Contamination on Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Miguel; de Viedma, Darío García; Alonso, María; Andrés, Sandra; Bouza, Emilio; Cabezas, Teresa; Cabeza, Isabel; Reyes, Armando; Sánchez-Yebra, Waldo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Sánchez, M. Isabel; Rogado, M. Cruz; Fernández, Rosa; Peñafiel, Teresa; Martínez, Juan; Barroso, Pilar; Lucerna, M. Ángeles; Diez, L. Felipe; Gutiérrez, Carmelo

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory cross-contamination by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to be responsible for the misdiagnosis of tuberculosis, but its impact on other contexts has not been analyzed. We present the findings of a molecular epidemiology analysis in which the recent transmission events identified by a genotyping reference center were overestimated as a result of unnoticed laboratory cross-contamination in the original diagnostic laboratories. PMID:16891518

  1. Air contamination analysis during emergency medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Fukutsu, K.; Yuuki, M.; Akashi, M.

    2009-01-01

    After radiological emergencies, patients contaminated with radioactivity are taken to radiation emergency hospitals for treatment. Numerical simulations using the computer software 'Flow Designer R were made in order to evaluate indoor air contamination caused by the breathing out of contaminated air. The National Inst. of Radiological Sciences facility was used for the numerical evaluation. Results indicate that the dispersion of contaminated air depends on the characteristics of the contaminants, and that the dispersion range was limited and localised. Only medical staff standing in a special position near the patient was exposed to almost un-diluted contaminated air. Highly contaminated air was evacuated with a local exhaust pump system. Room air quality was monitored using a continuous air sampling system, but it was found that the sampling point was not representative for the purpose of radiation protection. From the air-flow analysis, some problems that affect radiological safety were revealed and valuable information and measures for preventing secondary contamination were determined. (authors)

  2. Analysis and characterization of contamination in EUV reticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Fahr, Torsten; Wallow, Tom; La Fontaine, Bruno; Wood, Obert; Holfeld, Christian; Bubke, Karsten; Peters, Jan-Hendrik

    2010-04-01

    A host of complementary imaging techniques (Scanning Electron Microscopy), surface analytical technique (Auger Electron Spectroscopy, AES), chemical analytical and speciation techniques (Grazing Incidence Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, GIR-FTIR; and Raman spectroscopy) have been assessed for their sensitivity and effectiveness in analyzing contamination on three EUV reticles that were contaminated to varying degrees. The first reticle was contaminated as a result of its exposure experience on the SEMATECH EUV Micro Exposure Tool (MET) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, where it was exposed to up to 80 hours of EUV radiation. The second reticle was a full-field reticle, specifically designed to monitor molecular contamination, and exposed to greater than 1600J/cm2 of EUV radiation on the ASML Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) in Albany Nanotech in New York. The third reticle was intentionally contaminated with hydrocarbons in the Microscope for Mask Imaging and Contamination Studies (MIMICS) tool at the College of Nanoscale Sciences of State University of New York at Albany. The EUV reflectivities of some of these reticles were measured on the Advanced Light Source EUV Reflectomer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories and PTB Bessy in Berlin, respectively. Analysis and characterization of thin film contaminants on the two EUV reticles exposed to varying degrees of EUV radiation in both MET and ADT confirm that the two most common contamination types are carbonization and surface oxidation, mostly on the exposed areas of the reticle, and with the MET being significantly more susceptible to carbon contamination than the ADT. While AES in both surface scanning and sputter mode is sensitive and efficient in analyzing thin contaminant films (of a few nanometers), GIRFTIR is sensitive to thick films (of order of a 100 nm or more on non-infra-red reflecting substrates), Raman spectroscopy is not compatible with analyzing such contaminants because of

  3. Molecular biomonitoring during rhizoremediation of oil-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jussila, M.

    2006-07-01

    Rhizoremediation is the use of microbial populations present in the rhizosphere of plants for environmental cleanup. The idea of this work was that bacteria living in the rhizosphere of a nitrogen-fixing leguminous plant, goat's rue (Galega orientalis), could take part in the degradation of harmful monoaromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene and xylene (BTEX), from oil-contaminated soils. In addition to chemical (e.g. pollutant concentration) and physical (e.g. soil structure) information, the knowledge of biological aspects (e.g. bacteria and their catabolic genes) is essential when developing the rhizoremediation into controlled and effective bioremediation practice. Therefore, the need for reliable biomonitoring methods is obvious. The main aims of this thesis were to evaluate the symbiotic G. orientalis - Rhizobium galegae system for rhizoremediation of oil-contaminated soils, to develop molecular methods for biomonitoring, and to apply these methods for studying the microbiology of rhizoremediation. In vitro, Galega plants and rhizobia remained viable in m-toluate concentrations up to 3000 mg/l. Plant growth and nodulation were inhibited in 500 mg/l m-toluate, but were restored when plants were transferred to clean medium. In the greenhouse, Galega showed good growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and developed a strong rhizosphere in soils contaminated with oil or spiked with 2000 mg/l m-toluate. The high aromatic tolerance of R. galegae and the viability of Galega plants in oil-polluted soils proved this legume system to be a promising method for the rhizoremediation of oil-contaminated soils. Molecular biomonitoring methods were designed and/or developed further for bacteria and their degradation genes. A combination of genomic fingerprinting ((GTG)5-PCR), taxonomic ribotyping of 16S rRNA genes and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing were chosen for molecular grouping of culturable, heterogeneous rhizosphere bacteria. PCR primers specific for

  4. Environmental analysis of contaminated sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sunahara, G.I; Renoux, A; Thellen, C; Gaudet, C.L; Pilon, A

    2002-01-01

    .... Topics addressed include: the integration of terrestrial ecotoxicity testing with respect to a chemical's behaviour in soil, developments in contaminated soil risk assessment, and the use of advanced scientific data...

  5. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic characterization of PAH contaminants at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moonkoo . E-mail moonkoo.kim@wmich.edu; Kennicutt, Mahlon C.; Qian Yaorong

    2006-01-01

    The molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of contaminant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at McMurdo Station, Antarctica were analyzed in samples collected from land and sub-tidal area. PAHs in the study areas were characterized by high amounts of naphthalene and alkylated naphthalenes from petroleum products introduced by human activities in the area. Principal component analysis (PCA) of PAH composition data identified multiple sources of PAH contamination in the study area. Compositional assignments of origins were confirmed using compound specific stable carbon isotopic analysis

  6. Optimized molecular resolution of cross-contamination alerts in clinical mycobacteriology laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Viedma Darío

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of misdiagnosing tuberculosis (TB by laboratory cross-contamination when culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB has been widely reported and it has an obvious clinical, therapeutic and social impact. The final confirmation of a cross-contamination event requires the molecular identification of the same MTB strain cultured from both the potential source of the contamination and from the false-positive candidate. The molecular tool usually applied in this context is IS6110-RFLP which takes a long time to provide an answer, usually longer than is acceptable for microbiologists and clinicians to make decisions. Our purpose in this study is to evaluate a novel PCR-based method, MIRU-VNTR as an alternative to assure a rapid and optimized analysis of cross-contamination alerts. Results MIRU-VNTR was prospectively compared with IS6110-RFLP for clarifying 19 alerts of false positivity from other laboratories. MIRU-VNTR highly correlated with IS6110-RFLP, reduced the response time by 27 days and clarified six alerts unresolved by RFLP. Additionally, MIRU-VNTR revealed complex situations such as contamination events involving polyclonal isolates and a false-positive case due to the simultaneous cross-contamination from two independent sources. Conclusion Unlike standard RFLP-based genotyping, MIRU-VNTR i could help reduce the impact of a false positive diagnosis of TB, ii increased the number of events that could be solved and iii revealed the complexity of some cross-contamination events that could not be dissected by IS6110-RFLP.

  7. Molecular analysis of thymoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Badve

    Full Text Available Histologic classification of thymomas has significant limitations with respect to both subtype definitions and consistency. In order to better understand the biology of the disease processes, we performed whole genome gene expression analysis. RNA was extracted from fresh frozen tumors from 34 patients with thymomas and followup data was available. Using the Illumina BeadStudio® platform and Human Ref-8 Beadchip, gene expression data was analyzed with Partek Genomics Suite®, and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA. Unsupervised clustering of gene expression data, representing one of the largest series in literature, resulted in identification of four molecular clusters of tumors (C1-C4, which correlated with histology (P = 0.002. However, neither histology nor clusters correlated with clinical outcomes. Correlation of gene expression data with clinical data showed that a number of genes were associated with either advanced stage at diagnosis or development of recurrence or metastases. The top pathways associated with metastases were amino acid metabolisms, biosynthesis of steroids and glycosphingolipids, cell cycle checkpoint proteins and Notch signaling. The differential expression of some of the top genes related to both metastases and stage was confirmed by RT-PCR in all cases of metastases and matched nonmetastatic cases. A number of potential candidates for therapeutics were also identified.

  8. Evaluation of Contamination Inspection and Analysis Methods through Modeling System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasly, Elaine; Dever, Jason; Stuban, Steven M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Contamination is usually identified as a risk on the risk register for sensitive space systems hardware. Despite detailed, time-consuming, and costly contamination control efforts during assembly, integration, and test of space systems, contaminants are still found during visual inspections of hardware. Improved methods are needed to gather information during systems integration to catch potential contamination issues earlier and manage contamination risks better. This research explores evaluation of contamination inspection and analysis methods to determine optical system sensitivity to minimum detectable molecular contamination levels based on IEST-STD-CC1246E non-volatile residue (NVR) cleanliness levels. Potential future degradation of the system is modeled given chosen modules representative of optical elements in an optical system, minimum detectable molecular contamination levels for a chosen inspection and analysis method, and determining the effect of contamination on the system. By modeling system performance based on when molecular contamination is detected during systems integration and at what cleanliness level, the decision maker can perform trades amongst different inspection and analysis methods and determine if a planned method is adequate to meet system requirements and manage contamination risk.

  9. Economic analysis of recycling contaminated concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, A.; Ayers, K.W.; Boren, J.K.; Parker, F.L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination and Decommissioning activities in the DOE complex generate large volumes of radioactively contaminated and uncontaminated concrete. Currently, this concrete is usually decontaminated, the contaminated waste is disposed of in a LLW facility and the decontaminated concrete is placed in C&D landfills. A number of alternatives to this practice are available including recycling of the concrete. Cost estimates for six alternatives were developed using a spreadsheet model. The results of this analysis show that recycling alternatives are at least as economical as current practice.

  10. Method and system for gas flow mitigation of molecular contamination of optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Gildardo; Johnson, Terry; Arienti, Marco; Harb, Salam; Klebanoff, Lennie; Garcia, Rudy; Tahmassebpur, Mohammed; Scott, Sarah

    2018-01-23

    A computer-implemented method for determining an optimized purge gas flow in a semi-conductor inspection metrology or lithography apparatus, comprising receiving a permissible contaminant mole fraction, a contaminant outgassing flow rate associated with a contaminant, a contaminant mass diffusivity, an outgassing surface length, a pressure, a temperature, a channel height, and a molecular weight of a purge gas, calculating a flow factor based on the permissible contaminant mole fraction, the contaminant outgassing flow rate, the channel height, and the outgassing surface length, comparing the flow factor to a predefined maximum flow factor value, calculating a minimum purge gas velocity and a purge gas mass flow rate from the flow factor, the contaminant mass diffusivity, the pressure, the temperature, and the molecular weight of the purge gas, and introducing the purge gas into the semi-conductor inspection metrology or lithography apparatus with the minimum purge gas velocity and the purge gas flow rate.

  11. A study on EUV reticle surface molecular contamination under different storage conditions in a HVM foundry fab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, SherJang; Yatzor, Brett; Taylor, Ron; Wood, Obert; Mangat, Pawitter

    2017-03-01

    The prospect of EUVL (Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography) insertion into HVM (High Volume Manufacturing) has never been this promising. As technology is prepared for "lab to fab" transition, it becomes important to comprehend challenges associated with integrating EUVL infrastructure within existing high volume chip fabrication processes in a foundry fab. The existing 193nm optical lithography process flow for reticle handling and storage in a fab atmosphere is well established and in-fab reticle contamination concerns are mitigated with the reticle pellicle. However EUVL reticle pellicle is still under development and if available, may only provide protection against particles but not molecular contamination. HVM fab atmosphere is known to be contaminated with trace amounts of AMC's (Atmospheric Molecular Contamination). If such contaminants are organic in nature and get absorbed on the reticle surface, EUV photon cause photo-dissociation resulting into carbon generation which is known to reduce multilayer reflectivity and also degrades exposure uniformity. Chemical diffusion and aggregation of other ions is also reported under the e-beam exposure of a EUV reticle which is known to cause haze issues in optical lithography. Therefore it becomes paramount to mitigate absorbed molecular contaminant concerns on EUVL reticle surface. In this paper, we have studied types of molecular contaminants that are absorbed on an EUVL reticle surface under HVM fab storage and handling conditions. Effect of storage conditions (gas purged vs atmospheric) in different storage pods (Dual pods, Reticle Clamshells) is evaluated. Absorption analysis is done both on ruthenium capping layer as well as TaBN absorber. Ru surface chemistry change as a result of storage is also studied. The efficacy of different reticle cleaning processes to remove absorbed contaminant is evaluated as well.

  12. Nondestructive analysis of plutonium contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.E.; Taylor, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium contaminated soil is currently being removed from a covered liquid waste disposal trench near the Pu Processing facility on the Hanford Project. This soil with the plutonium is being mined using remote techniques and equipment. The mined soil is being packaged for placement into retrievable storage, pending possible recovery. To meet the requirements of criticality safety and materials accountability, a nondestructive analysis program has been developed to determine the quantity of plutonium in each packing-storage container. This paper describes the total measurement program: equipment systems, calibration techniques, matrix assumption, instrument control program and a review of laboratory operating experience

  13. Molecular Characterization of Microbial Communities in a JP-4 Fuel Contaminated Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelona, M.J.; Chang, Y.-J.; Gan, Y.D.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Peacock, A.; Stephen, J.R.; White, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, lipid biomarker characterization of the bacterial and eukaryotic communities was combined with PCR-DGGE analysis of the eubacterial community to evaluate correlation between JP-4 fuel concentration and community structure shifts. Vadose, capillary fringe and saturated-soils were taken from cores within, up- and down-gradient of the contaminant plume. Significant differences in biomass and proportion of Gram negative bacteria were found inside and outside the plume. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands from within the spill site suggested dominance by a limited number of phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Used in tandem with pollutant quantification, these molecular techniques should facilitate significant improvements over current assessment procedures for determination of remediation end points

  14. Molecular contamination mitigation in EUVL by environmental control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, N.; Mertens, B.; Jansen, R.; van de Runstraat, A.; Stietz, F.; Wedowski, M.; Meiling, H.; Klein, R.; Gottwald, A.; Scholze, F.; Visser, M.; Kurt, R.; Zalm, P.; E. Louis,; Yakshin, A.

    2002-01-01

    EUVL tools operate under vacuum conditions to avoid absorption losses. Under these conditions, the MoSi multilayer mirrors are contaminated, resulting in reduced reflection and thus throughput. We report on experiments on MoSi mirrors exposed to EUV radiation from a synchrotron. To mimic the effects

  15. Analysis of bacterial strains from contaminated and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... A total 18 strains were collected from non-contaminated and contaminated environments, and were purified. All purified strains were characterized for Gram reaction and biochemical analysis. Screening for bioplastic production was done by Sudan black staining. Strains isolated from non-contaminated.

  16. Conformation analysis of trehalose. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnamaira, M.C.; Howard, E.I.; Grigera, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Conformational analysis of the disaccharide trehalose is done by molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics. In spite of the different force fields used in each case, comparison between the molecular dynamics trajectories of the torsional angles of glycosidic linkage and energy conformational map shows a good agreement between both methods. By molecular dynamics it is observed a moderate mobility of the glycosidic linkage. The demands of computer time is comparable in both cases. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  17. Molecular detection of mycobiota and aflatoxin contamination of chili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherbawy Youssuf A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsicum annuum grows in warm areas. Pepper production conditions require the drying of fruits by sunlight. During the drying processes, the crop is exposed to contamination by microorganisms, especially fungi. In this article, the isolation of mycobiota from retail markets and food restaurants of Taif city was studied. Crushed chili showed a high fungal load compared to chili sauce and chili powder, while chili powder showed a high occurrence of total aflatoxins (AFs. Aspergillus, Eurotium and Penicillium were the most common genera isolated from chili samples. Thirty-four samples (out of 60 were naturally contaminated with AFs ranging from 20 to 200 ppb. The total aflatoxin potential of 35 isolates of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. tamarri were studied. Seventy percent of A. flavus isolates were aflatoxigenic. The frequencies of aflatoxin biosynthesis genes aflR, nor-1, ver-1 and omtA were studied in aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic isolates of Aspergillus species collected in this study. All aflatoxigenic isolates (21 and 1 non-aflatoxigenic isolate of A. flavus showed DNA fragments that correspond to the complete set of the targeted genes. In conclusion, the high co-occurrence of Aspergillus species capable of producing aflatoxins, particularly in chili samples, suggests the need for more efficient control during processing and storage to reduce fungal contamination.

  18. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarei, Mehdi; Hempel, Stefan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Schaefer, Tina; Savaghebi, Gholamreza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Buscot, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. - The molecular diversity of AMF was found to be influenced by a combination of soil heavy metal and other soil chemical parameters.

  19. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarei, Mehdi [Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture, University of Shiraz, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hempel, Stefan, E-mail: hempel.stefan@googlemail.co [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Biologie, Okologie der Pflanzen, Altensteinstrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wubet, Tesfaye; Schaefer, Tina [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Savaghebi, Gholamreza [Department of Soil Science Engineering, University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), P.O. Box 31535-1897, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Buscot, Francois [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. - The molecular diversity of AMF was found to be influenced by a combination of soil heavy metal and other soil chemical parameters.

  20. Sedimentological analysis of a contaminated groundwater aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towse, D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of sedimentological reservoir analysis techniques adapted from standard oilfield practice can improve the efficiency and reduce the costs of the evaluation of groundwater aquifers and the design of restoration programs. An evaluation/restoration program at a site in California drilled over 200 test wells in about 750 ac. All wells were logged lithologically and with wireline. The shallow aquifer is a complex braided alluvial floodplain deposit of Late Quaternary age. Analysis demonstrates depositional and erosional responses to periodic hinterland uplifts and to changing climatic conditions. Channel, overbank, lacustrine, and minor deltaic deposits can be recognized. The aquifer architecture has been interpreted to explain the movement of fuel and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents in the sediments and water. Routine engineering geology techniques and hydrologic tests were used to evaluate contamination and to design experimental restoration processes. As demonstrated here, sedimentological techniques show promise in reducing the costs and time required for this type of study. The abundant detailed data will be used in an attempt to develop a microcomputer-based expert system for rapid preliminary analyses of similar aquifers or reservoirs

  1. Collaborative, Nondestructive Analysis of Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davidson, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Parsons-Davis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sharp, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turin, H. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaMont, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zidi, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Belamri, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bounatiro, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Benbouzid, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fellouh, A. S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Idir, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Larbah, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moulay, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Noureddine, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rahal, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-12-14

    This report summarizes a joint nondestructive analysis exercise that LLNL, LANL, and COMENA discussed through a collaborative meeting in July 2017. This work was performed as one part of a collaboration with Algeria under Action Sheet 7: “Technical Cooperation and Assistance in Nuclear Forensics”. The primary intent of this exercise was for US and Algerian participants to jointly share results of nondestructive analyses (NDA) of a contaminated soil sample provided by the Algerians and to discuss key observations and analytical approaches. While the two samples were analyzed blind at LLNL and LANL, the soil samples were revealed after the exercise to have a common origin, and to have originated as an IAEA soil sample (IAEA-326, Bojanowski et al., 2001) provided to COMENA as part of a previous exercise. Comparative analysis revealed common findings between the laboratories, and also emphasized the need for standardized operating procedures to improve inter-comparability and confidence in conclusions. Recommended handling practices in the presence of sample heterogeneities were also discussed. This exercise provided an opportunity to demonstrate nuclear forensics analytical capabilities at COMENA, LANL, and LLNL, and identified areas that could benefit from future technical exchanges. Plans were made for a follow-on joint exercise in 2018, involving destructive analyses of the CUP-2 uranium ore concentrate standard.

  2. Contamination problems from glass beaker inner surface in low level Po-210 analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kameník, Jan; Hölgye, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 2 (2010), s. 493-495 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Po-210 * Low-level analysis * Contamination Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  3. Analysis of soils contaminated with petroleum constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shay, T.A.; Hoddinott, K.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium was held in Atlanta, Georgia on June 24, 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for exchange of information on petroleum contaminated soils. When spilled on the ground, petroleum products can cause massive problems in the environment. In this Special Technical Publication (STP), papers were selected in two categories; the analytical procedures for soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and the behavior of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  4. Long-term oil contamination alters the molecular ecological networks of soil microbial functional genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting eLiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001. Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential keystone genes, defined as either hubs or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions.

  5. RESEARCH NOTE Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous families with primary microcephaly ... Translational Research Institute, Academic Health System, Hamad Medical ..... bridging the gap between homozygosity mapping and deep sequencing.

  6. Methods for the analysis and remediation of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, M.; Bemporad, E.; Berardi, S.; Marino, A.; Paglietti, F.

    2008-01-01

    In Italy, in recent years, the number of contaminated sites has multiplied disproportionately. In essence, contamination is caused by accidental spills or intentional discharge of pollutants into the soils or waters from industrial activities, or non-controlled deposits of urban and/or industrial waste, mostly part toxic and harmful. Contaminated sites clearly pose risks to human health and the environment; hence the need to remediate these sites. The remediation of soil and water and the restoration of degraded areas are complex operations requiring specific technical and scientific know-how, including knowledge of the methodologies and tools required to tackle problems arising during the different phases of the remediation process. These include, in particular: - health and environmental risk assessment procedures for the quantification of risks to human health (general population and workers) and the environment from a contaminated site; - remote sensing and the Geographical Information Systems (GIS), which are a fundamentally important IT support for each phase of planning and management of remediation interventions; - criteria for the management of sites contaminated by asbestos, a highly carcinogenic and therefore hazardous substance that was widely used in the past due to its particular mechanical and thermal characteristics; - analysis of the issues relating to waste management in contaminated sites; - relationship between safety procedures for workers and the general population. Identification of the best available techniques for an efficient, integrated management of contaminated sites, which will also take into account the health protection of workers and of the general population living near such sites

  7. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATIONS RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable emphasis has been placed on developing watershed-based strategies with the potential to reduce non-point-source fecal contamination. Molecular methods applied used 16S-ribosomal-deoxyribonucleic-acid (rDNA) to try to determine sources of fecal contamination. Objectiv...

  8. Contamination control - the analysis of things as they should be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.B.

    Contamination can be controlled in chemical analyses by the use of suitable containers, cleanliness, appropriate apparatus design, isolation of the analysis process from air, and in-situ analysis. Examples based on analyses of organic reactor coolant, metals, and underground natural waters are given. (LL)

  9. Insulator Contamination Forecasting Based on Fractal Analysis of Leakage Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Luo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an artificial pollution test is carried out to study the leakage current of porcelain insulators. Fractal theory is adopted to extract the characteristics hidden in leakage current waveforms. Fractal dimensions of the leakage current for the security, forecast and danger zones are analyzed under four types of degrees of contamination. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fractal dimension in the forecast zone are calculated to characterize the differences. The analysis reveals large differences in the fractal dimension of leakage current under different contamination discharge stages and degrees. The experimental and calculation results suggest that the fractal dimension of a leakage current waveform can be used as a new indicator of the discharge process and contamination degree of insulators. The results provide new methods and valid indicators for forecasting contamination flashovers.

  10. Wavelet Analysis for Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Our method takes as input the topology and sparsity of the bonding structure of a molecular system, and returns a hierarchical set of system-specific...problems, such as modeling crack initiation and propagation, or interfacial phenomena. In the present work, we introduce a wavelet-based approach to extend...Several functional forms are common for angle poten- tials complicating not only implementation but also choice of approximation. In all cases, the

  11. More on contamination: the use of asymmetric molecular behavior to identify authentic ancient human DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Svensson, Emma M; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2007-01-01

    concerning the authenticity of such data. Although several methods have been developed to the purpose of authenticating ancient DNA (aDNA) results, while they are useful in faunal research, most of the methods have proven complicated to apply to ancient human DNA. Here, we investigate in detail...... the reliability of one of the proposed criteria, that of appropriate molecular behavior. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing, we have quantified the relative levels of authentic aDNA and contaminant human DNA sequences recovered from archaeological dog and cattle remains. In doing...

  12. Analysis of contaminants on electronic components by reflectance FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, G.W.

    1982-09-01

    The analysis of electronic component contaminants by infrared spectroscopy is often a difficult process. Most of the contaminants are very small, which necessitates the use of microsampling techniques. Beam condensers will provide the required sensitivity but most require that the sample be removed from the substrate before analysis. Since it can be difficult and time consuming, it is usually an undesirable approach. Micro ATR work can also be exasperating, due to the difficulty of positioning the sample at the correct place under the ATR plate in order to record a spectrum. This paper describes a modified reflection beam condensor which has been adapted to a Nicolet 7199 FTIR. The sample beam is directed onto the sample surface and reflected from the substrate back to the detector. A micropositioning XYZ stage and a close-focusing telescope are used to position the contaminant directly under the infrared beam. It is possible to analyze contaminants on 1 mm wide leads surrounded by an epoxy matrix using this device. Typical spectra of contaminants found on small circuit boards are included

  13. Interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes: Role of surfactant contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larciprete, R.; Goldoni, A.; Lizzit, S.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes in the form of a commercial bucky paper was investigated by high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Sodium contamination was found in the sample, which was completely removed only after prolonged heating at 1250 K. The C 1s core level spectrum measured on the sample annealed to 1020 K dramatically changed upon exposure to molecular oxygen. On the contrary, when exposing the Na-free SWNTs to several KL of O 2 , the sample remained oxygen free and no modification in the C 1s core level was observed. Therefore the observed sensitivity of the sample to O 2 was due to a Na mediated oxidation, determining a charge transfer from the C tubes to the Na-O complex

  14. Two methodologies for optical analysis of contaminated engine lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghayan, Hamid; Yang, Jun; Bordatchev, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    The performance, efficiency and lifetime of modern combustion engines significantly depend on the quality of the engine lubricants. However, contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, coolant and wear particles, reduce the life of engine mechanical components and lubricant quality. Therefore, direct and indirect measurements of engine lubricant properties, such as physical-mechanical, electro-magnetic, chemical and optical properties, are intensively utilized in engine condition monitoring systems and sensors developed within the last decade. Such sensors for the measurement of engine lubricant properties can be used to detect a functional limit of the in-use lubricant, increase drain interval and reduce the environmental impact. This paper proposes two new methodologies for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The methodologies are based on optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium (e.g. engine lubricant). The novelty of the proposed methodologies is in the introduction of an object with a known periodic shape behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant–object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodic structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. In the object shape-based optical analysis, several parameters of an acquired optical image, such as the gray scale intensity of lubricant and object, shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative intensity and width non-uniformity coefficient are newly proposed. Variations in the contaminant concentration and use of different contaminants lead to the changes of these parameters measured on-line. In the statistical optical analysis methodology, statistical auto- and cross-characteristics (e.g. auto- and cross-correlation functions, auto- and cross-spectrums, transfer function

  15. MAVEN Contamination Venting and Outgassing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Elaine M.; Hughes, David W.; Secunda, Mark S.; Chen, Philip T.; Morrissey, James R.; Riegle, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) is the first mission to focus its study on the Mars upper atmosphere. MAVEN will study the evolution of the Mars atmosphere and climate, by examining the conduit through which the atmosphere has to pass as it is lost to the upper atmosphere. An analysis was performed for the MAVEN mission to address two distinct concerns. The first goal of the analysis was to perform an outgassing study to determine where species outgassed from spacecraft materials would redistribute to and how much of the released material might accumulate on sensitive surfaces. The second portion of the analysis serves to predict what effect, if any, Mars atmospheric gases trapped within the spacecraft could have on instrument measurements when re-released through vents. The re-release of atmospheric gases is of interest to this mission because vented gases from a higher pressure spacecraft interior could bias instrument measurements of the Mars atmosphere depending on the flow rates and directions.

  16. Analysis of phthalate esters contamination in drinking water samples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The optimum condition method was successfully applied to the analysis of phthalate esters contamination in bottled drinking water samples. The concentration of DMP, DEP and DBP in drinking water samples were below allowable levels, while the DEHP concentration in three samples was found to be greater than the ...

  17. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a post-exercise analysis of decontamination options for the NUWAX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of NUWAX-83 was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to an accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program, called DECON, was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and used to conduct the decontamination analysis in November 1983. DECON was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: 1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; 2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; 3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; 4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; 5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and 6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  18. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  19. MOLFLUX analysis of the SSF electrical power system contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognion, Rita L.

    1991-01-01

    The external induced contamination of Space Station Freedom's electrical power system surfaces is assessed using a molecular flow evaluation code, MOLFLUX. Outgassing rates are compared to available experimental data, and deposition to the midregion of both the solar array and the photovoltaic power module thermal control system radiator is calculated using a constant sticking coefficient. An estimate of annual deposition to the solar array due to outgassing is found to be 10 percent of the Space Station Freedom program requirement for maximum allowable deposition, while annual deposition to the radiator is approximately equal to the requirement.

  20. Molecular Contamination on Anodized Aluminum Components of the Genesis Science Canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, D. S.; McNamara, K. M.; Jurewicz, A.; Woolum, D.

    2005-01-01

    Inspection of the interior of the Genesis science canister after recovery in Utah, and subsequently at JSC, revealed a darkening on the aluminum canister shield and other canister components. There has been no such observation of film contamination on the collector surfaces, and preliminary spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements support the theory that the films observed on the anodized aluminum components do not appear on the collectors to any significant extent. The Genesis Science Team has made an effort to characterize the thickness and composition of the brown stain and to determine if it is associated with molecular outgassing.Detailed examination of the surfaces within the Genesis science canister reveals that the brown contamination is observed to varying degrees, but only on surfaces exposed in space to the Sun and solar wind hydrogen. In addition, the materials affected are primarily composed of anodized aluminum. A sharp line separating the sun and shaded portion of the thermal closeout panel is shown. This piece was removed from a location near the gold foil collector within the canister. Future plans include a reassembly of the canister components to look for large-scale patterns of contamination within the canister to aid in revealing the root cause.

  1. Mobile Monitoring System for Nuclear Contamination Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broide, A.; Sheinfeld, M.; Marcus, E.; Wengrowicz, U.; Tirosh, D.

    2002-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, it is essential to have extensive knowledge concerning the nature of the radioactive plume expansion, for further analysis. For this purpose a mobile monitoring system may provide important data about the plume characteristics. An advanced Mobile Monitoring System is under development at the Nuclear Research Center-Negev. The system is composed of a network of mobile stations, typically installed onboard vehicles, which transmit radiation measurements along with position information to a central station. The mobile network's communications infrastructure is based on Motorola Mobile Logic Unit devices, which are state-of-the-art reliable modems with an integrated Global Positioning System module. The radiation measurements received by the central station are transferred to a risk assessment program, which evaluates the expected hazards to the populated areas located in the estimated plume's expansion direction

  2. Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on 137Cs release from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Po Neng; Wang, Ming Kuang; Huang, Pan Ming; Wang, Jeng Jong

    2011-01-01

    Radio pollutant removal is one of several priority restoration strategies for the environment. This study assessed the effect of low molecular weight organic acid on the lability and mechanisms for release of 137 Cs from contaminated soils. The amount of 137 Cs radioactivity released from contaminated soils reacting with 0.02 M low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) specifically acetic, succinic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid over 48 h were 265, 370, 760, 850, and 1002 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The kinetic results indicate that 137 Cs exhibits a two-step parabolic diffusion equation and a good linear relationship, indicating that the parabolic diffusion equation describes the data quite well, as shown by low p and high r 2 values. The fast stage, which was found to occur within a short period of time (0.083-3 h), corresponds to the interaction of LMWOAs with the surface of clay minerals; meanwhile, during the slow stage, which occurs over a much longer time period (3-24 h), desorption primarily is attributed to inter-particle or intra-particle diffusion. After a fifth renewal of the LMWOAs, the total levels of 137 Cs radioactivity released by acetic, succinic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid were equivalent to 390, 520, 3949, 2061, and 4422 Bq kg -1 soil, respectively. H + can protonate the hydroxyl groups and oxygen atoms at the broken edges or surfaces of the minerals, thereby weakening Fe-O and Al-O bonds. After protonation of H + , organic ligands can attack the OH and OH 2 groups in the minerals easily, to form complexes with surface structure cations, such as Al and Fe. The amounts of 137 Cs released from contaminated soil treated with LMWOAs were substantially increased, indicating that the LMWOAs excreted by the roots of plants play a critical role in 137 Cs release.

  3. Molecular-level removal of proteinaceous contamination from model surfaces and biomedical device materials by air plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, K K; Kumar, S; Bremmell, K E; Griesser, H J

    2010-11-01

    Established methods for cleaning and sterilising biomedical devices may achieve removal of bioburden only at the macroscopic level while leaving behind molecular levels of contamination (mainly proteinaceous). This is of particular concern if the residue might contain prions. We investigated at the molecular level the removal of model and real-life proteinaceous contamination from model and practical surfaces by air plasma (ionised air) treatment. The surface-sensitive technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to assess the removal of proteinaceous contamination, with the nitrogen (N1s) photoelectron signal as its marker. Model proteinaceous contamination (bovine serum albumin) adsorbed on to a model surface (silicon wafer) and the residual proteinaceous contamination resulting from incubating surgical stainless steel (a practical biomaterial) in whole human blood exhibited strong N1s signals [16.8 and 18.5 atomic percent (at.%), respectively] after thorough washing. After 5min air plasma treatment, XPS detected no nitrogen on the sample surfaces, indicating complete removal of proteinaceous contamination, down to the estimated XPS detection limit 10ng/cm(2). Applying the same plasma treatment, the 7.7at.% nitrogen observed on a clinically cleaned dental bur was reduced to a level reflective of new, as-received burs. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy also indicated complete molecular-level removal of the proteinaceous contamination upon air plasma treatment. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of air plasma treatment for removing proteinaceous contamination from both model and practical surfaces and offers a method for ensuring that no molecular residual contamination such as prions is transferred upon re-use of surgical and dental instruments. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk for molecular contamination of tissue samples evaluated for targeted anti-cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Asor

    Full Text Available With the increasing usage of sensitive PCR technology for pharmacogenetics, cross contamination becomes a significant concern. Researchers employed techniques which basically include replacing laboratory equipment after each sample preparation; however, there are no recommended guidelines. In the present work we wanted to evaluate the risk of cross contamination during tissue processing using the routine precaution measures. Twenty-one surgical samples of lung adenocarcinoma were used, of which 7 contained EGFR exon 19 mutation, 7 contained EGFR exon 21 mutation (p.L858R and 7 were EGFR wild-type. The samples were ordered by alternating the mutation group to maximize the potential for cross contamination and underwent tissue sectioning and de-paraffinization. The entire process was performed using the same tools. Following DNA extraction all samples underwent PCR amplification and were scrutinized for small fractions of EGFR mutation using deep sequencing with the Ion torrent PGM technology. Twenty samples yielded results. The fraction of mutated copies was 41 ± 23% (range 11-66 for the cases with known exon 19 mutation and 48±24% (range 0-65 for the cases with known exon 21 mutations. No in-frame exon 19 deletion mutations were identified in the wild-type (WT and exon 21 groups. The fraction of EGFR exon 21 (codon 858 mutations was 0.018±0.014% (range 0-0.05% in the WT and exon 19 groups, which was not statistically different than the background sequencing artifact noise for the same base-pair alteration (p = 0.21. Our results suggest that standard precautions are sufficient for molecular pathology diagnosis of surgical samples and are not associated with increased risk of cross contamination.

  5. Energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces: Impact of contact contaminations on the interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona, E-mail: sumona.net.09@gmail.com [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Wang, C.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Mukherjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Impact of contact contaminations on the energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces. • Adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. • Hole injection barrier height and interface dipole at rubrene/Ag interfaces depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. • Molecular conformation as well as orientation controlled by the cleanliness of Ag surface. • Resulted different surface morphology of rubrene thin films on unclean and clean Ag substrate. - Abstract: This paper addresses the impact of electrode contaminations on the interfacial energy level alignment, the molecular conformation, orientation and surface morphology deposited organic film at organic semiconductor/noble metal interfaces by varying of film thickness from sub-monolayer to multilayer, which currently draws significant attention with regard to its application in organic electronics. The UHV clean Ag and unclean Ag were employed as substrate whereas rubrene was used as an organic semiconducting material. The photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) was engaged to investigate the evolution of interfacial energetics; polarization dependent near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was employed to understand the molecular conformation as well as orientation whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the films. The adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between clean Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. As a consequence, hole injection barrier height, interface dipole as well as molecular-conformation, molecular-orientation and surface morphology of rubrene thin films were found to depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. The results have important inferences about the understanding of the impact of substrate contamination on the energy level alignment, the molecular conformation

  6. Hydrodynamic analysis application of contaminated groundwater remediation to oil hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajić Predrag R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of the hydrodynamic analysis in the selected ‘pumping and treatment’ remediation method of groundwater hydrocarbon pollution in the case of the Pancevo oil refinery is examined. The applied hydrodynamic analysis represents a regular and necessary approach in modern hydrogeology. Previous chemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples at observation objects revealed their pollution by oil products. New researches included the constraction of 12 piezometric boreholes of varying depths, geoelectric soil sounding, ‘in situ’ measurement of the present contaminant, detected as a hydrophobic phase of LNAPL, chemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples with emphasis on total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH content, total fats and mineral oils, mercury cations and other characteristic compounds, etc. These researches define the volume of contamination issued by the ‘light’ (LNAPL contamination phase. The selected remediation method for this type of pollution is the ‘Pump and Treat’ method, which implies the pumping of contaminated groundwater from aquifer and their subsequent treatment. A hydrodynamic method was used to select the optimal hydrotechnical solution for LNAPL extraction. On the mathematical model, the prediction calculations for two variant solutions were carried out (‘hydraulic isolation’ and complex for the application of groundwater contamination remediation characterized as front pollution substance (by extraction and injection wells or infiltration pool. By extraction wells performing, it would be possible to remove the LNAPL from the surface of the water with special pumps-skimmers. The importance of the hydrodynamic method application is, in addition to the hydrotechnical solution selection for the LNAPL drainage, the provision of quality basis for the dimensioning of these objects based on the results of the groundwater balance.

  7. Alternatives Generation Analysis Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Major pieces of Characterization sampling equipment are currently stored outdoors. This includes the Long Length Contaminated Equipment receiver trailer and transportation trailer. A decision is required to determine the preferred alternative for facilities to store and maintain this equipment. The Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS) consists of many tools, mechanisms, and controllers currently stored in various locations. Much of this equipment should be protected from the elements while being stored. Some of the LLCERS equipment should be protected with some kind of roof cover. This decision analysis is to determine the best alternative for weather protection for the large equipment requiring a cover. Additional details are included in Sections 2.0 and 5.0. Key assumptions used in this analysis are detailed in Section 3.2

  8. Removing external DNA decontamination from arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular gut-content analysis enables detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that mass-collection methods, such as sweep-netting, vacuum sampling, and foliage beating, can lead to contamination of fed pred...

  9. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mehdi; Hempel, Stefan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Schäfer, Tina; Savaghebi, Gholamreza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Buscot, François

    2010-08-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Culture and molecular identification of fungal contaminants in edible bird nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer Xiao Jing; Wong, Shew Fung; Lim, Patricia Kim Chooi; Mak, Joon Wah

    2015-01-01

    Widespread food poisoning due to microbial contamination has been a major concern for the food industry, consumers and governing authorities. This study is designed to determine the levels of fungal contamination in edible bird nests (EBNs) using culture and molecular techniques. Raw EBNs were collected from five house farms, and commercial EBNs were purchased from five Chinese traditional medicine shops (companies A-E) in Peninsular Malaysia. The fungal contents in the raw and commercial EBNs, and boiled and unboiled EBNs were determined. Culturable fungi were isolated and identified. In this study, the use of these methods revealed that all EBNs had fungal colony-forming units (CFUs) that exceeded the limit set by Standards and Industrial Research Institute of Malaysia (SIRIM) for yeast and moulds in EBNs. There was a significant difference (p 0.05). The types of fungi isolated from the unboiled raw EBNs were mainly soil, plant and environmental fungi, while the types of fungi isolated from the boiled raw EBNs, unboiled and boiled commercial EBNs were mainly environmental fungi. Aspergillus sp., Candida sp., Cladosporium sp., Neurospora sp. and Penicillum sp. were the most common fungi isolated from the unboiled and boiled raw and commercial EBNs. Some of these fungi are mycotoxin producers and cause opportunistic infections in humans. Further studies to determine the mycotoxin levels and methods to prevent or remove these contaminations from EBNs for safe consumption are necessary. The establishment and implementation of stringent regulations for the standards of EBNs should be regularly updated and monitored to improve the quality of the EBNs and consumer safety.

  11. Isolation, molecular and biochemical characterization of oil degrading bacteria from contaminated soil at an oil refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Deeb, T.M.; Malkawi, H.I.

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation using microorganisms is considered to be cost-effective and environmentally friendly treatment of oil-contaminated sites. Oil-biodegrading bacterial strains were isolated, identified and characterized from oil contaminated soil samples at oil refinery in Zarqa (Jordan). Thirty four bacterial isolates were grown on mineral salt media supplemented with crude oil, but 16 showed positive biodegradation of diesel. All the 34 bacterial isolates were characterized at the molecular and bio-chemical levels, and showed positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification product size of 1500 bp when 16s rDNA bacterial universal primers were used. Eighteen bacterial isolates showed positive PCR amplification product size of 150 bp specific for the genus Pseudomonas and 3 bacterial isolates showed positive amplification product size of 1500 bp specific for the genus Acinetobacter. Biochemical and physiological characterization performed on the 34 bacterial isolates revealed the presence of oil biodegrading bacterial genera and species of Pseudomonas Acidovorans, P. aeruginosa, P. vesicularis, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Ac. lowffii, Micro-ococcus luteus, M. varians, M. lylae, M. roseus, Alcaligenes denitrificians, Bacillus megaterium, Comamonas sp., Moralxella sp., Bordetella sp., P. putida, P. stutzeri and P. mallei. (au)

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hospital Outbreak Driven by a Contaminated Disinfectant-Soap Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Simone; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Puro, Vincenzo; Martini, Lorena; Imperi, Francesco; Piselli, Pierluca; Montanaro, Marco; Paoletti, Simonetta; Visca, Paolo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection represents a main cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. This study describes a fatal epidemic of P. aeruginosa that occurred in a hematology unit in Italy. Methods Retrospective cohort study, prospective surveillance, auditing, extensive testing on healthcare workers and environmental investigation were performed to define the dynamics and potential causes of transmission. RAPD, macrorestriction analyses and sequence typing were used to define relationships between P. aeruginosa isolates. Results Eighteen cases of infection were identified in the different phases of the investigation. Of these, five constitute a significant molecular cluster of infection. A P. aeruginosa strain with the same genetic fingerprint and sequence type (ST175) as clinical isolates strain was also isolated from a heavily contaminated triclosan soap dispenser. Discussion and Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that patients became indirectly infected, e.g., during central venous catheter handling through contaminated items, and that the triclosan soap dispenser acted as a common continuous source of P. aeruginosa infection. Since P. aeruginosa is intrinsically unsusceptible to triclosan, the use of triclosan-based disinfectant formulations should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:21359222

  13. Soft X-ray-assisted detection method for airborne molecular contaminations (AMCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Changhyuk; Zuo, Zhili [University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Finger, Hartmut; Haep, Stefan; Asbach, Christof; Fissan, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA e. V.) (Germany); Pui, David Y. H., E-mail: dyhpui@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Airborne molecular contaminations (AMCs) represent a wide range of gaseous contaminants in cleanrooms. Due to the unintentional nanoparticle or haze formation as well as doping caused by AMCs, improved monitoring and controlling methods for AMCs are urgent in the semiconductor industry. However, measuring ultra-low concentrations of AMCs in cleanrooms is difficult, especially, behind a gas filter. In this study, a novel detection method for AMCs, which is on-line, economical, and applicable for diverse AMCs, was developed by employing gas-to-particle conversion with soft X-ray, and then measuring the generated nanoparticles. Feasibility study of this method was conducted through the evaluations of granular-activated carbons (GACs), which are widely used AMC filter media. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) was used as an AMC for the feasibility study. Using this method, the ultra-low concentrations of SO{sub 2} behind GACs were determined in terms of concentrations of generated sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) nanoparticles. By calculating SO{sub 2} concentrations from the nanoparticle concentrations using empirical correlation equations between them, remarkable sensitivity of this method to SO{sub 2} was shown, down to parts-per-trillions, which are too low to detect using commercial gas sensors. Also, the calculated SO{sub 2} concentrations showed good agreement with those measured simultaneously by a commercial SO{sub 2} monitor at parts-per-billions.

  14. Characterization of high molecular weight cadmium species in contaminated vegetable food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, K.; Kastenholz, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere 7: Angewandte Physikalische Chemie; Ji, G. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelwissenschaft und Lebensmittelchemie

    2000-10-01

    Spinach and radish grown from seeds were each contaminated with 4 different amounts of cadmium. After a cell breakdown of the eatable parts and centrifugation of the resulting homogenates all supernatants (cytosols) were separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The size-range of the GPC method used was about 20-8000 kDa for globular proteins. The high molecular weight (HMW-Cd-SP, 150-700 kDa) and the low molecular weight Cd species (LMW-Cd-SP, < 150 kDa) in all plant cytosols eluted at about the same retention volume by GPC. The most important Cd binding form in the cytosols of all plants was found to be HMW-Cd-SP. The Cd elution maxima were detected in the range of about 200 kDa. The Cd determinations were performed with ET-AAS by means of matrix modifier. By incubating chosen cytosols with a proteinase before the GPC it was verified that the HMW-Cd-SP in both vegetables are Cd proteins. The molar proportions protein/Cd were about 2-6 in the respective GPC fractions of the HMW-Cd-SP of the highest contaminated plants. The GPC fractions of the HMW-Cd-SP of spinach and radish were further separated by a preparative, native and continuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) method. At pH 8 the species were negatively charged, had only a small UV-absorption at 280 nm and showed a very similar elution behavior in all analyzed cytosols. Therefore, we suppose that the HMW-Cd-SP of these two different vegetable foodstuffs have a very similar chemical structure. (orig.)

  15. Selective removal of diclofenac from contaminated water using molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Chaomeng; Geissen, Sven-Uwe; Zhang Yalei; Zhang Yongjun; Zhou Xuefei

    2011-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized by precipitation polymerization using diclofenac (DFC) as a template. Binding characteristics of the MIP were evaluated using equilibrium binding experiments. Compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), the MIP showed an outstanding affinity towards DFC in an aqueous solution with a binding site capacity (Q max ) of 324.8 mg/g and a dissociation constant (K d ) of 3.99 mg/L. The feasibility of removing DFC from natural water by the MIP was demonstrated by using river water spiked with DFC. Effects of pH and humic acid on the selectivity and adsorption capacity of MIP were evaluated in detail. MIP had better selectivity and higher adsorption efficiency for DFC as compared to that of powdered activated carbon (PAC). In addition, MIP reusability was demonstrated for at least 12 repeated cycles without significant loss in performance, which is a definite advantage over single-use activated carbon. - Highlights: → A MIP was synthesized by precipitation polymerization using DFC as template. → The MIP had better selectivity and higher adsorption efficiency for DFC. → The MIP is an effective method for selective removal of DFC from complex water. → MIP reusability is a definite advantage over single-use activated carbon. - A diclofenac molecularly imprinted polymer synthesized by precipitation polymerization was used for the selective removal of diclofenac from contaminated water.

  16. Selective removal of diclofenac from contaminated water using molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Chaomeng [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Department of Environmental Technology, Chair of Environmental Process Engineering, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Geissen, Sven-Uwe, E-mail: sven.geissen@tu-berlin.de [Department of Environmental Technology, Chair of Environmental Process Engineering, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Zhang Yalei, E-mail: zhangyalei@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Yongjun [Department of Environmental Technology, Chair of Environmental Process Engineering, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Zhou Xuefei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2011-06-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized by precipitation polymerization using diclofenac (DFC) as a template. Binding characteristics of the MIP were evaluated using equilibrium binding experiments. Compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), the MIP showed an outstanding affinity towards DFC in an aqueous solution with a binding site capacity (Q{sub max}) of 324.8 mg/g and a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 3.99 mg/L. The feasibility of removing DFC from natural water by the MIP was demonstrated by using river water spiked with DFC. Effects of pH and humic acid on the selectivity and adsorption capacity of MIP were evaluated in detail. MIP had better selectivity and higher adsorption efficiency for DFC as compared to that of powdered activated carbon (PAC). In addition, MIP reusability was demonstrated for at least 12 repeated cycles without significant loss in performance, which is a definite advantage over single-use activated carbon. - Highlights: > A MIP was synthesized by precipitation polymerization using DFC as template. > The MIP had better selectivity and higher adsorption efficiency for DFC. > The MIP is an effective method for selective removal of DFC from complex water. > MIP reusability is a definite advantage over single-use activated carbon. - A diclofenac molecularly imprinted polymer synthesized by precipitation polymerization was used for the selective removal of diclofenac from contaminated water.

  17. Pathway analysis for a contaminated landfill in Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; Merry-Libby, P.; Yang, J.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy began excavating contaminated materials from the Middlesex Municipal landfill in 1984. A total of 16,000 m 3 of landfill materials covering a 0.2-ha area was excavated, of which 11,000 m 3 was contaminated and has been transported to the nearby sampling plant site for interim storage. Based on the pathway analysis for the onsite and near-site resident scenarios, the radiation dose rates and radionuclide concentrations in groundwater would be below the regulatory requirements for both the short-term and long-term scenarios. Hence, the potential health risks to maximally exposed individuals due to radioactive releases from the Middlesex landfill would be insignificant

  18. The characterization of petroleum and creosote-contaminated soils: Class component analysis by thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, S.J.T.; Hrudey, S.E.; Fuhr, B.J.; Alex, R.F.; Holloway, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The assessment and reclamation of coal tar, creosote and petroleum-contaminated sites is emerging as a major challenge to industry and the federal and provincial Canadian governments. Contaminants frequently include polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), several high molecular weight analogues of which are documented carcinogens. Adaptation of thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detection for the analysis of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is described. The method is directly applicable to the analysis of oily waste extracts from petroleum and creosote wood preservative site soils and is capable of distinguishing between the saturate, aromatic and polar components of waste residues. The method provides a rapid, low cost class component analysis of heavy hydrocarbon waste extracts and is particularly useful for estimating the extent of weathering experienced by chronically exposed hydrocarbon wastes in the soil environment. As such, it is useful as a screening tool for a preliminary assessment of the biotreatability or inherent recalcitrance of hydrocarbon waste mixtures. 11 refs., 5 figs

  19. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) contaminated well cars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    In support of past operations, railcars were used to ship irradiated fuel from the 100 Area fuel storage basins to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility. There are two configurations for the packaging systems that transported the fuel: the Three-Well Cask Car, which is outfitted with three casks, and the taller, single well, New Production Reactor (NPR) Cask Car. In this document, these cask cars are referred to collectively as well cars. The purpose of this document is to evaluate and authorize the onsite transportation of well cars that contain significant levels of contamination. No irradiated fuel will be transported in the well cars. Neutron detection data confirmed that the well cars do not contain fuel. The intention is to move 14 retired well cars from their current locations in the 100 Area to a suitable storage location in the 200 Area. Each well car contains Type B quantities of radioactivity; so that the hazard of the transport operation is relatively low. This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the contaminated well cars meet the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for Hazardous Material Shipments for an onsite packaging. The scope of this document addresses the preparation and transportation of the contaminated well cars

  20. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  1. Heisenberg coupling constant predicted for molecular magnets with pairwise spin-contamination correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunov, Artëm E., E-mail: amasunov@ucf.edu [NanoScience Technology Center, Department of Chemistry, and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); Photochemistry Center RAS, ul. Novatorov 7a, Moscow 119421 (Russian Federation); Gangopadhyay, Shruba [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, CA 95120 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    New method to eliminate the spin-contamination in broken symmetry density functional theory (BS DFT) calculations is introduced. Unlike conventional spin-purification correction, this method is based on canonical Natural Orbitals (NO) for each high/low spin coupled electron pair. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state given in terms of energy of BS DFT solution, the occupation number of the bonding NO, and the energy of the higher spin state built on these bonding and antibonding NOs (not self-consistent Kohn–Sham orbitals of the high spin state). Compared to the other spin-contamination correction schemes, spin-correction is applied to each correlated electron pair individually. We investigate two binuclear Mn(IV) molecular magnets using this pairwise correction. While one of the molecules is described by magnetic orbitals strongly localized on the metal centers, and spin gap is accurately predicted by Noodleman and Yamaguchi schemes, for the other one the gap is predicted poorly by these schemes due to strong delocalization of the magnetic orbitals onto the ligands. We show our new correction to yield more accurate results in both cases. - Highlights: • Magnetic orbitails obtained for high and low spin states are not related. • Spin-purification correction becomes inaccurate for delocalized magnetic orbitals. • We use the natural orbitals of the broken symmetry state to build high spin state. • This new correction is made separately for each electron pair. • Our spin-purification correction is more accurate for delocalised magnetic orbitals.

  2. Molecular activation analysis for chemical species studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Zhifang; Mao Xueying; Wang Yuqi; Sun Jingxin; Qian Qingfang; Hou Xiaolin; Zhang Peiqun; Chen Chunying; Feng Weiyu; Ding Wenjun; Li Xiaolin; Li Chunsheng; Dai Xiongxin

    2001-01-01

    The Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) mainly refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in systems of interest, though its exact definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the bulk contents or concentrations are often insignificant for judging biological, environmental or geochemical effects of elements. In this paper, the features, methodology and limitation of MAA were outlined. Further, the up-to-date MAA progress made in our laboratory was introduced as well. (author)

  3. Microarray technology for major chemical contaminants analysis in food: current status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Li, Peiwu; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Chemical contaminants in food have caused serious health issues in both humans and animals. Microarray technology is an advanced technique suitable for the analysis of chemical contaminates. In particular, immuno-microarray approach is one of the most promising methods for chemical contaminants analysis. The use of microarrays for the analysis of chemical contaminants is the subject of this review. Fabrication strategies and detection methods for chemical contaminants are discussed in detail. Application to the analysis of mycotoxins, biotoxins, pesticide residues, and pharmaceutical residues is also described. Finally, future challenges and opportunities are discussed.

  4. Advances in molecular and genomic research to safeguard food and feed supply from aflatoxin contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide recognition that aflatoxin contamination of agricultural commodities by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is a global problem which has significantly benefitted from global collaboration for understanding the contaminating fungus as well as for developing and implementing solutions against the...

  5. Deterministic sensitivity analysis for the numerical simulation of contaminants transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, E.

    2007-12-01

    The questions of safety and uncertainty are central to feasibility studies for an underground nuclear waste storage site, in particular the evaluation of uncertainties about safety indicators which are due to uncertainties concerning properties of the subsoil or of the contaminants. The global approach through probabilistic Monte Carlo methods gives good results, but it requires a large number of simulations. The deterministic method investigated here is complementary. Based on the Singular Value Decomposition of the derivative of the model, it gives only local information, but it is much less demanding in computing time. The flow model follows Darcy's law and the transport of radionuclides around the storage site follows a linear convection-diffusion equation. Manual and automatic differentiation are compared for these models using direct and adjoint modes. A comparative study of both probabilistic and deterministic approaches for the sensitivity analysis of fluxes of contaminants through outlet channels with respect to variations of input parameters is carried out with realistic data provided by ANDRA. Generic tools for sensitivity analysis and code coupling are developed in the Caml language. The user of these generic platforms has only to provide the specific part of the application in any language of his choice. We also present a study about two-phase air/water partially saturated flows in hydrogeology concerning the limitations of the Richards approximation and of the global pressure formulation used in petroleum engineering. (author)

  6. Quantitative analysis of education effect by the number of contamination in an unsealed radioisotope facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Kaneko, Mamoru; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Okumura, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    The educational program for radiation workers is essential for the safety of radiation facility that stands on radiation protection practice by each worker. However, there appears no distinct criterion for quantitative evaluation of the education effect on radiation safety. The effectiveness of education was assessed by the number and the frequency (number of contamination/number of users) of contamination, a major incident involving radioactive materials, based on the long-term contamination surveillance data from 1996 to 2001 in Nagasaki University Radioisotope Center. Facility staffs monitored contamination in the facility every day. In 1996 and 1997, the yearly total number and the frequency of contamination found in a molecular biology room, a most frequently-used laboratory, were 150 and 1.21, respectively. The improvement of education program, including introduction of technical procedures to avoid contamination in molecular biological experiments, pre-entry instruction for fresh workers to demonstrate radiation safety practices on site, and spreading the new concept 'contamination happens by all means' through the radiation workers, markedly reduced both the number and the frequency of contamination to 33 and 0.48, respectively. This reduction seemed to be attributable for two different reasons; improvement of skills to avoid contamination, and thorough execution of monitoring and decontamination. These results suggested that contamination was a possible criterion for evaluating effectiveness of education program for radiation workers. (author)

  7. Analysis And Assessment Of The Security Method Against Incidental Contamination In The Collective Water Supply System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpak Dawid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main types of surface water incidental contaminations and the security method against incidental contamination in water sources. Analysis and assessment the collective water supply system (CWSS protection against incidental contamination was conducted. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA was used. The FMEA method allow to use the product or process analysis, identification of weak points, and implementation the corrections and new solutions for eliminating the source of undesirable events. The developed methodology was shown in application case. It was found that the risk of water contamination in water-pipe network of the analyzed CWSS caused by water source incidental contamination is at controlled level.

  8. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  9. White Oak Creek Embayment site characterization and contaminant screening analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of sediment samples collected near the mouth of White Oak Creek during the summer of 1990 revealed 137 Cs concentrations [> 10 6 Bq/kg dry wt (> 10 4 pCi/g dry wt)] near the sediment surface. Available evidence indicates that these relatively high concentrations of 137 Cs now at the sediment surface were released from White Oak Dam in the mid-1950s and had accumulated at depositionalsites in the embayment. These accumulated sediments are being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and the water turbulence created by the release of water from Melton Hill Dam during hydropower generation cycles. This report provides a more thorough characterization of the extent of contamination in WOCE than was previously available. Environmental samples collected from WOCE were analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in fish, water, and sediment. These results were used to conduct a human health effects screening analysis. Walkover radiation surveys conducted inside the fenced area surrounding the WOCE at summer-pool (741 ft MSL) and at winter-pool (733 ft MSL) level, indicated a maximum exposure rate of 3 mR h 1 1 m above the soil surface

  10. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room

  11. An overview of the contaminant analysis automation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.M.; Erkkila, T.; Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has significant amounts of radioactive and hazardous wastes stored, buried, and still being generated at many sites within the United States. These wastes must be characterized to determine the elemental, isotopic, and compound content before remediation can begin. In this paper, the authors project that sampling requirements will necessitate generating more than 10 million samples by 1995, which will far exceed the capabilities of our current manual chemical analysis laboratories. The Contaminant Analysis Automation effort (CAA), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as to the coordinating Laboratory, is designing and fabricating robotic systems that will standardize and automate both the hardware and the software of the most common environmental chemical methods. This will be accomplished by designing and producing several unique analysis systems called Standard Analysis Methods (SAM). Each SAM will automate a specific chemical method, including sample preparation, the analytical analysis, and the data interpretation, by using a building block known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). This concept allows the chemist to assemble an automated environmental method using standardized SLMs easily and without the worry of hardware compatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs

  12. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of bacterial populations isolated from diesel-contaminated soil and treated by two bioremediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta R, Olga M; Rivera R, Angela P; Rojano, Benjamin; Ruiz, Orlando; Correa, Margarita M; Cienfuegos Gallet, Astrid V; Arias, Lida; Cardona G, Santiago A

    2012-01-01

    In this study bioremediation is presented as an alternative for the recovery of contaminated ecosystems. In this work an experimental diesel spill on pasture land was remediated using two bioremediation technologies: natural attenuation, which is the natural capability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade a xenobiotic component in a determined time, and biostimulation, which consist in the acceleration of the degradation process through the stimulation of the metabolism of indigenous microorganisms by the addition of nutrients (P and N) to the media. Results of respirometry assays indicated that both treatments produced significant levels of hydrocarbon removal but the biostimulation treatment stranded out with 98.17% degradation. Seven bacterial isolates were obtained from these treatments which according to their molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis belong to the genus: Enterobacter, Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Sanguibacter, Staphylococcus and Flavobacterium. All isolates were able to metabolize diesel as a carbon and energy source; for this reason and taking into account that for some of these microorganisms their role in bioremediation have not been extensively studied, it is recommended to continue with their evaluation to know their real potential for the solution of environmental problems.

  13. Molecular DNA Analysis in Forensic Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Ciocan, Veronica; Muresan, Camelia; Enache, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Serological and biochemical identification methods used in forensics have several major disadvantages, such as: long time in processing biological sample and lack of sensitivity and specificity. In the last 30 years, DNA molecular analysis has become an important tool in forensic investigations. DNA profiling is based on the short tandem repeats (STR) and aids in human identification from biological samples. Forensic genetics, can provide information on the events which occurred at the crime scene or to supplement other methods of forensic identification. Currently, the methods used in identification are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. This method analyses the autosomal STRs, the Y-chromosome, and the mitochondrial DNA. Correlation of biological samples present at the crime scene with identification, selection, and the probative value factor is therefore the first aspect to be taken into consideration in the forensic genetic analysis. In the last decade, because of the advances in the field of molecular biology, new biomarkers such as: microRNAs (miR), messenger RNA (mRNA), and DNA methylation have been studied and proposed to be used in the forensic identifications of body fluids.

  14. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G. E. Jr.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals

  15. Colloidal crystal templated molecular imprinted polymer for the detection of 2-butoxyethanol in water contaminated by hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jingjing; Vu, Danh; Nagel, Susan; Lin, Chung-Ho; Fidalgo de Cortalezzi, Maria

    2017-12-06

    The authors describe a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) that enables detection of 2-butoxyethanol (2BE), a pollutant associated with hydraulic fracturing contamination. Detection is based on a combination of a colloidal crystal templating and a molecular imprinting. The MIPs are shown to display higher binding capacity for 2BE compared to non-imprinted films (NIPs), with imprinting efficiencies of ∼ 2. The tests rely on the optical effects that are displayed by the uniformly ordered porous structure of the material. The reflectance spectra of the polymer films have characteristic Bragg peaks whose location varies with the concentration of 2BE. Peaks undergo longwave red shifts up to 50 nm on exposure of the MIP to 2BE in concentrations in the range from 1 ppb to 100 ppm. This allows for quantitative estimates of the 2BE concentrations present in aqueous solutions. The material is intended for use in the early detection of contamination at hydraulic fracturing sites. Graphical abstract Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) sensor with the sensing ability on reflectance spectra responding to the presence of 2-butoxyethanol (2BE) for early detection of hydraulic fracking contamination.

  16. Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This document is the Final Report for NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Grant 15-NIAC16A-0145, titled Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets. The research was focused on developing a system concept for probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets, such as Asteroids, Comets, Planets and Moons from a distant vantage, for example from a spacecraft that is orbiting the target (Hughes et al., 2015). The orbiting spacecraft is equipped with a high-power laser, which is run by electricity from photovoltaic panels. The laser is directed at a spot on the target. Materials on the surface of the target are heated by the laser beam, and begin to melt and then evaporate, forming a plume of asteroid molecules in front of the heated spot. The heated spot glows, producing blackbody illumination that is visible from the spacecraft, via a path through the evaporated plume. As the blackbody radiation from the heated spot passes through the plume of evaporated material, molecules in the plume absorb radiation in a manner that is specific to the rotational and vibrational characteristics of the specific molecules. A spectrometer aboard the spacecraft is used to observe absorption lines in the blackbody signal. The pattern of absorption can be used to estimate the molecular composition of materials in the plume, which originated on the target. Focusing on a single spot produces a borehole, and shallow subsurface profiling of the targets bulk composition is possible. At the beginning of the Phase I research, the estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the system was TRL-1. During the Phase I research, an end-to-end theoretical model of the sensor system was developed from first principles. The model includes laser energy and optical propagation, target heating, melting and evaporation of target material, plume density, thermal radiation from the heated spot, molecular cross section of likely asteroid materials, and estimation of the

  17. XRF analysis of soils contaminated by dust falls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, Katsumi; Onoki, Yuka; Wada, Nobuhiko; Okano, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Dust falls from the chimneys of waste incineration plants, coal-fired power plants, and refineries may contaminate soil over vast areas. Using an auger machine at 72 sites around a refinery in the Kanto area, Japan, we obtained 216 soil samples for a screening survey of potentially contaminated land. Qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses of zinc, lead, and cadmium were performed using a transmission X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (TXRF). X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chemical analytical data suggested that contaminated soil extends up to 3 km away from the chimneys of the refinery. Using calibration curves for the intensity ratios of Zn Kα X-ray to Mo Kβ Compton scatter X-ray [(Zn Kα)/(Mo-Kβ-Compton)], Pb Lβ X-ray to Mo-Kβ-Compton scatter X-ray [(Pb Lβ)/(Mo-Kβ-Compton)], and Cd Kα X-ray to Mo-Kβ Compton scatter X-ray [(Cd Kβ)/(Mo-Kβ-Compton)] of 30 reference materials, we obtained the Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations of these 216 soil samples. The Pb and Cd concentrations from the XRF chemical analytical data were very similar to the Pb and Cd leachabilities determined by 1 M HC1 leaching test (MOE-approved method No. 19), suggesting that the chemical forms in which Pb and Cd occur are an adsorbed phase and a carbonate phase, which can be easily dissolved by 1 M HC1. XRF spectra of individual soil particles, obtained by spot-sized X-ray beams passed through a 1.5-mm-diameter and a 0.5-mm-diameter collimators, suggested that most of the soil fractions contained Zn and Pb. The levels of brightness of the X-ray images of these Zn- and Pb-bearing fractions were monitored with an X-ray CCD camera attached to the TXRF. Most of the soil fractions were transparent at the maximum X-ray tube voltage (50 kV), suggesting that the soil samples are suitable for the quantitative XRF chemical analysis of Zn and Pb. (author)

  18. Analysis of East Tank Farms Contamination Survey Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELDER, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the justification for the change in survey frequency in East Tank Farms occupied contamination areas from weekly to monthly. The Tank Farms Radiological Control Organization has performed radiological surveys of its Contamination Area (CA) Double Shell Tank (DST) farms in 200 East Area on a weekly basis for several years. The task package (DST-W012) controlling these routines designates specific components, at a minimum, that must be surveyed whenever the task is performed. This document documents the evaluation of these survey requirements and provides the recommendation and basis for moving DST tank farms in the 200 East Area from a weekly to monthly contamination survey. The contamination surveys for occupied contamination areas in West Tank Farms (WTF) were changed from a weekly frequency to a monthly frequency in 1997. Review of contamination survey data in WTF indicates a monthly interval remains satisfactory

  19. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmur, N.F.

    1987-06-01

    An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined

  20. Organic Contaminants Library for the Sample Analysis at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; Garcia-Sanchez, R.; Canham, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    A library containing mass spectra for Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) materials has been developed with the purpose of contamination identification and control. Based on analysis of the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric (GCMS) data through thermal desorption, organic compounds were successfully identified from material samples, such as polymers, paints and adhesives. The library contains the spectra for all the compounds found in each of these analyzed files and is supplemented by a file information spreadsheet, a spreadsheet-formatted library for easy searching, and a Perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA) based normalization protocol to make corrections to SAM data in order to meet the standard set by commercial libraries. An example of the library in use can be seen in Figure 1, where the abundances match closely, the spectral shape is retained, and the library picks up on it with an 88% identification probability. Of course, there are also compounds that have not been identified and are retained as unknowns. The library we have developed, along with its supplemental materials, is useful from both organizational and practical viewpoints. Through them we are able to organize large volumes of GCMS data, while at the same time breaking down the components that each material sample is made of. This approach in turn allows us straightforward and fast access to information that will be critical while performing analysis on the data recorded by the SAM instrumentation. In addition, the normalization protocol dramatically increased the identification probability. In SAM GCMS, PFTBA signals were obfuscated, resulting in library matches far away from PFTBA; by using the normalization protocol we were able to transform it into a 92% probable spectral match for PFTBA. The project has demonstrated conclusively that the library is successful in identifying unknown compounds utilizing both the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution & Identification System (AMDIS) and the Ion

  1. Molecular activation analysis for chemical speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai-Chifang

    1998-01-01

    The term of Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in system of interests, though its definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the total concentrations are often without any meaning when assessing health or environmental risks of trace elements.In practice, the MAA is a combination of conventional instrumental or radiochemical activation analysis and physical, chemical or biochemical separation techniques. The MAA is able to play a particular role in speciation studies. However, the critical point in the MAA is that it is not permitted to change the primitive chemical species of elements in systems, or the change has to be under control; in the meantime it is not allowed to form the 'new artifact' originally not present in systems. Some practical examples of MAA for chemical species research performed recently in our laboratory will be presented as follows: Chemical species of platinum group elements in sediment; Chemical species of iodine in marine algae; Chemical species of mercury in human tissues; Chemical species of selenium in corn; Chemical species of rare earth elements in natural plant, etc. The merits and limitations of MAA will be described as well. (author)

  2. Finite element analysis of a model scale footing on clean and oil contaminated sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evgin, E.; Boulon, M.; Das, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of oil contamination on the behavior of a model scale footing is determined. Tests are carried out with both clean and oil contaminated sand. The data show that the bearing capacity of the footing is reduced significantly as a result of oil contamination. A finite element analysis is performed to calculate the bearing capacity of the footing and the results are compared with the experimental data. The significance of using an interface element in the analysis is discussed

  3. Molecular identification and potential of an isolate of white rot fungi in bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mohammadi-sichani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Elimination or reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons from natural resources such as water and soil is a serious problem of countries, particularly oil-rich countries of the world. Using white rotting fungi compost for bioremediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons is effective. The aim of this study is molecular identification and potential of anisolate of white rot fungi in bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils. Materials and methods: Spent compost of white rotting fungi was inoculated with petroleum contaminated soil into 3%, 5% and 10% (w/w. Treatments were incubated at 25-23 °C for 3 months. Reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons in treated soil was determined by gas chromatography. Ecotoxicity of soil was evaluated by seed germination test. Results: Based on the genome sequence of 18s rRNA, it is revealed that this isolate is Ganoderma lucidum and this isolate is deposited as accession KX525204 in the Gene Bank database. Reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil treated with compost (3, 5 and 10% ranged from 42% to 71%. The germination index (% in ecotoxicity tests ranged from 20.8% to 70.8%. Gas chromatography results also showed a decrease in soil Hydrocarbons compounds. Discussion and conclusion: The compost of Ganoderma lucidum, a white rot fungus, has a potential ability to remove petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil. Removal of hydrocarbons was increased with increase in compost mixed with contaminated soil. Petroleum contaminated soil amended with spent compost of G.lucidum 10% during three months is appropriate to remove this pollutant.

  4. Mycological analysis and aflatoxin B 1 contaminant estimation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The present study explores the fungal contamination of important herbal drug raw materials (HDRM), which are widely used in the preparation of many herbal drugs. Understanding of the microbial contamination status of HDRM is one of the important steps to ensure the safety and efficacy of herbal drugs.

  5. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer as an Antibody Substitution in Pseudo-immunoassays for Chemical Contaminants in Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaochao; Luo, Jiaxun; Li, Chenglong; Ma, Mingfang; Yu, Wenbo; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2018-03-21

    The chemical contaminants in food and the environment are quite harmful to food safety and human health. Rapid, accurate, and cheap detection can effectively control the potential risks derived from these chemical contaminants. Among all detection methods, the immunoassay based on the specific interaction of antibody-analyte is one of the most widely used techniques in the field. However, biological antibodies employed in the immunoassay usually cannot tolerate extreme conditions, resulting in an unstable state in both physical and chemical profiles. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a class of polymers with specific molecular recognition abilities, which are highly robust, showing excellent operational stability under a wide variety of conditions. Recently, MIPs have been used in biomimetic immunoassays for chemical contaminants as an antibody substitute in food and the environment. Here, we reviewed these applications of MIPs incorporated in different analytical platforms, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, chemiluminescent immunoassay, electrochemical immunoassay, microfluidic paper-based immunoassay, and homogeneous immunoassay, and discussed current challenges and future trends in the use of MIPs in biomimetic immunoassays.

  6. Molecular modifications of cholesterol metabolism in the liver and the brain after chronic contamination with cesium 137.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, R; Grandcolas, L; Grison, S; Gourmelon, P; Guéguen, Y; Veyssière, G; Souidi, M

    2009-07-01

    Twenty years after Chernobyl accident, the daily ingestion of foodstuff grown on contaminated grounds remains the main source for internal exposure to ionizing radiations, and primarily to cesium 137 ((137)Cs). Though the effects of a long-term internal contamination with radionuclides are poorly documented, several non-cancerous pathologies have been described in this population. However, lipid metabolism was never investigated after chronic internal contamination although disturbances were observed in externally-exposed people. In this regard, we assessed the effects of a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs on hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. To mimic a chronically-exposed population, rats were given (137)Cs-supplemented water at a post-accidental dose (150 Bq/rat/day) during 9 months. The plasma profile, and brain and liver cholesterol concentrations were unchanged. A decrease of ACAT 2, Apo E, and LXRmRNA levels was recorded in the liver. In the brain, a decrease of CYP27A1 and ACAT 1 gene expression was observed. These results clearly show that cholesterol metabolism is not disrupted by a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs, although several molecular alterations are observed. This work would be interestingly completed by studying the influence of (137)Cs in models likely more sensitive to contaminants, such as the fetus or individuals susceptible to a lipidic disease.

  7. In vitro evaluation of microbial contamination of orthodontic brackets as received from the manufacturer using microbiological and molecular tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Gerzson, Darlene R; Simon, Daniel; Dos Anjos, Aline Lima; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-11-01

    To test the null hypothesis that orthodontic brackets as supplied by manufacturers do not have microbial contamination. The sample comprised 140 brackets of four different commercially available brands, used directly from the manufacturer's packaging, divided into 14 groups (n  =  10 brackets each). Of the 140 pieces, 60 were full cases and 80 were replacement brackets. Materials were tested to detect bacterial growth, analyze types of bacteria present (biochemical test), and identify bacteria (molecular test with polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). In two of 12 groups the brackets showed microbial contamination: group 1, Morelli full case brackets, and group 12, Abzil-3M Unitek replacement brackets. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the bacteria identified in groups 1 and 12, respectively (suggested by the biochemical test and confirmed by PCR). Brackets of two brands (Morelli and Abzil-3M Unitek) were found to be contaminated by bacteria in the original packages supplied by the manufacturers, which suggests a risk for patient contamination. These data suggest that the manufacturers of these materials should improve the quality control of the packaging used, including sterilization, for the security of patient health.

  8. Interferences in Prompt {gamma} Analysis of corrosive contaminants in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-12-21

    An accelerator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed to measure the concentration of corrosive chloride and sulfate contaminants in concrete. The Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) limit of chlorine and sulfur in the concrete depends upon the {gamma}-ray used for elemental analysis. For more interfering {gamma}-rays, the MDC limit is higher than that for less interfering {gamma}-rays. The MDC limit of sulfur in concrete measured for the KFUPM PGNAA setup was calculated to be 0.60{+-}0.19 wt%. The MDC limit is equal to the upper limit of sulfur concentration in concrete set by the British Standards. The MDC limit of chlorine in concrete for the KFUPM PGNAA setup, which was calculated for less interfering 1.165 MeV {gamma}-rays, was found to be 0.075{+-}0.025 wt%. The lower limits of the MDC of chlorine in concrete was 73% higher than the limit set by American Concrete Institute. The limit of the MDC can be improved to the desired standard by increasing the intensity of neutron source. For moreinterfering 5.715 and 6.110 MeV chlorine {gamma}-rays the MDC limit was found to be 2-3 times larger than that of 1.165 MeV {gamma}-rays. When normalized to the same intensity of the neutron source, the MDC limits of chlorine and sulfur in concrete from the KFUPM PGNAA setup are better than MDC limits of chlorine in concrete obtained with the {sup 241}Am-Be source-based PGNAA setup. This study has shown that an accelerator-based PGNAA setup can be used in chlorine and sulfur analysis of concrete samples.

  9. The contaminant analysis automation robot implementation for the automated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, J.R.; Igou, R.E.; Urenda, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) project defines the automated laboratory as a series of standard laboratory modules (SLM) serviced by a robotic standard support module (SSM). These SLMs are designed to allow plug-and-play integration into automated systems that perform standard analysis methods (SAM). While the SLMs are autonomous in the execution of their particular chemical processing task, the SAM concept relies on a high-level task sequence controller (TSC) to coordinate the robotic delivery of materials requisite for SLM operations, initiate an SLM operation with the chemical method dependent operating parameters, and coordinate the robotic removal of materials from the SLM when its commands and events has been established to allow ready them for transport operations as well as performing the Supervisor and Subsystems (GENISAS) software governs events from the SLMs and robot. The Intelligent System Operating Environment (ISOE) enables the inter-process communications used by GENISAS. CAA selected the Hewlett-Packard Optimized Robot for Chemical Analysis (ORCA) and its associated Windows based Methods Development Software (MDS) as the robot SSM. The MDS software is used to teach the robot each SLM position and required material port motions. To allow the TSC to command these SLM motions, a hardware and software implementation was required that allowed message passing between different operating systems. This implementation involved the use of a Virtual Memory Extended (VME) rack with a Force CPU-30 computer running VxWorks; a real-time multitasking operating system, and a Radiuses PC compatible VME computer running MDS. A GENISAS server on The Force computer accepts a transport command from the TSC, a GENISAS supervisor, over Ethernet and notifies software on the RadiSys PC of the pending command through VMEbus shared memory. The command is then delivered to the MDS robot control software using a Windows Dynamic Data Exchange conversation

  10. Molecular analysis of waxy mutants in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatou, O.; Amano, E.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The 'waxy' gene is a structural gene coding a glycosyl transferase which synthesises amylose in the endosperm tissue. 'Non-waxy' rice cultivars have an active gene and their amylose content is 18-25% depending upon gene performance and modifier genes. In 'waxy' rice, no amylose is found because the enzyme is absent. In mutants induced by gamma rays, neutrons, EI or EMS, amylose content ranged from 0 to 20%, i.e. there are intermediate phenotypes as well. Some of them had the same amount of the enzyme as a 'non-waxy' cultivar, even fully 'waxy' mutants showed a certain amount of the enzyme. This suggests that in mutants there may be no structural change in the enzyme gene but the enzyme produced might be less active. By molecular analysis of the mutants' genes it was found that only two mutants induced by thermal neutrons show structural alterations, the changes in other mutants are either too small to be detected by Southern analysis or are outside the structural gene in question. (author)

  11. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  12. Polymer Molecular Weight Analysis by [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izunobi, Josephat U.; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of molecular weight and molecular weight distribution remain matters of fundamental importance for the characterization and physical properties of polymers. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) is the most routinely used method for the molecular weight determination of polymers whereas matrix-assisted laser…

  13. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Chapon, V.; Berthomieu, C.; Piette, L.; Le Marrec, C.; Coppin, F.; Fevrier, L.; Martin-Garin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  14. Management of radiation contaminated sites: public policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massuelle, M.H.; Brenot, J.; Hubert, P.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is interested in the management of radio-contaminated sites whom pollution comes essentially from some leftover old controlled practices and more precisely from mining activities relative to uranium and radium and thorium industries. The contaminations coming from atmospheric nuclear explosions and post accidental situations do not come into the field of this document. The management of contaminated sites is tackled in the aspect of radiation protection of populations living near or that could be there in the future. (N.C.)

  15. Molecular epidemiology and environmental contamination during an outbreak of parainfluenza virus 3 in a haematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T; Jin, C E; Sung, H; Koo, B; Park, J; Kim, S-M; Kim, J Y; Chong, Y P; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Lee, J-H; Lee, J-H; Lee, K-H; Shin, Y; Kim, S-H

    2017-12-01

    Although fomites or contaminated surfaces have been considered as transmission routes, the role of environmental contamination by human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV-3) in healthcare settings is not established. To describe an hPIV-3 nosocomial outbreak and the results of environmental sampling to elucidate the source of nosocomial transmission and the role of environmental contamination. During an hPIV-3 outbreak between May and June 2016, environmental surfaces in contact with clustered patients were swabbed and respiratory specimens used from infected patients and epidemiologically unlinked controls. The epidemiologic relatedness of hPIV-3 strains was investigated by sequencing of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes. Of 19 hPIV-3-infected patients, eight were haematopoietic stem cell recipients and one was a healthcare worker. In addition, four had upper and 12 had lower respiratory tract infections. Of the 19 patients, six (32%) were community-onset infections (symptom onset within environmental swabs up to 12 days after negative respiratory polymerase chain reaction conversion. At least one-third of a peak season nosocomial hPIV-3 outbreak originated from nosocomial transmission, with multiple importations of hPIV-3 from the community, providing experimental evidence for extensive environmental hPIV-3 contamination. Direct contact with the contaminated surfaces and fomites or indirect transmission from infected healthcare workers could be responsible for nosocomial transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elimination and molecular identification of endophytic bacterial contaminants during in vitro propagation of Bambusa balcooa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Syandan Sinha; Ali, Md Nasim; Mukherjee, Shibasis; Chatterjee, Gautam; Banerjee, Maitreyi

    2017-02-01

    Bambusa balcooa is an economically important, multipurpose bamboo species, decidedly used in construction industry. Availability of natural bamboo is depleting very rapidly due to accelerated deforestation and its unrestrained use. The large number and timely supply of saplings are the need of the hour for the restoration of bamboo stands. Micropropagation, being the potent alternative for season independent rapid regeneration, is restricted in bamboo because of endophytic contamination. An in vitro attempt has been taken to overcome the endophytic contamination by using broad spectrum antibiotics as surface sterilant as well as a media component. Ampicillin sodium salt (5 mg/ml for 30 min) as a surface sterilant was found as the best treatment for high bud breaking (80%) coupled with high branching and low contamination (20%) but it was found ineffective to control the contamination during multiplication stage. Then, two endophytes were isolated and minimum inhibitory concentration was determined through antibiotic susceptibility test for successful eradication at multiplication stage. Finally, contamination free cultures were obtained when streptocycline (100 μg/ml) and gentamicin sulphate (75 μg/ml) were added into the medium. The two isolated endophytes, BB1 and BB2, were identified through 16S rDNA techniques and NCBI-BLAST algorithm with 99% sequence similarity with those of Janibacter sp. (KX423734) and Serratia marcescens strain (KX423735). To our knowledge, this is the first report for B. balcooa where antibiotics were used as surface sterilant as well as medium component, to control endophytic bacterial contaminants, followed by their identification.

  17. A system for the study of molecular contamination. [experimental vacuum chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillow, C. F.; Allen, T. H.; Linford, R. M. F.; Richmond, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental vacuum chambers was designed and fabricated to provide a wide range of experimental capability. This work chamber assembly (WCA) was conceived to establish the proof-of-principle of various techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminants and their effects. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation.

  18. Pathway analysis for a contaminated landfill in Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; Merry-Libby, P.; Yang, J.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The Middlesex Municipal Landfill is located in Middlesex, New Jersey, about 29 km southwest of Newark, New Jersey. It is one of several properties in the Borrough of Middlesex and Township of Piscataway that have been identified as being radioactively contaminated as a result of work that was carried out on various uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. Most of the contaminated properties have been cleaned up and the contaminated materials are being stored in a large interim storage pile at the sampling plant site. In 1948, during some renovations at the sampling plant, about 4,600 m/sup 3/ of excess soil contaminated with uranium ore was apparently transported and disposed in the landfill gully area next to Bound Brook. In 1961, the Atomic Energy Commission removed about 500 m/sup 3/ of near-surface radioactively contaminated material from the landfill and covered the area with 0.6 m of clean soil. From 1961 to 1974 (when the landfill was closed), an additional 2.4 to 3.0 m of fill material was placed in the landfill. Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the U.S. Department of Energy began excavating contaminated materials from the landfill in 1984. A total of 16,000 m/sup 3/ of landfill materials covering a 0.2-ha area was excavated, of which 11,000 m/sup 3/ was contaminated and has been transported to the nearby sampling plant site for interim storage

  19. Molecular Analysis Research at Community College of Philadelphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Community College of Philadelphia Community College of Philadelphia 1700 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19130...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Molecular Analysis Research at Community College of Philadelphia The views, opinions...Molecular Analysis Research at Community College of Philadelphia Report Title AXIMA Assurance mass spectrometer, Leica DMI-8 fluorescent microscope

  20. Analysis of predictors related to soil contamination in recreational areas of Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagiu, C; Pica, E M; Querol, X; Botezan, C S

    2015-12-01

    Soil contamination in recreational areas can considerably affect children's health, as they are the segment of the population most sensitive to anthropogenic contamination. Soil contamination in recreational areas is influenced by a number of factors such as type and age of the recreational area, nearby traffic intensity, proximity to industrial areas, presence of vegetation, level of usage, treated wood structures, and the extent of maintenance operations carried out in the area. These can most often be observed during a simple site visit. The purpose of the present research is to analyze to which extent the presence of these factors can trigger an alarm signal, highlighting soil contamination in urban recreational areas. In this regard, soil contamination was scaled using the integrated pollution index applied on nine distinctive contaminants (As, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Hg, Co, Ni, Mg) identified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed in order to assess predictors of soil contamination. The research was carried out in a number of 88 recreational areas, parks, and playgrounds from 19 Romanian cities, revealing the fact that proximity to industrial areas and intensive traffic had statistically significant effects on soil contamination. Furthermore, it was observed that in 78 out of the 88 analyzed locations, the concentrations of contaminants exceeded the guidelines established through national legislation, thus confirming the presumption that high concentrations of contaminants exist in the parks and playgrounds of Romania.

  1. Analysis of contamination in liquids hydrocarbons transport for pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Ricardo Zárate Neira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipeline contamination is usually understood to mean both the mixing effect produced when two different products transported by the same pipeline come into contact qith each other and often product of such mixing as well. This product os often referred to as "contamination" or as "interface" Cleary such intermixing is generally less serious in crude carrying, pipelines where each batch can become somewhat polluted by the batches inmediately preceding and immediately following without significant damage. However, the situation is different in a finished products pipeline, which may carry products as different as aircraft gasoline and light fuel oils. This article presents a brief description of the main factors influencing contamination with the objective of optimize conditions operating and to drive the more important respects about them.

  2. Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang; Sethi, Nilay S; Hinoue, Toshinori; Schneider, Barbara G; Cherniack, Andrew D; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Seoane, Jose A; Farshidfar, Farshad; Bowlby, Reanne; Islam, Mirazul; Kim, Jaegil; Chatila, Walid; Akbani, Rehan; Kanchi, Rupa S; Rabkin, Charles S; Willis, Joseph E; Wang, Kenneth K; McCall, Shannon J; Mishra, Lopa; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Bullman, Susan; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Lazar, Alexander J; Sakai, Ryo; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bass, Adam J; Laird, Peter W; de Krijger, RR

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed 921 adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum to examine shared and distinguishing molecular characteristics of gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas (GIACs). Hypermutated tumors were distinct regardless of cancer type and comprised those enriched for

  3. Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a system capable of probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets such as asteroids, comets, planets and moons from a distant vantage....

  4. Assessing the Risk of Secondary Transfer Via Fingerprint Brush Contamination Using Enhanced Sensitivity DNA Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, Paula-Andrea; Tracey, Martin; McCord, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the extent of cross-contamination of DNA resulting from secondary transfer due to fingerprint brushes used on multiple items of evidence. Analysis of both standard and low copy number (LCN) STR was performed. Two different procedures were used to enhance sensitivity, post-PCR cleanup and increased cycle number. Under standard STR typing procedures, some additional alleles were produced that were not present in the controls or blanks; however, there was insufficient data to include the contaminant donor as a contributor. Inclusion of the contaminant donor did occur for one sample using post-PCR cleanup. Detection of the contaminant donor occurred for every replicate of the 31 cycle amplifications; however, using LCN interpretation recommendations for consensus profiles, only one sample would include the contaminant donor. Our results indicate that detection of secondary transfer of DNA can occur through fingerprint brush contamination and is enhanced using LCN-DNA methods. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. 78 FR 37463 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act... page 32570, with the table entitled ``ALTERNATIVE TESTING METHODS FOR CONTAMINANTS LISTED AT 40 CFR 141... Contaminants Listed at 40 CFR 141.25(a) SM 21st Edition SM 22nd Edition Contaminant Methodology \\1\\ \\28\\ ASTM...

  6. Analysis of Zinc 65 Contamination after Vacuum Thermal Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korinko, Paul S.; Tosten, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive contamination with a gamma energy emission consistent with 65 Zn was detected in a glovebox following a vacuum thermal process. The contaminated components were removed from the glovebox and subjected to examination. Selected analytical techniques were used to determine the nature of the precursor material, i.e., oxide or metallic, the relative transferability of the deposit and its nature. The deposit was determined to be borne from natural zinc and was further determined to be deposited as a metallic material from vapor

  7. Advancements and application of immunosensors in the analysis of food contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD. SHOFIUL AZAM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Azam MS, Rahman MRT, Lou Z, Tang Y, Raqib SM, Jothi JS. 2014. Advancements and application of immunosensors in the analysis of food contaminants. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 186-195. Immunosensors are affinity ligand-based biosensor solid-state devices in which the immunochemical reaction is coupled to a transducer. The fundamental basis of all immunosensors is the specificity of the molecular recognition of antigens by antibodies to form a stable complex. This is similar to the immunoassay methodology. Immunosensors can be categorized based on the detection principle applied. The main developments are electrochemical, optical, and microgravimetric immunosensors. In contrast to immunoassay, modern transducer technology enables the label-free detection and quantification of the immune complex. The analysis of trace substances in environmental science, pharmaceutical and food industries is a challenge since many of these applications demand a continuous monitoring mode. The use of immunosensors in these applications is most appropriate. Food chemists should take advantage of immunosensors in food and clinical diagnostics. There are many recent developments in the immunosensor field which have potential impacts. The future role of this technique in intra-laboratory, as well as bedside testing, will become even more important as the food laboratory is faced with increasing pressure to contain costs. Objective of this paper is to give a general overview of the possible application of immunosensors to the food analysis field.

  8. Molecular analysis of pancreatic cyst fluid changes clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, David M; Corning, Brooke E; Ahmed, Ali M; Ho, Henry C; Weinbaum, Bradley J; Siddiqui, Uzma; Aslanian, Harry; Adams, Reid B; Bauer, Todd W; Wang, Andrew Y; Shami, Vanessa M; Sauer, Bryan G

    2018-01-01

    DNA molecular analysis has been suggested as a tool to evaluate pancreatic cysts. This study assesses whether the addition of DNA molecular analysis alters clinical management. This is a retrospective review of 46 consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts with DNA molecular analysis at two major academic institutions. Cases were presented to two pancreaticobiliary surgeons first without and then with DNA molecular analysis data. The primary outcome was the frequency with which clinical management was altered with the addition of DNA molecular analysis. Forty-six patients with a mean age of 62.0 (±13.4) years and mean cyst size of 3.2 (±2.3) cm were included in the study. Cyst carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was available in 30 patients and ranged from 0.4 to 15,927 ng/mL. DNA molecular analysis was described as benign in 23 (50%), statistically indolent in 13 (28%), statistically higher risk in 9 (20%), and indeterminate in 1 (2%). Surgeon #1 changed the management in 13/46 cases (28%) and surgeon #2 changed the management in 12/46 cases (26%) with the addition of DNA molecular analysis. When organized by CEA concentration, those with an intermediate CEA (45-800 ng/mL) or without a CEA concentration had a management changed more frequently (40%) compared to all others (P molecular analysis alters the clinical management of pancreatic cystic lesions most often when CEA levels are intermediate (45-800 ng/mL) or when no CEA concentration is available. Use of DNA molecular analysis can be considered in this cohort. Further study of molecular markers in pancreatic cystic lesions is recommended.

  9. Modeling tissue contamination to improve molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Perell, Katharina; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2014-01-01

    with any predictor model. The usability of the model is illustrated on primary tumor site identification of liver biopsies, specifically, on a human dataset consisting of microRNA expression measurements of primary tumor samples, benign liver samples and liver metastases. For a predictor trained on primary...... tumor and benign liver samples, the contamination model decreased the test error on biopsies from liver metastases from 77 to 45%. A further reduction to 34% was obtained by including biopsies in the training data....

  10. Comparative Analysis of Aflatoxin Contamination of Maize in Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Aflatoxicosis resulting from consumption of contaminated maize poses a significant public health problem in many countries including Kenya, and many people living in developing countries could be chronically exposed to aflatoxin through their diet. It is caused by Aflatoxins produced by fungus of species ...

  11. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis of potassium bicarbonate contaminated cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Broido

    1966-01-01

    When samples undergo a complicated set of simultaneous and sequential reactions, as cellulose does on heating, results of thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses are difficult to interpret. Nevertheless, careful comparison of pure and contaminated samples, pyrolyzed under identical conditions, can yield useful information. In these experiments TGA and DTA...

  12. Chemometric Analysis of Selected Organic Contaminants in Surface Water of Langat River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Rafaie Mohamed Zubir; Rozita Osman; Norashikin Saim

    2016-01-01

    Chemometric techniques namely hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis (HACA), discriminant analysis (DA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) were applied to the distribution of selected organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sterols, pesticides (chloropyrifos), and phenol) to assess the potential of using these organic contaminants as chemical markers in Langat River Basin. Water samples were collected from February 2012 to January 2013 on a monthly basis for nine monitoring sites along Langat River Basin. HACA was able to classify the sampling sites into three clusters which can be correlated to the level of contamination (low, moderate and high contamination sites). DA was used to discriminate the sources of contamination using the selected organic contaminants and relate to the existing DOE local activities groupings. Forward and backward stepwise DA was able to discriminate two and five organic contaminants variables, respectively, from the original 13 selected variables. The five significant variables identified using backward stepwise DA were fluorene, pyrene, stigmastanol, stigmasterol and phenol. PCA and FA (varimax functionality) were used to identify the possible sources of each organic contaminant based on the inventory of local activities. Five principal components were obtained with 66.5 % of the total variation. Result from FA indicated that PAHs (pyrene, fluorene, acenaphthene, benzo[a]anthracene) originated from industrial activity and socio-economic activities; while sterols (coprostanol, stigmastanol and stigmasterol) were associated to domestic sewage and local socio-economic activities. The occurrence of chloropyrifos was correlated to agricultural activities, urban and domestic discharges. This study showed that the application of chemometrics on the distribution of selected organic contaminants was able to trace the sources of contamination in surface water. (author)

  13. Mortality risk factor analysis in colonic perforation: would retroperitoneal contamination increase mortality in colonic perforation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ri Na; Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Gun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2017-10-01

    Colonic perforation is a lethal condition presenting high morbidity and mortality in spite of urgent surgical treatment. This study investigated the surgical outcome of patients with colonic perforation associated with retroperitoneal contamination. Retrospective analysis was performed for 30 patients diagnosed with colonic perforation caused by either inflammation or ischemia who underwent urgent surgical treatment in our facility from January 2005 to December 2014. Patient characteristics were analyzed to find risk factors correlated with increased postoperative mortality. Using the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) audit system, the mortality and morbidity rates were estimated to verify the surgical outcomes. Patients with retroperitoneal contamination, defined by the presence of retroperitoneal air in the preoperative abdominopelvic CT, were compared to those without retroperitoneal contamination. Eight out of 30 patients (26.7%) with colonic perforation had died after urgent surgical treatment. Factors associated with mortality included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and the ischemic cause of colonic perforation. Three out of 6 patients (50%) who presented retroperitoneal contamination were deceased. Although the patients with retroperitoneal contamination did not show significant increase in the mortality rate, they showed significantly higher ASA physical status classification than those without retroperitoneal contamination. The mortality rate predicted from Portsmouth POSSUM was higher in the patients with retroperitoneal contamination. Patients presenting colonic perforation along with retroperitoneal contamination demonstrated severe comorbidity. However, retroperitoneal contamination was not found to be correlated with the mortality rate.

  14. Investigation of elements contamination and analysis of electrical effect of this contamination in silicon on the neutron transmutation doping in the RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjadi, U.

    1998-01-01

    The elements of the contamination on the Neutron Transmutation Doping Process (NTD) have investigated by Multi Channel Analyser (MCA). This Investigation is important to know the quality of silicon doping in NTD. We have found that Mn-45, Ga-72 and Au-198 are elements of contamination in silicon after NTD process. Analysis of electrical effect of this elements contamination on semiconductor silicon is described also in this paper

  15. The use of radiochemical analysis for detecting biotracers of food radioactive contamination in Cherkasy Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matvyijenko, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    Stable biotracers of radioactive contamination according to the findings of analytical control of the foodstuffs was determined. The use of radiochemical analysis for determining the activity of the foodstuffs and water (Sr-90, Cs-137) was evaluated

  16. Analysis of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on Vannamei Shrimp using binary logit model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviana, P. P.; Fithriasari, K.

    2018-04-01

    Mostly Indonesian citizen consume vannamei shrimp as their food. Vannamei shrimp also is one of Indonesian exports comodities mainstay. Vannamei shrimp in the ponds and markets could be contaminated by Salmonella sp bacteria. This bacteria will endanger human health. Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp could be affected by many factors. This study is intended to identify what factors that supposedly influence the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp. The researchers used the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp as response variable. This response variable has two categories: 0 = if testing result indicate that there is no Salmonella sp on vannamei shrimp; 1 = if testing result indicate that there is Salmonella sp on vannamei shrimp. There are four factors that supposedly influence the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp, which are the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on farmer hand swab; the subdistrict of vannamei shrimp ponds; the fish processing unit supplied by; and the pond are in hectare. This four factors used as predictor variables. The analysis used is Binary Logit Model Approach according to the response variable that has two categories. The analysis result indicates that the factors or predictor variables which is significantly affect the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp are the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on farmer hand swab and the subdistrict of vannamei shrimp ponds.

  17. Molecular marker analysis of 'Shatangju' and 'Wuzishatangju ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Wuzishatangju'(Citrus reticulata Blanco) is an excellent cultivar derived from a bud sport of a seedy 'Shatangju' cultivar found in Guangdong Province in the 1980s. In this study, six molecular markers including random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  18. Analysis of Food Contaminants, Residues, and Chemical Constituents of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Baraem; Reuhs, Bradley L.; Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The food chain that starts with farmers and ends with consumers can be complex, involving multiple stages of production and distribution (planting, harvesting, breeding, transporting, storing, importing, processing, packaging, distributing to retail markets, and shelf storing) (Fig. 18.1). Various practices can be employed at each stage in the food chain, which may include pesticide treatment, agricultural bioengineering, veterinary drug administration, environmental and storage conditions, processing applications, economic gain practices, use of food additives, choice of packaging material, etc. Each of these practices can play a major role in food quality and safety, due to the possibility of contamination with or introduction (intentionally and nonintentionally) of hazardous substances or constituents. Legislation and regulation to ensure food quality and safety are in place and continue to develop to protect the stakeholders, namely farmers, consumers, and industry. [Refer to reference (1) for information on regulations of food contaminants and residues.

  19. Preliminary Experimental Analysis of Soil Stabilizers for Contamination Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Zidan, A.; Gudavalli, R.; Wu, Kuang-His

    2006-01-01

    A major focus of Department of Energy's (DOE's) environmental management mission at the Hanford site involves characterizing and remediating contaminated soil and groundwater; stabilizing contaminated soil; remediating disposal sites; decontaminating and decommissioning structures, and demolishing former plutonium production process buildings, nuclear reactors, and separation plants; maintaining inactive waste sites; transitioning facilities into the surveillance and maintenance program; and mitigating effects to biological and cultural resources from site development and environmental cleanup and restoration activities. For example, a total of 470,914 metric tons of contaminated soil from 100 Areas remediation activities were disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) during 2004. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) is supporting the Hanford's site remediation program by analyzing the effectiveness of several soil stabilizers (fixatives) for contamination control during excavation activities. The study is focusing on determining the effects of varying soil conditions, temperature, humidity and wind velocity on the effectiveness of the candidate stabilizers. The test matrix consists of a soil penetration-depth study, wind tunnel experiments for determination of threshold velocity, and temperature and moisture-controlled drying/curing experiments. These three set of experiments are designed to verify performance metrics, as well as provide insight into what fundamental forces are altered by the use of the stabilizer. This paper only presents the preliminary results obtained during wind tunnel experiments using dry Hanford soil samples (with 2.7% moisture by weight). These dry soil samples were exposed to varying wind speeds from 2.22 m/sec to 8.88 m/sec. Furthermore, airborne particulate data was collected for the dry Hanford soil experiments using an aerosol analyzer instrument. (authors)

  20. Analysis of contamination conditions of the Joyo Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, S.; Ishijima, N.; Tanimoto, K.

    1999-08-01

    Decontamination methods have been studied for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility whose operation has been stopped in 1994. In this study, we analyzed samples of its system piping, whose dose rate was relatively low, to determine conditions of contamination. We also study appropriate decontamination methods for them. Results are as follows. 1. The inner surfaces of piping were covered with a very thin clad that was less than 1 micrometer in thickness and had many vacancies, looked like particle detachment, which were about 20 micrometers in depth. Something like corrosion product was observed near the surface and it was 440 micrometers in depth. 2. Radioactive contamination was considered to settle on a lower part of the piping and to be buried in the clad. A kind of dominant contamination nuclide was 60 Co. 3. Hot nitric acid process will be suitable for system decontamination to reduce dose rate before dismantling. But its feasibility tests are indispensable using samples of main system components that have high dose rate. Rubber lining tanks requires another methods because of its difficulty of decontamination. 4. Analyses and decontamination tests using main system are required to decide through decontamination methods according to the clearance level. (author)

  1. Molecular characterization and potential sources of aqueous humor bacterial contamination during phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Luciana C C; de Souza-Pollo, Andressa; Padua, Ivan Ricardo M; Conceição, Luciano F; da Silveira, Camila P Balthazar; Silva, Germana A; Maluta, Renato P; Laus, José L

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber during cataract surgery is one of the main responsible for endophthalmitis postoperative. Phacoemulsification is a less invasive technique for cataract treatment, although it does not exclude the possibility of contamination. In this study, bacterial contaminants of aqueous humor collected pre- and post-phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation (IOL) of twenty dogs were identified. As the conjunctival microbiota constitute a significant source of anterior chamber contamination, bacterial isolates from aqueous humor were genetically compared with those present in the conjunctival surface of the patients. Three dogs presented bacterial growth in both aqueous humor and conjunctival surface samples. Bacterial isolates from these samples were grouped according to their genetic profiles by repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) and their representatives were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Isolates from conjunctival surface were identified as Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus spp. and S. aureus; and from aqueous humor samples as Enterobacter spp., Pantoea spp., Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp., respectively in decreasing order of prevalence. According to the rep-PCR analysis, 16.6% of Enterobacter spp. isolates from conjunctival surface were genetically similar to those from aqueous humor. The rest of isolates encountered in aqueous humor were genetically distinct from those of conjunctival surface. The significant genetic diversity of bacterial isolates found in the aqueous humor samples after surgery denoted the possibility of anterior chamber contamination during phacoemulsification by bacteria not only from conjunctival surface but also from different sources related to surgical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multivariate analysis of heavy metal contamination using river sediment cores of Nankan River, northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, An-Sheng; Lu, Wei-Li; Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Chang, Queenie; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Lin, Chin-Jung; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Through the geology and climate characteristic in Taiwan, generally rivers carry a lot of suspended particles. After these particles settled, they become sediments which are good sorbent for heavy metals in river system. Consequently, sediments can be found recording contamination footprint at low flow energy region, such as estuary. Seven sediment cores were collected along Nankan River, northern Taiwan, which is seriously contaminated by factory, household and agriculture input. Physico-chemical properties of these cores were derived from Itrax-XRF Core Scanner and grain size analysis. In order to interpret these complex data matrices, the multivariate statistical techniques (cluster analysis, factor analysis and discriminant analysis) were introduced to this study. Through the statistical determination, the result indicates four types of sediment. One of them represents contamination event which shows high concentration of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni and Fe, and low concentration of Si and Zr. Furthermore, three possible contamination sources of this type of sediment were revealed by Factor Analysis. The combination of sediment analysis and multivariate statistical techniques used provides new insights into the contamination depositional history of Nankan River and could be similarly applied to other river systems to determine the scale of anthropogenic contamination.

  3. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION FOR TRACE ANALYSIS OF DIAZINON IN DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahiminejad ، S. J. Shahtaheri ، M. R. Ganjali ، A. Rahimi Forushani ، F. Golbabaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Amongst organophosphate pesticides, the one most widely used and common environmental contaminant is diazinon; thus methods for its trace analysis in environmental samples must be developed. Use of diazinon imprinted polymers such as sorbents in solid phase extraction, is a prominent and novel application area of molecular imprinted polymers. For diazinon extraction, high performance liquid chromatography analysis was demonstrated in this study. During optimization of the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure for efficient solid phase extraction of diazinon, Plackett-Burman design was conducted. Eight experimental factors with critical influence on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction performance were selected, and 12 different experimental runs based on Plackett-Burman design were carried out. The applicability of diazinon imprinted polymers as the sorbent in solid phase extraction, presented obtained good recoveries of diazinon from LC-grade water. An increase in pH caused an increase in the recovery on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction. From these results, the optimal molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure was as follows: solid phase extraction packing with 100 mg diazinon imprinted polymers; conditioning with 5 mL of methanol and 6 mL of LC-grade water; sample loading containing diazinon (pH=10; washing with 1 mL of LC-grade water, 1 mL LC- grade water containing 30% acetonitrile and 0.5 mL of acetonitrile, respectively; eluting with 1 mL of methanol containing 2% acetic acid. The percentage recoveries obtained by the optimized molecular imprinted solid phase extraction were more than 90% with drinking water spiked at different trace levels of diazinon. Generally speaking, the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure and subsequent high performance liquid chromatography analysis can be a relatively fast and proper approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diazinon in

  4. LMWOA (low molecular weight organic acid) exudation by salt marsh plants: Natural variation and response to Cu contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2010-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate, in vitro, the capability of roots of two salt marsh plants to release low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) and to ascertain whether Cu contamination would stimulate or not organic acids exudation. The sea rush Juncus maritimus and the sea-club rush Scirpus maritimus, both from the lower Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were used. Plants were collected seasonally, four times a year in 2004, during low tide. After sampling, plant roots were washed for removal of adherent particles and immersed for 2 h in a solution that matched salinity (3) and pH (7.5) of the pore water from the same location to obtain plant exudates. In one of the seasons, similar experiments were carried out but spiking the solution with different amounts of Cu in order to embrace the range between 0 and 1600 nM. In the final solutions as well as in sediment pore water LMWOAs were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Plants were able to release, in a short period of time, relatively high amounts of LMWOAs (oxalate, citrate, malate, malonate, and succinate). In the sediment pore water oxalate, succinate and acetate were also detected. Therefore, plant roots probably contributed to the presence of some of these organic compounds in pore water. Exudation differed between the plant species and also showed some seasonally variation, particularly for S. maritimus. The release of oxalate by J. maritimus increased with Cu increase in the media. However, exudation of the other LMWOAs did not seem to be stimulated by Cu contamination in the media. This fact is compatible with the existence of alternative internal mechanisms for Cu detoxification, as denoted by the fact that in media contaminated with Cu both plant species accumulated relatively high amounts (29-83%) of the initially dissolved Cu. This study expands our knowledge on the contribution of globally dominant salt marsh plants to the release of LMWOAs into the environment.

  5. Determining uranium speciation in contaminated soils by molecular spectroscopic methods: Examples from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's former uranium production facility located at Fernald, OH (18 mi NW of Cincinnati) is the host site for an Integrated Demonstration for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. A wide variety of source terms for uranium contamination have been identified reflecting the diversity of operations at the facility. Most of the uranium contamination is contained in the top ∼1/2 m of soil, but uranium has been found in perched waters indicating substantial migration. In support of the development of remediation technologies and risk assessment, we are conducting uranium speciation studies on untreated and treated soils using molecular spectroscopies. Untreated soils from five discrete sites have been analyzed. We have found that ∼80--90% of the uranium exists as hexavalent UO 2 2+ species even though many source terms consisted of tetravalent uranium species such as UO 2 . Much of the uranium exists as microcrystalline precipitates (secondary minerals). There is also clear evidence for variations in uranium species from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale. However, similarities in speciation at sites having different source terms suggest that soil and groundwater chemistry may be as important as source term in defining the uranium speciation in these soils. Characterization of treated soils has focused on materials from two sites that have undergone leaching using conventional extractants (e.g., carbonate, citrate) or novel chelators such as Tiron. Redox reagents have also been used to facilitate the leaching process. Three different classes of treated soils have been identified based on the speciation of uranium remaining in the soils. In general, the effective treatments decrease the total uranium while increasing the ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) species

  6. A genetic analysis of segregation distortion revealed by molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 90, No. ... Segregation analysis was based on 64 molecular markers, including 26 .... FHB of RIL populations was controlled by quantitative trait ... The authors acknowledge financial support by the National Basic.

  7. Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase deficiency in a Tunisian family. Jaouani Mouna, Hamdi Nadia, Chaouch Leila, Kalai Miniar, Mellouli Fethi, Darragi Imen, Boudriga Imen, Chaouachi Dorra, Bejaoui Mohamed, Abbes Salem ...

  8. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  9. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level

  10. Feasibility study of X-ray K-edge analysis of RCRA heavy metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, T.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been completed to assess the capabilities of X-ray K-edge analysis in the measurement of RCRA metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums. Results were obtained for mercury and lead contamination. It was not possible to measure cadmium contamination using this technique. No false positive signals were observed. In cases where uniformity of the sludge can be assumed, this analysis can provide a quick, accurate measurement of heavy-metal contamination

  11. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Recent Advances and Uses of Monolithic Columns for the Analysis of Residues and Contaminants in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Bao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are gaining interest as excellent substitutes to conventional particle-packed columns. These columns show higher permeability and lower flow resistance than conventional liquid chromatography columns, providing high-throughput performance, resolution and separation in short run times. Monoliths possess also great potential for the clean-up and preparation of complex mixtures. In situ polymerization inside appropriate supports allows the development of several microextraction formats, such as in-tube solid-phase and pipette tip-based extractions. These techniques using porous monoliths offer several advantages, including miniaturization and on-line coupling with analytical instruments. Additionally, monoliths are ideal support media for imprinting template-specific sites, resulting in the so-called molecularly-imprinted monoliths, with ultra-high selectivity. In this review, time-saving LC columns and preparative applications applied to the analysis of residues and contaminants in food in 2010–2014 are described, focusing on recent improvements in design and with emphasis in automated on-line systems and innovative materials and formats.

  13. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  14. Process design of high-concentration benzimidazole wastewater treatment based on the molecular structure of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenru; Qian, Kun; Liu, Qinyao; Zhang, Qianyi; Yao, Chen; Song, Wei; Wang, Yihong

    2018-04-01

    Benzimidazole is an important intermediate in industry and it is usually difficult to be degraded by many treatment technologies. Looking for a highly effective, environment-friendly degradation process for benzimidazole wastewater is of great significance to reduce pollution. Based on the structure of contaminants, the micro-electrolysis (ME) coupled with the Fenton technique was chosen to degrade the industrial benzimidazole wastewater. Special feeding was applied to maintain the suitable hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) concentration to produce the hydroxyl radicals (•OH) as much as possible and protect •OH from being quenched by excess H 2 O 2 according to the reaction mechanism. The results showed that this combined technique was highly efficient to decompose benzimidazole compounds. More chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be reduced when flow control was used, compared to the flow not being controlled. The COD removal rate could reach 85.2% at optimal parameters. Then the effluent of this process was combined with the existing biochemical system for further degradation. The studies of Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry showed that both 2-(a-Hydroxyethyl) benzimidazole and 2-Acetylbenzimidazole were decomposed to the isopropanolamine and aniline after the ME treatment; then the intermediates were oxidized into oxalic acid after the Fenton reaction.

  15. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO 2 ). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil

  16. Improved removal of blood contamination from ThinPrep cervical cytology samples for Raman spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Damien; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Martin, Cara M; O'Leary, John J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-05-01

    There is an unmet need for methods to help in the early detection of cervical precancer. Optical spectroscopy-based techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy, have shown great potential for diagnosis of different cancers, including cervical cancer. However, relatively few studies have been carried out on liquid-based cytology (LBC) pap test specimens and confounding factors, such as blood contamination, have been identified. Previous work reported a method to remove blood contamination before Raman spectroscopy by pretreatment of the slides with hydrogen peroxide. The aim of the present study was to extend this work to excessively bloody samples to see if these could be rendered suitable for Raman spectroscopy. LBC ThinPrep specimens were treated by adding hydrogen peroxide directly to the vial before slide preparation. Good quality Raman spectra were recorded from negative and high grade (HG) cytology samples with no blood contamination and with heavy blood contamination. Good classification between negative and HG cytology could be achieved for samples with no blood contamination (sensitivity 92%, specificity 93%) and heavy blood contamination (sensitivity 89%, specificity 88%) with poorer classification when samples were combined (sensitivity 82%, specificity 87%). This study demonstrates for the first time the improved potential of Raman spectroscopy for analysis of ThinPrep specimens regardless of blood contamination. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. First comparative analysis concerning the plasma platelet contamination during MNC collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hella; Achenbach, Susanne; Strobel, Julian; Zimmermann, Robert; Eckstein, Reinhold; Strasser, Erwin F

    2017-08-01

    Monocytes can be cultured into dendritic cells with addition of autologous plasma, which is highly prone to platelet contamination due to the apheresis process. Since platelets affect the maturation process of monocytes into dendritic cells and might even lead to a diminished harvest of dendritic cells, it is very important to reduce the platelet contamination. A new collection device (Spectra Optia) was analyzed, compared to two established devices (COM.TEC, Cobe Spectra) and evaluated regarding the potential generation of source plasma. Concurrent plasma collected during leukapheresis was analyzed for residual cell contamination in a prospective study with the new Spectra Optia apheresis device (n=24) and was compared with COM.TEC and Cobe Spectra data (retrospective analysis, n=72). Donor pre-donation counts of platelets were analyzed for their predictive value of contaminating PLTs in plasma harvests. The newest apheresis device showed the lowest residual platelet count of the collected concurrent plasma (median 3.50×10 9 /l) independent of pre-donation counts. The other two devices and sets had a higher platelet contamination. The contamination of the plasma with leukocytes was very low (only 2.0% were higher than 0.5×10 9 /l). This study showed a significant reduction of platelet contamination of the concurrent plasma collected with the new Spectra Optia device. This plasma product with low residual platelets and leukocytes might also be used as plasma for fractionation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Image Analysis in the Field of Oil Contamination Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ceco, Ema

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring wear particles in lubricating oils allows specialists to evaluate thehealth and functionality of a mechanical system. The main analysis techniquesavailable today are manual particle analysis and automatic optical analysis. Man-ual particle analysis is effective and reliable since the analyst continuously seeswhat is being counted . The drawback is that the technique is quite time demand-ing and dependent of the skills of the analyst. Automatic optical particle countingconstitutes o...

  19. Correlation analysis of the Taurus molecular cloud complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiner, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Autocorrelation and power spectrum methods were applied to the analysis of the density and velocity structure of the Taurus Complex and Heiles Cloud 2 as traced out by 13 CO J = 1 → 0 molecular line observations obtained with the 14m antenna of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory. Statistically significant correlations in the spacing of density fluctuations within the Taurus Complex and Heiles 2 were uncovered. The length scales of the observed correlations correspond in magnitude to the Jeans wavelengths characterizing gravitational instabilities with (i) interstellar atomic hydrogen gas for the case of the Taurus complex, and (ii) molecular hydrogen for Heiles 2. The observed correlations may be the signatures of past and current gravitational instabilities frozen into the structure of the molecular gas. The appendices provide a comprehensive description of the analytical and numerical methods developed for the correlation analysis of molecular clouds

  20. 75 FR 32295 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act... methods for use in measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with... required to measure contaminants in drinking water samples. In addition, EPA Regions as well as States and...

  1. Analysis of Leading Edge and Trailing Edge Cover Glass Samples Before and After Treatment with Advanced Satellite Contamination Removal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    surface analysis, 40 contamination control, ANCC ( Aerogel Mesh Contamination Collector) iPRICECODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1 & SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...operational parameter space (temperature, vibration, radiation, vacuum and micrometorite environments). One embodiment of this device, the Aerogel Mesh...Lippey and Dan Demeo of Hughes Aircraft Corporation for their kind hospitality and research collaboration on the contamination removal phase of this work

  2. Decision making support of the management of technogenically contaminated territories basing on risk analysis with use of geographic information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatsalo, B.I.; Demin, V.F.

    2002-01-01

    Overall questions of decision making support of the contaminated territories management on a basis of risk assessment were considered. Characteristics and possibilities of the applied geoinformation system of decision making support PRANA developed for the risk control and rehabilitation of contaminated territories are demonstrated. The PRANA system involves estimations of all fundamental characteristics of risk during analysis of results and contaminated territories management [ru

  3. Fragrance analysis using molecular and biochemical methods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Biochemical analysis of aroma was performed with the 1.7% KOH solution and molecular analysis of aroma was carried out with microsatellite markers present on chromosome 8 (BAD2, BADEX7-5, SCUSSR1) to determine the extent of association between trait, marker and chromosome 8. Among these markers, BAD2 ...

  4. Molecular responses and expression analysis of genes in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Molecular responses and expression analysis of genes in a xerophytic desert shrub Haloxylon ammodendron .... physiological determination and cDNA-AFLP analysis, three groups of seeds were sowed in pots with sand and .... HaDR27. U. 234. PDR-like ABC transporter. AT1G59870. HaDR28. U. 135.

  5. Material Cycles and Chemicals: Dynamic Material Flow Analysis of Contaminants in Paper Recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Laner, David; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2016-01-01

    material source-segregation and collection was the least effective strategy for reducing chemical contamination, if the overall recycling rates should be maintained at the current level (approximately 70% for Europe). The study provides a consistent approach for evaluating contaminant levels in material......This study provides a systematic approach for assessment of contaminants in materials for recycling. Paper recycling is used as an illustrative example. Three selected chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOHs), are evaluated within the paper...... cycle. The approach combines static material flow analysis (MFA) with dynamic material and substance flow modeling. The results indicate that phasing out of chemicals is the most effective measure for reducing chemical contamination. However, this scenario was also associated with a considerable lag...

  6. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  7. Interactive analysis of systems biology molecular expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Sunil

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology aims to understand biological systems on a comprehensive scale, such that the components that make up the whole are connected to one another and work through dependent interactions. Molecular correlations and comparative studies of molecular expression are crucial to establishing interdependent connections in systems biology. The existing software packages provide limited data mining capability. The user must first generate visualization data with a preferred data mining algorithm and then upload the resulting data into the visualization package for graphic visualization of molecular relations. Results Presented is a novel interactive visual data mining application, SysNet that provides an interactive environment for the analysis of high data volume molecular expression information of most any type from biological systems. It integrates interactive graphic visualization and statistical data mining into a single package. SysNet interactively presents intermolecular correlation information with circular and heatmap layouts. It is also applicable to comparative analysis of molecular expression data, such as time course data. Conclusion The SysNet program has been utilized to analyze elemental profile changes in response to an increasing concentration of iron (Fe in growth media (an ionomics dataset. This study case demonstrates that the SysNet software is an effective platform for interactive analysis of molecular expression information in systems biology.

  8. Use of molecular oxygen to reduce EUV-induced carbon contamination of optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Michael E.; Grunow, Philip A.; Steinhaus, Chip; Clift, W. Miles; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-08-01

    Carbon deposition and removal experiments on Mo/Si multilayer mirror (MLM) samples were performed using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light on Beamline 12.0.1.2 of the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Carbon (C) was deposited onto Mo/Si multilayer mirror (MLM) samples when hydrocarbon vapors where intentionally introduced into the MLM test chamber in the presence of EUV at 13.44 nm (92.3eV). The carbon deposits so formed were removed by molecular oxygen + EUV. The MLM reflectivities and photoemission were measured in-situ during these carbon deposition and cleaning procedures. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) sputter-through profiling of the samples was performed after experimental runs to help determine C layer thickness and the near-surface compositional-depth profiles of all samples studied. EUV powers were varied from ~0.2mW/mm2 to 3mW/mm2(at 13.44 nm) during both deposition and cleaning experiments and the oxygen pressure ranged from ~5x10-5 to 5x10-4 Torr during the cleaning experiments. C deposition rates as high as ~8nm/hr were observed, while cleaning rates as high as ~5nm/hr could be achieved when the highest oxygen pressure were used. A limited set of experiments involving intentional oxygen-only exposure of the MLM samples showed that slow oxidation of the MLM surface could occur.

  9. Physiological and molecular responses of the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to soil chlortetracycline contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dasong; Zhou Qixing; Xu Yingming; Chen Chun; Li Ye

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate toxic effects of exposure to chlortetracycline (CTC) in soil on reproductive endpoints (juvenile counts and cocoon counts), biochemical responses, and genotoxic potentials of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Results showed that juvenile counts and cocoon counts of the tested earthworms were reduced after exposure to CTC. The effective concentrations (EC 50 values) for juvenile and cocoon counts were 96.1 and 120.3 mg/kg, respectively. Treatment of earthworms with CTC significantly changed the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). An increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) indicated that CTC could cause cellular lipid peroxidation in the tested earthworms. The percentage of DNA in the tail of single-cell gel electrophoresis of coelomocytes as an indication of DNA damage increased after treatment with different doses of CTC, and a dose-dependent DNA damage of coelomocytes was found. In conclusion, CTC induces physiological responses and genotoxicity on earthworms. - Highlights: ► Reproductive endpoints were assessed for Eisenia fetida exposed to chlortectracyline (CTC). ► CTC may induce physiological and molecular responses in E. fetida. ► A clear relationship was observed between CTC doses and DNA damage of coelomocytes. - Chlortetracycline in soil could induce physiological responses and genotoxicity on earthworms at realistic environmental concentrations.

  10. Analysis of contaminating elements in tree rings in Santiago, Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Kroeger, C.M.; Avila, M.J.; Eaton, L.C.; Lopez, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using the 22'' isochronous cyclotron at the University of Chile, we have performed PIXE analyses on a group of samples collected from trees of metropolitan parks in Santiago. Dendrochronology was performed on each sample, which was then sectioned for the PIXE and other analyses, neutron activation and electro-chemistry. Available samples are trunk sections or cores obtained by the use of a 4.0 mm stainless steel incremental corer. We took three cores from each tree with permission of the municipalities. For the PIXE we use infinitely thick targets, as wood slabs taken along the trunk radius, and thin targets obtained by acid digestion of wood pieces and deposition on Kapton foils. Self supporting thick targets were placed directly in the PIXE chamber in a position so as to allow the irradiation of a specific annual ring. Potassium and Calcium appear as the most abundant elements in wood. Other elements such as S, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Pb were detected in amounts above the natural background in wood, and can be attributed to environmental contamination. The K/Ca ratios appear to be different for each species of tree, and seem to be related to the physico-chemical properties of wood. Preliminary results show important amounts of As and Cu (supposedly from mining origin) with increasing presence in the recent years. Pb and Zn (supposedly from vehicle origin) are also higher in recent years. (author)

  11. Analysis of contaminating elements in tree rings in Santiago, Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo-Kroeger, C.M.; Avila, M.J.; Eaton, L.C.; Lopez, L.A. [Faculty of Sciences. Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    1996-12-31

    Using the 22`` isochronous cyclotron at the University of Chile, we have performed PIXE analyses on a group of samples collected from trees of metropolitan parks in Santiago. Dendrochronology was performed on each sample, which was then sectioned for the PIXE and other analyses, neutron activation and electro-chemistry. Available samples are trunk sections or cores obtained by the use of a 4.0 mm stainless steel incremental corer. We took three cores from each tree with permission of the municipalities. For the PIXE we use infinitely thick targets, as wood slabs taken along the trunk radius, and thin targets obtained by acid digestion of wood pieces and deposition on Kapton foils. Self supporting thick targets were placed directly in the PIXE chamber in a position so as to allow the irradiation of a specific annual ring. Potassium and Calcium appear as the most abundant elements in wood. Other elements such as S, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Pb were detected in amounts above the natural background in wood, and can be attributed to environmental contamination. The K/Ca ratios appear to be different for each species of tree, and seem to be related to the physico-chemical properties of wood. Preliminary results show important amounts of As and Cu (supposedly from mining origin) with increasing presence in the recent years. Pb and Zn (supposedly from vehicle origin) are also higher in recent years. (author)

  12. Proteomic analysis of Sydney Rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) exposed to metal contamination in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Emma L.; Taylor, Daisy A.; Nair, Sham V.; Birch, Gavin; Hose, Grant C.; Raftos, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This study used proteomics to assess the impacts of metal contamination in the field on Sydney Rock oysters. Oysters were transplanted into Lake Macquarie, NSW, for two weeks in both 2009 and 2010. Two-dimensional electrophoresis identified changes in protein expression profiles of oyster haemolymph between control and metal contaminated sites. There were unique protein expression profiles for each field trial. Principal components analysis attributed these differences in oyster proteomes to the different combinations and concentrations of metals and other environmental variables present during the three field trials. Identification of differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins associated with cytoskeletal activity and stress responses were the most commonly affected biological functions in the Sydney Rock oyster. Overall, the data show that proteomics combined with multivariate analysis has the potential to link the effects of contaminants with biological consequences. - Highlights: ► Sydney Rock oyster haemolymph was analysed by proteomics after metal exposure in 3 field trials. ► 2-DE analysis was used to compare protein profiles between control and contaminated sites. ► Different protein expression profiles were revealed per field trial. ► Principal components analysis attributed profiles to different suites of metals and environmental variables per trial. ► The study highlights the need to do multiple field trials and to combine proteomic and enviro. data. - This study used proteomics to analyse impacts of metal contamination on Sydney Rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) haemolymph in multiple field trials.

  13. Flow cytometric analysis of microbial contamination in food industry technological lines--initial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józwa, Wojciech; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-04-02

    Flow cytometry constitutes an alternative for traditional methods of microorganisms identification and analysis, including methods requiring cultivation step. It enables the detection of pathogens and other microorganisms contaminants without the need to culture microbial cells meaning that the sample (water, waste or food e.g. milk, wine, beer) may be analysed directly. This leads to a significant reduction of time required for analysis allowing monitoring of production processes and immediate reaction in case of contamination or any disruption occurs. Apart from the analysis of raw materials or products on different stages of manufacturing process, the flow cytometry seems to constitute an ideal tool for the assessment of microbial contamination on the surface of technological lines. In the present work samples comprising smears from 3 different surfaces of technological lines from fruit and vegetable processing company from Greater Poland were analysed directly with flow cytometer. The measured parameters were forward and side scatter of laser light signals allowing the estimation of microbial cell contents in each sample. Flow cytometric analysis of the surface of food industry production lines enable the preliminary evaluation of microbial contamination within few minutes from the moment of sample arrival without the need of sample pretreatment. The presented method of fl ow cytometric initial evaluation of microbial state of food industry technological lines demonstrated its potential for developing a robust, routine method for the rapid and labor-saving detection of microbial contamination in food industry.

  14. Hydrodynamic analysis application of contaminated groundwater remediation to oil hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Pajić Predrag R.; Čalenić Aleksandar I.; Polomčić Dušan M.; Bajić Dragoljub I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the application of the hydrodynamic analysis in the selected ‘pumping and treatment’ remediation method of groundwater hydrocarbon pollution in the case of the Pancevo oil refinery is examined. The applied hydrodynamic analysis represents a regular and necessary approach in modern hydrogeology. Previous chemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples at observation objects revealed their pollution by oil products. New researches included the constraction of 12 piezometric bor...

  15. Microbiological Analysis of an Active Pilot-Scale Mobile Bioreactor Treating Organic Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigmon, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor (GAC-FBR). This GAC-FBR was in operation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) Site in Augusta Georgia for in situ groundwater bioremediation of organics. The samples included contaminated site groundwater, GAC-FBR effluent, and biofilm coated granular activated carbon at 5, 9, and 13 feet within the GAC-FBR column. The objective of this analysis was to correlate contaminant removal with microbiological activity within the GAC-FBR

  16. Contaminants reduce the richness and evenness of marine communities: A review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Emma L.; Roberts, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Biodiversity of marine ecosystems is integral to their stability and function and is threatened by anthropogenic processes. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis of 216 studies to understand the effects of common contaminants upon diversity in various marine communities. The most common diversity measures were species richness, the Shannon-Wiener index (H') and Pielou evenness (J). Largest effect sizes were observed for species richness, which tended to be the most sensitive index. Pollution was associated with marine communities containing fewer species or taxa than their pristine counterparts. Marine habitats did not vary in their susceptibility to contamination, rather a ∼40% reduction in richness occurred across all habitats. No class of contaminant was associated with significantly greater impacts on diversity than any other. Survey studies identified larger effects than laboratory or field experiments. Anthropogenic contamination is strongly associated with reductions in the species richness and evenness of marine habitats. - Contamination substantially reduces the biodiversity of marine communities in all major habitat types and across all major contaminant classes.

  17. Allowable residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil from pathway analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Baes, C.F. III

    1987-01-01

    The Remedial Action Program (RAP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will include well drilling, facility upgrades, and other waste management operations likely to involve soils contaminated with radionuclides. A preliminary protocol and generalized criteria for handling contaminated soils is needed to coordinate and plan RAP activities, but there exists only limited information on contaminate nature and distribution at ORNL RAP sites. Furthermore, projections of long-term decommissioning and closure options for these sites are preliminary. They have adapted a pathway analysis model, DECOM, to quantify risks to human health from radionuclides in soil and used it to outline preliminary criteria for determining the fate of contaminated soil produced during RAP activities. They assumed that the site could be available for unrestricted use immediately upon decontamination. The pathways considered are consumption of food grown on the contaminated soil, including direct ingestion of soil from poorly washed vegetables, direct radiation from the ground surface, inhalation of resuspended radioactive soil, and drinking water from a well drilled through or near the contaminated soil. We will discuss the assumptions and simplifications implicit in DECOM, the site-specific data required, and the results of initial calculations for the Oak Ridge Reservation

  18. Color image analysis of contaminants and bacteria transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mehdi; Dehmeshki, Jamshid; Daemi, Mohammad F.; Cole, Larry; Dickenson, Eric

    1997-10-01

    Transport of contaminants and bacteria in aqueous heterogeneous saturated porous systems have been studied experimentally using a novel fluorescent microscopic imaging technique. The approach involves color visualization and quantification of bacterium and contaminant distributions within a transparent porous column. By introducing stained bacteria and an organic dye as a contaminant into the column and illuminating the porous regions with a planar sheet of laser beam, contaminant and bacterial transport processes through the porous medium can be observed and measured microscopically. A computer controlled color CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images as a function of time. These images are recorded by a frame accurate high resolution VCR and are then analyzed using a color image analysis code written in our laboratories. The color images are digitized this way and simultaneous concentration and velocity distributions of both contaminant and bacterium are evaluated as a function of time and pore characteristics. The approach provides a unique dynamic probe to observe these transport processes microscopically. These results are extremely valuable in in-situ bioremediation problems since microscopic particle-contaminant- bacterium interactions are the key to understanding and optimization of these processes.

  19. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Harter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES. Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES used in Born-Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v, then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters.

  20. Molecular thermal transistor: Dimension analysis and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S.; Panahinia, R.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, large challenge has been spent to realize high efficient thermal transistors. Outstanding properties of DNA make it as an excellent nano material in future technologies. In this paper, we introduced a high efficient DNA based thermal transistor. The thermal transistor operates when the system shows an increase in the thermal flux despite of decreasing temperature gradient. This is what called as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). Based on multifractal analysis, we could distinguish regions with NDTR state from non-NDTR state. Moreover, Based on dimension spectrum of the system, it is detected that NDTR state is accompanied by ballistic transport regime. The generalized correlation sum (analogous to specific heat) shows that an irregular decrease in the specific heat induces an increase in the mean free path (mfp) of phonons. This leads to the occurrence of NDTR.

  1. Contamination of cockroaches (Insecta: Blattaria) to medically fungi: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirian, H

    2017-12-01

    Fungal infections have emerged worldwide. Cockroaches have been proved vectors of medically fungi. A systematic meta-analysis review about cockroach fungal contamination was investigated. Relevant topics were collected between January 2016 and January 2017. After a preliminary review among 392 collected papers, 156 were selected to become part of the detailed systematic meta-analysis review. Cockroaches contaminated to 38 fungi species belonging to 19 families and 12 orders. About 38, 25 and 13 fungal species were recovered from the American, German and brown-banded cockroaches, respectively with a variety of medical importance. Except the fungi isolated from German and brown-banded cockroaches, 15 species have been isolated only from the American cockroaches. The global world mean and trend of cockroach fungal contamination were 84.1 and 50.6-100%, respectively in the human dwelling environments. There is a significant difference between cockroach fungal contamination in the urban and rural environments (P0.05). The external and internal cockroach fungal contamination is more dangerous than entire surfaces, while the internal is more dangerous than the external surface. The German and brown-banded cockroach fungal contamination are more dangerous than the American cockroaches in the hospital environments. The study indicates that globally cockroach fungal contamination has been increased recognizing as agents of human infections and associating with high morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised patients. These facts, along with insecticide resistance emergence and increasing globally cockroach infestation, reveal importance of cockroaches and need for their control more than ever. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomarkers and Molecular Analysis to Improve Bloodstream Infection Diagnostics in an Emergency Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonen, Anne J. M.; de Jager, Cornelis P. C.; Tosserams, Janna; Kusters, Ron; Hilbink, Mirrian; Wever, Peter C.; van den Brule, Adriaan J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular pathogen detection from blood is still expensive and the exact clinical value remains to be determined. The use of biomarkers may assist in preselecting patients for immediate molecular testing besides blood culture. In this study, 140 patients with ≥ 2 SIRS criteria and clinical signs of infection presenting at the emergency department of our hospital were included. C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels were determined. One ml EDTA blood was obtained and selective pathogen DNA isolation was performed with MolYsis (Molzym). DNA samples were analysed for the presence of pathogens, using both the MagicPlex Sepsis Test (Seegene) and SepsiTest (Molzym), and results were compared to blood cultures. Fifteen patients had to be excluded from the study, leaving 125 patients for further analysis. Of the 125 patient samples analysed, 27 presented with positive blood cultures of which 7 were considered to be contaminants. suPAR, PCT, and NLCR values were significantly higher in patients with positive blood cultures compared to patients without (p molecular assays perform poorly when one ml whole blood is used from emergency care unit patients. NLCR is a cheap, fast, easy to determine, and rapidly available biomarker, and therefore seems most promising in differentiating BSI from non-BSI patients for subsequent pathogen identification using molecular diagnostics. PMID:24475269

  3. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Baez, L.E.

    1989-09-01

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface

  4. Application of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) to organic chemical contaminants in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, K; Beck, A J

    2002-03-01

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment, and control of hazards that was developed as an effective alternative to conventional end-point analysis to control food safety. It has been described as the most effective means of controlling foodborne diseases, and its application to the control of microbiological hazards has been accepted internationally. By contrast, relatively little has been reported relating to the potential use of HACCP, or HACCP-like procedures, to control chemical contaminants of food. This article presents an overview of the implementation of HACCP and discusses its application to the control of organic chemical contaminants in the food chain. Although this is likely to result in many of the advantages previously identified for microbiological HACCP, that is, more effective, efficient, and economical hazard management, a number of areas are identified that require further research and development. These include: (1) a need to refine the methods of chemical contaminant identification and risk assessment employed, (2) develop more cost-effective monitoring and control methods for routine chemical contaminant surveillance of food, and (3) improve the effectiveness of process optimization for the control of chemical contaminants in food.

  5. Molecular analysis of manufactured gas plant soils for naphthalene mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanseverino, J.; Werner, C.; Fleming, J.; Applegate, B.M.; King, J.M.H.; Sayler, G.S.; Blackburn, J.

    1991-01-01

    New molecular tools are being developed and tested to ascertain the biodegradability of hazardous wastes by soil bacterial population. The potential for manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil bacterial populations to degrade naphthalene, as a component mixture of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, was evaluated by the detection of a naphthalene biodegradative genotype by DNA probe hybridization with DNA extracts and colonies of cultured bacteria of the MGP soils. The activity of the naphthalene-degrading populations was evaluated by mineralization assays, 14 CO 2 production from 14 C-naphthalene. Direct messenger RNA (mRNA) extraction from MGP soil was evaluated as an instantaneous measure of naphthalene catabolic gene expression in MGP soil. The bioavailability of naphthalene for bacterial degradation within the MGP soils was assessed by measuring the bioluminescent response of a naphthalene-lux catabolic reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 (pUTK21). DNA extracted from 5 MGP soils and 1 creosote-contaminated soil and hybridized with a nahA gene probe indicated that the naphthalene degradative genes were present in all samples in the range of 0.06 to 0.95 ng/100 μl DNA extract which was calculated to represent 3.58 x 10 8 to 1.05 x 10 10 nahA positive cells/g soil. Phenanthrene, anthracene, and benzo(a)pyrene were mineralized also by some of the soils. NAH7 homologous messenger RNA transcripts were detectable in one MGP soil and in the creosote-contaminated soil

  6. Emerging organic contaminants in sludges. Analysis, fate and biological treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicent, Teresa [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Eljarrat, Ethel [IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry; Caminal, Gloria [IQAC-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Grupo de biocatalisis Aplicada y biodegradacion; Barcelo, Damia (eds.) [IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry; Girona Univ. (Spain). Catalan Inst. for Water Research

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive review. Written by experts. Richly illustrated. There are a growing number of new chemicals in the environment that represent an ascertained or potential risk. Many of them can be found in sewage sludge and are the subject of this volume. Experts in the field highlight their occurrence and fate, risks of biosolid use, advanced chemical analysis methods, and degradation techniques with a special focus on biodegradation using fungi. In the final chapter conclusions and trends are offered as a point of departure for future studies. The double-disciplinary approach combining environmental analysis and engineering makes the book a valuable and comprehensive source of information for a broad audience, such as environmental chemists and engineers, biotechnologists, ecotoxicologists and professionals responsible for waste and water management.

  7. Molecular analysis of Ku redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatilla Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can occur in response to ionizing radiation (IR, radiomimetic agents and from endogenous DNA-damaging reactive oxygen metabolites. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DSBs are potentially the most lethal form of DNA damage and can result in chromosomal translocations and contribute to the development of cancer. The principal mechanism for the repair of DSBs in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Ku is a key member of the NHEJ pathway and plays an important role in the recognition step when it binds to free DNA termini. Ku then stimulates the assembly and activation of other NHEJ components. DNA binding of Ku is regulated by redox conditions and evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that Ku undergoes structural changes when oxidized that results in a reduction in DNA binding activity. The C-terminal domain and cysteine 493 of Ku80 were investigated for their contribution to redox regulation of Ku. Results We effectively removed the C-terminal domain of Ku80 generating a truncation mutant and co-expressed this variant with wild type Ku70 in an insect cell system to create a Ku70/80ΔC heterodimer. We also generated two single amino acid variants of Cys493, replacing this amino acid with either an alanine (C493A or a serine (C493S, and over-expressed the variant proteins in SF9 insect cells in complex with wild type Ku70. Neither the truncation nor the amino acid substitutions alters protein expression or stability as determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We show that the C493 mutations do not alter the ability of Ku to bind duplex DNA in vitro under reduced conditions while truncation of the Ku80 C-terminus slightly reduced DNA binding affinity. Diamide oxidation of cysteines was shown to inhibit DNA binding similarly for both the wild-type and all variant proteins. Interestingly, differential DNA binding activity following re-reduction was observed for the Ku70/80

  8. Newly developed standard reference materials for organic contaminant analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poster, D.; Kucklick, J.; Schantz, M.; Porter, B.; Wise, S. [National Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Gaithersburg, MD (USA). Center for Anal. Chem.

    2004-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a number of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) for specified analytes. The SRMs are biota and biological related materials, sediments and particle related SRMs. The certified compounds for analysis are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro-analogues, chlorinated pesticides, methylmercury, organic tin compounds, fatty acids, polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDE). The authors report on origin of materials and analytic methods. (uke)

  9. Analysis of the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6. — journal of. June 2016 physics pp. 1275–1286. Analysis of the normal ... the levels are obtained for the three optical potentials to estimate the quality ... The experimental angular distribution data for the 40Ca(6Li, d)44Ti reaction .... analysed using the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials within the framework.

  10. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of fat mass and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO); rabbit; mRNA expression patterns; sequence analysis; Oryctolagus cuniculus. ... In this work, the molecular characterization and expression features of rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) FTO cDNA were analysed. The rabbit FTO cDNA with a size of 2158 bp was cloned, ...

  11. Fragrance analysis using molecular and biochemical methods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For molecular and biochemical analysis of aroma, a mapping population comprising 208 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a diverse cross between CSR10 and Taraori Basmati through Single seed descent (SSD) method was used. RILs are among the best mapping populations, which provide a novel material ...

  12. A Molecular Iodine Spectral Data Set for Rovibronic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Charles; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kafader, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    A data set of 7,381 molecular iodine vapor rovibronic transitions between the X and B electronic states has been prepared for an advanced undergraduate spectroscopic analysis project. Students apply standard theoretical techniques to these data and determine the values of three X-state constants (image omitted) and four B-state constants (image…

  13. A Homotopy-Perturbation analysis of the non-linear contaminant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research work, a Homotopy-perturbation analysis of a non –linear contaminant flow equation with an initial continuous point source is provided. The equation is characterized by advection, diffusion and adsorption. We assume that the adsorption term is modeled by Freudlich Isotherm. We provide an approximation of ...

  14. RAMAN SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION IN COMMONLY-USED FERTILIZERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate (ClO4-1) in 30+ commonly-used fertilizers. Perchlorate contamination is emerging as an important environmental issue since its discovery in water resources that are widely used for drinking...

  15. Mass Balance Model, A study of contamination effects in AMS 14C sample analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokopiou, Markella

    2010-01-01

    In this training thesis a background correction analysis, also known as mass balance model, was implemented to study the contamination effects in AMS 14C sample processing. A variety of backgrounds and standards with sizes ranging from 50 μg C to 1500 μg

  16. ECONOMICS ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents an analysis of the cost of using permeable reactive barriers to remediate contaminated ground water. When possible, these costs are compared with the cost of pump-and-treat technology for similar situations. Permeable reactive barriers are no longer perceiv...

  17. An Application of Discriminant Analysis to Pattern Recognition of Selected Contaminated Soil Features in Thin Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1997-01-01

    qualitative microprobe results: present elements Al, Si, Cr, Fe, As (associated with others). Selected groups of calibrated images (same light conditions and magnification) submitted to discriminant analysis, in order to find a pattern of recognition in the soil features corresponding to contamination already...

  18. Importance and pitfalls of molecular analysis to parasite epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Clare C

    2003-08-01

    Molecular tools are increasingly being used to address questions about parasite epidemiology. Parasites represent a diverse group and they might not fit traditional population genetic models. Testing hypotheses depends equally on correct sampling, appropriate tool and/or marker choice, appropriate analysis and careful interpretation. All methods of analysis make assumptions which, if violated, make the results invalid. Some guidelines to avoid common pitfalls are offered here.

  19. Conformational analysis of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates usually have a large number of rotatable bonds and consequently a large number of theoretically possible conformations can be generated (combinatorial explosion). The application of systematic search methods for conformational analysis of carbohydrates is therefore limited to disaccharides and trisaccharides in a routine analysis. An alternative approach is to use Monte-Carlo methods or (high-temperature) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the conformational space of complex carbohydrates. This chapter describes how to use MD simulation data to perform a conformational analysis (conformational maps, hydrogen bonds) of oligosaccharides and how to build realistic 3D structures of large polysaccharides using Conformational Analysis Tools (CAT).

  20. MEGA X: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis across Computing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Stecher, Glen; Li, Michael; Knyaz, Christina; Tamura, Koichiro

    2018-06-01

    The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (Mega) software implements many analytical methods and tools for phylogenomics and phylomedicine. Here, we report a transformation of Mega to enable cross-platform use on Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. Mega X does not require virtualization or emulation software and provides a uniform user experience across platforms. Mega X has additionally been upgraded to use multiple computing cores for many molecular evolutionary analyses. Mega X is available in two interfaces (graphical and command line) and can be downloaded from www.megasoftware.net free of charge.

  1. Distribution and geology accumulation contamination analysis of heavy metal cadmium in agricultural soil of Zunyi county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hongliang; Long Qian; Ke Yang

    2011-01-01

    The pollution of heavy metal Cd in agricultural soils of Zunyi County, Guizhou Province, was investigated and assessed by using geology accumulation indices (igeo) and pollution index method in this study. Results showed that the average content of Cd is 0.356 mg/kg, and the geochemistry baseline content of Cd was 0.147 mg/kg. The I geo s of Cd was 0.691, which suggested that non-contaminated soil accounts for 13.84%, 59.17% of tested soils was between non-polluted and mid-level polluted, 21.37% with mid-level polluted and 5.17% was between mid-level polluted and severely polluted, 0.45% of which was severely polluted. Contamination degree analysis indicated that non-contaminated soil was only 10.57%, 54.44% was influenced by Cd and 34.98% was seriously influenced by Cd. (authors)

  2. Management of radio-contaminated sites analysis of various public policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massuelle, M.H.; Brenot, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper aims at comparing public implemented in several countries in the field of the management of site contaminated by radionuclides. An analysis of decision-aiding tools will be made with an emphasis on the making of diagnostic, the choice of the radiation protection principles, the possible recommendations on optimization, the quantitative criteria and levels of action set up and the setting-up of long term monitoring. The management of sites contaminated by radionuclides also requires to express qualitatively and quantitatively the two notions of residual health risk and acceptable risk. This comes ahead of the definition of levels and modes of action. The adequacy between the principles announced and their concrete implementation will be studied in depth for some countries. The following questions will be dealt with. Who are the responsibles for such policies? Who are the different actors and operators of the public policy? Is the public involved in the decision making process? How assessment and decision go off? What are the gaps between the expected results and those obtained? What are the hindering points? Are the principles put forward implemented? Presently decision-aiding tools must fit with the reality of any system of risk management in which officials, public representatives and individuals participate in order to define and implement the solutions. This paper will focus on radioactive contamination but it will also address other types of contamination, such as chemical ones, as some countries make no distinction according to the nature of the contamination. (author)

  3. Contribution of the surface contamination of uranium-materials on the quantitative analysis results by electron probe microbeam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonino, O.; Fournier, C.; Fucili, C.; Dugne, O.; Merlet, C.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical testing of uranium materials is necessary for quality research and development in nuclear industry applications (enrichment, safety studies, fuel, etc). Electron Probe Microbeam Analysis Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry (EPMA-WDS) is a dependable non-destructive analytical technology. The characteristic X-ray signal is measured to identify and quantify the sample components, and the analyzed volume is about one micron cube. The surface contamination of uranium materials modifies and contributes to the quantitative analysis results of EPMA-WDS. This contribution is not representative of the bulk. A thin oxidized layer appears in the first instants after preparation (burnishing, cleaning) as well as a carbon contamination layer, due to metallographic preparation and carbon cracking under the impact of the electron probe. Several analytical difficulties subsequently arise, including an overlapping line between the carbon Ka ray and the Uranium U NIVOVI ray. Sensitivity and accuracy of the quantification of light elements like carbon and oxygen are also reduced by the presence of uranium. The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis on uranium materials by EPMA-WDS by taking account of the contribution of surface contamination. The first part of this paper is devoted to the study of the contaminated surface of the uranium materials U, UFe 2 and U 6 Fe a few hours after preparation. These oxidation conditions are selected so as to reproduce the same contamination surfaces occurring in microprobe analytical conditions. Surface characterization techniques were SIMS and Auger spectroscopy. The contaminated surfaces are shown. They consist of successive layers: a carbon layer, an oxidized iron layer, followed by an iron depletion layer (only in UFe 2 and U 6 Fe), and a ternary oxide layer (U-Fe-O for UFe 2 et U 6 Fe and UO 2+x for uranium). The second part of the paper addresses the estimation of the errors in quantitative

  4. Flow cytometric analysis of microbial contamination in food industry technological lines – initial study

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Czaczyk; Wojciech Juzwa

    2012-01-01

    Background. Flow cytometry constitutes an alternative for traditional methods of microorganisms identifi cation and analysis, including methods requiring cultivation step. It enables the detection of pathogens and other microorganisms contaminants without the need to culture microbial cells meaning that the sample (water, waste or food e.g. milk, wine, beer) may be analysed directly. This leads to a signifi cant reduction of time required for analysis allowing monitoring of production process...

  5. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed.

  7. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Lyons, Brett P; Thain, John E; Law, Robin J

    2013-09-30

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The cleaning of burned and contaminated archaeological maize prior to 87Sr/86Sr analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Larry V.; Taylor, Howard E.; Plowman, Terry I.; Roth, David A.; Antweiler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate trace-metal and strontium-isotope analyses of archaeological corn cobs require that metal contaminants be removed prior to chemical analysis. Archaeological cobs are often coated with construction debris, dust, or soil which contains mineral particles. In addition, most archaeological cobs are partially or completely burned and the burned parts incorporate mineral debris in their hardened residual structures. Unburned cobs are weak ion exchangers and most metals within a cob are not firmly bound to cob organic matter; therefore, immersing cobs in acids and rinsing them in deionized water to remove mineral contaminants may result in the undesirable loss of metals, including strontium, from the cob.In this paper we show that some cob metal-pair ratios are not substantially changed when the cob is “cleaned” with deionized water, if the water-cob contact time does not exceed five minutes. Additionally, we introduce a method for eliminating mineral contaminants in both burned and unburned cobs, thus rendering them acceptable for strontium-isotope analysis. However, the decontamination procedure results in the rapid non-stoichiometric leaching of trace metals from the unburned cobs and it is possible that most metals will be extracted from the cobs during the lengthy decontamination process. Trace metals, in particular Al and Ca, should be analyzed in order to determine the presence and level of mineral contamination after cleaning.

  9. Multi-criteria decision analysis with probabilistic risk assessment for the management of contaminated ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadam, Ibrahim M.; Kaluarachchi, Jagath J.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, environmental decision analysis in subsurface contamination scenarios is performed using cost-benefit analysis. In this paper, we discuss some of the limitations associated with cost-benefit analysis, especially its definition of risk, its definition of cost of risk, and its poor ability to communicate risk-related information. This paper presents an integrated approach for management of contaminated ground water resources using health risk assessment and economic analysis through a multi-criteria decision analysis framework. The methodology introduces several important concepts and definitions in decision analysis related to subsurface contamination. These are the trade-off between population risk and individual risk, the trade-off between the residual risk and the cost of risk reduction, and cost-effectiveness as a justification for remediation. The proposed decision analysis framework integrates probabilistic health risk assessment into a comprehensive, yet simple, cost-based multi-criteria decision analysis framework. The methodology focuses on developing decision criteria that provide insight into the common questions of the decision-maker that involve a number of remedial alternatives. The paper then explores three potential approaches for alternative ranking, a structured explicit decision analysis, a heuristic approach of importance of the order of criteria, and a fuzzy logic approach based on fuzzy dominance and similarity analysis. Using formal alternative ranking procedures, the methodology seeks to present a structured decision analysis framework that can be applied consistently across many different and complex remediation settings. A simple numerical example is presented to demonstrate the proposed methodology. The results showed the importance of using an integrated approach for decision-making considering both costs and risks. Future work should focus on the application of the methodology to a variety of complex field conditions to

  10. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, A.

    2003-04-01

    A culture-independent molecular approach has been applied to investigate the bacterial diversity in three uranium contaminated sites. The three analysed soil samples have been collected from the uranium waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt (Germany), from the uranium mill tailings in Gunnison, Colorado (USA) and from the uranium mill tailings in Shiprock, New Mexico (USA). The 16S rDNA fragments which has been isolated through direct lysis of the whole-DNA were amplified by the use of the universal primers 16S 43f and 16S 1404r and cloned. With restriction fragment length polymorphismus (RFLP) were the clones screened and one representative of all RFLP types that occurred more than once in the clone library was sequenced and analysed. In spite of the contamination a considerable diversity and significant differences in the composition of the natural bacterial communities in these three sites have been found. In the sample collected from the waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt α-Proteobacteria and representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium were numerically predominant. The distribution of bacteria in the sample collected from uranium mill tailings Gunnison was very similar to those found in the Haberland waste pile, but there were found besides α-Proteobacteria and representatives of Holophaga/Acidobacterium a lot of γ-Proteobacteria. The structure of the bacterial community in the sample collected from the uranium mill tailings Shiprock was significantly different. Only some representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium and α-Proteobacteria were represented. Large populations of Bacilli, γ-Proteobacteria and green non sulfur bacteria were dominant in this sample. (orig.)

  11. The market trend analysis and prospects of cancer molecular diagnostics kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ju Hwan; Lee, Joon Woo; Cho, Daemyeong

    2018-01-01

    The molecular diagnostics market can be broadly divided into PCR (rt-PCR, d-PCR), NGS(Next Generation Sequencing), Microarray, FISH(Fluorescent in situ-hybridization) and other categories, based on the diagnostic technique. Also, depending on the disease being diagnosed, the market can also be divided into cancer, infectious diseases, HIV/STDs (herpes, syphilis), and women's health issues such as breast cancer, cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, HPV(human papillomavirus), and vaginitis.Chromosome analysis (including Fluorescent In-situ Hybridization) is one type of blood cancer diagnostic method, which involves the direct detection of individual cells with chromosomal translocation, but there have been problems of sensitivity when using this method. PCR targeting individual genes or the RT (reverse transcription)-PCR method offers outstanding sensitivity, but one drawback is the risk of false-positive reaction caused by contamination of samples, etc. Blood cancer molecular diagnostics kits allow us to overcome these shortcomings, and related products have been under development, with a focus on improving detection sensitivity, enabling multiple tests, and reducing the cost and diagnostic time. Blood cancer molecular diagnostics is usually performed based on platforms such as PCR. The global market for blood cancer molecular diagnostics kits is $ 335.9 million as of 2016 and is expected to reach $ 6980 million in 2026 with an average annual growth rate of 32.9%. The market in South Korea is anticipated to grow at an average annual rate of 28.9%, from $ 3.75 million as of 2016 to $ 60.89 million in 2026. The Market for blood cancer molecular diagnostics kits is judged to be higher in growth possibility due to the increase in the number of cancer patients.

  12. TREEFINDER: a powerful graphical analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Haeseler Arndt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most analysis programs for inferring molecular phylogenies are difficult to use, in particular for researchers with little programming experience. Results TREEFINDER is an easy-to-use integrative platform-independent analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics. In this paper the main features of TREEFINDER (version of April 2004 are described. TREEFINDER is written in ANSI C and Java and implements powerful statistical approaches for inferring gene tree and related analyzes. In addition, it provides a user-friendly graphical interface and a phylogenetic programming language. Conclusions TREEFINDER is a versatile framework for analyzing phylogenetic data across different platforms that is suited both for exploratory as well as advanced studies.

  13. Analysis of copper contamination in transformer insulating material with nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, N.; Vasa, N. J.; Sarathi, R.

    2018-06-01

    This work examines the oil-impregnated pressboard insulation of high-voltage power transformers, for the determination of copper contamination. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy revealed atomic copper lines and molecular copper monoxide bands due to copper sulphide diffusion. X-ray diffraction studies also indicated the presence of CuO emission. Elemental and molecular mapping compared transformer insulating material ageing in different media—air, N2, He and vacuum.

  14. Accommodating error analysis in comparison and clustering of molecular fingerprints.

    OpenAIRE

    Salamon, H.; Segal, M. R.; Ponce de Leon, A.; Small, P. M.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of infectious diseases rely on pathogen genotype comparisons, which usually yield patterns comprising sets of DNA fragments (DNA fingerprints). We use a highly developed genotyping system, IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to develop a computational method that automates comparison of large numbers of fingerprints. Because error in fragment length measurements is proportional to fragment length and is ...

  15. Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, Marco; Winter, Martin; Åberg, Magnus; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik; Rosén, Johan

    2018-03-29

    A non-target analysis method for unexpected contaminants in food is described. Many current methods referred to as "non-target" are capable of detecting hundreds or even thousands of contaminants. However, they will typically still miss all other possible contaminants. Instead, a metabolomics approach might be used to obtain "true non-target" analysis. In the present work, such a method was optimized for improved detection capability at low concentrations. The method was evaluated using 19 chemically diverse model compounds spiked into milk samples to mimic unknown contamination. Other milk samples were used as reference samples. All samples were analyzed with UHPLC-TOF-MS (ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry), using reversed-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in positive mode. Data evaluation was performed by the software TracMass 2. No target lists of specific compounds were used to search for the contaminants. Instead, the software was used to sort out all features only occurring in the spiked sample data, i.e., the workflow resembled a metabolomics approach. Procedures for chemical identification of peaks were outside the scope of the study. Method, study design, and settings in the software were optimized to minimize manual evaluation and faulty or irrelevant hits and to maximize hit rate of the spiked compounds. A practical detection limit was established at 25 μg/kg. At this concentration, most compounds (17 out of 19) were detected as intact precursor ions, as fragments or as adducts. Only 2 irrelevant hits, probably natural compounds, were obtained. Limitations and possible practical use of the approach are discussed.

  16. Safeguarding food and food products from radiological contamination through gammametric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racho, Joseph Michael D.; Bautista, Angel T.VII; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.; Mendoza, Norman DS.; Cuyco, Danilo A.; Jimenez, Gloria R.; Bucal, Camille Grace D.; Morco, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate gammametric analysis in safeguarding food and food products from radioactive contamination caused by a nuclear accident. Different food and food products submitted for analysis from March 2011 to September 2011 were analyzed for Cesium-137, Cesium 134, and Iodine-131 radioactivity levels using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector gamma spectrometer system. Radioactivity levels of the said samples were found to be less than 1-4 Bq/Kg for both Cs-137 and Cs-134, and less than 0.2 - 2 Bq/Kg for I-131, and were found to below the Codex Alimentarius Commission Guideline Levels for Radionuclides in Foods Following Accidental Nuclear Contamination for Use in International Trade limits of 1,000 Bq/Kg for the sum of Cs-137 and Cs-134 in feeding stuffs, and that of 100 Bq/Kg for the sum of all isotopes of iodine notably I-131 in feeding stuff. (author)

  17. Capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of contaminants in emerging food safety issues and food traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2010-07-01

    This review presents an overview of the applicability of CE in the analysis of chemical and biological contaminants involved in emerging food safety issues. Additionally, CE-based genetic analyzers' usefulness as a unique tool in food traceability verification systems was presented. First, analytical approaches for the determination of melamine and specific food allergens in different foods were discussed. Second, natural toxin analysis by CE was updated from the last review reported in 2008. Finally, the analysis of prion proteins associated with the "mad cow" crises and the application of CE-based genetic analyzers for meat traceability were summarized.

  18. Radionuclide contaminated soil: Laboratory study and economic analysis of soil washing. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Zhou, H.; Patel, B.; Bowerman, B.; Brower, J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the work discussed in this report is to determine if soil washing is a feasible method to remediate contaminated soils from the Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The contaminants are predominantly Cs-137 and Sr-90. The authors have assumed that the target activity for Cs-137 is 50 pCi/g and that remediation is required for soils having greater activities. Cs-137 is the limiting contaminant because it is present in much greater quantities than Sr-90. This work was done in three parts, in which they: estimated the volume of contaminated soil as a function of Cs-137 content, determined if simple removal of the fine grained fraction of the soil (the material that is less than 0.063 mm) would effectively reduce the activity of the remaining soil to levels below the 50 pCi/g target, assessed the effectiveness of chemical and mechanical (as well as combinations of the two) methods of soil decontamination. From this analysis the authors were then able to develop a cost estimate for soil washing and for a baseline against which soil washing was compared

  19. Application of atomic absorption in molecular analysis (spectrophotometry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliza, S.V.; Soledade, L.E.B.

    1981-01-01

    The apparatus of atomic absorption has been considered by all the experts in chemical analysis as one of the most important equipments in actual utilization in such field. Among its several applications one should emphasize direct and indirect metals analyses using flame, graphite furnace, cold vapor generator,... Besides such known applications, the authors have developed at the R and D Center of CSN a patent pendent method for the utilization of such equipment for molecular analysis, in substitution of a sophisticated and specific apparatus. (Author) [pt

  20. Safety analysis report for packaging onsite long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks

  1. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  2. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Lyons, Brett P.; Thain, John E.; Law, Robin J.

    2013-01-01

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology

  3. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  4. Quantification of pressure sensitive adhesive, residual ink, and other colored process contaminants using dye and color image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy R. Rosenberger; Carl J. Houtman

    2000-01-01

    The USPS Image Analysis (IA) protocol recommends the use of hydrophobic dyes to develop contrast between pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) particles and cellulosic fibers before using a dirt counter to detect all contaminants that have contrast with the handsheet background. Unless the sample contains no contaminants other than those of interest, two measurement steps...

  5. Characterization of contaminated soil and groundwater surrounding an illegal landfill (S. Giuliano, Venice, Italy) by principal component analysis and kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critto, Andrea; Carlon, Claudio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Information on soil and groundwater contamination was used to develop a site conceptual model and to identify exposure scenarios. - The characterization of a hydrologically complex contaminated site bordering the lagoon of Venice (Italy) was undertaken by investigating soils and groundwaters affected by the chemical contaminants originated by the wastes dumped into an illegal landfill. Statistical tools such as principal components analysis and geostatistical techniques were applied to obtain the spatial distribution of chemical contaminants. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), SO 4 2- and Cl - were used to trace the migration of the contaminants from the top soil to the underlying groundwaters. The chemical and hydrogeological available information was assembled to obtain the schematic of the conceptual model of the contaminated site capable to support the formulation of major exposure scenarios, which are also provided

  6. Accommodating error analysis in comparison and clustering of molecular fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, H; Segal, M R; Ponce de Leon, A; Small, P M

    1998-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of infectious diseases rely on pathogen genotype comparisons, which usually yield patterns comprising sets of DNA fragments (DNA fingerprints). We use a highly developed genotyping system, IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to develop a computational method that automates comparison of large numbers of fingerprints. Because error in fragment length measurements is proportional to fragment length and is positively correlated for fragments within a lane, an align-and-count method that compensates for relative scaling of lanes reliably counts matching fragments between lanes. Results of a two-step method we developed to cluster identical fingerprints agree closely with 5 years of computer-assisted visual matching among 1,335 M. tuberculosis fingerprints. Fully documented and validated methods of automated comparison and clustering will greatly expand the scope of molecular epidemiology.

  7. Quantification of fossil organic matter in contaminated sediments from an industrial watershed: Validation of the quantitative multimolecular approach by radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Faure, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative multimolecular approach (QMA) based on an exhaustive identification and quantification of molecules from the extractable organic matter (EOM) has been recently developed in order to investigate organic contamination in sediments by a more complete method than the restrictive quantification of target contaminants. Such an approach allows (i) the comparison between natural and anthropogenic inputs, (ii) between modern and fossil organic matter and (iii) the differentiation between several anthropogenic sources. However QMA is based on the quantification of molecules recovered by organic solvent and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which represent a small fraction of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). In order to extend the conclusions of QMA to SOM, radiocarbon analyses have been performed on organic extracts and decarbonated sediments. This analysis allows (i) the differentiation between modern biomass (contemporary 14 C) and fossil organic matter ( 14 C-free) and (ii) the calculation of the modern carbon percentage (PMC). At the confluence between Fensch and Moselle Rivers, a catchment highly contaminated by both industrial activities and urbanization, PMC values in decarbonated sediments are well correlated with the percentage of natural molecular markers determined by QMA. It highlights that, for this type of contamination by fossil organic matter inputs, the conclusions of QMA can be scaled up to SOM. QMA is an efficient environmental diagnostic tool that leads to a more realistic quantification of fossil organic matter in sediments.

  8. Using on based molecular biology approaches to assess plant elusive responses mechanisms to chronic ionizing radiation in radionuclide contaminated Chernobyl zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashydov, N.; Hajduch, M.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : It is well known that the Chernobyl accident released large amounts of radioactive isotopes into the environment. As a consequence, the vicinity of Chernobyl Nuclear power Plant remains contaminated with long-lived radionuclide such as 137Cs, 90Sr and several transuranic isotopes. There have been a few molecular analyses of plants grown in the radio-contaminated Chernobyl area, but there is as yet no broad understanding of the mechanisms that underlie their survival or success. Much research has addressed the nature of mutation sites in DNA, changes in signaling networks, epigenetic changes, changes at the transcription level, protein level. All of these must be considered when designing a global strategy for understanding the far discovering elusive of resistance and adaptive mechanisms of plants to chronic ionizing radiation

  9. Analysis of Radioactivity Contamination Level of Kartini Reactor Efluen Gas to the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suratman; Purwanto; Aminjoyo, S

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of radioactivity contamination level of Kartini reactor efluen gas to the environment has been done from 13-10-'95 until 8-2-'96. The aim of this research is to determine the radioactivity contamination level on the environment resulted from the release of Kartini reactor efluen gas and other facilities at Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre through stack. The analysis methods is the student t-test, the first count factor test and the gamma spectrometry. The gas sampling were carried out in the stack reactor, reactor room, environment and in other room for comparison. Efluen gas was sucked through a filter by a high volume vacuum pump. The filter was counted for beta, gamma and alpha activities. The radioactivity contamination level of the efluen gas passing through the stack to the environment was measured between 0.57 - 1.34 Bq/m3, which was equal to the airborne radioactivity in environment between 0.69 - 1.12 Bq/m3. This radioactivity comes from radon daughter, decay products result from the natural uranium and thorium series of the materials of the building

  10. A reactive transport model for mercury fate in contaminated soil--sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterme, Bertrand; Jacques, Diederik

    2015-11-01

    We present a sensitivity analysis of a reactive transport model of mercury (Hg) fate in contaminated soil systems. The one-dimensional model, presented in Leterme et al. (2014), couples water flow in variably saturated conditions with Hg physico-chemical reactions. The sensitivity of Hg leaching and volatilisation to parameter uncertainty is examined using the elementary effect method. A test case is built using a hypothetical 1-m depth sandy soil and a 50-year time series of daily precipitation and evapotranspiration. Hg anthropogenic contamination is simulated in the topsoil by separately considering three different sources: cinnabar, non-aqueous phase liquid and aqueous mercuric chloride. The model sensitivity to a set of 13 input parameters is assessed, using three different model outputs (volatilized Hg, leached Hg, Hg still present in the contaminated soil horizon). Results show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration in soil solution and the binding constant to DOM thiol groups are critical parameters, as well as parameters related to Hg sorption to humic and fulvic acids in solid organic matter. Initial Hg concentration is also identified as a sensitive parameter. The sensitivity analysis also brings out non-monotonic model behaviour for certain parameters.

  11. [Phytoremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Soils with Iris pseudacorus L. and the Metabolic Analysis in Roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-nan; Cheng, Li-juan; Zhou, Qi-xing

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we performed a greenhouse pot-culture experiment to investigate the potential of a wild ornamental plant Iris pseudacorus L. in remediating petroleum contaminated soils from the Dagang Oilfield in Tianjin, China. The results suggested that Iris pseudacorus L. had great resistance to ≤ 40,000 mg · kg(⁻¹ of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). The removal rate of TPHs with concentrations of 10,000 mg · kg⁻¹, 20,000 mg · kg⁻¹ and 40,000 mg · kg⁻¹ in soils by Iris pseudacorus L. was 42.1%, 33.1% 31.2%, respectively, much higher than those in the corresponding controls (31.8%, 21.3% 11.9%, respectively) (P 1.2) with the root specific surface area from the PLS-DA model analysis, including ethanedioic acid, lactic acid, 2-butenedioic acid, phosphate and propanedioic acid, were positively correlated with the root specific surface area, but the others, gluconic acid, uridine, butanoic acid, maltose, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid, phenylalanine, were negatively correlated with it. In conclusion, using Iris pseudacorus L. to remediate petroleum contaminated soils is feasible, and the metabolic analysis in roots is useful to better understand the metabolic response of plants exposure to petroleum contaminated soils, and then reveals its remediated mechanisms.

  12. Analysis of the regulation on protective and remedial measures on the radioactive contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutkov, V.A.; Demin, V.F.; Vasiliev, A.; Ivanov, E.; Tsyb, A.

    2002-01-01

    The current regulation and decisions on the radiation and social protection and rehabilitation of the radioactive contaminated territories are analyzed with purpose to learn all lessons needed for improvement of the regulation and activity in restoration phase and in the preparedness to possible future radiological accidents. Necessity to go beyond the simple radiation protection approach in the decision making and to use risk analysis considering both radiological and non-radiological factors is one of the lessons. The conceptual aspects of risk analysis together with dose assessment in decision making are considered. (author)

  13. Geostatistical methods for radiological evaluation and risk analysis of contaminated premises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, Y.; Jeannee, N.; Chiles, J.P.; Dubot, D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At the end of process equipment dismantling, the complete decontamination of nuclear facilities requires the radiological assessment of residual activity levels of building structures. As stated by the IAEA, 'Segregation and characterization of contaminated materials are the key elements of waste minimization'. From this point of view, the set up of an appropriate evaluation methodology is of primordial importance. The radiological characterization of contaminated premises can be divided into three steps. First, the most exhaustive facility analysis provides historical, functional and qualitative information. Then, a systematic (exhaustive or not) control of the emergent signal is performed by means of in situ measurement methods such as surface control device combined with in situ gamma spectrometry. Besides, in order to assess the contamination depth, samples can be collected from boreholes at several locations within the premises and analyzed. Combined with historical information and emergent signal maps, such data improve and reinforce the preliminary waste zoning. In order to provide reliable estimates while avoiding supplementary investigation costs, there is therefore a crucial need for sampling optimization methods together with appropriate data processing techniques. The relevance of the geostatistical methodology relies on the presence of a spatial continuity for radiological contamination. In this case, geostatistics provides reliable methods for activity estimation, uncertainty quantification and risk analysis, which are essential decision-making tools for decommissioning and dismantling projects of nuclear installations. Besides, the ability of this geostatistical framework to provide answers to several key issues that generally occur during the clean-up preparation phase is discussed: How to optimise the investigation costs? How to deal with data quality issues? How to consistently take into account auxiliary information such as historical

  14. Analysis on decontamination of contaminated soil with strontium using electrorestoration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    The electrokinetic apparatus for remediation of the soil contaminated with Sr 2+ was designed. After kaolin clay compulsorily contaminated by Sr 2+ solution, the remediation characteristics by electrokinetic method were analyzed. Meanwhile, the numerical code for analysis of electrokinetic migration was developed for modelling of the soil remediation. And the input parameters needed for modelling were measured by laboratory experiment, or taken from literature. Experimental results are as follows : After 6 day remediation under 40 V, the front part of experimental cell was almost decontaminated, but the back part didn't almost be decontaminated. Consequently, the total remediation ratio of Sr 2+ from cell soil was about 84.8 %. The values calculated by the developed code almost agreed with experimental values. When voltages of electrode were increased by 10, 20, 40V, the total Sr 2+ remediation ratios were about 21.9%. 43.3%, 84.8 % , respectively, after 6 days

  15. Analytical analysis of soil-moisture and trace-contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.; Reeves, M.

    1976-03-01

    A transport model is presented which predicts the coupled movement of both water and trace contaminants through a layered and unsaturated soil-moisture zone. In order to achieve computation speeds suitable for watershed implementations, moisture properties are approximated as exponential functions of pressure head, and lateral flows are treated as sinks in a basically vertical one-dimensional analysis. In addition, only advection by the Darcy-flow velocities and linear adsorption by the soil matrix are considered in depicting movement of the trace contaminant. Formal solution of the resulting transport equations is obtained through use of both eigenfunction-expansion and coordinate-transformation methods. Numerical solution is effected by means of a program written in FORTRAN IV and implemented on an IBM 360/91 computer. Two example calculations illustrate both strengths and weaknesses of our model

  16. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  17. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with adjustable mass accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html.

  18. Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration: Analysis of Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration at Three Contaminated Sites Remediated and Revitalized with Soil Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper provides EPA's analysis of the data to determine carbon sequestration rates at three diverse sites that differ in geography/location, weather, soil properties, type of contamination, and age.

  19. A molecular epidemiological study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci environmental contamination in railway stations and coach stations in Guangzhou of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J L; Peng, Y; Ou, Q T; Lin, D X; Li, Y; Ye, X H; Zhou, J L; Yao, Z J

    2017-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has caused a series of public health problems since it was first found in 1961. However, there are few research studies on the MRSA environmental contamination in railway stations and coach stations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine MRSA environmental contamination in public transport stations. Between December 2013 and January 2014, 380 surface samples from three railway stations (180) and four coach stations (200) in Guangzhou were collected to isolate and determine the prevalence and characteristics of Staphylococci strains. 39·21% of all samples were Staphylococci isolates, 1·58% of Staphylococci isolates were MRSA isolates, and 6·05% were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. The proportion of multidrug resistant among 149 Staphylococci isolates was 75·84%. None of MRSA isolates was identified with the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes, and one of them was identified with the qac gene. Four MRSA isolates were Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec IVa, and the other two were nontypeable. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were classified into several sequence types (STs), and STs showed possible cross-transmissions of isolates from various sources. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococci contamination prevalence was high, and the environment of stations may be the vectors transmitting the Staphylococci to passengers. This is the first study to comprehensively report the prevalence, antibiotic resistance, and molecular characteristics of contamination of Staphylococci isolates in railway stations and coach stations of China. It will have great public health implications on infection control in community settings because of the serious hazard of Staphylococci, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococci. Our findings have provided evidence for relevant departments to reduce the contamination of Staphylococci in environment of public transport stations. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  20. The cost and benefit analysis of a contaminated area remediation: case study of dose level selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Without radiological rules, these industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of installations and sites. Depending on the potential hazardous to the environment and public health, the radioactive contaminated sites may require remediation. The extent of the site cleanup is a function of the size, localization, complexity, potential risks and on possible future uses envisioned for the site. Since worker and public health, public anxiety and economics factors are involved; the selection of an appropriate dose level can be quite complicated. This paper discusses the selection of a dose level criterion to remedy a site, which was contaminated by wastes from monazite processing. The site is located in the Sao Paulo city; the most densely populated Brazilian City. In its 60,000 square meters of area, a preliminary survey showed contaminated zones covering an area of 6,500 square meters. In some places, contamination was found below the superficial layer of the soil, being the radionuclide vertical distribution not uniform. The 228 Ra soil activity concentration reached values up to 33,000 Bq/kg while those for 226 Ra reached values up to 6,700 Bq/kg. Based on pathway analysis model and considering both the current land use and a hypothetical residential scenario, the residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil have been derived for dose values of 10 mSv/y (dose level for intervention), 5 mSv/y, 3 mSv/y, 1 mSv/y (dose limit for practices) and 0.3 mSv/y (dose constraint for practices). An optimized value o f annual dose of about 5 mSv/y would be a good option for intervention level, but taking into account the public concern and anxiety, the site location and size, and the remediation costs, it is suggested the

  1. The cost and benefit analysis of a contaminated area remediation: case study of dose level selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauria, D.C. [Instituto de Radioproteccion e Dosimetria- IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Barra de Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro- RJ (Brazil)]. e-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br

    2006-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Without radiological rules, these industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of installations and sites. Depending on the potential hazardous to the environment and public health, the radioactive contaminated sites may require remediation. The extent of the site cleanup is a function of the size, localization, complexity, potential risks and on possible future uses envisioned for the site. Since worker and public health, public anxiety and economics factors are involved; the selection of an appropriate dose level can be quite complicated. This paper discusses the selection of a dose level criterion to remedy a site, which was contaminated by wastes from monazite processing. The site is located in the Sao Paulo city; the most densely populated Brazilian City. In its 60,000 square meters of area, a preliminary survey showed contaminated zones covering an area of 6,500 square meters. In some places, contamination was found below the superficial layer of the soil, being the radionuclide vertical distribution not uniform. The {sup 228} Ra soil activity concentration reached values up to 33,000 Bq/kg while those for {sup 226} Ra reached values up to 6,700 Bq/kg. Based on pathway analysis model and considering both the current land use and a hypothetical residential scenario, the residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil have been derived for dose values of 10 mSv/y (dose level for intervention), 5 mSv/y, 3 mSv/y, 1 mSv/y (dose limit for practices) and 0.3 mSv/y (dose constraint for practices). An optimized value o f annual dose of about 5 mSv/y would be a good option for intervention level, but taking into account the public concern and anxiety, the site location and size, and the remediation costs, it is suggested

  2. Remediation of PCB-contaminated soils. Risk analysis of biological in situ processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rein, Arno

    2006-12-08

    Biological in situ measures can be efficient and cost effective options for the remediation of contaminated sites. However, the accepted application requires a detailed and reliable analysis of potential impacts. An important objective is to quantify the potential of contaminant degradation and metabolite formation. This thesis addresses a quantitative multimedia risk assessment. Methodologies and tools were developed for this objective and applied to evaluate in situ bioremediation of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Soil bacteria in conjunction with plant roots were addressed (rhizoremediation) with a focus on the use of genetically modified microorganisms (GMOs). PCBs are known to be harmful compounds that are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. PCB contaminations in soil and groundwater were identified as important problems. 209 different congeners are sterically possible, but not all are of environmental significance. PCB congeners of concern were evaluated with respect to their potential toxicity, environmental occurrence and mobility. For this objective, congener specific data on the toxicity potential and the frequency in environmental matrices were collected. To quantify the mobility potential, multimedia modelling was performed applying deterministic and probabilistic procedures. 56 PCB congeners of concern were evaluated, and multimedia risk assessments of PCB-contaminated soils should concentrate on this group. Kinetics parameters were specified for degradation experiments with individual PCB congeners in solution and different bacterial strains. These laboratory assays were performed with wild-type Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 and the genetically modified Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113pcb and F113L::1180. The F113 derivatives demonstrated a good survival ability in willow (Salix sp.) rhizosphere (mesocosm experiments). Therefore, and due to high depletion rates, rhizoremediation with F113L::1180 and willow

  3. Gas Bubbles Investigation in Contaminated Water Using Optical Tomography Based on Independent Component Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Taufiq Mohd Khairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of concentration profiles for gas bubble flow in a vertical pipeline containing contaminated water using an optical tomography system. The concentration profiles for the bubble flow quantities are investigated under five different flows conditions, a single bubble, double bubbles, 25% of air opening, 50% of air opening, and 100% of air opening flow rates where a valve is used to control the gas flow in the vertical pipeline. The system is aided by the independent component analysis (ICA algorithm to reconstruct the concentration profiles of the liquid-gas flow. The behaviour of the gas bubbles was investigated in contaminated water in which the water sample was prepared by adding 25 mL of colour ingredients to 3 liters of pure water. The result shows that the application of ICA has enabled the system to detect the presence of gas bubbles in contaminated water. This information provides vital information on the flow inside the pipe and hence could be very significant in increasing the efficiency of the process industries.

  4. A possibilistic analysis approach for environmental risk assessment of petroleum-contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Huang, G.H.; Fuller, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A possibilistic approach for assessing risks associated with petroleum-contaminated sites is provided. The approach is applied to an illustrative case study in order to show its applicability and implementation for decision making in effective site remediation and management. The approach consists of three main parts: (1) the determination of fuzzy steady state contaminant concentrations in a aquifer based on an analytical solute transport model; (2) possibilistic analysis of fuzzy criteria for different risk levels; and (3) environmental risk assessment based on the Euclidian method. Based on results from an illustrative case study, environmental risks at a petroleum-contaminated site can be effectively evaluated using the developed methodology. The risk assessment framework can effectively handle uncertainities presented as fuzzy numbers. The fuzzy nature of water quality and risk level criteria were seen in the related simulation and evaluation models, and the framework is especially useful for situations in which probabilistic information is not available. This use of this approach is new in the area of petroleum waste management under uncertainty, and its results are useful for the related site remediation and management decisions. 36 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  5. GROWTH AND NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS OF TREE SPECIES IN CONTAMINATED SUBSTRATE BY LEACHABLE HERBICIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca de Araújo Fiore

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ecosystems contamination by residues of pesticides requires special attention to the herbicides subject to leaching. The objective was to select tree species to rhizodegradation contaminated by residues of 2,4-D and atrazine and to recompose riparian areas to agricultural fields, then reducing the risk of contamination of water courses. A total of 36 treatments consisted of the combinations of forest species were evaluated [Inga marginata (Inga, Schizolobium parahyba (guapuruvu, Handroanthus serratifolius (ipê amarelo, Jacaranda puberula (carobinha, Cedrela fissilis (cedro, Calophyllum brasiliensis (landin, Psidium mirsinoides (goiabinha, Tibouchina glandulosa (quaresmeira, Caesalpinia férrea (pau-ferro, Caesalpinia pluviosa (sibipiruna, Terminalia argêntea (capitão and Schinopsis brasiliensis (braúna] and three solutions simulating leachate compound (atrazine, 2,4-D and water - control, with four replicates each. The characteristics measured were plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves, leaf area and dry biomass, and foliar nutrition. Forest species survived the herbicide application, and most showed an increase in macronutrients even under an herbicide application, and the Inga had the highest tolerance regarding growth analysis. It is recommended to use species that are more tolerant to Atrazine and 2,4-D in field experiments to confirm previous results of this simulation.

  6. Emerging contaminants in the environment: Risk-based analysis for better management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Ravi; Arias Espana, Victor Andres; Liu, Yanju; Jit, Joytishna

    2016-07-01

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) are chemicals of a synthetic origin or deriving from a natural source that has recently been discovered and for which environmental or public health risks are yet to be established. This is due to limited available information on their interaction and toxicological impacts on receptors. Several types of ECs exist such as antibiotics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, effluents, certain naturally occurring contaminants and more recently nanomaterials. ECs may derive from a known source, for example released directly to the aquatic environment from direct discharges such as those from wastewater treatment plants. Although in most instances the direct source cannot be identified, ECs have been detected in virtually every country's natural environment and as a consequence they represent a global problem. There is very limited information on the fate and transport of ECs in the environment and their toxicological impact. This lack of information can be attributed to limited financial resources and the lack of analytical techniques for detecting their effects on ecosystems and human health on their own or as mixture. We do not know how ECs interact with each other or various contaminants. This paper presents an overview of existing knowledge on ECs, their fate and transport and a risk-based analysis for ECs management and complementary strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Observation of topography and analysis of surface contamination of titanium implant after roughness treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongdan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Dayi; Zhang, Xingdong

    2007-04-01

    The roughness treatment of dental implant surface could improve the bone bonding and increase the success rate of implant, but the difference of diverse treatments is still unknown. In this study using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectrometer (EDS) and the test of contact angle, we studied the microstructure, surface contamination and surface energy, and hence conducted a comparative analysis of the following surface roughness treatments: Polished Treatment (PT), Sandblasting with Alumina(SA), Sandblasting with Aluminia and Acid-etched (SAA), Sandblasting with Titanium Acid-etched (STA), Electro-erosion Treatment(ET). The result of SEM showed that the surface displayed irregularities after roughness treatments and that the surface properties of different roughness treatments had some distinctions. SAA and SA had some sharp edges and protrutions; the STA showed a regular pattern like honeycomb, but the ET sample treated by electric erosion exhibited the deeper pores of different sizes and the pores with a perforated secondary structure. The EDS indicated that the surface was contaminated after the treatment with foreign materials; the SA surface had some embedded contaminations even after acid etching. The measurement of water contact angle indicated that the morphology correlated with the surface treatments. These findings suggest that the distinction of surface structure and composition caused by different treatments may result in the disparity in biological behavior of dental implant.

  8. Risk analysis on heavy metal contamination in sediments of rivers flowing into Nansi Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qingqing; Song, Ying; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2017-12-01

    In order to understand the risk of heavy metals in sediments of the rivers flowing into Nansi Lake, 36 surface sediments were sampled from six rivers and seven heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, As, Pb, and Cd) were determined. Potential ecological risk index (RI) of the six rivers showed significant differences: Xinxue River, Jiehe River, and Guangfu River were at medium potential risk, whereas the risk of Chengguo River was the lowest. Jiehe River, Xuesha River, and Jiangji River were meeting the medium potential risk at river mouths. Geo-accumulation index (I geo ) of the seven heavy metals revealed that the contamination of Cu and Cd was more serious than most other metals in the studied areas, whereas Cr in most sites of our study was not polluted. Moreover, correlation cluster analysis demonstrated that the contamination of Cu, Ni, and Zn in six rivers was mainly caused by local emissions, whereas that of As, Pb, and Cd might come from the external inputs in different forms. Consequently, the contamination of Cu and Cd and the potential risk in Xinxue River, Jiehe River, and Guangfu River as well as the local emissions should be given more attention to safeguard the water quality of Nansi Lake and the East Route Project of South to North Water Transfer.

  9. Comparative analysis of decision tree algorithms on quality of water contaminated with soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Andrea Dota

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture, roads, animal farms and other land uses may modify the water quality from rivers, dams and other surface freshwaters. In the control of the ecological process and for environmental management, it is necessary to quickly and accurately identify surface water contamination (in areas such as rivers and dams with contaminated runoff waters coming, for example, from cultivation and urban areas. This paper presents a comparative analysis of different classification algorithms applied to the data collected from a sample of soil-contaminated water aiming to identify if the water quality classification proposed in this research agrees with reality. The sample was part of a laboratory experiment, which began with a sample of treated water added with increasing fractions of soil. The results show that the proposed classification for water quality in this scenario is coherent, because different algorithms indicated a strong statistic relationship between the classes and their instances, that is, in the classes that qualify the water sample and the values which describe each class. The proposed water classification varies from excelling to very awful (12 classes

  10. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Stuart; Miyagawa, Shoji; Kasuga, Fumiko; Shibuya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG), and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents. We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF) and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for areas at risk of

  11. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gilmour

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG, and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents.We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137 of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for

  12. The prevalence of Listeria spp. food contamination in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidiyan, Negar; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Rezaei, Zeynab; Dehghani-Tafti, Roohollah; Akrami-Mohajeri, Fateme

    2018-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause circling disease, encephalitis, meningitis, septicemia, and mastitis in dairy cattle. Contamination from the environment can contaminate foods with Listeria spp. Consumption of foods containing L. monocytogenes can lead to listeriosis in susceptible people (adults with a compromised immune system), pregnant women, and infants. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in various foods in Iran. We searched PubMed, Science direct, Scopus, Google scholar, and Iranian local databases including Iranian scientific information database and Magiran for relevant studies up to May 2015 using related keywords. In our preliminary search, we retrieved 1344 articles. After removing duplicates and reviewing titles/abstracts, 117 articles were considered, out of which, 75 articles had sufficient quality for inclusion in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of Listeria spp. contamination was about 18.3% in poultry, 8.5% in raw meat, 14.6% in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods, 10% in sea foods, 7.3% in traditional dairy, 3.2% in commercial dairy, and 0.1% in eggs. The findings showed that L. monocytogenes was most prevalent in ready to eat (9.2%), seafood (5.1%), poultry (5%), traditional dairy (4%), raw meat (2.6%), commercial dairy (1.4%), and egg (0.2%), respectively. Furthermore, the presence of L. monocytogenes particularly in RTE foods (that are consumed without further heat processing) and under-cooked products could be a potential risk for public health. So, contamination should be controlled at all levels of the food chain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Implementation of force distribution analysis for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Christian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The way mechanical stress is distributed inside and propagated by proteins and other biopolymers largely defines their function. Yet, determining the network of interactions propagating internal strain remains a challenge for both, experiment and theory. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we developed force distribution analysis (FDA, a method that allows visualizing strain propagation in macromolecules. Results To be immediately applicable to a wide range of systems, FDA was implemented as an extension to Gromacs, a commonly used package for molecular simulations. The FDA code comes with an easy-to-use command line interface and can directly be applied to every system built using Gromacs. We provide an additional R-package providing functions for advanced statistical analysis and presentation of the FDA data. Conclusions Using FDA, we were able to explain the origin of mechanical robustness in immunoglobulin domains and silk fibers. By elucidating propagation of internal strain upon ligand binding, we previously also successfully revealed the functionality of a stiff allosteric protein. FDA thus has the potential to be a valuable tool in the investigation and rational design of mechanical properties in proteins and nano-materials.

  14. Delineation of Chondroid Lipoma: An Immunohistochemical and Molecular Biological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vreeze, Ronald S. A.; van Coevorden, Frits; Boerrigter, Lucie; Nederlof, Petra M.; Haas, Rick L.; Bras, Johannes; Rosenwald, Andreas; Mentzel, Thomas; de Jong, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    Aims. Chondroid lipoma (CL) is a benign tumor that mimics a variety of soft tissue tumors and is characterized by translocation t(11;16). Here, we analyze CL and its histological mimics. Methods. CL (n = 4) was compared to a variety of histological mimics (n = 83) for morphological aspects and immunohistochemical features including cyclinD1(CCND1). Using FISH analysis, CCND1 and FUS were investigated as potential translocation partners. Results. All CLs were strongly positive for CCND1. One of 4 myoepitheliomas, CCND1, was positive. In well-differentiated lipomatous tumors and in chondrosarcomas, CCND1 was frequently expressed, but all myxoid liposarcomas were negative. FISH analysis did not give support for direct involvement of CCND1 and FUS as translocation partners. Conclusions. Chondroid lipoma is extremely rare and has several and more prevalent histological mimics. The differential diagnosis of chondroid lipomas can be unraveled using immunohistochemical and molecular support. PMID:21559269

  15. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced mutations in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    This review will focus on the nature of specific locus mutations detected in mammalian cells exposed in vitro to different types of ionizing radiations. Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce a wide variety of heritable alterations in DNA. These range from single base pair substitutions to stable loss or translocation of large portions of whole chromosomes. Data will be reviewed for certain test systems that reveal different mutation spectra. Techniques for the analysis of molecular alterations include applications of the polymerase chain reaction, some of which may be coupled with DNA sequence analysis, and a variety of hybridization-based techniques. The complexity of large scale rearrangements is approached with cytogenetic techniques including high resolution banding and various applications of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Radiation-induced mutant frequencies and mutation spectra are a function of the linkage constraints on the recovery of viable mutants for a given locus and test system. 44 refs

  16. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATION RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of watersheds by fecal bacteria is a frequent cause for surface waters to be placed on the national impaired waters list. However, since the presence of fecal bacteria does not always indicate human fecal input, it is necessary to distinguish between fecal sources. ...

  17. Essential application of depositional analysis and interpretation in hydrogeologic assessments of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciacca, J.

    1991-01-01

    In most hydrogeologic studies of contaminated sites, little attention is given to analysis of depositional environments and associated depositional patterns. This analysis is essential for sedimentary deposits present at a majority of these sites. The depositional processes associated with alluvial, fluvial and deltaic environments yield heterogeneity ranging from large to small scale. These processes also yield preferential grain orientations in coarse grained units which result in preferential directions of increased permeability. Studies conducted in fluvial and deltaic petroleum reservoirs have shown varying permeabilities resulting from deposition that strongly control the flow of fluids. The marked heterogeneity evident in the sandy portion of a single 3 to 30-foot thick fluvial point bar deposit can exert significant differences in porous flow. Preferential permeability has been shown parallel to the long axis of fluvial channel sand units while barrier beach sands exhibit preferential permeability perpendicular to the long axis of the sand body. Such controls influence natural flow and transport of contaminants in groundwater. Hydrogeologic studies should: determine the depositional environment and facies present at the site; determine the propensity for heterogeneity within the entire vertical sequence investigated and within the different facies present; assess the potential for preferential permeability within sand bodies; and provide a predictive depositional model to assess potential connections between major high permeability units. Sand unit connections are commonly forced during cross section generation and subsequent aquifer analysis. Failure to incorporate the above objectives in hydrogeologic investigations ignores the basic precept that process controls the distribution of permeability and will result in poor prediction of natural and remedial transport of contaminants in groundwater

  18. Determination of contaminants in rare earth materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2005-01-01

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to detect and quantify impurities in the analyses of rare earth (RE) oxides. The analytical results are discussed with respect to the importance of having a thorough identification and contaminant elements in these compounds regarding the function of the materials in their various applications. Also, the importance of using PGAA to analyze materials in support of other physico-chemical studies of the materials is discussed, including the study of extremely low concentrations of ions - such as the rare earth ions themselves - in bulk material matrices. (author)

  19. Analysis of radioactive contaminations and radiological hazard in Poland after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnowiecki, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is a report on radiological impact in Poland following the Chernobyl reactor accident prepared in the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection. The results of measurement and its analysis are presented. Isotopic composition of the contamined air and the concentration of radionuclides are determined. The trajectories of the airborne radioactive material movement from Chernobyl to Poland at the last days of April 1986 are presented. Assessment of the radiological risk of the population is done. 38 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs. (M.F.W.)

  20. An Assessment of Air As a Source of DNA Contamination Encountered When Performing PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Nina; Rodger, Gillian; Vandesompele, Jo; Benes, Vladimir; Zumla, Alimuddin; Rook, Graham A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive molecular methods, such as the PCR, can detect low-level contamination, and careful technique is required to reduce the impact of contaminants. Yet, some assays that are designed to detect high copy-number target sequences appear to be impossible to perform without contamination, and frequently, personnel or laboratory environment are held responsible as the source. This complicates diagnostic and research analysis when using molecular methods. To investigate the air specifically as...

  1. Application of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers for removal of emerging contaminants in water and wastewater treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Audrey; Ormeci, Banu

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have reported trace levels of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in surface waters, drinking water, and wastewater effluents. There has also been an increased concern about the ecological and human health impact of these contaminants, and their removal from water and wastewater has become a priority. Traditional treatment processes are limited in their ability to remove emerging contaminants from water, and there is a need for new technologies that are effective and feasible. This paper presents a review on recent research results on molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted (NIP) polymers and evaluates their potential as a treatment method for the removal of emerging contaminants from water and wastewater. It also discusses the relative benefits and limitations of using MIP or NIP for water and wastewater treatment. MIP, and in particular NIP, offer promising applications for wastewater treatment, but their toxicity and possible health effects should be carefully studied before they are considered for drinking water treatment. More research is also required to determine how best to incorporate MIP and NIP in treatment plants.

  2. [Inhibition of Low Molecular Organic Acids on the Activity of Acidithiobacillus Species and Its Effect on the Removal of Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-wei; Wang, He-rul; Cao, Yan-xiao; Li, Fei; Cui, Chun-hong; Zhou, Li

    2016-05-15

    Application of organic fertilizer can reduce the solubility and bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soil, but in the flooded anaerobic environment, organic fertilizer will be decomposed to produce a large number of low molecular organic acids, which can inhibit the biological activity of Acidithiobacillus species. Batch cultures studies showed that the monocarboxylic organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid exhibited a marked toxicity to Acidithiobacillus species, as indicated by that 90% of inhibitory rate for Fe2 and So oxidation in 72 h were achieved at extremely low concentrations of 41.2 mg · L⁻¹, 78.3 mg · L⁻¹, 43.2 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ and 81.9 mg 230. 4 mg · L⁻¹, 170.1 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ respectively. Of these organic acids, formic acid was the most toxic one as indicated by that Fe2 and So oxidation was almost entirely inhibited at a low concentration. In addition, it was found that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was more sensitive to low molecular organic acids than Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. What's more, there was little effect on biological acidification process of heavy metal contaminated soil when organic acids were added at initial stage (Oh), but it was completely inhibited when these acids were added after 12 h of conventional biological acidification, thus decreasing the efficiency of heavy metals dissolution from soil.

  3. Analysis of a sewage sludge for inorganic chemical contaminants and nutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1984-01-01

    This study forms part of the NIWR's series of interlaboratory comparison studies involving southern African laboratories engaged in water and wastewater analysis, and is concerned with the analysis by 29 laboratories of a sample of dried sewage sludge for various inorganic contaminants and nutrients by means of methods provided by the originating laboratory, the aim being to test these methods for their suitability for use in a proposed manual of methods for sewage sludge analysis. The results obtained are evaluated and discussed. From the results obtained, the suggested methods for the determination of pH, Kjeldahl, nitrogen, total phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc, mercury, and arsenic were considered to be sufficiently reliable for inclusion in the manual. It was recommended that further investigation be carried out on finding suitable methods for the determination of selenium, molybdenum, boron, and fluoride

  4. Molecular analysis of precursor lesions in familial pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic

    Full Text Available With less than a 5% survival rate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC is almost uniformly lethal. In order to make a significant impact on survival of patients with this malignancy, it is necessary to diagnose the disease early, when curative surgery is still possible. Detailed knowledge of the natural history of the disease and molecular events leading to its progression is therefore critical.We have analysed the precursor lesions, PanINs, from prophylactic pancreatectomy specimens of patients from four different kindreds with high risk of familial pancreatic cancer who were treated for histologically proven PanIN-2/3. Thus, the material was procured before pancreatic cancer has developed, rather than from PanINs in a tissue field that already contains cancer. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using such unique specimens was performed. Bulk frozen sections displaying the most extensive but not microdissected PanIN-2/3 lesions were used in order to obtain the holistic view of both the precursor lesions and their microenvironment. A panel of 76 commonly dysregulated genes that underlie neoplastic progression from normal pancreas to PanINs and PDAC were identified. In addition to shared genes some differences between the PanINs of individual families as well as between the PanINs and PDACs were also seen. This was particularly pronounced in the stromal and immune responses.Our comprehensive analysis of precursor lesions without the invasive component provides the definitive molecular proof that PanIN lesions beget cancer from a molecular standpoint. We demonstrate the need for accumulation of transcriptomic changes during the progression of PanIN to PDAC, both in the epithelium and in the surrounding stroma. An identified 76-gene signature of PDAC progression presents a rich candidate pool for the development of early diagnostic and/or surveillance markers as well as potential novel preventive/therapeutic targets for both familial and sporadic

  5. Comparative analysis of doses to aquatic biota in water bodies impacted by radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, A.I.; Sazykina, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of doses to the reference species of freshwater biota was performed for the following water bodies in Russia or former USSR: Chernobyl NPPs cooling pond, Lakes Uruskul and Berdenish located in the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace, Techa River, Yenisei River. It was concluded that the doses to biota were considerably different in the acute and chronic periods of radioactive contamination. The most vulnerable part of all considered aquatic ecosystems was benthic trophic chain. A numerical scale on the “dose rate – effects” relationships for fish was formulated. Threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in fish were evaluated to be the following: 1 mGy d −1 for appearance of the first morbidity effects in fish; 5 mGy d −1 for the first negative effects on reproduction system; 10 mGy d −1 for the first effects on life shortening of fish. The results of dose assessment to biota were compared with the scale “dose rate – effects” and the literature data on the radiobiological effects observed in the considered water bodies. It was shown that in the most contaminated water bodies the dose rates were high enough to cause the radiobiological effects in fish. - Highlights: ► Comparative analysis of dose rates to biota in different water bodies was performed. ► A numerical scale on the dose rates – effects relationships for fish was formulated. ► Results of assessment of exposure to biota were compared with the dose rates – effects scale. ► In the most contaminated water bodies the doses were high enough to cause radiobiological effects in fish. ► Current dose rates to biota in all considered water bodies are below the safety level of 1 mGy/day.

  6. Semi-automated relative quantification of cell culture contamination with mycoplasma by Photoshop-based image analysis on immunofluorescence preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Yerneni, Lakshmana K

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination in cell culture is a serious setback for the cell-culturist. The experiments undertaken using contaminated cell cultures are known to yield unreliable or false results due to various morphological, biochemical and genetic effects. Earlier surveys revealed incidences of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures to range from 15 to 80%. Out of a vast array of methods for detecting mycoplasma in cell culture, the cytological methods directly demonstrate the contaminating organism present in association with the cultured cells. In this investigation, we report the adoption of a cytological immunofluorescence assay (IFA), in an attempt to obtain a semi-automated relative quantification of contamination by employing the user-friendly Photoshop-based image analysis. The study performed on 77 cell cultures randomly collected from various laboratories revealed mycoplasma contamination in 18 cell cultures simultaneously by IFA and Hoechst DNA fluorochrome staining methods. It was observed that the Photoshop-based image analysis on IFA stained slides was very valuable as a sensitive tool in providing quantitative assessment on the extent of contamination both per se and in comparison to cellularity of cell cultures. The technique could be useful in estimating the efficacy of anti-mycoplasma agents during decontaminating measures.

  7. Potential external contamination with bisphenol A and other ubiquitous organic environmental chemicals during biomonitoring analysis: an elusive laboratory challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Hennings, Ryan; Kramer, Joshua; Calafat, Antonia M

    2013-03-01

    Biomonitoring studies are conducted to assess internal dose (i.e., body burden) to environmental chemicals. However, because of the ubiquitous presence in the environment of some of these chemicals, such as bisphenol A (BPA), external contamination during handling and analysis of the biospecimens collected for biomonitoring evaluations could compromise the reported concentrations of such chemicals. We examined the contamination with the target analytes during analysis of biological specimens in biomonitoring laboratories equipped with state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation. We present several case studies using the quantitative determination of BPA and other organic chemicals (i.e., benzophenone-3, triclosan, parabens) in human urine, milk, and serum to identify potential contamination sources when the biomarkers measured are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Contamination with target analytes during biomonitoring analysis could result from solvents and reagents, the experimental apparatus used, the laboratory environment, and/or even the analyst. For biomonotoring data to be valid-even when obtained from high-quality analytical methods and good laboratory practices-the following practices must be followed to identify and track unintended contamination with the target analytes during analysis of the biological specimens: strict quality control measures including use of laboratory blanks; replicate analyses; engineering controls (e.g., clean rooms, biosafety cabinets) as needed; and homogeneous matrix-based quality control materials within the expected concentration ranges of the study samples.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer installation modifications in a radioactive contaminated laboratory for the analysis of DOE radioactive waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaquinto, J.M.; Keller, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    The operation and maintenance of a complex analytical instrument such as an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in a radioactive contaminated environment presents unique problems and challenges that have to be considered in the purchasing and installation process. Considerations such as vendor experience, typical radiation levels, sample matrices encountered during sample analysis, instrument accessibility for maintenance, and upkeep must be incorporated into the decision process. The Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently purchased and installed an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for the analysis of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste streams. This presentation will outline the purchasing decision, installation of the instrument, and how the modifications needed to operate in a radioactive contaminated laboratory do not significantly impact the daily operation and maintenance requirements of the instrument. Also, a contamination survey of the system will be presented which demonstrates the contamination levels in the instrument from the sample introduction system to the detector

  9. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer installation modifications in a radioactive contaminated laboratory for the analysis of DOE radioactive waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaquinto, J.M.; Keller, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The operation and maintenance of a complex analytical instrument such as an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in a radioactive contaminated environment presents unique problems and challenges that have to be considered in the purchasing and installation process. Considerations such as vendor experience, typical radiation levels, sample matrices encountered during sample analysis, instrument accessibility for maintenance, and upkeep must be incorporated into the decision process. The Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently purchased and installed an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for the analysis of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste streams. This presentation will outline the purchasing decision, installation of the instrument, and how the modifications needed to operate in a radioactive contaminated laboratory do not significantly impact the daily operation and maintenance requirements of the instrument. Also, a contamination survey of the system will be presented which demonstrates the contamination levels in the instrument from the sample introduction system to the detector. (author)

  10. Application of PIXE analysis to investigation of plants cultivated with contaminated soil of Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K., E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Ishizaki, A.; Arai, H.; Osada, N.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H. [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sera, K. [Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, 348-58 Tomegamori, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0173 (Japan); Sasaki, H.; Sasaki, K.; Sawamura, T. [Sasaki Taro memorial PIXE Center, Asano-cho 5, Hakodate 040-0076 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to research low radioactive cesium contaminated plants by the use of PIXE analysis. Highly contaminated regions still remain in the Fukushima prefecture. We collected wild plants growing in this area, that is, Butterbur, Welsh onion, Alpine leek and White clover and measured their specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K. We also measured {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K specific activities of soil under these plants. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs were ∼0.02 for 4 wild plants and those of {sup 40}K were ∼0.5 except for White clover. Using PIXE analysis, we measured the concentration of mineral elements in these plants. Among mineral elements, we noted the concentrations of additional alkali metal elements such as Na, K and Rb. The experimental results showed that the concentration of Rb was proportional to the specific activities of {sup 137}Cs except for Welsh onion and other elements had no strong correlation with {sup 137}Cs. These results indicate that there may be correlations between the adsorption of Cs and Rb.

  11. UNCERT: geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software applied to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingle, W.L.; Poeter, E.P.; McKenna, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    UNCERT is a 2D and 3D geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software package applied to ground water flow and contaminant transport modeling. It is a collection of modules that provides tools for linear regression, univariate statistics, semivariogram analysis, inverse-distance gridding, trend-surface analysis, simple and ordinary kriging and discrete conditional indicator simulation. Graphical user interfaces for MODFLOW and MT3D, ground water flow and contaminant transport models, are provided for streamlined data input and result analysis. Visualization tools are included for displaying data input and output. These include, but are not limited to, 2D and 3D scatter plots, histograms, box and whisker plots, 2D contour maps, surface renderings of 2D gridded data and 3D views of gridded data. By design, UNCERT's graphical user interface and visualization tools facilitate model design and analysis. There are few built in restrictions on data set sizes and each module (with two exceptions) can be run in either graphical or batch mode. UNCERT is in the public domain and is available from the World Wide Web with complete on-line and printable (PDF) documentation. UNCERT is written in ANSI-C with a small amount of FORTRAN77, for UNIX workstations running X-Windows and Motif (or Lesstif). This article discusses the features of each module and demonstrates how they can be used individually and in combination. The tools are applicable to a wide range of fields and are currently used by researchers in the ground water, mining, mathematics, chemistry and geophysics, to name a few disciplines. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  13. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S.

    2013-11-01

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  14. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairacan Augusto Pereira da Fonseca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$ notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or “feiras” in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2015-10-22

    Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$) notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or "feiras" in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food.

  16. Meta-analysis of biochar potential for pollutant immobilization and stabilization in contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Gerhard; Marsz, Aleksandra; Fristak, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is the pyrolysis product of biomass, preferably from agricultural and forestry residues and waste materials. Characterized by a polyaromatic structure rich in carbon, it offers a microporous structure with a high specific surface area and active functional groups as binding sites. Because of the high sorption capacity for organic and inorganic soil pollutants biochar is an interesting tool for in-situ soil remediation. Especially if the reduction of contaminant bioavailability and the protection of groundwater from pollutants in the vadose zone are the most relevant issues for remediating a polluted site without excavation and removal of the soil, an in-situ application of biochar may offer a promising remediation strategy. The resulting interest of deploying biochar as sorbent for soil contaminants has stimulated a wealth of studies to develop successful applications for environmental technology. However, the existing studies do not always agree on the efficacy for different pollutants and on the most relevant char and soil characteristics that determine the rate of success when using biochar as sorbent. This makes it necessary to apply advanced literature assessment techniques to allow for the recognition of the extent and the significance of the efficacy of a given pollutant treatment technique. A meta-analysis is a study assessment technique that allows extracting a harmonized answer to a specific research question that has been studied more often than one time, even if the results are partially conflicting. Such a technique also allows getting an overview about the degree of consensus or contradiction in the answers to the question if biochar can be applied successfully for immobilizing certain soil contaminants. The meta-analysis results can also be used to quantify the average extent of effects of a certain treatment, depending on the characteristics of the sorbent and on the application rate. By checking 104 published papers in the peer

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  19. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  1. Sampling strategies for the analysis of reactive low-molecular weight compounds in air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneken, H.

    2006-01-01

    Within this thesis, new sampling and analysis strategies for the determination of airborne workplace contaminants have been developed. Special focus has been directed towards the development of air sampling methods that involve diffusive sampling. In an introductory overview, the current

  2. Environmental hazard analysis - contamination of nutrients, mercury and cesium-137 in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakanson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Results from some ongoing Swedish research projects on different types of contamination of limnic as well as marine areas are summarized. A brief theoretical outline on the central concepts of the 'meso-scale-type' of environmental hazard analysis, utilizing examples on eutrophication of coastal waters is given. The concepts are further substantiated in two subsequent parts dealing with radioactive cesium and mercury. The idea is to illustrate that the basic concepts for ('real' world/'meso scale') environmental hazard analysis can be used for different substances and different aquatic environments. It is important to give clear, quantifiable definitions of the effect, dose and environmental sensitivity parameters, which should be valid for a defined area and for a defined span of time. All other parameters should be compatible and have the same area and time resolution. (author)

  3. Reactivity of etoricoxib based on computational study of molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential surface and Mulliken charge analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ritika; Soni, Abhinav; Singh, V. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2018-05-01

    Etoricoxib is one of the selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor drug which plays a significant role in the pharmacological management of arthritis and pain. The theoretical investigation of its reactivity is done using Density Functional Theory calculations. Molecular Electrostatic Potential Surface of etoricoxib and its Mulliken atomic charge distribution are used for the prediction of its electrophilic and nucleophilic sites. The detailed analysis of its frontier molecular orbitals is also done.

  4. Detection of Low Molecular Weight Adulterants in Beverages by Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Dake, Jeffrey

    2016-04-14

    Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) has been used to detect the presence of non-narcotic adulterants in beverages. The non-narcotic adulterants that were examined in this work incorporated a number low molecular weight alcohols, acetone, ammonium hydroxide, and sodium hypochlorite. Analysis of the adulterants was completed by pipetting 1 µL deposits onto glass microcapillaries along with an appropriate dopant species followed by introduction into the DART gas stream. It was found that detection of these compounds in the complex matrices of common beverages (soda, energy drinks, etc.) was simplified through the use of a dopant species to allow for adduct formation with the desired compound(s) of interest. Other parameters that were investigated included DART gas stream temperature, in source collision induced dissociation, ion polarity, and DART needle voltage. Sensitivities of the technique were found to range from 0.001 % volume fraction to 0.1 % volume fraction, comparable to traditional analyses completed using headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS). Once a method was established using aqueous solutions, , fifteen beverages were spiked with each of the nine adulterants, to simulate real world detection, and in nearly all cases the adulterant could be detected either in pure form, or complexed with the added dopant species. This technique provides a rapid way to directly analyze beverages believed to be contaminated with non-narcotic adulterants at sensitivities similar to or exceeding those of traditional confirmatory analyses.

  5. Analysis of microbiological contamination in mixed pressed ham and cooked sausage in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Su; Wang, Jun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Forghani, Fereidoun; Moon, Jin-San; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial contamination levels (aerobic bacteria plate count [APC], coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes) in mixed pressed ham and cooked sausage. A total of 180 samples were collected from factories with and without hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems at four steps: after chopping (AC), after mixing (AM), cooling after the first heating process, and cooling after the second heating process. For ham, APCs and coliform and E. coli counts increased when ingredients were added to the meat at the AC step. Final product APC was 1.63 to 1.85 log CFU/g, and coliforms and E. coli were not detected. S. aureus and L. monocytogenes were found in nine (15.0%) and six (10.0%) samples, respectively, but only at the AC and AM steps and not in the final product. Sausage results were similar to those for ham. The final product APC was 1.52 to 3.85 log CFU/g, and coliforms and E. coli were not detected. S. aureus and L. monocytogenes were found in 29 (24.2%) and 25 (20.8%) samples at the AC and AM steps, respectively, but not in the final product. These results indicate that the temperature and time of the first and second heating are of extreme importance to ensure the microbiological safety of the final product regardless of whether a HACCP system is in place. Microorganism contamination must be monitored regularly and regulations regarding sanitization during processing should be improved. Education regarding employee personal hygiene, environmental hygiene, prevention of cross-contamination, ingredient control, and step-by-step process control is needed to reduce the risk of food poisoning.

  6. Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabukhin, Yu.S.

    1976-10-01

    The burning of fossil fuel, discharges from metallurgical and chemical plants, the wide use of chemicals, and other human activities, result in releasing into the biosphere large quantities of elements which are found in relatively low concentrations in the human organism. The pollution of the biosphere by such trace elements, and in particular heavy metals, has reached such proportions that on the scale of significance of the factors causing the 'stressed' state of the environment of heavy metals occupy the second place and, according to forecasts, may in the future move on to the first. In the problem of pollution of the biosphere, man himself undoubtedly occupies the central position as a target. The pollution of air, soil and water, the contamination of micro-organisms, plants and animals are certainly growing into a serious threat and leading to heavy losses. However, it would be a real disaster if man himself became contaminated to levels giving rise to large scale harmful somatic or genetic effects. It is therefore an urgent problem today to determine the initial levels of trace elements in man and the extent of his contamination in areas where these elements are expected to show anomalous concentrations. Attention should be paid in the first place to those trace elements which probably play no physiological role, are particularly abundant in the environment, and have high toxicity (arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, etc.). Moreover, it should be born in mind that in anomalously high concentrations even the physiologically necessary trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese, fluorine, etc.) cause harmful effects. This paper justifies the use of hair samples as a biological indicator of environmental pollutants from physiological and morphological aspect and recommends on sample preparation and analysis methods

  7. Identifying sources of emerging organic contaminants in a mixed use watershed using principal components analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Fairbairn, David; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2014-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify sources of emerging organic contaminants in the Zumbro River watershed in Southeastern Minnesota. Two main principal components (PCs) were identified, which together explained more than 50% of the variance in the data. Principal Component 1 (PC1) was attributed to urban wastewater-derived sources, including municipal wastewater and residential septic tank effluents, while Principal Component 2 (PC2) was attributed to agricultural sources. The variances of the concentrations of cotinine, DEET and the prescription drugs carbamazepine, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole were best explained by PC1, while the variances of the concentrations of the agricultural pesticides atrazine, metolachlor and acetochlor were best explained by PC2. Mixed use compounds carbaryl, iprodione and daidzein did not specifically group with either PC1 or PC2. Furthermore, despite the fact that caffeine and acetaminophen have been historically associated with human use, they could not be attributed to a single dominant land use category (e.g., urban/residential or agricultural). Contributions from septic systems did not clarify the source for these two compounds, suggesting that additional sources, such as runoff from biosolid-amended soils, may exist. Based on these results, PCA may be a useful way to broadly categorize the sources of new and previously uncharacterized emerging contaminants or may help to clarify transport pathways in a given area. Acetaminophen and caffeine were not ideal markers for urban/residential contamination sources in the study area and may need to be reconsidered as such in other areas as well.

  8. Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabukhin, Yu S [ed.

    1976-10-01

    The burning of fossil fuel, discharges from metallurgical and chemical plants, the wide use of chemicals, and other human activities, result in releasing into the biosphere large quantities of elements which are found in relatively low concentrations in the human organism. The pollution of the biosphere by such trace elements, and in particular heavy metals, has reached such proportions that on the scale of significance of the factors causing the 'stressed' state of the environment of heavy metals occupy the second place and, according to forecasts, may in the future move on to the first. In the problem of pollution of the biosphere, man himself undoubtedly occupies the central position as a target. The pollution of air, soil and water, the contamination of micro-organisms, plants and animals are certainly growing into a serious threat and leading to heavy losses. However, it would be a real disaster if man himself became contaminated to levels giving rise to large scale harmful somatic or genetic effects. It is therefore an urgent problem today to determine the initial levels of trace elements in man and the extent of his contamination in areas where these elements are expected to show anomalous concentrations. Attention should be paid in the first place to those trace elements which probably play no physiological role, are particularly abundant in the environment, and have high toxicity (arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, etc.). Moreover, it should be born in mind that in anomalously high concentrations even the physiologically necessary trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese, fluorine, etc.) cause harmful effects. This paper justifies the use of hair samples as a biological indicator of environmental pollutants from physiological and morphological aspect and recommends on sample preparation and analysis methods.

  9. Analysis of the potential contamination risk of groundwater resources circulating in areas with anthropogenic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spizzico

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The area investigated is located in the province of Brindisi (Italy. It is a generally flat area separated from the nearby carbonatic plateau of the Murgia by quite indistinct and high fault scarps. As regards the geological features, carbonatic basement rocks and post-cretaceous terrains made up of calabrian calcarenites and middle-upper Pleistocenic marine terraced deposits can be distinguished. In the examined area there are two different hydrogeological environments. The first is represented by deep groundwater, the main groundwater resource in Apulia. The second hydrogeological environment, now of lesser importance than the deep aquifer in terms of size and use, is made up of some small shallow groundwater systems situated in post-calabrian sands and located in the eastern area. During some sampling cycles carried out in the studied area, water was withdrawn from both the deep aquifer and from the shallow groundwater. For every sample, the necessary parameters were determined for the physical and chemical characterisation of two different hydrogeological environments. Moreover, some chemical parameters indicating anthropogenic activities were determined. Analysis of the aerial distribution of the measured parameters has shown some main areas subject to different conditions of contamination risk, in accordance with the hydrogeological and geological features of the investigated area. In the south-eastern part of the investigated area, the important action performed by the surface aquifer for protecting the deep groundwater from contamination of anthropogenic origin is clear. On the other hand, in the shallow groundwater, areas of nitrate and nitrite contamination have been identified, which result from the extensive use of fertilizers.

  10. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed removal of contaminated materials at the Elza Gate site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has been prepared in support of the proposed removal action for cleanup of radioactive and chemically contaminated soil at the Elza Gate site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This property became contaminated as a result of storage of ore residues, equipment, and other materials for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The US Department of Energy is responsible for cleanup of portions of the site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In December 1990 an area known as Pad 1 was abrasively scoured to remove surface contamination, and in March 1991 removal of Pad 1 contamination was begun under a separate EE/CA. This EE/CA is intended to cover the remaining portions of the site for which the Department of Energy has responsibility. It has been determined that an EE/CA report is appropriate documentation for the proposed removal action. This EE/CA covers removal of contaminated soils and contaminated concrete rubble from the Elza Gate site. The primary objectives of this EE/CA report are to identify and describe the preferred removal action, and to document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential for release of contaminants from the property into the environment and that will minimize the associated threats to human health or welfare and the environment. The preferred alternative is disposition on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Climate change - An uncertainty factor in risk analysis of contaminated land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustsson, Anna; Filipsson, Monika; Oberg, Tomas; Bergbaeck, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Metals frequently occur at contaminated sites, where their potential toxicity and persistence require risk assessments that consider possible long-term changes. Changes in climate are likely to affect the speciation, mobility, and risks associated with metals. This paper provides an example of how the climate effect can be inserted in a commonly used exposure model, and how the exposure then changes compared to present conditions. The comparison was made for cadmium (Cd) exposure to 4-year-old children at a highly contaminated iron and steel works site in southeastern Sweden. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches (through probability bounds analysis, PBA) were used in the exposure assessment. Potential climate-sensitive variables were determined by a literature review. Although only six of the total 39 model variables were assumed to be sensitive to a change in climate (groundwater infiltration, hydraulic conductivity, soil moisture, soil:water distribution, and two bioconcentration factors), the total exposure was clearly affected. For example, by altering the climate-sensitive variables in the order of 15% to 20%, the deterministic estimate of exposure increased by 27%. Similarly, the PBA estimate of the reasonable maximum exposure (RME, defined as the upper bound of the 95th percentile) increased by almost 20%. This means that sites where the exposure in present conditions is determined to be slightly below guideline values may in the future exceed these guidelines, and risk management decisions could thus be affected. The PBA, however, showed that there is also a possibility of lower exposure levels, which means that the changes assumed for the climate-sensitive variables increase the total uncertainty in the probabilistic calculations. This highlights the importance of considering climate as a factor in the characterization of input data to exposure assessments at contaminated sites. The variable with the strongest influence on the result was the

  12. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karg, F.; Henkler, Ch.

    2005-01-01

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  13. Assessment of gold exposure and contamination in galvanizing workplace by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, M.A.B.C.; Amaral, A.M.; Maia, E.C.P.; Albinati, C.C.B.

    2007-01-01

    Gold is not included in the current list of elements considered essential to humans and there are many controversies related to its toxicity. According to the chemical characteristics of the element, Au 1+ is favored for binding at sites with S donor, such as sulfhydryl group (-SH) in proteins in biological systems. This tendency raises the possibility of health-related risk, mainly linked to a long-term exposure to high and low levels of gold. This paper highlights the determination of gold by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) during the assessment of exposure levels to metals and possible workers' contamination in three galvanizing factories applying the same processes. This assessment is aimed at giving support to Worker's Health Awareness Program of the Municipal Department of Health of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. INAA, mix of k 0 and monostandard methods was applied to air filter, hair and toenail samples, and to urine samples. Solvent extraction of gold was carried out followed by comparative INAA. The results revealed that gold was present in all matrixes, indicating the exposure in the workplace and suggesting endogenous contamination. Is gold playing a role as a toxic element? (author)

  14. Determination of protection zones for Dutch groundwater wells against virus contamination--uncertainty and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijven, J F; Mülschlegel, J H C; Hassanizadeh, S M; Teunis, P F M; de Roda Husman, A M

    2006-09-01

    Protection zones of shallow unconfined aquifers in The Netherlands were calculated that allow protection against virus contamination to the level that the infection risk of 10(-4) per person per year is not exceeded with a 95% certainty. An uncertainty and a sensitivity analysis of the calculated protection zones were included. It was concluded that protection zones of 1 to 2 years travel time (206-418 m) are needed (6 to 12 times the currently applied travel time of 60 days). This will lead to enlargement of protection zones, encompassing 110 unconfined groundwater well systems that produce 3 x 10(8) m3 y(-1) of drinking water (38% of total Dutch production from groundwater). A smaller protection zone is possible if it can be shown that an aquifer has properties that lead to greater reduction of virus contamination, like more attachment. Deeper aquifers beneath aquitards of at least 2 years of vertical travel time are adequately protected because vertical flow in the aquitards is only 0.7 m per year. The most sensitive parameters are virus attachment and inactivation. The next most sensitive parameters are grain size of the sand, abstraction rate of groundwater, virus concentrations in raw sewage and consumption of unboiled drinking water. Research is recommended on additional protection by attachment and under unsaturated conditions.

  15. Allowable residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil from pathway analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1987-01-01

    The uncertainty regarding radionuclide distributions among Remedial Action Program (RAP) sites and long-term decommissioning and closure options for these sites requires a flexible approach capable of handling different levels of contamination, dose limits, and closure scenarios. We identified a commercially available pathway analysis model, DECOM, which had been used previously in support of remedial activities involving contaminated soil at the Savannah River Plant. The DECOM computer code, which estimates concentrations of radionuclides uniformly distributed in soil that correspond to an annual effective dose equivalent, is written in BASIC and runs on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer. We obtained the latest version of DECOM and modified it to make it more user friendly and applicable to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RAP. Some modifications involved changes in default parameters or changes in models based on approaches used by the EPA in regulating remedial actions for hazardous substances. We created a version of DECOM as a LOTUS spreadsheet, using the same models as the BASIC version of DECOM. We discuss the specific modeling approaches taken, the regulatory framework that guided our efforts, the strengths and limitations of each approach, and areas for improvement. We also demonstrate how the LOTUS version of DECOM can be applied to specific problems that may be encountered during ORNL RAP activities. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Distributed Channel Estimation and Pilot Contamination Analysis for Massive MIMO-OFDM Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaib, Alam

    2016-07-22

    By virtue of large antenna arrays, massive MIMO systems have a potential to yield higher spectral and energy efficiency in comparison with the conventional MIMO systems. This paper addresses uplink channel estimation in massive MIMO-OFDM systems with frequency selective channels. We propose an efficient distributed minimum mean square error (MMSE) algorithm that can achieve near optimal channel estimates at low complexity by exploiting the strong spatial correlation among antenna array elements. The proposed method involves solving a reduced dimensional MMSE problem at each antenna followed by a repetitive sharing of information through collaboration among neighboring array elements. To further enhance the channel estimates and/or reduce the number of reserved pilot tones, we propose a data-aided estimation technique that relies on finding a set of most reliable data carriers. Furthermore, we use stochastic geometry to quantify the pilot contamination, and in turn use this information to analyze the effect of pilot contamination on channel MSE. The simulation results validate our analysis and show near optimal performance of the proposed estimation algorithms.

  17. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  18. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, O.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, F.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  19. MDAnalysis: a toolkit for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Denning, Elizabeth J; Woolf, Thomas B; Beckstein, Oliver

    2011-07-30

    MDAnalysis is an object-oriented library for structural and temporal analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories and individual protein structures. It is written in the Python language with some performance-critical code in C. It uses the powerful NumPy package to expose trajectory data as fast and efficient NumPy arrays. It has been tested on systems of millions of particles. Many common file formats of simulation packages including CHARMM, Gromacs, Amber, and NAMD and the Protein Data Bank format can be read and written. Atoms can be selected with a syntax similar to CHARMM's powerful selection commands. MDAnalysis enables both novice and experienced programmers to rapidly write their own analytical tools and access data stored in trajectories in an easily accessible manner that facilitates interactive explorative analysis. MDAnalysis has been tested on and works for most Unix-based platforms such as Linux and Mac OS X. It is freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://mdanalysis.googlecode.com. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Molecular Characterization and Expression Analysis of Equine ( Gene in Horse (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Duk Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the molecular characteristics of the horse vascular endothelial growth factor alpha gene (VEGFα by constructing a phylogenetic tree, and to investigate gene expression profiles in tissues and blood leukocytes after exercise for development of suitable biomarkers. Using published amino acid sequences of other vertebrate species (human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, cow, pig, chicken and dog, we constructed a phylogenetic tree which showed that equine VEGFα belonged to the same clade of the pig VEGFα. Analysis for synonymous (Ks and non-synonymous substitution ratios (Ka revealed that the horse VEGFα underwent positive selection. RNA was extracted from blood samples before and after exercise and different tissue samples of three horses. Expression analyses using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR showed ubiquitous expression of VEGFα mRNA in skeletal muscle, kidney, thyroid, lung, appendix, colon, spinal cord, and heart tissues. Analysis of differential expression of VEGFα gene in blood leukocytes after exercise indicated a unimodal pattern. These results will be useful in developing biomarkers that can predict the recovery capacity of racing horses.

  1. Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes with surface modified molecular sieves for natural gas purification: II. Performance characterization under contaminated feed conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ward, Jason K.

    2011-07-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) composed of the crosslinkable polyimide PDMC and surface modified (SM) SSZ-13 have recently been shown to enhance carbon dioxide permeability and carbon dioxide/methane selectivity versus neat PDMC films by as much as 47% and 13%, respectively (Part I). The previous film characterization, however, was performed using ideal, clean mixed gas feeds. In this paper, PDMC/SSZ-13 MMMs are further characterized using more realistic mixed gases containing low concentrations (500 or 1000. ppm) of toluene as a model contaminant. Mixed matrix membranes are shown to outperform pure PDMC films in the presence of toluene with 43% greater carbon dioxide permeability and 12% greater carbon dioxide/selectivity at 35 °C and 700 psia feed pressure. These results suggest that MMMs-in addition to exhibiting enhanced transport properties-may mitigate performance degradation due to antiplasticization effects. Moreover, the analyses presented here show that the reduction in separation performance by trace contaminant-accelerated physical aging can be suppressed greatly with MMMs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Monitoring of Fasciola Species Contamination in Water Dropwort by cox1 Mitochondrial and ITS-2 rDNA Sequencing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Wook; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Quan, Juan-Hua; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Sun, Rubing; Lee, Young-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Fascioliasis, a food-borne trematode zoonosis, is a disease primarily in cattle and sheep and occasionally in humans. Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica), an aquatic perennial herb, is a common second intermediate host of Fasciola, and the fresh stems and leaves are widely used as a seasoning in the Korean diet. However, no information regarding Fasciola species contamination in water dropwort is available. Here, we collected 500 samples of water dropwort in 3 areas in Korea during February and March 2015, and the water dropwort contamination of Fasciola species was monitored by DNA sequencing analysis of the Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica specific mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2). Among the 500 samples assessed, the presence of F. hepatica cox1 and 1TS-2 markers were detected in 2 samples, and F. hepatica contamination was confirmed by sequencing analysis. The nucleotide sequences of cox1 PCR products from the 2 F. hepatica-contaminated samples were 96.5% identical to the F. hepatica cox1 sequences in GenBank, whereas F. gigantica cox1 sequences were 46.8% similar with the sequence detected from the cox1 positive samples. However, F. gigantica cox1 and ITS-2 markers were not detected by PCR in the 500 samples of water dropwort. Collectively, in this survey of the water dropwort contamination with Fasciola species, very low prevalence of F. hepatica contamination was detected in the samples.

  3. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud; Momin, Afaque Ahmad Imtiyaz; Diederichs, Kay; Arold, Stefan T.

    2016-01-01

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for 'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for 'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  4. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud

    2016-11-02

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  5. Accuracy Analysis of a Robotic Radionuclide Inspection and Mapping System for Surface Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauer, Georg F.; Kawa, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The mapping of localized regions of radionuclide contamination in a building can be a time consuming and costly task. Humans moving hand-held radiation detectors over the target areas are subject to fatigue. A contamination map based on manual surveys can contain significant operator-induced inaccuracies. A Fanuc M16i light industrial robot has been configured for installation on a mobile aerial work platform, such as a tall forklift. When positioned in front of a wall or floor surface, the robot can map the radiation levels over a surface area of up to 3 m by 3 m. The robot's end effector is a commercial alpha-beta radiation sensor, augmented with range and collision avoidance sensors to ensure operational safety as well as to maintain a constant gap between surface and radiation sensors. The accuracy and repeatability of the robotically conducted contamination surveys is directly influenced by the sensors and other hardware employed. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of various non-contact sensors for gap measurement, and the means to compensate for predicted systematic errors that arise during the area survey scans. The range sensor should maintain a constant gap between the radiation counter and the surface being inspected. The inspection robot scans the wall surface horizontally, moving down at predefined vertical intervals after each scan in a meandering pattern. A number of non-contact range sensors can be employed for the measurement of the gap between the robot end effector and the wall. The nominal gap width was specified as 10 mm, with variations during a single scan not to exceed ± 2 mm. Unfinished masonry or concrete walls typically exhibit irregularities, such as holes, gaps, or indentations in mortar joints. These irregularities can be sufficiently large to indicate a change of the wall contour. The responses of different sensor types to the wall irregularities vary, depending on their underlying principles of operation. We explored

  6. Risk-based economic decision analysis of remediation options at a PCE-contaminated site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Friis-Hansen, P.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2010-01-01

    by the remediation activities. More attention is increasingly being given to these secondary environmental impacts when evaluating remediation options. This paper presents a methodology for an integrated economic decision analysis which combines assessments of remediation costs, health risk costs and potential...... at a downstream groundwater well. Potential environmental impacts on the local, regional and global scales due to the site remediation activities are evaluated using life cycle assessments (LCA). The potential impacts on health and environment are converted to monetary units using a simplified cost model. A case......Remediation methods for contaminated sites cover a wide range of technical solutions with different remedial efficiencies and costs. Additionally, they may vary in their secondary impacts on the environment i.e. the potential impacts generated due to emissions and resource use caused...

  7. Evaluation of endogenous contamination using hair as biomonitor by K0 parametric neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Neves, Otaviano F.; Batista, Jose R.; Maia, Elene Cristina P.

    2000-01-01

    The environment of the work is an important source of pollutant exposition to human beings. The main goal of this paper is to make a survey of the exposures to metals related to occupational diseases. The hair samples as biomonitors were donated by galvanising factory workers in Belo Horizonte. The samples for a Comparative Group were collected from individuals not exposed to a specific environment. The k 0 -neutron activation analysis was applied on the elemental determination. The Comparative Group presented no significant difference compared to literature. Therefore the very high values exhibited by the Workers' Group suggest endogenous contamination. The GBW09101 'Human Hair' Shangai Institute of Nuclear Research, China, Reference Material was also evaluated presenting good agreement to certified and information values. The elements Ag, Al, As Au, Br, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, Mn, Na, Sb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zn were determined. (author)

  8. Applications and mechanisms of laser ablation for elemental analysis of nuclear wastes and contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Survey methods for compositional analysis of nuclear wastes and contaminated soils are under development to support characterization prior to treatment and continued monitoring during remediation. Laser ablation in conjunction with optical spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are attractive because of the safety and convenience of minimal sample handling and very small sampling volume. However, the signal intensities in analytic applications depend sensitively on the physical state of the sample (e.g., particle morphology, defect concentration, impurities, and presence of liquids). In this work, the authors examine how solid and condensed state properties of the sample affect the laser-substrate interaction, and the dynamic electronic, physical, and chemical processes which ultimately generate the signals that are detected for analytic purposes

  9. Stochastic analysis of contaminant transport in porous media: analysis of a two-member radionuclide chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonano, E.J.; Shipers, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the authors extend previous stochastic analyses of contaminant transport in geologic media for a single species to a chain of two species. The authors particular application is the quantification of uncertainties due to lack of characterization of the spatial variability of hydrologic parameters on transport of radionuclides from a high-level waste repository to the biosphere. Radionuclide chains can have a significant impact on demonstrating compliance (or violation) of standards regulating the release to the environment accessible to humans. Two approaches for determining the cross-covariance terms in the mean concentration equations are presented. One uses a Taylor expansion to obtain the cross-covariance between the velocity and concentration fluctuations, while the other is based on a Fourier-Laplace double transform method. For the conditions of interest here, the difference between these two approaches are expected to be small. In addition, the variances are calculated in a unique way by solving another associated partial differential equation. A parametric study is carried out to examine the sensitivity of the mean concentration of the two species and their corresponding variances and cross-covariance on the parameters associated with the structure of the stochastic velocity field. It is found that the dependent variables are most sensitive to the intensity and correlation length of the velocity fluctuations. The magnitude of the variances and cross-covariance of the concentrations are proportional to the magnitude of the mean concentrations which depend on inlet concentration boundary conditions

  10. Effects of anthropogenic heavy metal contamination on litter decomposition in streams – A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Verónica; Koricheva, Julia; Duarte, Sofia; Niyogi, Dev K.; Guérold, François

    2016-01-01

    Many streams worldwide are affected by heavy metal contamination, mostly due to past and present mining activities. Here we present a meta-analysis of 38 studies (reporting 133 cases) published between 1978 and 2014 that reported the effects of heavy metal contamination on the decomposition of terrestrial litter in running waters. Overall, heavy metal contamination significantly inhibited litter decomposition. The effect was stronger for laboratory than for field studies, likely due to better control of confounding variables in the former, antagonistic interactions between metals and other environmental variables in the latter or differences in metal identity and concentration between studies. For laboratory studies, only copper + zinc mixtures significantly inhibited litter decomposition, while no significant effects were found for silver, aluminum, cadmium or zinc considered individually. For field studies, coal and metal mine drainage strongly inhibited litter decomposition, while drainage from motorways had no significant effects. The effect of coal mine drainage did not depend on drainage pH. Coal mine drainage negatively affected leaf litter decomposition independently of leaf litter identity; no significant effect was found for wood decomposition, but sample size was low. Considering metal mine drainage, arsenic mines had a stronger negative effect on leaf litter decomposition than gold or pyrite mines. Metal mine drainage significantly inhibited leaf litter decomposition driven by both microbes and invertebrates, independently of leaf litter identity; no significant effect was found for microbially driven decomposition, but sample size was low. Overall, mine drainage negatively affects leaf litter decomposition, likely through negative effects on invertebrates. - Highlights: • A meta-analysis was done to assess the effects of heavy metals on litter decomposition. • Heavy metals significantly and strongly inhibited litter decomposition in streams.

  11. Inorganic Contaminants Associated with the Extraction of Unconventional Gas.Initial Analysis and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L.; Hurtado, A.; Recreo, F.; Eguilior, S.

    2015-01-01

    The latest technological developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing are driving a commercial scale extraction of unconventional fossil fuels in various regions of the world. Europe's position in relation to the exploitation of unconventional fossil fuels is this has to be made under a paradigm of coherence between the technical and economic-financial aspects and environments and public trust, which are essential and which will eventually would enable the viability of exploiting these resources.This requires, by those decision makers, both industry and regulators, a comprehensive management of the risks associated with these exploitations, which implies the need to develop tools of analysis and assessment to environmental impact and risk. The exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbons in formations of shale requires the creation of a network of artificial fractures to connect with production well Horizontal wells are drilled for this purpose and go on for several km into the shale formation. During drilling, a mixture of oil, gas and formation water is pumped to the surface. The water is separated from oil and gas in tanks or pools. The flowback and produced water contains different kinds of chemicals in varying concentrations: salt, oil and other organic compounds, suspended solids, bacteria, naturally occurring radioactive elements (NORM), and any element injected with the fracturing fluid. The concentration of these elements in the water may be increased due to the treatments suffered by flowback and produced water for disposal. Due to the large variability of contaminants in the flowback and produced water and the potentially large volumes involved, the determination of the its composition is essential for proper management of them and to prevent health, safety and environmental risks. This report covers the risk analysis of an unconventional gas extraction project, the initial assessment of the risks associated with the use and management of

  12. Use of technical and economic analysis for optimizing technology selection and remedial design for contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardisty, P.E.; Brown, A.

    1996-01-01

    The decision to remediate a contaminated site can be seen from the macroeconomic and microeconomic viewpoints. Macroeconomics can be used to plan and account for the overall cost of pollution as part of a firm's production, and thus make overall decisions on the real cost of pollution and the level of clean-up which may be called for. Valuation of damaged resources, option values and intrinsic worth is an important part of this process. Once the decision to remediate has been taken, the question becomes how best to remediate. Microeconomic analysis deals with providing efficient allocative decisions for reaching specified goals. it is safe to say that cost is one of the single most important factors in site clean-up decision making. A basic rule of remediation is often taken to be the maximization of contaminant mass removed per dollar spent. However, remediation may also be governed by other objectives and constraints. In some situations, minimization of time, rather than cost, could be the constraint. Or perhaps the objective could be to achieve a set level of clean-up for the lowest possible cost, even if a large program would result in unit-cost reductions. Evaluation of the economics of a clean-up project is directly linked to the objectives of the site owner, and the constraints within which the remediation is to be performed. Economic analysis of remedial options for containment of a 350,000 L hydrocarbon spill migrating through fractured rock into a river in Alberta, Canada, clear direction to the site owner

  13. Sex Change in Clownfish: Molecular Insights from Transcriptome Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2016-10-17

    Sequential hermaphroditism is a unique reproductive strategy among teleosts that is displayed mainly in fish species living in the coral reef environment. The reproductive biology of hermaphrodites has long been intriguing; however, very little is known about the molecular pathways underlying their sex change. Here, we provide the first de novo transcriptome analyses of a hermaphrodite teleost´s undergoing sex change in its natural environment. Our study has examined relative gene expression across multiple groups—rather than just two contrasting conditions— and has allowed us to explore the differential expression patterns throughout the whole process. Our analysis has highlighted the rapid and complex genomic response of the brain associated with sex change, which is subsequently transmitted to the gonads, identifying a large number of candidate genes, some well-known and some novel, involved in the process. The present study provides strong evidence of the importance of the sex steroidogenic machinery during sex change in clownfish, with the aromatase gene playing a central role, both in the brain and the gonad. This work constitutes the first genome-wide study in a social sex-changing species and provides insights into the genetic mechanism governing social sex change and gonadal restructuring in protandrous hermaphrodites.

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of phosphomannomutase genes in Triticum monococcum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunmei; Yu; Xinyan; Liu; Qian; Zhang; Xinyu; He; Wan; Huai; Baohua; Wang; Yunying; Cao; Rong; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants, phosphomannomutase(PMM) is essential for synthesizing the antioxidant ascorbic acid through the Smirnoff–Wheeler pathway. Previously, we characterized six PMM genes(Ta PMM-A1, A2, B1, B2, D1 and D2) in common wheat(Triticum aestivum, AABBDD).Here, we report a molecular genetic analysis of PMM genes in Triticum monococcum(AmAm), a diploid wheat species whose Amgenome is closely related to the A genome of common wheat. Two distinct PMM genes, Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2, were found in T. monococcum. The coding region of Tm PMM-1 was intact and highly conserved. In contrast, two main Tm PMM-2 alleles were identified, with Tm PMM-2a possessing an intact coding sequence and Tm PMM-2b being a pseudogene. The transcript level of Tm PMM-2a was much higher than that of Tm PMM-2b, and a bacterially expressed Tm PMM-2a recombinant protein displayed relatively high PMM activity. In general, the total transcript level of PMM was substantially higher in accessions carrying Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2a than those harboring Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2b. However, total PMM protein and activity levels did not differ drastically between the two genotypes. This work provides new information on PMM genes in T. monococcum and expands our understanding on Triticeae PMM genes, which may aid further functional and applied studies of PMM in crop plants.

  15. Deterministic sensitivity analysis for the numerical simulation of contaminants transport; Analyse de sensibilite deterministe pour la simulation numerique du transfert de contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, E

    2007-12-15

    The questions of safety and uncertainty are central to feasibility studies for an underground nuclear waste storage site, in particular the evaluation of uncertainties about safety indicators which are due to uncertainties concerning properties of the subsoil or of the contaminants. The global approach through probabilistic Monte Carlo methods gives good results, but it requires a large number of simulations. The deterministic method investigated here is complementary. Based on the Singular Value Decomposition of the derivative of the model, it gives only local information, but it is much less demanding in computing time. The flow model follows Darcy's law and the transport of radionuclides around the storage site follows a linear convection-diffusion equation. Manual and automatic differentiation are compared for these models using direct and adjoint modes. A comparative study of both probabilistic and deterministic approaches for the sensitivity analysis of fluxes of contaminants through outlet channels with respect to variations of input parameters is carried out with realistic data provided by ANDRA. Generic tools for sensitivity analysis and code coupling are developed in the Caml language. The user of these generic platforms has only to provide the specific part of the application in any language of his choice. We also present a study about two-phase air/water partially saturated flows in hydrogeology concerning the limitations of the Richards approximation and of the global pressure formulation used in petroleum engineering. (author)

  16. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed management of contaminated water in the Weldon Spring quarry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonell, M.M.; Peterson, J.M.; Joya, I.E.

    1989-01-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report has been prepared to support the proposed removal action for management of contaminated water in the Weldon Spring quarry, located near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The water became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of contact with various wastes that were disposed of in the quarry between 1942 and 1968. The US Department of Energy is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which includes the quarry, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that are associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus real property available for other uses, to the extent possible. The objectives of the EE/CA report are to identify the cleanup as a removal action, to document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential for release of radioactive or chemical contaminant for the quarry water into the nearby environment, and to address environmental impacts associated with the proposed action. Pursuant to the evaluation alternatives in this report, it is proposed that the water be pumped from the quarry pond to a newly constructed treatment plant for removal of the contaminants of concern. This removal action is necessary for and consistent with the overall response action being planned to minimize potential threats to the public and the environment associated with the current contamination at the quarry. 66 refs., 15 figs., 32 tabs

  17. Gene hunting: molecular analysis of the chicken genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development of molecular tools to identify genes that are involved in production and health traits in poultry. To unravel the chicken genome, fluorescent molecular markers (microsatellite markers) were developed and optimized to perform high throughput

  18. Assessment of bacterial superficial contamination in classical or ritually slaughtered cattle using metagenetics and microbiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Hupperts, C; Delhalle, L; Nezer, C; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2017-04-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the slaughter technique (Halal vs Classical slaughter) on the superficial contamination of cattle carcasses, by using traditional microbiological procedures and 16S rDNA metagenetics. The purpose was also to investigate the neck area to identify bacteria originating from the digestive or the respiratory tract. Twenty bovine carcasses (10 from each group) were swabbed at the slaughterhouse, where both slaughtering methods are practiced. Two swabbing areas were chosen: one "legal" zone of 1600cm 2 (composed of zones from rump, flank, brisket and forelimb) and locally on the neck area (200cm 2 ). Samples were submitted to classical microbiology for aerobic Total Viable Counts (TVC) at 30°C and Enterobacteriaceae counts, while metagenetic analysis was performed on the same samples. The classical microbiological results revealed no significant differences between both slaughtering practices; with values between 3.95 and 4.87log CFU/100cm 2 and 0.49 and 1.94log CFU/100cm 2 , for TVC and Enterobacteriaceae respectively. Analysis of pyrosequencing data showed that differences in the bacterial population abundance between slaughtering methods were mainly observed in the "legal" swabbing zone compared to the neck area. Bacterial genera belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum were more abundant in the "legal" swabbing zone in "Halal" samples, while Brevibacterium and Corynebacterium were encountered more in "Halal" samples, in all swabbing areas. This was also the case for Firmicutes bacterial populations (families of Aerococcaceae, Planococcaceae). Except for Planococcoceae, the analysis of Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) abundances of bacteria from the digestive or respiratory tract revealed no differences between groups. In conclusion, the slaughtering method does not influence the superficial microbiological pattern in terms of specific microbiological markers of the digestive or respiratory tract. However

  19. Trace Contaminant Control for the International Space Station's Node 1- Analysis, Design, and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Trace chemical contaminant generation inside crewed spacecraft cabins is a technical and medical problem that must be continuously evaluated. Although passive control through materials selection and active control by adsorption and catalytic oxidation devices is employed during normal operations of a spacecraft, contaminant buildup can still become a problem. Buildup is particularly troublesome during the stages between the final closure of a spacecraft during ground processing and the time that a crewmember enters for the first time during the mission. Typically, the elapsed time between preflight closure and first entry on orbit for spacecraft such as Spacelab modules was 30 days. During that time, the active contamination control systems are not activated and contaminants can potentially build up to levels which exceed the spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) specified by NASA toxicology experts. To prevent excessively high contamination levels at crew entry, the Spacelab active contamination control system was operated for 53 hours just before launch.

  20. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) — A new concept to evaluate the environmental fate of chiral organic contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Danet, Andrei-Florin

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011, the enantiospecific stable carbon isotope analysis (ESIA) has emerged as an innovative technique to assess the environmental fate of chiral emerging compounds by combining in one experimental technique both compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and enantioselective analysis. To date, the ESIA was applied for four classes of compounds: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), polar herbicides (phenoxy acids), synthetic polycyclic musk galaxolide (HHCB), and phenoxyalkanoic methyl herbicides. From an analytical point of view there are factors that are hindering the application of ESIA methods for the field samples: (i.e. amounts of target analyte, matrix effects, GC resolution) and overcoming these factors is challenging. While ESIA was shown as a mature technique for the first three abovementioned class of compounds, no isotope analysis of individual enantiomers could be performed for phenoxyalkanoic methyl herbicides. With respect to field studies, one study showed that ESIA might be a promising tool to distinguish between biotic and abiotic transformation pathways of chiral organic contaminants and even to differentiate between their aerobic and anaerobic biotransformation pathways. The development of ESIA methods for new chiral emerging contaminants in combination with development of multi-element isotope analysis will contribute to a better characterization of transformation pathways of chiral organic contaminants. - Highlights: • ESIA is an innovative technique to assess the environmental fate of chiral pollutants • Overcoming the analytical limitations of ESIA is challenging • Development of ESIA methods for new chiral emerging contaminants is needed

  1. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) — A new concept to evaluate the environmental fate of chiral organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu, E-mail: badeasilviu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Danet, Andrei-Florin [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, 90-92 Panduri Str., Bucharest 050657 (Romania)

    2015-05-01

    Since 2011, the enantiospecific stable carbon isotope analysis (ESIA) has emerged as an innovative technique to assess the environmental fate of chiral emerging compounds by combining in one experimental technique both compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and enantioselective analysis. To date, the ESIA was applied for four classes of compounds: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), polar herbicides (phenoxy acids), synthetic polycyclic musk galaxolide (HHCB), and phenoxyalkanoic methyl herbicides. From an analytical point of view there are factors that are hindering the application of ESIA methods for the field samples: (i.e. amounts of target analyte, matrix effects, GC resolution) and overcoming these factors is challenging. While ESIA was shown as a mature technique for the first three abovementioned class of compounds, no isotope analysis of individual enantiomers could be performed for phenoxyalkanoic methyl herbicides. With respect to field studies, one study showed that ESIA might be a promising tool to distinguish between biotic and abiotic transformation pathways of chiral organic contaminants and even to differentiate between their aerobic and anaerobic biotransformation pathways. The development of ESIA methods for new chiral emerging contaminants in combination with development of multi-element isotope analysis will contribute to a better characterization of transformation pathways of chiral organic contaminants. - Highlights: • ESIA is an innovative technique to assess the environmental fate of chiral pollutants • Overcoming the analytical limitations of ESIA is challenging • Development of ESIA methods for new chiral emerging contaminants is needed.

  2. The molecular turn in psychiatry: a philosophical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Abraham

    2002-06-01

    Biological psychiatry has been dominated by a psychopharmacologically-driven neurotransmitter dysfunction paradigm. The objective of this paper is to explore a reductionist assumption underlying this paradigm, and to suggest an improvement on it. The methods used are conceptual analysis with a comparative approach, particularly using illustrations from the history of both biological psychiatry and molecular biology. The results are that complete reduction to physicochemical explanations is not fruitful, at least in the initial stages of research in the medical and life sciences, and that an appropriate (non-reducible) integrative principle--addressing a property of the whole system under study--is required for each domain of research. This is illustrated in Pauling's use of a topological integrative principle for the discovery of the functioning of proteins and in Watson and Crick's use of the notion of a genetic code as an integrative principle for the discovery of the structure of genes. The neurotransmitter dysfunction paradigm addresses single molecules and their neural pathways, yet their interactions within the CNS as a whole seem most pertinent to mental disorders such as schizophrenia. The lack within biological psychiatry of an integrative principle addressing a property of the CNS as a whole may be responsible for the empirical failure of orthomolecular psychiatry, as well as for the central role that serendipity has played in the study of mental disorders, which is dominated by the neurotransmitter paradigm. The conclusion is that research in biological psychiatry may benefit from using, at least initially, some integrative principle(s) addressing a property of the CNS as a whole, such as connectionism or a hierarchical notion.

  3. microsatellite analysis of the correlation between molecular and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    3Northeast Normal University, Laboratory of Plant Molecular Epigenetics, Changchun China, Zip 130024 ... grounds. Furthermore, recent evidences that the environment can influence the ..... Forty Coffee Varieties Assessed by RAPD. Markers ...

  4. Analysis of Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition, as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties, such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamics simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one-dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  5. Probabilistic Round Trip Contamination Analysis of a Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling Process Using Markovian Decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nicolas; Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2010-01-01

    A method for evaluating the probability of a Viable Earth Microorganism (VEM) contaminating a sample during the sample acquisition and handling (SAH) process of a potential future Mars Sample Return mission is developed. A scenario where multiple core samples would be acquired using a rotary percussive coring tool, deployed from an arm on a MER class rover is analyzed. The analysis is conducted in a structured way by decomposing sample acquisition and handling process into a series of discrete time steps, and breaking the physical system into a set of relevant components. At each discrete time step, two key functions are defined: The probability of a VEM being released from each component, and the transport matrix, which represents the probability of VEM transport from one component to another. By defining the expected the number of VEMs on each component at the start of the sampling process, these decompositions allow the expected number of VEMs on each component at each sampling step to be represented as a Markov chain. This formalism provides a rigorous mathematical framework in which to analyze the probability of a VEM entering the sample chain, as well as making the analysis tractable by breaking the process down into small analyzable steps.

  6. Microbial community analysis in rice paddy soils irrigated by acid mine drainage contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Xiao, Enzong; Sun, Weimin

    2015-03-01

    Five rice paddy soils located in southwest China were selected for geochemical and microbial community analysis. These rice fields were irrigated with river water which was contaminated by Fe-S-rich acid mine drainage. Microbial communities were characterized by high-throughput sequencing, which showed 39 different phyla/groups in these samples. Among these phyla/groups, Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in all samples. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Bacteroidetes exhibited higher relative abundances than other phyla. A number of rare and candidate phyla were also detected. Moreover, canonical correspondence analysis suggested that pH, sulfate, and nitrate were significant factors that shaped the microbial community structure. In addition, a wide diversity of Fe- and S-related bacteria, such as GOUTA19, Shewanella, Geobacter, Desulfobacca, Thiobacillus, Desulfobacterium, and Anaeromyxobacter, might be responsible for biogeochemical Fe and S cycles in the tested rice paddy soils. Among the dominant genera, GOUTA19 and Shewanella were seldom detected in rice paddy soils.

  7. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.L. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.

  8. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, C.L.

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described

  9. Vadose Zone Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis for the 216-B-26 Trench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.

    2004-10-14

    contaminant inventory and water content depth distributions of any complexity. However, the results are somewhat conservative in that the model does not take credit for stratification and its dimensionality effects. Transient analysis shows transport to be controlled by small-scale stratification that resulted in laterally movement of contaminants and their failure to reach the ground water. Multiple discharges quickly merged into a single plume that migrated beyond the domain boundaries. However, it appears that this very feature that was effective in mitigating deep transport of the contaminants for almost 50 years now functions to confound expected barrier effects. Simulations suggest that a barrier provides no additional protection above the no-action alternative. Although continuous layers are assumed, in reality, there may be discontinuities that could lead to vertical movement. Episodic recharge events could also be conducive to downward movement. As more data becomes available, the conceptual model will be revised. Based on the analyses, capping appears to be no better than the no-action alternative. Projected 99Tc concentrations reaching the groundwater suggest that alternate source control actions may be necessary to reach soil screening levels. The benefits of active remediation are therefore readily apparent. Because none of the alternatives reduce soil concentrations, they effect no active reduction in the groundwater concentrations therefore the residual risk will remain high.

  10. Molecular analysis of the oral microbiota of dental diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kanasi, Eleni

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, bacterial culture has been used for bacterial detection, allowing study of living microorganisms. Molecular methods are rapid and allow simultaneous identification of numerous species and uncultivated phylotypes. The objective of this doctoral thesis was to investigate the role of the oral microbiota, including poorly characterized and uncultivated bacteria, in dental caries and periodontitis, by comprehensive molecular, clinical, and statistical methods. The microbiota of 275 ...

  11. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Scarabaeinae (dung beetles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael T; Inward, Daegan J G; Hunt, Toby; Vogler, Alfried P

    2007-11-01

    The dung beetles (Scarabaeinae) include ca. 5000 species and exhibit a diverse array of morphologies and behaviors. This variation presumably reflects the adaptation to a diversity of food types and the different strategies used to avoid competition for vertebrate dung, which is the primary breeding environment for most species. The current classification gives great weight to the major behavioral types, separating the ball rollers and the tunnelers, but existing phylogenetic studies have been based on limited taxonomic or biogeographic sampling and have been contradictory. Here, we present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 214 species of Scarabaeinae, representing all 12 traditionally recognized tribes and six biogeographical regions, using partial gene sequences from one nuclear (28S) and two mitochondrial (cox1, rrnL) genes. Length variation in 28S (588-621 bp) and rrnL (514-523 bp) was subjected to a thorough evaluation of alternative alignments, gap-coding methods, and tree searches using model-based (Bayesian and likelihood), maximum parsimony, and direct optimization analyses. The small-bodied, non-dung-feeding Sarophorus+Coptorhina were basal in all reconstructions. These were closely related to rolling Odontoloma+Dicranocara, suggesting an early acquisition of rolling behavior. Smaller tribes and most genera were monophyletic, while Canthonini and Dichotomiini each consisted of multiple paraphyletic lineages at hierarchical levels equivalent to the smaller tribes. Plasticity of rolling and tunneling was evidenced by a lack of monophyly (S-H test, p > 0.05) and several reversals within clades. The majority of previously unrecognized clades were geographical, including the well-supported Neotropical Phanaeini+Eucraniini, and a large Australian clade of rollers as well as tunneling Coptodactyla and Demarziella. Only three lineages, Gymnopleurini, Copris+Microcopris and Onthophagus, were widespread and therefore appear to be dispersive at a global scale. A

  12. A quantitative analysis of cross-contamination of Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. via domestic kitchen surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusumaningrum, H.D.; Asselt, van E.D.; Beumer, R.R.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that cross-contamination during food preparation in the home contributes noticeably to the occurrence of foodborne diseases. To help prevent such occurrences, the inclusion of a cross-contamination model in exposure assessments would aid in the development and

  13. CHEMICAL MARKERS OF HUMAN WASTE CONTAMINATION: ANALYSIS OF UROBILIN AND PHARMACEUTICALS IN SOURCE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giving public water authorities another tool to monitor and measure levels of human waste contamination of waters simply and rapidly would enhance public protection. Most of the methods used today detect such contamination by quantifying microbes occurring in feces in high enough...

  14. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 1. Building and sustaining capacity in laboratory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Ernst, Hiba; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Smith, Terry; Hedrick, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents, such as natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and industrial accidents, can occur suddenly and have high impact. However, they often occur at such a low frequency and in unpredictable locations that planning for the management of the consequences of a catastrophe can be difficult. For those catastrophes that result in the release of contaminants, the ability to analyze environmental samples is critical and contributes to the resilience of affected communities. Analyses of environmental samples are needed to make appropriate decisions about the course of action to restore the area affected by the contamination. Environmental samples range from soil, water, and air to vegetation, building materials, and debris. In addition, processes used to decontaminate any of these matrices may also generate wastewater and other materials that require analyses to determine the best course for proper disposal. This paper summarizes activities and programs the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has implemented to ensure capability and capacity for the analysis of contaminated environmental samples following catastrophic incidents. USEPA's focus has been on building capability for a wide variety of contaminant classes and on ensuring national laboratory capacity for potential surges in the numbers of samples that could quickly exhaust the resources of local communities. USEPA's efforts have been designed to ensure a strong and resilient laboratory infrastructure in the United States to support communities as they respond to contamination incidents of any magnitude. The efforts include not only addressing technical issues related to the best-available methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants, but also include addressing the challenges of coordination and administration of an efficient and effective response. Laboratory networks designed for responding to large scale contamination incidents can be sustained by applying

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF APPROACHES TO ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF POLYELEMENT CONTAMINATION SOIL OF URBAN ECOSYSTEM BY HEAVY METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAKOVYSHYNA T. F.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. In modern conditions, anthropogenic impact to the soil urban ecosystems is fairly stable over time and space, is manifested in various forms, as the transformation of the soil profile, the change in direction of the soil-forming processes, contamination of the various pollutants, and, above all, heavy metals (HM – elements of the first class of the danger. Their sources of the income to the urban environment are industrial enterprises, transport, housing and communal services. Determination of the anthropogenic pressure to the urban soil is carried out by the environmental assessment of the HM polyelement contamination, which allows to establish not only the fact of pollution, but also limits of the possible load with considering regional background or sanitary standards – MPC. However, until now discussions arise regarding the index which will be carried out the valuation – the cornerstone of any methodological approach to the environmental assessment of the soil polyelement contamination by the HM of the urban ecosystems, which allows to establish not only the fact of contamination, but also limits the possible load, taking into account the regional background or sanitary norm – MPC. Purpose. Lies in the grounded selection of the environmental assessment indexes of the soil contamination by the HM of the urban ecosystems through a comparative analysis of the existing approaches, such as the determination of the summary contamination index (SCI, the index of the soil contamination (ISC, factor imbalance (Sd, taking into account environmental safety standards and binding to the specific conditions territory. Conclusion. In summary it should be noted that it is necessary to use a set of integrated indexes, including the SCI to determine the violation of the metals content with respect to the geochemical background of zonal soil, ISC – link the contamination level with health indexes of the environmental safety

  16. Study into the mechanisms of hydrogen contamination of niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Molecular dynamics studies for simulation of the hydrogen diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, B.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency cavities were chosen for most of the future particle accelerators. In the case of pure niobium cavities, several laboratories have observed degradation of superconducting properties related to the conditions of the cooling down process. This effect seems to stem from hydrogen contamination which occurs during surface treatments. With the aim to study the influence of different surface treatments on the hydrogen contamination depth concentration profiling of the near surface region (the first 200 nm) was first carried out by the classical ERDA technique with 30 nm depth resolution. In order to better localize hydrogen, the initial particle selecting device (Teflon foil) was replaced by an electromagnetic (ExB) filter improving then the depth resolution by a factor three. This study reveals an hydrogen segregation at the niobium surface. Such a result is in contradiction with the relative high experimental value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient given by the literature. To understand the trapping mechanism of hydrogen, a simulation by molecular dynamics of this impurity diffusion process was performed. This approach requires the knowledge of the interatomic potential. The potential parameters were fitted with static and dynamic tests. Nb-Nb interaction is based on many body potential. Nb-H is represented by two body potential. The Arrhenius diagram of the diffusion coefficient achieved by dynamic for a single crystal provides too small activation energy in comparison with experimental results. However, in presence of defects, a simulation proves a large increase of these values. It is only around 1000 K that the diffusion of hydrogen is not altered by defects. This conclusion confirms the experimental results concerning a good characteristic of superconducting cavities after thermal treatments. (orig.)

  17. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed management of contaminated water impounded at the Weldon Spring chemical plant area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonell, M.M.; Maxey, M.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Joya, I.E.

    1990-07-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report has been prepared to support the proposed removal action for managing contaminated surface waters impounded at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site, located near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The US Department of Energy is responsible for cleanup activities at the site under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to human health and the environment that are associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus real property available for other uses, to the extent possible. The objectives of this EE/CA report are to identify the cleanup as a removal action, document the selection of a response that will mitigate the potential release of radioactive or chemical contaminants from the impounded waters into the nearby environment, and address environmental impacts associated with the proposed action. 41 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Behavioral Observation and Microbiological Analysis of Older Adult Consumers' Cross-Contamination Practices in a Model Domestic Kitchen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2018-04-01

    The incidence of foodborne illness is higher in older adults because of their increased susceptibility; therefore, food safety practices are important. However, inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward food safety have been reported, which may increase use of unsafe food handling practices. Data on the actual food safety behaviors of older adults are lacking. In this study, food safety practices of older adults were observed and linked to microbiological analysis of kitchen surfaces to identify suspected routes of contamination. Older adults (≥60 years, n = 100) prepared a set meal in a model domestic kitchen sanitized according to a validated protocol to ensure minimal and consistent microbiological loads. Food safety behaviors were observed using ceiling-mounted cameras and recorded using a predetermined behavioral checklist. Surface microbiological contamination also was determined after food preparation. Overall, older adults frequently implemented unsafe food handling practices; 90% failed to implement adequate hand decontamination immediately after handling raw chicken. For older adults who used a larger number of adequate hand decontamination attempts, microbiological contamination levels in the kitchen following the food preparation session were significantly lower ( P food handling practices as suspected routes of microbiological cross-contamination in a model domestic kitchen. Findings indicate the potential impact on domestic food safety of unsafe food handling practices used by older adult consumers. This innovative approach revealed that a large proportion of older adults implement behaviors resulting in microbiological cross-contamination that may increase the risk of foodborne illness in the home.

  19. Analysis of raw meat for heavy metals and bacterial contamination and comparison of antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the study was to analyze the commercially available meat for its heavy metal contents and bacterial contamination. The meat samples were collected from four commercial markets of Lahore, i.e., as Wafaqi Colony (Site I),Township (Site II), G-1 Market (Site III) and Zenith (Site IV), and analyzed for heavy metal [i.e., manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu)] contents and bacterial contaminants (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp. and Salmonella sp.) Atomic absorption spectrophotometery was employed for the detection of the heavy metals and plate count method was used for the detection of bacterial contaminants. The Ni concentration in the Site II sample only and Cd concentration in all meat samples were found above the standard value and the concentration of other metals (Cu, Cr, and Mn) was less than the standard concentrations. Bacterial (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp. and Staphylococcus sp.) contamination was found in all meat samples; however, the number was a little lower in the Site IV samples. Statistical analysis was done, by one-way ANOVA using SPSS, to compare heavy metal contamination in the meat samples. The results showed distribution of heavy metals in all meat samples there was significant difference of Ni concentration in the meat samples. The measure of antibiotic susceptibility showed that isolated species of bacteria were resistant to lincomycin, streptomycin, tertracyclin, ampicillin, amoxicillin and doxycyclin, but did not survive in the medium containing ofloxacin. (author)

  20. The use of cluster analysis for plant grouping by their tolerance to soil contamination with hydrocarbons at the germination stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potashev, Konstantin; Sharonova, Natalia; Breus, Irina

    2014-07-01

    Clustering was employed for the analysis of obtained experimental data set (42 plants in total) on seed germination in leached chernozem contaminated with kerosene. Among investigated plants were 31 cultivated plants from 11 families (27 species and 20 varieties) and 11 wild plant species from 7 families, 23 annual and 19 perennial/biannual plant species, 11 monocotyledonous and 31 dicotyledonous plants. Two-dimensional (two-parameter) clustering approach, allowing the estimation of tolerance of germinating seeds using a pair of independent parameters (С75%, V7%) was found to be most effective. These parameters characterized the ability of seeds to both withstand high concentrations of contaminants without the significant reduction of the germination, and maintain high germination rate within certain contaminant concentrations. The performed clustering revealed a number of plant features, which define the relation of a particular plant to a particular tolerance cluster; it has also demonstrated the possibility of generalizing the kerosene results for n-tridecane, which is one of the typical kerosene components. In contrast to the "manual" plant ranking based on the assessment of germination at discrete concentrations of the contaminant, the proposed clustering approach allowed a generalized characterization of the seed tolerance/sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recommendations for dealing with waste contaminated with Ebola virus: a Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Elrahman, Samira Abd; Bell, Diana J; Brainard, Julii; Dervisevic, Samir; Fedha, Tsimbiri P; Few, Roger; Howard, Guy; Lake, Iain; Maes, Peter; Matofari, Joseph; Minnigh, Harvey; Mohamedani, Ahmed A; Montgomery, Maggie; Morter, Sarah; Muchiri, Edward; Mudau, Lutendo S; Mutua, Benedict M; Ndambuki, Julius M; Pond, Katherine; Sobsey, Mark D; van der Es, Mike; Zeitoun, Mark; Hunter, Paul R

    2016-06-01

    To assess, within communities experiencing Ebola virus outbreaks, the risks associated with the disposal of human waste and to generate recommendations for mitigating such risks. A team with expertise in the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework identified waste products from the care of individuals with Ebola virus disease and constructed, tested and confirmed flow diagrams showing the creation of such products. After listing potential hazards associated with each step in each flow diagram, the team conducted a hazard analysis, determined critical control points and made recommendations to mitigate the transmission risks at each control point. The collection, transportation, cleaning and shared use of blood-soiled fomites and the shared use of latrines contaminated with blood or bloodied faeces appeared to be associated with particularly high levels of risk of Ebola virus transmission. More moderate levels of risk were associated with the collection and transportation of material contaminated with bodily fluids other than blood, shared use of latrines soiled with such fluids, the cleaning and shared use of fomites soiled with such fluids, and the contamination of the environment during the collection and transportation of blood-contaminated waste. The risk of the waste-related transmission of Ebola virus could be reduced by the use of full personal protective equipment, appropriate hand hygiene and an appropriate disinfectant after careful cleaning. Use of the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework could facilitate rapid responses to outbreaks of emerging infectious disease.

  2. The health risk of the agricultural production in potentially contaminated sites: an environmental-health risk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Russo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rural areas are often interested by pollution phenomena generated by agricultural activities with a high use of pesticides and/or by anthropic activities, such as industrial plants or illegal waste disposal sites, which may cause even long-range contamination. The risk for human health from the pollutants present in the environment can be quantitatively evaluated by the environmental health risk analysis set out in the Italian Legislative Decree no. 152/2006 (Italian Regulation, 2006. This analysis is the best technical-normative tool to estimate the health risks linked to the pollutants present in the environment but it does not consider the specificity of agricultural soils or the contamination of agricultural products. This study aims to provide this missing technical-normative data by identifying and applying a suitable methodology to evaluate the health risk caused by the ingestion of agricultural products grown in contaminated soils. The risk analysis was applied to two contaminated areas in southern Italy using an innovative methodology based on widely accepted parameters for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs soil-plant bio-transfer factor in the case of horticultural crops. In addition, some concentration limits of PAHs in agricultural soils are proposed that may be of help to the competent authorities (health agencies, local authorities in delineating the areas requiring strict health surveillance of the food products cultivated.

  3. Real-time detection of organic contamination events in water distribution systems by principal components analysis of ultraviolet spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Hou, Dibo; Wang, Ke; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin; Loáiciga, Hugo

    2017-05-01

    The detection of organic contaminants in water distribution systems is essential to protect public health from potential harmful compounds resulting from accidental spills or intentional releases. Existing methods for detecting organic contaminants are based on quantitative analyses such as chemical testing and gas/liquid chromatography, which are time- and reagent-consuming and involve costly maintenance. This study proposes a novel procedure based on discrete wavelet transform and principal component analysis for detecting organic contamination events from ultraviolet spectral data. Firstly, the spectrum of each observation is transformed using discrete wavelet with a coiflet mother wavelet to capture the abrupt change along the wavelength. Principal component analysis is then employed to approximate the spectra based on capture and fusion features. The significant value of Hotelling's T 2 statistics is calculated and used to detect outliers. An alarm of contamination event is triggered by sequential Bayesian analysis when the outliers appear continuously in several observations. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is tested on-line using a pilot-scale setup and experimental data.

  4. A new risk and stochastic analysis of monitoring and remediation in subsurface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetridis, K.; Paleologos, E.

    2012-04-01

    Sanitary landfills constitute the most widely used management approach for the disposal of solid wastes because of their simplicity and cost effectiveness. However, historical records indicate that landfills exhibit a high failure rate of groundwater contamination. Successful detection of aquifer contamination via monitoring wells is a complicated problem with many factors, such as the heterogeneity of the geologic environment, the dispersion of contamination into the geologic medium, the quantity and nature of the contaminants, the number and location of the monitoring wells, and the frequency of sampling, all contributing to the uncertainty of early detection. Detection of contaminants, of course, is of value if remedial actions follow as soon as possible, so that the volume of contaminated groundwater to be treated is minimized. Practically, there is always a time lag between contaminant detection and remedial action response. Administrative decisions and arrangements with local contractors initiate remedial procedures introduces a time lag between detection and remediation time. During this time lag a plume continues to move into an aquifer contaminating larger groundwater volumes. In the present study these issues are addressed by investigating the case of instantaneous leakage from a landfill facility into a heterogeneous aquifer. The stochastic Monte Carlo framework was used to address, in two dimensions, the problem of evaluating the effectiveness of contaminant detection in heterogeneous aquifers by linear networks of monitoring wells. Numerical experiments based on the random-walk tracking-particle method were conducted to determine the detection probabilities and to calculate contaminated areas at different time steps. Several cases were studied assuming different levels of geologic heterogeneity, contamination dispersion, detectable contamination limits and monitoring wells' sampling frequencies. A new perspective is introduced for the correction of

  5. Density functional theory, comparative vibrational spectroscopic studies, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, K.; Gunasekaran, S.; Kumaresan, S.

    2015-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra of Linezolid have been recorded in the regions 4,000-400 and 4,000-100 cm-1, respectively. Utilizing the observed Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound have been carried out. The optimum molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities, have been calculated by density functional theory with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) levels. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of Linezolid is reported. Mulliken's net charges have also been calculated. Ultraviolet-visible spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using time-dependent density functional method. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis and several thermodynamic properties have been performed by the density functional theoretical method.

  6. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at -4°C. Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes using UFLC analysis. The contaminant peak detected was prominent, sharp detectable at 9.176 ± 0.138 min on a Waters 250-4.6 mm, 4 μ, Nova-Pak C18 column with mobile phase consisting of methanol:water (70:30). It was evident from the study that long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peak. Further, this may mislead in future reporting an unnatural compound by researchers. Long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peakContamination peak with higher area under the curve (609993) was obtained in ultra-flow liquid chromatographic run for methanol stored in PP microcentrifuge tubesContamination peak was detected at retention time 9.113 min with a lambda max of 220.38 nm and 300 mAU intensity on the given chromatographic conditionsGlass vials serve better option over PP microcentrifuge tubes for storing biological samples. Abbreviations used: UFLC: Ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography; LC: Liquid Chromatography; MS: Mass spectrometry; AUC: Area Under Curve.

  7. Analysis of quinocide in unprocessed primaquine diphosphate and primaquine diphosphate tablets using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondz, Ilia; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2009-01-30

    Malaria is one of the most widespread and deadly diseases on the planet. Every year, about 500 million new cases are diagnosed, and the annual death toll is about 3 million. Primaquine has strong antiparasitic effects against gametocytes and can therefore prevent the spread of the parasite from treated patients to mosquitoes. It is also used in radical cures and prevents relapse. Consequently, primaquine is an often-used drug. In this study the separation of unprocessed primaquine from the contaminant quinocide based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is presented and 7.5 mg primaquine diphosphate tablets were analyzed. We present a novel method for fast determination of quinocide which is an isomer of primaquine as the main contaminant in unprocessed primaquine and in its medical form as tablets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with SMB (also named supersonic GC-MS). Supersonic GC-MS provides enhanced molecular ion without any ion source related peak tailing plus extended range of compounds amenable for GC-MS analysis. In addition, major isomer mass spectral effects were revealed in the mass spectra of primaquine and quinocide which facilitated the unambiguous identification of quinocide in primaquine tablets. Fast GC-MS analysis is demonstrated with less then 2 min elution time of the drug and its main contaminants.

  8. Irreversible thermodynamic analysis and application for molecular heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Açıkkalp, Emin

    2017-09-01

    Is there a link between the macroscopic approach to irreversibility and microscopic behaviour of the systems? Consumption of free energy keeps the system away from a stable equilibrium. Entropy generation results from the redistribution of energy, momentum, mass and charge. This concept represents the essence of the thermodynamic approach to irreversibility. Irreversibility is the result of the interaction between systems and their environment. The aim of this paper is to determine lost works in a molecular engine and compare results with macro (classical) heat engines. Firstly, irreversible thermodynamics are reviewed for macro and molecular cycles. Secondly, irreversible thermodynamics approaches are applied for a quantum heat engine with -1/2 spin system. Finally, lost works are determined for considered system and results show that macro and molecular heat engines obey same limitations. Moreover, a quantum thermodynamic approach is suggested in order to explain the results previously obtained from an atomic viewpoint.

  9. Quantitative analysis of residual protein contamination of podiatry instruments reprocessed through local and central decontamination units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gordon Wg; Goldie, Frank; Long, Steven; Lappin, David F; Ramage, Gordon; Smith, Andrew J

    2011-01-10

    The cleaning stage of the instrument decontamination process has come under increased scrutiny due to the increasing complexity of surgical instruments and the adverse affects of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments. Instruments used in the podiatry field have a complex surface topography and are exposed to a wide range of biological contamination. Currently, podiatry instruments are reprocessed locally within surgeries while national strategies are favouring a move toward reprocessing in central facilities. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of local and central reprocessing on podiatry instruments by measuring residual protein contamination of instruments reprocessed by both methods. The residual protein of 189 instruments reprocessed centrally and 189 instruments reprocessed locally was determined using a fluorescent assay based on the reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate. Residual protein was detected on 72% (n = 136) of instruments reprocessed centrally and 90% (n = 170) of instruments reprocessed locally. Significantly less protein (p podiatry instruments when protein contamination is considered, though no significant difference was found in residual protein between local decontamination unit and central decontamination unit processes for Blacks files. Further research is needed to undertake qualitative identification of protein contamination to identify any cross contamination risks and a standard for acceptable residual protein contamination applicable to different instruments and specialities should be considered as a matter of urgency.

  10. Quantitative analysis of residual protein contamination of podiatry instruments reprocessed through local and central decontamination units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramage Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cleaning stage of the instrument decontamination process has come under increased scrutiny due to the increasing complexity of surgical instruments and the adverse affects of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments. Instruments used in the podiatry field have a complex surface topography and are exposed to a wide range of biological contamination. Currently, podiatry instruments are reprocessed locally within surgeries while national strategies are favouring a move toward reprocessing in central facilities. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of local and central reprocessing on podiatry instruments by measuring residual protein contamination of instruments reprocessed by both methods. Methods The residual protein of 189 instruments reprocessed centrally and 189 instruments reprocessed locally was determined using a fluorescent assay based on the reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate. Results Residual protein was detected on 72% (n = 136 of instruments reprocessed centrally and 90% (n = 170 of instruments reprocessed locally. Significantly less protein (p Conclusions Overall, the results show the superiority of central reprocessing for complex podiatry instruments when protein contamination is considered, though no significant difference was found in residual protein between local decontamination unit and central decontamination unit processes for Blacks files. Further research is needed to undertake qualitative identification of protein contamination to identify any cross contamination risks and a standard for acceptable residual protein contamination applicable to different instruments and specialities should be considered as a matter of urgency.

  11. Analysis of radioactive waste contamination in soils. Part 1: integral transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romani, Z.V.; Cotta, R.M.; Perez-Guerreo, J.S.; Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.

    1997-01-01

    The migration of radioactive waste in soils and other porous media is studied through the hybrid numerical-analytical solution of the mass convection-diffusion equations for this phenomenon. Initially, a radionuclide leak function is derived to model the phenomenon that occurs after the failure of the engineering barriers of the repository. This function is obtained from a first order ordinary differential equation which is solved numerically. Subsequently, the migration of this radioactive waste through the soil and the aquifer below the repository is studied; the soil and the aquifer are modeled as two saturated and coupled porous media. The convection-diffusion equations obtained for the concentration field in each medium studied are solved through the use of the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (G.I.T.T.), which provides automatic error control and relatively low computational cost for a user-prescribed accuracy. This work is part of the joint project COPPE/CNEN on the analysis of radioactive waste contamination in soils. (author)

  12. Application of sequential extraction analysis to electrokinetic remediation of cadmium, nickel and zinc from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannis, Apostolos; Pentari, Despina; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    An enhanced electrokinetic process for the removal of cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) from contaminated soils was performed. The efficiency of the chelate agents nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and diaminocycloexanetetraacetic acid (DCyTA) was examined under constant potential gradient (1.23 V/cm). The results showed that chelates were effective in desorbing metals at a high pH, with metal-chelate anion complexes migrating towards the anode. At low pH, metals existing as dissolved cations migrated towards the cathode. In such conflicting directions, the metals accumulated in the middle of the cell. Speciation of the metals during the electrokinetic experiments was performed to provide an understanding of the distribution of the Cd, Ni and Zn. The results of sequential extraction analysis revealed that the forms of the metals could be altered from one fraction to another due to the variation of physico-chemical conditions throughout the cell, such as pH, redox potential and the chemistry of the electrolyte solution during the electrokinetic treatment. It was found that binding forms of metals were changed from the difficult type to easier extraction type.

  13. Application of sequential extraction analysis to electrokinetic remediation of cadmium, nickel and zinc from contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannis, Apostolos, E-mail: apostolos.giannis@enveng.tuc.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece); Pentari, Despina [Department of Mineral Resources Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece); Wang, Jing-Yuan [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre (R3C), Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Gidarakos, Evangelos, E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece)

    2010-12-15

    An enhanced electrokinetic process for the removal of cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) from contaminated soils was performed. The efficiency of the chelate agents nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and diaminocycloexanetetraacetic acid (DCyTA) was examined under constant potential gradient (1.23 V/cm). The results showed that chelates were effective in desorbing metals at a high pH, with metal-chelate anion complexes migrating towards the anode. At low pH, metals existing as dissolved cations migrated towards the cathode. In such conflicting directions, the metals accumulated in the middle of the cell. Speciation of the metals during the electrokinetic experiments was performed to provide an understanding of the distribution of the Cd, Ni and Zn. The results of sequential extraction analysis revealed that the forms of the metals could be altered from one fraction to another due to the variation of physico-chemical conditions throughout the cell, such as pH, redox potential and the chemistry of the electrolyte solution during the electrokinetic treatment. It was found that binding forms of metals were changed from the difficult type to easier extraction type.

  14. Risk analysis of drinking water microbial contamination versus disinfection by-products (DBPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashbolt, Nicholas John

    2004-01-01

    Managing the provision of safe drinking water has a renewed focus in light of the new World Health Organization (WHO) water safety plans. Risk analysis is a necessary component to assist in selecting priority hazards and identifying hazardous scenarios, be they qualitative to quantitative assessments. For any approach, acute diarrhoeal pathogens are often the higher risk issue for municipal water supplies, no matter how health burden is assessed. Furthermore, potential sequellae (myocarditis, diabetes, reactive arthritis and cancers) only further increase the potential health burden of pathogens; despite the enormous uncertainties in determining pathogen exposures and chemical dose-responses within respective microbial and chemical analyses. These interpretations are currently being improved by Bayesian and bootstrapping approaches to estimate parameters for stochastic assessments. A case example, covering the health benefits of ozonation for Cryptosporidium inactivation versus potential cancers from bromate exposures, illustrated the higher risks from a pathogen than one of the most likely disinfection by-products (DBPs). Such analyses help justify the industries long-held view of the benefits of multiple barriers to hazards and that microbial contamination of water supplies pose a clear public health risk when treatment is inadequate. Therefore, efforts to reduce potential health risks from DBP must not compromise pathogen control, despite socio-political issues

  15. Pathway analysis and exposure assessment: MEPAS modeling for nonradiological chemical contaminants at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, M.L.; Dirkes, R.; Buck, J.; Cooper, A.; Castieton, K.; Glantz, C.

    1995-01-01

    A Chemical Pathway Analysis and Exposure Assessment was performed by the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). The SESP monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife in order to assess onsite of offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health risk at the Hanford Site. The objectives of this study are (1) determine if a nonradiological chemical monitoring program is warranted for the Hanford Site, (2) ensure that the selection of surveillance parameters such as media, sampling location, and analytes are chosen in a manner that is scientifically sound and cost-efficient, and (3) identify specific nonradiological chemicals of concern (COC) for the Hanford Site. The basis for identification of COC for the Hanford Site was an extensive literature review. The model was also used to predict COC concentrations required onsite to achieve an offsite cancer incidence of 1 E-6 and a hazard quotient of 1.0. This study indicated that nonradiological chemical contamination occurring onsite does not pose a significant offsite human health risk. The highest cancer incidence to the offsite maximally exposed individual from COC was from arsenic (1.76E-1 0); the highest hazard quotient was chromium VI (1.48E-04)

  16. Molecular tools for carotenogenesis analysis in the zygomycete Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Garre, Victoriano; López-García, Sergio; Navarro, Eusebio; Vila, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The carotene producer fungus Mucor circinelloides is the zygomycete more amenable to genetic manipulations by using molecular tools. Since the initial development of an effective procedure of genetic transformation, more than two decades ago, the availability of new molecular approaches such as gene replacement techniques and gene expression inactivation by RNA silencing, in addition to the sequencing of its genome, has made Mucor a valuable organism for the study of a number of processes. Here we describe in detail the main techniques and methods currently used to manipulate M. circinelloides, including transformation, gene replacement, gene silencing, RNAi, and immunoprecipitation.

  17. Contamination of public transports by Staphylococcus aureus and its carriage by biomedical students: point-prevalence, related risk factors and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Â; Martins da Costa, P; Rego, D; Beça, N; Alves, C; Moreira, T; Conceição, T; Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the contamination of public transports by Staphylococcus aureus and assess its carriage by biomedical students, focussing on the point-prevalence, related risk factors and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant strains. Cross-sectional survey. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolated from handrails of buses (n = 112) and trains (n = 79) circulating in Porto and from nasal swabs of local university students (n = 475) were quantified, characterized by molecular typing methods and related to possible risk factors. The MRSA prevalence in buses (16.1%) was not significantly different from trains (8.9%). There was also no identifiable association between the counts of MSSA and MRSA in buses and trains and the number of travellers in each sampling day, specific routes (including those passing by main hospitals) or other risk factors. Of the students, 37.1% carried S. aureus, and having a part-time job or smoking were found to be risk factors for carriage. EMRSA-15 (ST22-SCCmecIVh) was the prevalent MRSA clonal lineage, found not only in the buses (n = 14) and trains (n = 2) but also in the single MRSA-carrier among the students. The characteristics of the community-associated Southwest Pacific MRSA clone were found in a single ST30-IVa isolate, which may suggest a recent SCCmec acquisition by an MSSA background in the community. The spread of EMRSA-15, a common hospital-associated lineage, among different public transports and as a nasal coloniser is of concern and warrants adequate public health control measures. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a novel kinetic model for the analysis of PAH biodegradation in the presence of lead and cadmium co-contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deary, Michael E., E-mail: michael.deary@northumbria.ac.uk [Department of Geography,Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Ekumankama, Chinedu C. [Department of Geography,Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Cummings, Stephen P. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • 40 week study of the biodegradation of 16 US EPA priority PAHs in a soil with high organic matter. • Effects of cadmium, lead and mercury co-contaminants studied. • Novel kinetic approach developed. • Biodegradation of lower molecular weight PAHs relatively unaffected by Cd or Pb. • Soil organic matter plays a key role in the PAH removal mechanism. - Abstract: We report on the results of a 40 week study in which the biodegradation of 16 US EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was followed in microcosms containing soil of high organic carbon content (11%) in the presence and absence of lead and cadmium co-contaminants. The total spiked PAH concentration was 2166 mg/kg. Mercury amendment was also made to give an abiotic control. A novel kinetic model has been developed to explain the observed biphasic nature of PAH degradation. The model assumes that PAHs are distributed across soil phases of varying degrees of bioaccessibility. The results of the analysis suggest that overall percentage PAH loss is dependent on the respective rates at which the PAHs (a) are biodegraded by soil microorganisms in pore water and bioaccessible soil phases and (b) migrate from bioaccessible to non-bioaccessible soil phases. In addition, migration of PAHs to non-bioaccessible and non-Soxhlet-extractable soil phases associated with the humin pores gives rise to an apparent removal process. The presence of metal co-contaminants shows a concentration dependent inhibition of the biological degradation processes that results in a reduction in overall degradation. Lead appears to have a marginally greater inhibitory effect than cadmium.

  19. Analysis of Process Gases and Trace Contaminants in Membrane-Aerated Gaseous Effluent Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin Michael; Meyer, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    In membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs), hollow fibers are used to supply oxygen to the biofilms and bulk fluid. A pressure and concentration gradient between the inner volume of the fibers and the reactor reservoir drives oxygen mass transport across the fibers toward the bulk solution, providing the fiber-adhered biofilm with oxygen. Conversely, bacterial metabolic gases from the bulk liquid, as well as from the biofilm, move opposite to the flow of oxygen, entering the hollow fiber and out of the reactor. Metabolic gases are excellent indicators of biofilm vitality, and can aid in microbial identification. Certain gases can be indicative of system perturbations and control anomalies, or potentially unwanted biological processes occurring within the reactor. In confined environments, such as those found during spaceflight, it is important to understand what compounds are being stripped from the reactor and potentially released into the crew cabin to determine the appropriateness or the requirement for additional mitigation factors. Reactor effluent gas analysis focused on samples provided from Kennedy Space Center's sub-scale MABRs, as well as Johnson Space Center's full-scale MABRs, using infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography techniques. Process gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrous oxide, were quantified to monitor reactor operations. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) GC-MS analysis was used to identify trace volatile compounds. Compounds of interest were subsequently quantified. Reactor supply air was examined to establish target compound baseline concentrations. Concentration levels were compared to average ISS concentration values and/or Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) levels where appropriate. Based on a review of to-date results, current trace contaminant control systems (TCCS) currently on board the ISS should be able to handle the added load from bioreactor systems without the need

  20. Molecular cloning, structural analysis and expression of a zinc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of prokaryotic expression of ZnBP and overexpression of the ZnBP gene in A. thaliana improve our understanding of the function of this gene. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in gland morphogenesis in cotton. Key words: Gossypium hirsutum, pigment gland, zinc binding ...

  1. RAPD-PCR molecular analysis of the threatened Cabrera's vole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal management and conservation programs of the threatened Cabrera's vole require investigating potential molecular genetic markers in the genomic background, if the few remaining fragile populations are to ... The results described Cabrera's vole populations as a single genetic unit with slightly restricted gene flow.

  2. Molecular Analysis of Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review therefore brings to light some of the processes involved in molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains like the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and spoligotyping, which have become valuable tools in the epidemiology of tuberculosis, identification of genotypes and ...

  3. Cryogenic Collection of Complete Subsurface Samples for Molecular Biological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    276.5318.1568 Moser, D. P., J. K. Fredrickson, D. R. Geist, E. V. Arntzen, A. D. Peacock , S.-M. W. Li, T. Spadoni, et al. (2003). Biogeochemical...Influencing Amplification Efficiency and Allele Drop-out in Single Cell PCR: Implications for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Molecular Human Reproduction

  4. Molecular Analysis of AFP and HSA Interactions with PTEN Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytoplasmic alpha-fetoprotein (AFP has been classified as a member of the albuminoid gene family. The protein sequence of AFP has significant homology to that of human serum albumin (HSA, but its biological characteristics are vastly different from HSA. The AFP functions as a regulator in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT pathway, but HSA plays a key role as a transport protein. To probe their molecular mechanisms, we have applied colocalization, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP, and molecular docking approaches to analyze the differences between AFP and HSA. The data from colocalization and co-IP displayed a strong interaction between AFP and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog, demonstrating that AFP did bind to PTEN, but HSA did not. The molecular docking study further showed that the AFP domains I and III could contact with PTEN. In silicon substitutions of AFP binding site residues at position 490M/K and 105L/R corresponding to residues K490 and R105 in HSA resulted in steric clashes with PTEN residues R150 and K46, respectively. These steric clashes may explain the reason why HSA cannot bind to PTEN. Ultimately, the experimental results and the molecular modeling data from the interactions of AFP and HSA with PTEN will help us to identify targets for designing drugs and vaccines against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  6. Molecular analysis of candidate probiotic effector molecules of Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remus, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are health-promoting microorganisms that exert their beneficial effects in several ways. While it is known that probiotic bacteria interact with cells of the host gastrointestinal tractand modulate cell-signaling responses by which they might promote health, the underlying molecular

  7. Molecular analysis of mutants of the Neurospora adenylosuccinate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-07

    Aug 7, 2012 ... and mutants induced with X-ray, UV or chemical mutagens. ... We have sequenced the ad-8 locus from 13 of these mutants and identified the molecular nature ..... mutants in yeast by selection for constitutive behavior in pig-.

  8. A molecular cytogenetic analysis of introgression in Alstroemeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a molecular cytogenetic investigation of the process of introgression in Alstroemeria . The aim of this study was to transfer chromosomes or genes from one Alstroemeria species into another. For this, two

  9. Molecular dynamic analysis of the structure of dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G. E-mail: maino@bologna.enea.it

    2004-01-01

    We present main results of molecular dynamics simulations that we have carried out in order to investigate structural properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. Obtained data confirm the PAMAM dendrimer structure proposed by experiments, performed by means of X-ray scattering (SAXS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) techniques.

  10. Molecular dynamic analysis of the structure of dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G.

    2004-01-01

    We present main results of molecular dynamics simulations that we have carried out in order to investigate structural properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. Obtained data confirm the PAMAM dendrimer structure proposed by experiments, performed by means of X-ray scattering (SAXS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) techniques

  11. Molecular responses and expression analysis of genes in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A Mey.) Bunge is a xero-halophytic desert shrub with excellent drought resistance and salt tolerance. To decipher the molecular responses involved in its drought resistance, the cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) technique was employed to identify genes expressed ...

  12. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of a hepcidin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... the liver, intestine and brain were 2.4, 1.5 and 2-fold increase, respectively, compared with the control animals after 5 days .... (sex change) of RFE attracted more attention (Cheng et al., 2003 ...... Molecular Biology. New York: ...

  13. Physiological response, molecular analysis and water use efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With a view to study the effects of irrigation scheduling on the water use efficiency and physiological response and molecular basis of maize hybrids of different maturity groups, a field experiment was conducted at Water Management Research Center (WMRC), Belvatagi, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India ...

  14. Comparative molecular analysis of old olive ( Olea europaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We compared the genetic profiles of six old olive cultivars from an Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey to 15 modern Turkish olive cultivars from different geographical origins. The RAPD profiles successfully clarified the molecular relationships among the genotypes tested. Seventeen RAPD primers generated 153 ...

  15. Molecular analysis of childhood primitive neuroectodermal tumors defines markers associated with poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheurlen, W G; Schwabe, G C; Joos, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The diagnostic and prognostic significance of well-defined molecular markers was investigated in childhood primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using microsatellite analysis, Southern blot analysis, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), 30 primary tumors......: In our study, amplification of c-myc was a poor-prognosis marker in PNET. LOH of chromosome 17p was associated with metastatic disease. Molecular analysis of primary tumors using these markers may be useful for stratification of children with PNET in future prospective studies. The other aberrations...... investigated were not of significant prognostic value, but may provide an entry point for future large-scale molecular studies....

  16. Environmental health: an analysis of available and proposed remedies for victims of toxic waste contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Past and present residents of the Love Canal area near Niagara Falls, New York, fear that they and their homes have been contaminated by toxic wastes seeping out from nearby chemical disposal sites. Hundreds of landfills nationwide are as potentially dangerous as Love Canal. In the absence of a statutory remedy, victims of contamination must rely upon common law theories of lability in order to recover damages for injuries suffered as a result of toxic waste contamination. This Note examines the merits and deficiencies of four common law theories: negligence, strict liability, nuisance and trespass. The Note concludes that none of these remedies is adequate to assure recovery to a person injured by toxic waste disposal, and recommends that legislation be adopted to ensure that victims of toxic waste contamination can be compensated for their injuries

  17. Molecular analysis of MECP2 gene in Egyptian patients with Rett ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular analysis of MECP2 gene in Egyptian patients with Rett syndrome. ... Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics ... This study represents one of the limited MECP2 molecular analyses done on Egyptian patients with RTT, in which direct sequencing of MECP2 coding region in 10 female Egyptian patients ...

  18. Risk analysis of Listeria spp. contamination in two types of ready-to-eat chicken meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Lekroengsin, Sumalin

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the risk of Listeria contamination in frozen ready-to-eat roasted and steamed chicken meat in a chicken plant in Thailand. Environmental surfaces were divided into three zones. Zone 1 included surfaces in direct contact with products. Zones 2 and 3 included indirect contact surfaces; zone 2 was next to zone 1, and zone 3 was located next to zone 2 and relatively far from the product. A mathematical model for the probability of product contamination after contact with contaminated zone 1 surfaces was established. This model was augmented by an already established model for the probability of Listeria contamination on zone 1 surfaces. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the prevalence of Listeria on zone 1 surfaces before cleaning and sanitizing, production time, and concentration and contact time of sanitizer were correlated with contamination of both products. Alternative risk management measures for reducing the risk of Listeria contamination were developed using sanitizer concentrations of 0.25 to 1.25% (vol/vol), sanitizer contact times of 5 to 20 min, and production times of 5 to 20 h. The plant's risk manager chose a 0.25% (vol/vol) sanitizer concentration, a contact time of 20 min, and a production time of 20 h. After implementation of the selected risk management option, the prevalence of Listeria on roasted and steamed products was reduced by 2.19 and 2.01%, respectively. The prevalence of Listeria in zones 1, 2, and 3 was also reduced by 3.13, 11.24, and 25.66%, respectively.

  19. Gonadal transcriptome analysis of wild contaminated female European eels during artificial gonad maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillon, Lucie; Oses, Jennifer; Pierron, Fabien; Bureau du Colombier, Sarah; Caron, Antoine; Normandeau, Eric; Lambert, Patrick; Couture, Patrice; Labadie, Pierre; Budzinski, Hélène; Dufour, Sylvie; Bernatchez, Louis; Baudrimont, Magalie

    2015-11-01

    Since the early 1980s, the population of European eels (Anguilla anguilla) has dramatically declined. Nowadays, the European eel is listed on the red list of threatened species (IUCN Red List) and is considered as critically endangered of extinction. Pollution is one of the putative causes for the collapse of this species. Among their possible effects, contaminants gradually accumulated in eels during their somatic growth phase (yellow eel stage) would be remobilized during their reproductive migration leading to potential toxic events in gonads. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of organic and inorganic contaminants on the gonad development of wild female silver eels. Female silver eels from two sites with differing contamination levels were artificially matured. Transcriptomic analyses by means of a 1000 candidate gene cDNA microarray were performed on gonads after 11weeks of maturation to get insight into the mechanisms of toxicity of contaminants. The transcription levels of several genes, that were associated to the gonadosomatic index (GSI), were involved in mitotic cell division but also in gametogenesis. Genes associated to contaminants were mainly involved in the mechanisms of protection against oxidative stress, in DNA repair, in the purinergic signaling pathway and in steroidogenesis, suggesting an impairment of gonad development in eels from the polluted site. This was in agreement with the fact that eels from the reference site showed a higher gonad growth in comparison to contaminated fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis and molecular docking of imidazole derivatives and investigation of its reactive properties by DFT and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Renjith; Hossain, Mossaraf; Mary, Y. Sheena; Resmi, K. S.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Nanda, Ashis Kumar; Ranjan, Vivek Kumar; Vijayakumar, G.; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2018-04-01

    Solvent-free synthesis pathway for obtaining two imidazole derivatives (2-chloro-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazole (CLMPDI) and 1-(4-bromophenyl)-2-chloro-4,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazole (BPCLDI) has been reported in this work, followed by detailed experimental and computational spectroscopic characterization and reactivity study. Spectroscopic methods encompassed IR, FT-Raman and NMR techniques, with the mutual comparison of experimentally and computationally obtained results at DFT/B3LYP level of theory. Reactivity study based on DFT calculations encompassed molecular orbitals analysis, followed by calculations of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and average local ionization energy (ALIE) values, Fukui functions and bond dissociation energies (BDE). Additionally, the stability of title molecules in water has been investigated via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, while interactivity with aspulvinonedimethylallyl transferase protein has been evaluated by molecular docking procedure. CLMPDI compound showed antimicrobial activity against all four bacterial strain in both gram positive and gram negative bacteria while, BPCLDI showed only in gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus Aureus (MTCC1144). The first order hyperpolarizability of CLMPDI and BPCLDI are 20.15 and 6.10 times that of the standard NLO material urea.

  1. Assessing potential impacts associated with contamination events in water distribution systems : a sensitivity analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M. J.; Janke, R.; Taxon, T. N. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); (EPA)

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of the nature of the adverse effects that could be associated with contamination events in water distribution systems is necessary for carrying out vulnerability analyses and designing contamination warning systems. This study examines the adverse effects of contamination events using models for 12 actual water systems that serve populations ranging from about 104 to over 106 persons. The measure of adverse effects that we use is the number of people who are exposed to a contaminant above some dose level due to ingestion of contaminated tap water. For this study the number of such people defines the impact associated with an event. We consider a wide range of dose levels in order to accommodate a wide range of potential contaminants. For a particular contaminant, dose level can be related to a health effects level. For example, a dose level could correspond to the median lethal dose, i.e., the dose that would be fatal to 50% of the exposed population. Highly toxic contaminants may be associated with a particular response at a very low dose level, whereas contaminants with low toxicity may only be associated with the same response at a much higher dose level. This report focuses on the sensitivity of impacts to five factors that either define the nature of a contamination event or involve assumptions that are used in assessing exposure to the contaminant: (1) duration of contaminant injection, (2) time of contaminant injection, (3) quantity or mass of contaminant injected, (4) population distribution in the water distribution system, and (5) the ingestion pattern of the potentially exposed population. For each of these factors, the sensitivities of impacts to injection location and contaminant toxicity are also examined. For all the factors considered, sensitivity tends to increase with dose level (i.e., decreasing toxicity) of the contaminant, with considerable inter-network variability. With the exception of the population distribution (factor 4

  2. Study on phytoremediation in the uranium contaminated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Dejuan; Zhu Yean; Hua Rong; Yu Yue; Luo Mingbiao; Liu Qingcheng; Huang Dechao

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of phytoremediation in the uranium contaminated environment are described, and a worldwide overview of the content and progress of the related research topics is provided. Based on the analysis, it is pointed out that we should strengthen the research of plant-microbial coexistence system as well as the research of the related molecular biology and genetic engineering in order to enhance the phytoremediation's efficiency in the uranium contaminated environment. (authors)

  3. Gravity models to classify commuting vs. resident workers. An application to the analysis of residential risk in a contaminated area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The analysis of risk for the population residing and/or working in contaminated areas raises the topic of commuting. In fact, especially in contaminated areas, commuting groups are likely to be subject to lower exposure than residents. Only very recently environmental epidemiology has started considering the role of commuting as a differential source of exposure in contaminated areas. In order to improve the categorization of groups, this paper applies a gravitational model to the analysis of residential risk for workers in the Gela petrochemical complex, which began life in the early 60s in the municipality of Gela (Sicily, Italy) and is the main source of industrial pollution in the local area. Results A logistic regression model is implemented to measure the capacity of Gela "central location" to attract commuting flows from other sites. Drawing from gravity models, the proposed methodology: a) defines the probability of finding commuters from municipalities outside Gela as a function of the origin's "economic mass" and of its distance from each destination; b) establishes "commuting thresholds" relative to the origin's mass. The analysis includes 367 out of the 390 Sicilian municipalities. Results are applied to define "commuters" and "residents" within the cohort of petrochemical workers. The study population is composed of 5,627 workers. Different categories of residence in Gela are compared calculating Mortality Rate Ratios for lung cancer through a Poisson regression model, controlling for age and calendar period. The mobility model correctly classifies almost 90% of observations. Its application to the mortality analysis confirms a major risk for lung cancer associated with residence in Gela. Conclusions Commuting is a critical aspect of the health-environment relationship in contaminated areas. The proposed methodology can be replicated to different contexts when residential information is lacking or unreliable; however, a careful consideration

  4. A critical evaluation of the use of cluster analysis to identify contaminated sediments in the Ria de Vigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, B; Nombela, M. A; Vilas, F [Departamento de Geociencias Marinas y Ordenacion del Territorio, Vigo, Espana (Spain)

    2001-06-01

    The indiscriminate use of cluster analysis to distinguish contaminated and non-contaminated sediments has led us to make a comparative evaluation of different cluster analysis procedures as applied to heavy metal concentrations in subtidal sediments from the Ria de Vigo, NW Spain. The use of different clusters algorithms and other transformations from the same departing set of data lead to the formation of different clusters with a clear inconclusive result about the contamination status of the sediments. The results show that this approach is better suited to identifying groups of samples differing in sedimentological characteristics, such as grain size, rather than in the degree of contamination. Our main aim is to call attention to these aspects in cluster analysis and to suggest that researches should be rigorous with this kind of analysis. Finally, the use of discriminate analysis allows us to find a discriminate function that separates the samples into two clearly differentiated groups, which should not be treated jointly. [Spanish] El uso indiscriminado del analisis cluster para distinguir sedimentos contaminados y no contaminados nos ha llevado a realizar una evaluacion comparativa entre los diferentes procedimientos de estos analisis aplicada a la concentracion de metales pesados en sedimentos submareales de la Ria de Vigo, NW de Espana. La utilizacion de distintos algoritmos de cluster, asi como otras transformaciones de la misma matriz de datos conduce a la formacion de diferentes clusters con un resultado inconcluso sobre el estado de contaminacion de los sedimentos. Los resultados muestran que esta aproximacion se ajusta mejor para identificar grupos de muestras que difieren en caracteristicas sedimentologicas, tal como el tamano de grano, mas que el grado de contaminacion. El principal objetivo es llamar la atencion sobre estos aspectos del analisis cluster y sugerir a los investigadores que sean rigurosos con este tipo de analisis. Finalmente el uso

  5. Gravity models to classify commuting vs. resident workers. An application to the analysis of residential risk in a contaminated area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Rocca Marina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of risk for the population residing and/or working in contaminated areas raises the topic of commuting. In fact, especially in contaminated areas, commuting groups are likely to be subject to lower exposure than residents. Only very recently environmental epidemiology has started considering the role of commuting as a differential source of exposure in contaminated areas. In order to improve the categorization of groups, this paper applies a gravitational model to the analysis of residential risk for workers in the Gela petrochemical complex, which began life in the early 60s in the municipality of Gela (Sicily, Italy and is the main source of industrial pollution in the local area. Results A logistic regression model is implemented to measure the capacity of Gela "central location" to attract commuting flows from other sites. Drawing from gravity models, the proposed methodology: a defines the probability of finding commuters from municipalities outside Gela as a function of the origin's "economic mass" and of its distance from each destination; b establishes "commuting thresholds" relative to the origin's mass. The analysis includes 367 out of the 390 Sicilian municipalities. Results are applied to define "commuters" and "residents" within the cohort of petrochemical workers. The study population is composed of 5,627 workers. Different categories of residence in Gela are compared calculating Mortality Rate Ratios for lung cancer through a Poisson regression model, controlling for age and calendar period. The mobility model correctly classifies almost 90% of observations. Its application to the mortality analysis confirms a major risk for lung cancer associated with residence in Gela. Conclusions Commuting is a critical aspect of the health-environment relationship in contaminated areas. The proposed methodology can be replicated to different contexts when residential information is lacking or unreliable

  6. Molecular malaria diagnostics: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Johanna M; Korevaar, Daniël A; Leeflang, Mariska M G; Mens, Pètra F

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of malaria is essential for identification and subsequent treatment of the disease. Currently, microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests are the most commonly used diagnostics, next to treatment based on clinical signs only. These tests are easy to deploy, but have a relatively high detection limit. With declining prevalence in many areas, there is an increasing need for more sensitive diagnostics. Molecular tools may be a suitable alternative, although costs and technical requirements currently hamper their implementation in resource limited settings. A range of (near) point-of-care diagnostics is therefore under development, including simplifications in sample preparation, amplification and/or read-out of the test. Accuracy data, in combination with technical characteristics, are essential in determining which molecular test, if any, would be the most promising to be deployed. This review presents a comprehensive overview of the currently available molecular malaria diagnostics, ranging from well-known tests to platforms in early stages of evaluation, and systematically evaluates their published accuracy. No important difference in accuracy was found between the most commonly used PCR-based assays (conventional, nested and real-time PCR), with most of them having high sensitivity and specificity, implying that there are no reasons other than practical ones to choose one technique over the other. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification and other (novel) diagnostics appear to be highly accurate as well, with some offering potential to be used in resource-limited settings.

  7. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  8. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  9. Biofilm formation and microbial community analysis of the simulated river bioreactor for contaminated source water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang-Yang; Feng, Li-Juan; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Qi, Han-Ying

    2012-06-01

    The start-up pattern of biofilm remediation system affects the biofilm characteristics and operating performances. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of the contaminated source water remediation systems with different start-up patterns in view of the pollutants removal performances and microbial community succession. The operating performances of four lab-scale simulated river biofilm reactors were examined which employed different start-up methods (natural enrichment and artificial enhancement via discharging sediment with influent velocity gradient increase) and different bio-fillers (Elastic filler and AquaMats® ecobase). At the same time, the microbial communities of the bioreactors in different phases were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. The pollutants removal performances became stable in the four reactors after 2 months' operation, with ammonia nitrogen and permanganate index (COD(Mn)) removal efficiencies of 84.41-94.21% and 69.66-76.60%, respectively. The biomass of mature biofilm was higher in the bioreactors by artificial enhancement than that by natural enrichment. Microbial community analysis indicated that elastic filler could enrich mature biofilm faster than AquaMats®. The heterotrophic bacteria diversity of biofilm decreased by artificial enhancement, which favored the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) developing on the bio-fillers. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas- and Nitrosospira-like AOB coexisted in the biofilm, and Pseudomonas sp., Sphaerotilus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Corynebacterium aurimucosum were dominant in the oligotrophic niche. Artificial enhancement via the combination of sediment discharging and influent velocity gradient increasing could enhance the biofilm formation and autotrophic AOB enrichment in oligotrophic niche.

  10. Determination of dominant biogeochemical processes in a contaminated aquifer-wetland system using multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Cazull, S. E.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the processes governing aqueous biogeochemistry in a wetland hydrologically linked to an underlying contaminated aquifer is challenging due to the complex exchange between the systems and their distinct responses to changes in precipitation, recharge, and biological activities. To evaluate temporal and spatial processes in the wetland-aquifer system, water samples were collected using cm-scale multichambered passive diffusion samplers (peepers) to span the wetland-aquifer interface over a period of 3 yr. Samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, methane, and a suite of organic acids resulting in a large dataset of over 8000 points, which was evaluated using multivariate statistics. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen with the purpose of exploring the sources of variation in the dataset to expose related variables and provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that control the water chemistry of the system. Factor scores computed from PCA were mapped by date and depth. Patterns observed suggest that (i) fermentation is the process controlling the greatest variability in the dataset and it peaks in May; (ii) iron and sulfate reduction were the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes in the system and were associated with fermentation but had more complex seasonal variability than fermentation; (iii) methanogenesis was also important and associated with bacterial utilization of minerals as a source of electron acceptors (e.g., barite BaSO4); and (iv) seasonal hydrological patterns (wet and dry periods) control the availability of electron acceptors through the reoxidation of reduced iron-sulfur species enhancing iron and sulfate reduction. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  11. CFG-7-P3 : potential of aggregate-associated biodegradation of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon fractions in crude-oil contaminated soils from a northern Canadian site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, W.; Snelgrove, J.; Akbari, A.; Ghoshal, S. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

    2010-07-01

    Soil aggregation can limit aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates due to the slower intra-pore diffusion of nutrients, oxygen and hydrocarbons. This study investigated the influence of soil aggregation at a pilot-scale biopile of crude oil-contaminated soil shipped from a site in the Northwest Territories. Attempts were made to stimulate indigenous microbial activity of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria through soil aeration and nutrient amendments in a tank maintained at 15 degrees C. Results showed that nutrient amendment significantly enhanced aggregation. After 60 days, approximately 50 per cent of the initial total hydrocarbon productivity (TPH) was reduced in both the treated and untreated biopile. However, a TPH analysis of soil aggregate levels showed that the biodegradation of high weight hydrocarbon fractions in macroaggregates was more significantly reduced in the nutrient-amended soils. Results suggested that the soil particles in the macroaggregates were more loosely clustered, and may have supported enhanced hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  12. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Shihui; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging. PMID:29114182

  13. Actual measurement, hygrothermal response experiment and growth prediction analysis of microbial contamination of central air conditioning system in Dalian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Hu, Guangyao; Wang, Chunyang; Yuan, Wenjie; Wei, Shanshan; Gao, Jiaoqi; Wang, Boyuan; Song, Fangchao

    2017-04-03

    The microbial contamination of central air conditioning system is one of the important factors that affect the indoor air quality. Actual measurement and analysis were carried out on microbial contamination in central air conditioning system at a venue in Dalian, China. Illumina miseq method was used and three fungal samples of two units were analysed by high throughput sequencing. Results showed that the predominant fungus in air conditioning unit A and B were Candida spp. and Cladosporium spp., and two fungus were further used in the hygrothermal response experiment. Based on the data of Cladosporium in hygrothermal response experiment, this paper used the logistic equation and the Gompertz equation to fit the growth predictive model of Cladosporium genera in different temperature and relative humidity conditions, and the square root model was fitted based on the two environmental factors. In addition, the models were carried on the analysis to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the established model equation.

  14. Multivariate analysis of heavy metal contaminations in seawater and sediments from a heavily industrialized harbor in Southern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Yuan-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Kaohsiung Harbor is the largest international commercial port in Taiwan. • The metal distributions in the seawater and sediments were investigated. • Many metals exhibited higher levels of enrichment inside the harbor. • Multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metal pollutions. • Two complex arrays of contamination behaviors exist inside and outside the harbor. -- Abstract: Heavy metal pollution, including chromium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury, copper, lead, and aluminum, in the largest industrial harbor in southern Taiwan was investigated. Increasing metal contamination was observed by monitoring heavy metal concentrations in seawater and sediments and estimating the enrichment factors, particularly those inside the harbor. Compared to other metal-polluted harbors worldwide, the presence of chromium in the sediments was relatively high. Excluding the background contribution, the harbor area was polluted by outflows from river mouths, wastewater discharging pipes, and point sources near industrial activities within the harbor. It is shown by principal component and cluster analyses that metal contamination was affected by a wide range of different and complex contamination mechanisms inside and outside the harbor, suggesting managing the pollution using straightforward strategies, i.e., solutions that only consider a single source or single pathway of metal emissions, is problematic

  15. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. Materials and Methods: One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at ?4?C. Results: Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene m...

  16. Biological assessment of contaminated land using earthworm biomarkers in support of chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankard, Peter K.; Svendsen, Claus; Wright, Julian; Wienberg, Claire; Fishwick, Samantha K.; Spurgeon, David J.; Weeks, Jason M.

    2004-01-01

    Biological indicators can be used to assess polluted sites but their success depends on the availability of suitable assays. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of two earthworm biomarkers, lysosomal membrane stability measured using the neutral red retention assay (NRR-T) and the total immune activity (TIA) assay, that have previously been established as responsive to chemical exposure. Responses of the two assays were measured following in situ exposure to complexly contaminated field soils at three industrial sites as well as urban and rural controls. The industrial sites were contaminated with a range of metal (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, nickel and cobalt) and organic (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) contaminants, but at concentrations below the 'New Dutch List' Intervention concentrations. Exposed earthworms accumulated both metals and organic compounds at the contaminated sites, indicating that there was significant exposure. No effect on earthworm survival was found at any of the sites. Biomarker measurements, however, indicated significant effects, with lower NRR-T and TIA found in the contaminated soils when compared to the two controls. The results demonstrate that a comparison of soil pollutant concentrations with guideline values would not have unequivocally identified chemical exposure and toxic effect for soil organisms living in these soils. However, the earthworm biomarkers successfully identified significant exposure and biological effects caused by the mixture of chemicals present

  17. Prognostic value of Ki-67 index in adult medulloblastoma after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fu; Zhang, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Qiangyi; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Chi; Wang, Bo; Yang, Zhijun; Li, Chunde; Liu, Pinan

    2018-04-23

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a rare primary brain tumor in adults. We previously evaluated that combining both clinical and molecular classification could improve current risk stratification for adult MB. In this study, we aimed to identify the prognostic value of Ki-67 index in adult MB. Ki-67 index of 51 primary adult MBs was reassessed using a computer-based image analysis (Image-Pro Plus). All patients were followed up ranging from 12 months up to 15 years. Gene expression profiling and immunochemistry were used to establish the molecular subgroups in adult MB. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical characteristics, molecular classification and Ki-67 index, and identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. In our cohort, the mean Ki-67 value was 30.0 ± 11.3% (range 6.56-63.55%). The average Ki-67 value was significantly higher in LC/AMB than in CMB and DNMB (P = .001). Among three molecular subgroups, Group 4-tumors had the highest average Ki-67 value compared with WNT- and SHH-tumors (P = .004). Patients with Ki-67 index large than 30% displayed poorer overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) than those with Ki-67 less than 30% (OS: P = .001; PFS: P = .006). Ki-67 index (i.e. > 30%, < 30%) was identified as an independent significant prognostic factor (OS: P = .017; PFS: P = .024) by using multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. In conclusion, Ki-67 index can be considered as a valuable independent prognostic biomarker for adult patients with MB.

  18. Online molecular image repository and analysis system: A multicenter collaborative open-source infrastructure for molecular imaging research and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahabubur; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Molecular imaging serves as an important tool for researchers and clinicians to visualize and investigate complex biochemical phenomena using specialized instruments; these instruments are either used individually or in combination with targeted imaging agents to obtain images related to specific diseases with high sensitivity, specificity, and signal-to-noise ratios. However, molecular imaging, which is a multidisciplinary research field, faces several challenges, including the integration of imaging informatics with bioinformatics and medical informatics, requirement of reliable and robust image analysis algorithms, effective quality control of imaging facilities, and those related to individualized disease mapping, data sharing, software architecture, and knowledge management. As a cost-effective and open-source approach to address these challenges related to molecular imaging, we develop a flexible, transparent, and secure infrastructure, named MIRA, which stands for Molecular Imaging Repository and Analysis, primarily using the Python programming language, and a MySQL relational database system deployed on a Linux server. MIRA is designed with a centralized image archiving infrastructure and information database so that a multicenter collaborative informatics platform can be built. The capability of dealing with metadata, image file format normalization, and storing and viewing different types of documents and multimedia files make MIRA considerably flexible. With features like logging, auditing, commenting, sharing, and searching, MIRA is useful as an Electronic Laboratory Notebook for effective knowledge management. In addition, the centralized approach for MIRA facilitates on-the-fly access to all its features remotely through any web browser. Furthermore, the open-source approach provides the opportunity for sustainable continued development. MIRA offers an infrastructure that can be used as cross-boundary collaborative MI research platform for the rapid

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and computational analysis of a water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-11-06

    Nov 6, 2012 ... analysis of a water stress inducible copper-containing ... Although, in slico analysis of the protein have indicated its probable structure and functions, further ..... based on protein data bank (PDB) template c1ksiA which.

  20. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  1. [Analysis on contamination of aflatoxins in food samples in Shaanxi Province from 2012-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiawei; Tian, Li; Wang, Caixia; Qiao, Haiou; Wang, Minjuan

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the contamination of aflatoxins in food in Shaanxi Province, and provide the basic data of dietary intakes of aflatoxins for food safety assessment. In year 2012- 2015, 1007 food samples of eight kinds of food including grains, beans, vegetable oil, nuts and seeds, condiment, liquor, tea and infants' food were collected randomly from ten cities, and determined with UPLC. 1007 samples were detected aflatoxins and the total detection rate was 10. 7%. The detection range was 0. 070- 323 μg / kg, with the mean value of 2. 34 μg / kg. Among all food samples, only peanut products were more seriously polluted than other kinds of foods. The overall level of aflatoxins contamination in market food is low, but peanut products might be the contaminated foods with aflatoxins in Shaanxi Province, and should be given more attention.

  2. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  3. Numerical analysis of ALADIN optics contamination due to outgassing of solar array materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, G; Endemann, M; Wernham, D

    2008-01-01

    ALADIN is the very first space-based lidar that will provide global wind profile and a special attention has been paid to contamination of ALADIN optics. The paper presents a numerical approach, which is based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The method allows one to accurately compute collisions between various species, in the case under consideration, free-stream flow and outgassing from solar array materials. The collisions create a contamination flux onto the optics despite there is no line-of-sight from the solar arrays to the optics. Comparison of obtained results with a simple analytical model prediction shows that the analytical model underpredicts mass fluxes

  4. Comparative analysis of on site bioremediation: Alternatives for petroleum contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, P.E.; Tremaine, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental Protection Systems, Inc. has developed a low maintenance, highly effective method to remediate petroleum and hazardous waste contamination of soils. This method combines the use of a slow release chemical oxygen source, along with nutrient amendments for the degradation of contaminants that require oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor. This method has been used successfully in bench and field experiments on creosote. The authors have performed laboratory experiments on diesel fuel. This paper describes rapid (site closure in 2.5 months in cold weather) field degradation of relatively freshly spilled diesel fuel using native bacteria and tailored nutrient amendments

  5. Numerical analysis of ALADIN optics contamination due to outgassing of solar array materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markelov, G [Advanced Operations and Engineering Services (AOES) Group BV, Postbus 342, 2300 AH Leiden (Netherlands); Endemann, M [ESA-ESTEC/EOP-PAS, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Wernham, D [ESA-ESTEC/EOP-PAQ, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)], E-mail: Gennady.Markelov@aoes.com

    2008-03-01

    ALADIN is the very first space-based lidar that will provide global wind profile and a special attention has been paid to contamination of ALADIN optics. The paper presents a numerical approach, which is based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The method allows one to accurately compute collisions between various species, in the case under consideration, free-stream flow and outgassing from solar array materials. The collisions create a contamination flux onto the optics despite there is no line-of-sight from the solar arrays to the optics. Comparison of obtained results with a simple analytical model prediction shows that the analytical model underpredicts mass fluxes.

  6. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osin, Pinchas P; Lakhani, Sunil R

    1999-01-01

    Extensive studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast tumours have been carried out in the few years since the identification of these familial breast cancer predisposing genes. The morphological studies suggest that BRCA1 tumours differ from BRCA2 tumours and from sporadic breast cancers. Recent progress in immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques has enabled in-depth investigation of molecular pathology of these tumours. Studies to date have investigated issues such as steroid hormone receptor expression, mutation status of tumour suppressor genes TP53 and c-erbB2, and expression profiles of cell cycle proteins p21, p27 and cyclin D 1 . Despite relative paucity of data, strong evidence of unique biological characteristics of BRCA1-associated breast cancer is accumulating. BRCA1-associated tumours appear to show an increased frequency of TP53 mutations, frequent p53 protein stabilization and absence of imunoreactivity for steroid hormone receptors. Further studies of larger number of samples of both BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated tumours are necessary to clarify and confirm these observations

  7. Processing-Dependent and Clonal Contamination Patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in the Cured Ham Food Chain Revealed by Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Marina; Scaltriti, Erika; Cozzolino, Paolo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele; Pierantoni, Marco; Foni, Emanuela; Pongolini, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The quantitative and qualitative patterns of environmental contamination by Listeria monocytogenes were investigated in the production chain of dry-cured Parma ham. Standard arrays of surfaces were sampled in processing facilities during a single visit per plant in the three compartments of the food chain, i.e., ham production (19 plants) and postproduction, which was divided into deboning (43 plants) and slicing (25 plants) steps. The numbers of sampled surfaces were 384 in ham production, with 25 positive for L. monocytogenes, and 1,084 in postproduction, with 83 positives. Statistical analysis of the prevalence of contaminated surfaces showed that in ham production, contamination was higher at the beginning of processing and declined significantly toward the end, while in postproduction, prevalence rose toward the end of processing. Prevalence was higher in the deboning facilities than in slicing facilities and was dependent on the type of surface (floor/drainage > clothing > equipment). The qualitative pattern of contamination was investigated through an analysis of the survey isolates and a set of isolates derived from routine monitoring, including longitudinal isolations. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis revealed a remarkable clonality of L. monocytogenes within plants, with the detection of 16 plant-specific clones out of 17 establishments with multiple isolates. Repeated detections of clonal isolates >6 months apart were also observed. Six was the maximum number of between-isolate differences in core SNPs observed within these clones. Based on the same six-SNP threshold, three clusters of clonal isolates, shared by six establishments, were also identified. The spread of L. monocytogenes within and between plants, as indicated by its clonal behavior, is a matter of concern for the hygienic management of establishments. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  8. Pteros: fast and easy to use open-source C++ library for molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2012-07-15

    An open-source Pteros library for molecular modeling and analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories for C++ programming language is introduced. Pteros provides a number of routine analysis operations ranging from reading and writing trajectory files and geometry transformations to structural alignment and computation of nonbonded interaction energies. The library features asynchronous trajectory reading and parallel execution of several analysis routines, which greatly simplifies development of computationally intensive trajectory analysis algorithms. Pteros programming interface is very simple and intuitive while the source code is well documented and easily extendible. Pteros is available for free under open-source Artistic License from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pteros/. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Degradation of contaminants by Cu{sup +}-activated molecular oxygen in aqueous solutions: Evidence for cupryl species (Cu{sup 3+})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yong, E-mail: fengy@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Lee, Po-Heng, E-mail: phlee@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, Deli, E-mail: wudeli@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhou, Zhengyuan, E-mail: zzy247@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Li, Hangkong, E-mail: hangkong@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • Sulfadiazine and methylene blue were nearly completely degraded by Cu{sup +}-O{sub 2} oxidation. • Reaction of Cu{sup +} and hydrogen peroxide produced Cu{sup 3+} as the major active species. • 5,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxypyrrolidine-N-oxyl (DMPO-OH) was found in the reaction process. • Benzoic acid and electron paramagnetic resonance are not capable to differentiate Cu{sup 3+} and ·OH. - Abstract: Copper ions (Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +}) have shown potential as Fenton-like activators for the circumneutral removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. However, the major active species (cupryl species (Cu{sup 3+}) versus hydroxyl radical (·OH)) produced during the activation of hydrogen peroxide by Cu{sup +} remain unclear. In this study, Cu{sup +}-O{sub 2} oxidation, in which hydrogen peroxide is produced via the activated decomposition of dissolved molecular oxygen, was used to degrade sulfadiazine, methylene blue, and benzoic acid. The results showed that both sulfadiazine and methylene blue could be efficiently degraded by Cu{sup +}-O{sub 2} oxidation in a wide effective pH range from 2.0 to 10.0. Quenching experiments with different alcohols and the effect of Br{sup −} suggested that Cu{sup 3+} rather than ·OH was the major active species. Electron paramagnetic resonance detected 5,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxypyrrolidine-N-oxyl (DMPO-OH), which was probably produced by the oxidation of DMPO by Cu{sup 3+} or ·OH formed as a product of Cu{sup 3+} decomposition. 4-hydroxybenzoic acid was produced during the degradation of benzoic acid by Cu{sup 3+}. The findings of this study may help to explain the inconsistency regarding the dominant active species produced by the interaction of Cu{sup +} and hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Distributed Channel Estimation and Pilot Contamination Analysis for Massive MIMO-OFDM Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaib, Alam; Masood, Mudassir; Ali, Anum; Xu, Weiyu; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2016-01-01

    of reserved pilot tones, we propose a data-aided estimation technique that relies on finding a set of most reliable data carriers. Furthermore, we use stochastic geometry to quantify the pilot contamination, and in turn use this information to analyze

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Unsaturated Flow and Contaminant Transport with Correlated Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relative contributions from uncertainties in input parameters to the predictive uncertainties in unsaturated flow and contaminant transport are investigated in this study. The objectives are to: (1) examine the effects of input parameter correlations on the sensitivity of unsaturated flow and conta...

  12. Analysis of the contamination of soils and plants by the power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hirohisa

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural and forest products, the main industry of Fukushima prefecture, by radioactive materials is the problem that jeopardizes the safety of consumers and the life continuation of producers. This report elucidates the transfer mechanism of radioactive materials to agricultural products and the dynamic mechanism of radioactive materials in the environment. (M.H.)

  13. The analysis of the level of radioactive contamination of agricultural lands in Mogilev region [Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komleva, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the conditions of the Republic of Belarus there was analyzed the present level of radioactive situation and contamination of areas of agricultural companies with radiocesium at in Mogilev region. There were suggested methodical approaches on organizing the use of the lands in such a way as to get the minimum content of radionuclides in the manufactured products

  14. Ground water contamination analysis by using a fully coupled numerical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya Sukirman; Norhan Abd Rahman; Raihan Ismail

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater contamination in the subsurface is not a new or emerging issue, which can be highly toxic at very low concentrations. It can cause a great damage to our environment and public health. In recent years, accidental oil spill, leaking from underground storage and pipeline are getting more and more attention from various parties. There are very important to improve the understanding of the mobilization, transport mechanism and fate of hydrocarbon in the subsurface in checking the risk of public exposure to the contaminants and in evaluating various remediation scenarios. In this paper, groundwater contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), such as organic solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons, will be simulated for a multiphase flow, heat flow and pollutant transport phenomenon in a semisaturated porous medium. The governing partial differential equations, in terms of soil displacements, fluid pressures, energy balance and concentrations are coupled and behave non-linearly but can be solved by a numerical method. Finally, the developed finite element model has been applied to analyze the transport behavior of hydrocarbon pollutant in subsurface, which can be used to propose a suitable remedial scheme for the groundwater contamination problems. (Author)

  15. An analysis of the composition and metal contamination of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenvall, Erik, E-mail: erik.stenvall@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Tostar, Sandra [Department of Industrial Materials Recycling, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Boldizar, Antal [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Foreman, Mark R.StJ. [Department of Industrial Materials Recycling, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Möller, Kenneth [Chemistry and Materials Technology, SP, 50115 Borås (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The compositions of three WEEE plastic batches of different origin were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, and the metal content was determined with inductively coupled plasma. The composition analysis of the plastics was based mainly on 14 samples collected from a real waste stream, and showed that the major constituents were high impact polystyrene (42 wt%), acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene copolymer (38 wt%) and polypropylene (10 wt%). Their respective standard deviations were 21.4%, 16.5% and 60.7%, indicating a considerable variation even within a single batch. The level of metal particle contamination was found to be low in all samples, whereas wood contamination and rubber contamination were found to be about 1 wt% each in most samples. In the metal content analysis, iron was detected at levels up to 700 ppm in the recyclable waste plastics fraction, which is of concern due to its potential to catalyse redox reactions during melt processing and thus accelerate the degradation of plastics during recycling. Toxic metals were found only at very low concentrations, with the exception of lead and cadmium which could be detected at 200 ppm and 70 ppm levels, respectively, but these values are below the current threshold limits of 1000 ppm and 100 ppm set by the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directive.

  16. An analysis of the composition and metal contamination of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvall, Erik; Tostar, Sandra; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R.StJ.; Möller, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The compositions of three WEEE plastic batches of different origin were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, and the metal content was determined with inductively coupled plasma. The composition analysis of the plastics was based mainly on 14 samples collected from a real waste stream, and showed that the major constituents were high impact polystyrene (42 wt%), acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene copolymer (38 wt%) and polypropylene (10 wt%). Their respective standard deviations were 21.4%, 16.5% and 60.7%, indicating a considerable variation even within a single batch. The level of metal particle contamination was found to be low in all samples, whereas wood contamination and rubber contamination were found to be about 1 wt% each in most samples. In the metal content analysis, iron was detected at levels up to 700 ppm in the recyclable waste plastics fraction, which is of concern due to its potential to catalyse redox reactions during melt processing and thus accelerate the degradation of plastics during recycling. Toxic metals were found only at very low concentrations, with the exception of lead and cadmium which could be detected at 200 ppm and 70 ppm levels, respectively, but these values are below the current threshold limits of 1000 ppm and 100 ppm set by the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directive

  17. Modern, PC based, high resolution portable EDXRF analyzer offers laboratory performance for field, in-situ analysis of environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piorek, Stanislaw

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of a new, high resolution, portable probe that has improved the sensitivity of the conventional field portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) by up to an order of magnitude had been reported earlier [S. Piorek and J.R. Pasmore, Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Field Screening Methods for Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals, Las Vegas, 1991, p. 737]. A high resolution Si(Li) detector probe operates connected to a multichannel X-ray analyzer (2048 channels) which is housed in a portable, battery powered industrial computer. An improved energy resolution of the detector allows the implementation of more sophisticated data treatment methods to convert the measured intensities into mass concentrations of the analytes. A backscatter with a fundamental parameters approach (BFP) is one of the best methods, specifically for metallic contaminants in soil. A program has been written based on the BFP method for use with the new probe. The new software/probe combination enables one to quickly assess levels of contaminants on the site without the need of analyzed samples for instrument calibration. The performance of the EDXRF system in application to analysis of metals in contaminated soil is discussed in this paper. Also discussed is the extension of this method in the analysis of other types of environmental samples such as air particulates collected on filter paper. ((orig.))

  18. An analysis of the composition and metal contamination of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvall, Erik; Tostar, Sandra; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Möller, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    The compositions of three WEEE plastic batches of different origin were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, and the metal content was determined with inductively coupled plasma. The composition analysis of the plastics was based mainly on 14 samples collected from a real waste stream, and showed that the major constituents were high impact polystyrene (42 wt%), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (38 wt%) and polypropylene (10 wt%). Their respective standard deviations were 21.4%, 16.5% and 60.7%, indicating a considerable variation even within a single batch. The level of metal particle contamination was found to be low in all samples, whereas wood contamination and rubber contamination were found to be about 1 wt% each in most samples. In the metal content analysis, iron was detected at levels up to 700 ppm in the recyclable waste plastics fraction, which is of concern due to its potential to catalyse redox reactions during melt processing and thus accelerate the degradation of plastics during recycling. Toxic metals were found only at very low concentrations, with the exception of lead and cadmium which could be detected at 200 ppm and 70 ppm levels, respectively, but these values are below the current threshold limits of 1000 ppm and 100 ppm set by the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Three-dimensional finite elements for the analysis of soil contamination using a multiple-porosity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zein, Abbas; Carter, John P.; Airey, David W.

    2006-06-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element model of contaminant migration in fissured clays or contaminated sand which includes multiple sources of non-equilibrium processes is proposed. The conceptual framework can accommodate a regular network of fissures in 1D, 2D or 3D and immobile solutions in the macro-pores of aggregated topsoils, as well as non-equilibrium sorption. A Galerkin weighted-residual statement for the three-dimensional form of the equations in the Laplace domain is formulated. Equations are discretized using linear and quadratic prism elements. The system of algebraic equations is solved in the Laplace domain and solution is inverted to the time domain numerically. The model is validated and its scope is illustrated through the analysis of three problems: a waste repository deeply buried in fissured clay, a storage tank leaking into sand and a sanitary landfill leaching into fissured clay over a sand aquifer.

  20. Payload/orbiter contamination control requirement study: Preliminary contamination mission support plan. [a management analysis of project planning of spacecraft sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, L. E.; Hooper, V. W.; Ress, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the mission support plan and those support activities envisioned to be applicable and necessary during premission and postmission phases of the Spacelab program. The purpose, role, and requirements of the contamination control operations for the first two missions of the Spacelab equipped Space Transportation System are discussed. The organization of the contamination control operation and its relationship to and interfaces with other mission support functions is also discussed. Some specific areas of contamination to be investigated are treated. They are: (1) windows and viewports, (2) experiment equipment, (3) thermal control surfaces, (4) the contaminant induced atmosphere (as differentiated from the normal ambient atmosphere at the orbit altitude), and (5) optical navigation instruments.

  1. Detection and Monitoring of E-Waste Contamination through Remote Sensing and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Yaakov; Friedlander, Lonia

    2015-04-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of today's fastest growing waste streams, and also one of the more problematic, as this end-of-life product contains precious metals mixed with and embedded in a variety of low value and potentially harmful plastic and other materials. This combination creates a powerful incentive for informal value chains that transport, extract from, and dispose of e-waste materials in far-ranging and unregulated ways, and especially in settings where regulation and livelihood alternatives are sparse, most notably in areas of India, China, and Africa. E-waste processing is known to release a variety of contaminants, such as heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, including flame retardants, dioxins and furans. In several sites, where the livelihoods of entire communities are dependent on e-waste processing, the resulting contaminants have been demonstrated to enter the hydrological system and food chain and have serious health and ecological effects. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the usefulness of multi-spectral remote sensing imagery to detect and monitor the release and possibly the dispersal of heavy metal contaminants released in e-waste processing. While similar techniques have been used for prospecting or for studying heavy metal contamination from mining and large industrial facilities, we suggest that these techniques are of particular value in detecting contamination from the more dispersed, shifting, and ad-hoc kinds of release typical of e-waste processing. Given the increased resolution and decreased price of multi-spectral imagery, such techniques may offer a remarkably cost-effective and rapidly responsive means of assessing and monitoring this kind of contamination. We will describe the geochemical and multi-spectral image-processing principles underlying our approach, and show how we have applied these to an area in which we have a detailed, multi-temporal, spatially referenced, and ground

  2. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Theelen, T.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Keunen, J.E.E.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to evaluate genotype-phenotype and histopathologic correlations. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with BVMD who underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual

  3. CLINICAL AND MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BEST VITELLIFORM MACULAR DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, Camiel J. F.; Theelen, Thomas; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Keunen, Jan E. E.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the phenotype of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to evaluate genotype-phenotype and histopathologic correlations. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with BVMD who underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual

  4. Molecular cloning, characterization and functional analysis of a 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... other plant HMGRs and contained 2 transmembrane domains and a catalytic domain. The potential significance ... used as animal feed. Therefore ... Table 1. Primers used in the cloning and analysis of JcHMGR gene. Primers.

  5. Management of radio-contaminated sites. Analysis of various public policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massuelle, M.H.; Brenot, J.; Hubert, P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the management of sites that were contaminated by radioactive substances in the past because of industrial practices, such as the mining, milling and processing of uranium ores, the radium luminizing industry, and thorium processing. Contaminations due to nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents and on-going practices are not considered. The management refers to the protection of the near populations and of people who are using the site now or who might use it in the future. International organizations have issued recommendations which apply to these contaminated sites. The concepts called for to manage these de facto situations are intervention, optimization and intervention levels. Few countries have yet elaborated regulations or guidelines concerning the treatment and the use of contaminated sites. The United States has one regulation in preparation that will be generally applicable whereas most countries follow the recommendations of their national radiation protection board on a case by case basis. This paper aims at comparing public policies in several countries by developing first, how policies are defined, and second, how they are implemented in practice. The present survey suffers from the limitation of such an approach. The main limitation lies in the fact that remediation cannot be summarized by a series of prescriptions that can be found in regulatory documents. Rather it is a series of practical decisions that must be investigated, and of recommendations that may not have an official statute and cannot be traced easily. Nevertheless, this work allowed us to put forward some important points. The main one is that flexible approaches are usually adopted. Even when quantitative levels (intervention levels, non intervention levels) are put forward, they can be interpreted in different ways, depending on the approach followed for assessment and on the exact concepts. Should one consider that contaminated sites can be a building in an

  6. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P. [Unite INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola gigantica from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Tokashiki, Minami; Opara, Maxwell Nwachukwu; Iroh, Gabriel; Hayashi, Kei; Kumar, Uday Mohanta; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola gigantica is considered the major pathogen causing fasciolosis in Africa; however, molecular characterization of this fluke has not been adequately elucidated. It is important to scientifically elucidate the dispersal history of F. gigantica by analyzing its genetic diversity. Fasciola flukes from Nigeria were analyzed using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers. A total of 172 Fasciola flukes collected from cattle were identified as F. gigantica because they displayed the F. gigantica fragment pattern in multiplex PCR for the nuclear marker, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck). In total, 70 haplotypes were detected from Nigerian F. gigantica on the basis of the concatenated sequence of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1). The index of neutrality (Fu's Fs) suggests rapid expansion of the Nigerian F. gigantica population. Although four haplogroups, Nigeria 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B, were detected from Nigerian F. gigantica, a climate-specific genetic structure was not observed among F. gigantica populations from three agro-climatic regions (Sahel, Savannah, and Forest). This is probably because of the frequent transportation of livestock from one part of the country to the other. Nigeria 1A and 1B had close relationships with the Egyptian population of F. gigantica, whereas Nigeria 2A and 2B were comparatively related to the Zambian population. No haplotype was shared among the three countries, and it therefore is difficult to estimate the dispersal route of F. gigantica within the African continent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Molecular analysis of peroxisome proliferation in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Agharul I; Sims, Helen M; Horley, Neill J; Roberts, Ruth A; Tomlinson, Simon R; Salter, Andrew M; Bruce, Mary; Shaw, P Nicholas; Kendall, David; Barrett, David A; Bell, David R

    2004-05-15

    Three novel P450 members of the cytochrome P450 4A family were cloned as partial cDNAs from hamster liver, characterised as novel members of the CYP4A subfamily, and designated CYP4A17, 18, and 19. Hamsters were treated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists, methylclofenapate (MCP) or Wy-14,643, and shown to develop hepatomegaly and induction of CYP4A17 RNA, and concomitant induction of lauric acid 12- hydroxylase. This treatment also resulted in hypolipidaemia, which was most pronounced in the VLDL fraction, with up to 50% reduction in VLDL-triglycerides; by contrast, blood cholesterol concentration was unaffected by this treatment. These data show that hamster is highly responsive to induction of CYP4A by peroxisome proliferators. To characterise the molecular basis of peroxisome proliferation, the hamster PPARalpha was cloned and shown to encode a 468-amino-acid protein, which is highly similar to rat and mouse PPARalpha proteins. The level of expression of hamster PPARalpha in liver is intermediate between mouse and guinea pig. These results fail to support the hypothesis that the level of PPARalpha in liver is directly responsible for species differences in peroxisome proliferation.

  9. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  10. Projection methods for the analysis of molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchese, R.R.; Montuoro, R.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A.N.; Liu, X.-J.; Pruemper, G.; Morishita, Y.; Saito, N.; Ueda, K.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) is discussed within the dipole approximation. The general expressions are reviewed and strategies for extracting the maximum amount of information from different types of experimental measurements are considered. The analysis of the N 1s photoionization of NO is given to illustrate the method

  11. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  12. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  13. Rapid Analysis of Eukaryotic Bioluminescence to Assess Potential Groundwater Contamination Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacariah L. Hildenbrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present data using a bioluminescent dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula, in a toxicological bioassay to rapidly assess potential instances of groundwater contamination associated with natural gas extraction. P. lunula bioluminescence can be quantified using spectrophotometry as a measurement of organismal viability, with normal bioluminescent output declining with increasing concentration(s of aqueous toxicants. Glutaraldehyde and hydrochloric acid (HCl, components used in hydraulic fracturing and shale acidization, triggered significant toxicological responses in as little as 4 h. Conversely, P. lunula was not affected by the presence of arsenic, selenium, barium, and strontium, naturally occurring heavy metal ions potentially associated with unconventional drilling activities. If exogenous compounds, such as glutaraldehyde and HCl, are thought to have been introduced into groundwater, quantification of P. lunula bioluminescence after exposure to water samples can serve as a cost-effective detection and risk assessment tool to rapidly assess the impact of putative contamination events attributed to unconventional drilling activity.

  14. Theoretical considerations on design and analysis of monitoring systems for Pu-contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.

    1979-01-01

    Monitoring systems for plutonium contaminated wastes refers to both managerial regulations and instrumental hardware. Its design is inseparable from the design of the production line in the fuel handling facility, and depends on the general wastes management program. Characteristic functions of the monitors are discussed and the necessity of reference monitors is stressed. The reference monitor enables the formation of a quality scale. Guidelines for future R and D efforts are suggested

  15. The effect of contaminated groundwater on tree growth: A tree-ring analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, D.C.; Loehle, C.

    1990-10-01

    A study was conducted on the effect of contaminated groundwater seepage on tree growth downslope from F- and H-Area seepage basins of the Savannah River Site. Trees in wetlands along Four Mile Creek began to show localized stress and mortality in the late 1970s. Extreme winter temperatures and high rainfall were ruled out as potential causal factors of tree stress. Drought was shown to affect trees in both contaminated and uncontaminated zones, but trees in uncontaminated areas exhibit better recovery after drought than trees in contaminated areas. Pollution-mediated alteration of soil acidity and aluminum, sodium, and heavy metal concentrations likely acted to predispose trees to decline, with severe drought acting as the trigger for decline initiation and tree death. Thus, a moderate pollution loading, not sufficient to cause visible damage of itself, may create conditions in which sudden, severe decline could result from natural stresses. This mechanism of forest decline is common, and should be considered in evaluations of the impact of pollution on wetland forest systems. 28 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Experimental analysis on removal factor of smear method in measurement of surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Taira, Junichi; Takenaka, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Kazuo; Sugai, Kenji; Kosako, Toshiso

    2007-01-01

    The smear test is one of the important ways to measure surface contamination. The loose contamination under the high background radiation, which is more significant in handling non-sealed radioisotopes, can be evaluated by this method. The removal factor is defined as the ratio of the activity removed from the surface by one smear to the whole activity of the removable surface contamination. The removal factor is greatly changed by the quality and condition of surface materials. In this study, the values of removal factor at several typical surface conditions were evaluated experimentally and the practical application of those values was considered. It is required the smear should be pressed by moderate pressure when wiping the surface. The pressure from 1.0 kg to 1.5 kg per filter paper was recommended. The removal factor showed lower value in wiping by the pressure below 1.0 kg. The value of 0.5 for the removal factor could be applied to the smooth surface of linoleum, concrete coated with paint or epoxy resin, stainless steel and glass with the statistical allowance. (author)

  17. Proteomic analysis of flax seed grown in radioactive contaminated areas of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klubicova, K.; Danchenko, M.; Pretova, A.; Hajduch, M.; Skultety, L.; Rashydov, N.

    2010-01-01

    An explosion of one of the four reactors at the Chernobyl nuclear power occurring 26.4.1986, causing the worst nuclear disaster in human history. During the explosion is released into the environment are a number of different radioactive elements was also contaminated and much of Europe. Nowadays, after more than 20 years, the area located near the nuclear power plant is still contaminated by radioactive elements with long-lived, such as 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite the increased radiation in the environment of the plant not ceased to increase, that is, they have created a mechanism of adaptation. The aim of our work was to investigate the possible mechanisms involved in the adaptation of plants in the environment. During the first generation, we analyzed the mature seeds of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) grown in the control and in the contaminated zone. Proteins have separated and identified by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins (28) We were categorized into nine functional categories. We have designed a working model of adaptation of plants to elevated levels of radiation in the environment.

  18. Proteomic analysis of flax seed grown in radioactive contaminated areas of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klubicova, K.; Danchenko, M.; Pretova, A.; Hajduch, M.; Skultety, L.; Rashydov, N.

    2010-01-01

    An explosion of one of the four reactors at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred on 26 th April 1986, causing the worst nuclear disaster in human history. During the explosion a number of different radioactive elements were released into the environment which contaminated much of Europe. Nowadays, after more than 20 years, the area located near the nuclear power plant is still contaminated by radioactive long-lived elements, such as 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite increased radiation in the environment the plants did not stop increasing. It means that they have created a mechanism of adaptation . The aim of the work was to investigate the possible mechanisms involved in adaptation of plants in the environment. During the first generation, the authors analyzed the mature seeds of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) grown in control zone and in contaminated zone. Proteins were separated and identified by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins (28) were categorized into nine functional categories. The authors have designed a working model of adaptation of the plants to elevated level of radiation in the environment.

  19. Analysis of grease contamination influence on the internal radial clearance of ball bearings by thermographic inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišković Žarko Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors influencing ball bearings service life is its internal radial clearance. However, this parameter is also very complex because it depends on applied radial load and ball bearings dimensions, surface finish and manufacturing materials. Thermal condition of ball bearings also significantly affects internal radial clearance. Despite many researches performed in order to find out relevant facts about different aspects of ball bearings thermal behaviour, only few of them are dealing with the real working conditions, where high concentration of solid contaminant particles is present. That’s why the main goal of research presented in this paper was to establish statistically significant correlation between ball bearings temperatures, their working time and concentration of contaminant particles in their grease. Because of especially difficult working conditions, the typical conveyor idlers bearings were selected as representative test samples and appropriate solid particles from open pit coal mines were used as artificial contaminants. Applied experimental methodology included thermographic inspection, as well as usage of custom designed test rig for ball bearings service life testing. Finally, by obtained experimental data processing in advanced software, statistically significant mathematical correlation between mentioned bearings characteristics was determined and applied in commonly used internal radial clearance equation. That is the most important contribution of performed research - the new equation and methodology for ball bearings internal clearance determination which could be used for eventual improvement of existing bearings service life equations. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35029 i br. TR14033

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of soil metal contamination around a derelict mine site in the Blue Mountains, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, A.; Raval, S.; Taplin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Abandoned mine sites pose the potential threat of the heavy metal pollution spread through streams and via runoff leading to contamination of soil and water in their surrounding areas. Regular monitoring of these areas is critical to minimise impacts on water resources, flora and fauna. Conventional ground based monitoring is expensive and sometimes impractical; spectroscopic methods have been emerged as a reliable alternative for this purpose. In this study, the capabilities of the spectroscopy method were examined for modelling soil contamination from around the abandoned silver-zinc mine located at Yerranderie, NSW Australia. The diagnostic characteristics of the original reflectance data were compared with models derived from first and second derivatives of the reflectance data. The results indicate that the models derived from the first derivative of the reflectance data estimate heavy metals significantly more accurately than model derived from the original reflectance. It was also found in this study that there is no need to use second derivative for modelling heavy metal soil contamination. Finally, the results indicate that estimates were of greater accuracy for arsenic and lead compared to other heavy metals, while the estimation for silver was found to be the most erroneous.

  1. An analysis of nature and mechanisms of the Lira objects territories' radionuclide contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K; Tuleushev, A.Zh.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Solodukhin, V.P.; Kazachevskij, I.V.; Reznikov, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of study of radioactive contamination of 'Lira' objects territories are presented. Obtained data are evidencing, that existing radiation situation does not presents a threat for operating personnel of both the occupied on the deposit and its objects furthermore for inhabitants of the closest localities. Therewith a radionuclides concentration in the soils on the examined areas is slightly exceeds the background values characteristic for this region. Two hypothesises for reveled radionuclide contamination have been considered: yield on the surface and distribution by territory immediately after explosion 137 Xe and 90 Kr inert gases - they are genetical predecessors of 137 Cs and 90 Sr, relatively; existence of a constant effluence of these radionuclides on a surface from a 'ditch cavities' of the 'Lira' objects by the zones of dis-consolidation and crack propagations in the earth crust. With purpose for these hypothesis correctness clarification the distribution of radionuclides by soil layer depth in the vicinities of militant wells (TK-2 and TK-5), as well as in the case and riverbed of the Berezovka river. There are not data confirm the hypothesis about possible constant radionuclides influent from a 'ditch cavities'. So, the hypothesis of the 'Lira' objects territories radionuclide contamination due to inert gases yield on the surface is a more rightful

  2. Integrated risk analysis of a heavy-metal-contaminated site in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching-Tsan Tsai [China Medical College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang, J.H.C. [National Science Council, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-12-31

    The Love Canal episode began the long battle on hazardous wastes in the United States. Obviously, the potential danger of hazardous wastes is one of the hottest issues among environmental professionals as well as the public. The problems of hazardous wastes in economically booming Taiwan are also alarming. Several farmlands in northern Taiwan were contaminated heavily by industrial effluents containing heavy metals (cadmium and lead) in the early 1980s. Regardless of the many studies that have been conducted about these polluted farmlands, there has not been any remediation - just a passive abandonment of farming activities with minimal compensation. This paper addresses a heavy-metal-contaminated fanning area. A pollution profile across time is delineated using information from the abundance of reports, and the contamination is modeled mathematically. The past, the present, and future exposures are also modeled. The results are presented in terms of societal impacts and health effects. Reasonable soil guidelines for cleanup are estimated, and recommendations for rational mitigation solutions are presented. The current strategies for cleanup actions are also described. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Investigation of internal radionuclide contamination from the analysis of nasal swabs and facial swipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond Ko; Baki Sadi; Chunsheng Li; Chad Shew; Sharman Perera; Ed Waller; Kristine Mattson; Kathy Nielsen; David Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Nasal swabs and facial swipes have been used to screen potential internal radioactive contamination for decades. However, the ratio between the lung intake and the activity on a swab or a swipe varies according to the nature of the contaminant involved and the exposure conditions such as particle sizes of the contaminant and the humidity in the air. This paper reports the experimental results using stable La 2 O 3 as an analog for actinide oxides, focusing on the most important parameters such as humidity, plume velocity, and facial condition at a fixed room temperature of 23 ± 2 deg C. The results showed that the effects of humidity, plume velocity, and facial condition vary more on orofacial swipe/lung deposition ratios compared to nasal swab/lung deposition ratios. The amounts on nasal swabs tended to show smaller change with respect to parameters such as plume velocity, humidity, and skin moisture. The amounts on orofacial swipes varied by a factor of 10-15 among the samples collected across all parameters. Such variability would be expected to be even greater in a real-world scenario with a larger range of physiological and environmental conditions. (author)

  4. Polymyxin B as inhibitor of LPS contamination of Schistosoma mansoni recombinant proteins in human cytokine analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacífico Lucila G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli vectors are generally contaminated with endotoxin. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Polymyxin B to neutralize the effect of LPS present as contaminant on Schistosoma mansoni recombinant proteins produced in E. coli in inducing TNF-α and IL-10. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals chronically infected with S. mansoni were stimulated in vitro with recombinant Sm22.6, Sm14 and P24 antigens (10 μg/mL in the presence of Polymyxin B (10 μg/mL. Results The levels of cytokines were measured using ELISA. There was greater than 90 % reduction (p S. mansoni recombinant proteins in the presence of Polymyxin B, a reduction in the levels of TNF-α and IL-10 was also observed. However, the percentage of reduction was lower when compared to the cultures stimulated with LPS, probably because these proteins are able to induce the production of these cytokines by themselves. Conclusion This study showed that Polymyxin B was able to neutralize the effect of endotoxin, as contaminant in S. mansoni recombinant antigens produced in E. coli, in inducing TNF-α and IL-10 production.

  5. Contamination Control for Thermal Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel B.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). This course will cover the basics of Contamination Control, including contamination control related failures, the effects of contamination on Flight Hardware, what contamination requirements translate to, design methodology, and implementing contamination control into Integration, Testing and Launch.

  6. Monitoring of Environmental Contamination and Addressing Health Risks Through the Analysis of Teeth by Means of Nuclear Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.C.C.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Deppman, A.; Likhachev, V.P.; Medero, D.R.; Luzardo, F.M.; Cazorla, L.L.; Dias, J.F.; Yoneama, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclides (mostly uranium and thorium) and heavy metals (lead and cadmium) are environmental contaminants produced by agricultural and industrial activities, or are simply the result of soil and water pollution by non regular human activities (e.g. disposal of garbage in rivers and water ponds). Humans incorporate these contaminants via the food chain, where bones are the most important target-organ. The incidence of health risk and hazards would depend, obviously, on the time length and intensity of such incorporation. However, while in vivo monitoring of human bones is difficult, the analysis of teeth is a promising possibility, particularly for the quantification of lead and cadmium in deciduous tooth (milk tooth), and uranium in adult tooth. This study will be focused, initially, on the Guarapiranga dam and on the human settlements located in its surroundings. Their teeth will be collected and classified by age and social-economical status, with the collaboration of the Dentistry School from UNISA, which is developing several social tasks in the Guarapiranga region. Water, plants and fishes will be collected and analyzed too, aiming at biokinetic al study of contaminants, particularly the transfer dynamics among the species of the dam. (Author)

  7. A comparative analysis of mycotoxin contamination of supermarket and premium brand pelleted dog food in Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanil D; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2017-10-06

    Dry pelleted dog food in the South African market is available via supermarkets, pet stores (standard brands [SBs]) and veterinary channels (premium brands [PBs]). For the purpose of this study, the supermarket channel included the cheaper quality foods and PBs were sold via the veterinary channel (n = 20). These feeds were analysed for four main mycotoxins (aflatoxins [AF], fumonisin [FB], ochratoxin A [OTA] and zearalenone [ZEA]) using standard welldescribed extraction, characterisation and quantitation processes. Irrespective of the brand or marketing channel, all foods were contaminated with fungi (mainly Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus parasiticus) and mycotoxins (most prevalent being aflatoxins and fumonisins). This was observed in all 20 samples irrespective of the marketing channel or perceived quality. Also, many samples within each marketing channel failed the 10 ppb limit for aflatoxin set by regulations in South Africa. Although fumonisin was detected in all samples, a single sample failed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limit of 100 ppb. Both OTA and ZEA were found at low concentrations and were absent in some samples. This study suggested that higher priced dog food does not ensure superior quality or that it is free from contamination with fungi or mycotoxins. However, analysis of the more expensive PBs did reveal contamination concentrations lower than those of the SBs.

  8. Selective Detection of Target Volatile Organic Compounds in Contaminated Humid Air Using a Sensor Array with Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Toshio; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Tsuruta, Akihiro; Shin, Woosuck

    2017-01-01

    We investigated selective detection of the target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nonanal, n-decane, and acetoin for lung cancer-related VOCs, and acetone and methyl i-butyl ketone for diabetes-related VOCs, in humid air with simulated VOC contamination (total concentration: 300 μg/m3). We used six “grain boundary-response type” sensors, including four commercially available sensors (TGS 2600, 2610, 2610, and 2620) and two Pt, Pd, and Au-loaded SnO2 sensors (Pt, Pd, Au/SnO2), and two “bulk-response type” sensors, including Zr-doped CeO2 (CeZr10), i.e., eight sensors in total. We then analyzed their sensor signals using principal component analysis (PCA). Although the six “grain boundary-response type” sensors were found to be insufficient for selective detection of the target gases in humid air, the addition of two “bulk-response type” sensors improved the selectivity, even with simulated VOC contamination. To further improve the discrimination, we selected appropriate sensors from the eight sensors based on the PCA results. The selectivity to each target gas was maintained and was not affected by contamination. PMID:28753948

  9. A comparative analysis of mycotoxin contamination of supermarket and premium brand pelleted dog food in Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil D. Singh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry pelleted dog food in the South African market is available via supermarkets, pet stores (standard brands [SBs] and veterinary channels (premium brands [PBs]. For the purpose of this study, the supermarket channel included the cheaper quality foods and PBs were sold via the veterinary channel (n = 20. These feeds were analysed for four main mycotoxins (aflatoxins [AF], fumonisin [FB], ochratoxin A [OTA] and zearalenone [ZEA] using standard welldescribed extraction, characterisation and quantitation processes. Irrespective of the brand or marketing channel, all foods were contaminated with fungi (mainly Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus parasiticus and mycotoxins (most prevalent being aflatoxins and fumonisins. This was observed in all 20 samples irrespective of the marketing channel or perceived quality. Also, many samples within each marketing channel failed the 10 ppb limit for aflatoxin set by regulations in South Africa. Although fumonisin was detected in all samples, a single sample failed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA limit of 100 ppb. Both OTA and ZEA were found at low concentrations and were absent in some samples. This study suggested that higher priced dog food does not ensure superior quality or that it is free from contamination with fungi or mycotoxins. However, analysis of the more expensive PBs did reveal contamination concentrations lower than those of the SBs.

  10. 3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirewalt, G. L.; Shepherd, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Analysis of hydrostratigraphy and uranium and nitrate contamination in groundwater at a former nuclear materials processing facility in Oklahoma were undertaken employing 3-dimensional (3D) geospatial modeling software. Models constructed played an important role in the regulatory decision process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because they enabled visualization of temporal variations in contaminant concentrations and plume geometry. Three aquifer systems occur at the site, comprised of water-bearing fractured shales separated by indurated sandstone aquitards. The uppermost terrace groundwater system (TGWS) aquifer is composed of terrace and alluvial deposits and a basal shale. The shallow groundwater system (SGWS) aquifer is made up of three shale units and two sandstones. It is separated from the overlying TGWS and underlying deep groundwater system (DGWS) aquifer by sandstone aquitards. Spills of nitric acid solutions containing uranium and radioactive decay products around the main processing building (MPB), leakage from storage ponds west of the MPB, and leaching of radioactive materials from discarded equipment and waste containers contaminated both the TGWS and SGWS aquifers during facility operation between 1970 and 1993. Constructing 3D geospatial property models for analysis of groundwater contamination at the site involved use of EarthVision (EV), a 3D geospatial modeling software developed by Dynamic Graphics, Inc. of Alameda, CA. A viable 3D geohydrologic framework model was initially constructed so property data could be spatially located relative to subsurface geohydrologic units. The framework model contained three hydrostratigraphic zones equivalent to the TGWS, SGWS, and DGWS aquifers in which groundwater samples were collected, separated by two sandstone aquitards. Groundwater data collected in the three aquifer systems since 1991 indicated high concentrations of uranium (>10,000 micrograms/liter) and nitrate (> 500 milligrams

  11. High excitation rovibrational molecular analysis in warm environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ferland, Gary J.

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by advances in infrared observation (e.g., Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA), we investigate rovibrational emission CO and SiO in warm astrophysical environments. With recent innovation in collisional rate coefficients and rescaling methods, we are able to construct more comprehensive collisional data with high rovibrational states (vibration up to v=5 and rotation up to J=40) and multiple colliders (H2, H and He). These comprehensive data sets are used in spectral simulations with the radiative transfer codes RADEX and Cloudy. We obtained line ratio diagnostic plots and line spectra for both near- and far-infrared emission lines over a broad range of density and temperature for the case of a uniform medium. Considering the importance of both molecules in probing conditions and activities of UV-irradiated interstellar gas, we model rovibrational emission in photodissociation region (PDR) and AGB star envelopes (such as VY Canis Majoris, IK Tau and IRC +10216) with Cloudy. Rotational diagrams, energy distribution diagrams, and spectra are produced to examine relative state abundances, line emission intensity, and other properties. With these diverse models, we expect to have a better understanding of PDRs and expand our scope in the chemical architecture and evolution of AGB stars and other UV-irradiated regions. The soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide high resolution observations at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths, which opens a new window to study molecular vibrational emission calling for more detailed chemical modeling and comprehensive laboratory astrophysics data on more molecules. This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNX12AF42G and NNX15AI61G. We thank Benhui Yang, Kyle Walker, Robert Forrey, and N. Balakrishnan for collaborating on the collisional data adopted in the current work.

  12. Molecular analysis of radiation injury in rat taste buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Abe, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A critical adverse effect of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer is the resulting decreased sense of taste, which greatly impairs patients' quality of life. Irradiation of the head and neck area decreases the sense of taste within one or two weeks and recovery takes about one month. Although taste bud cells are intimately involved in these manifestations, few basic studies in this area have been reported. Here, we investigate the injury and recovery process of taste bud tissue after irradiation, at the molecular and cellular levels. Rat tongues were selectively irradiated once with 15 Gy of 6 MV X-rays. Immediately thereafter and at periods up to 30 days samples were collected for HE staining, BrdU labelling, p21 and p53 immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL staining. Six days after irradiation, morphologically-identified taste bud cells, as well as the surrounding epithelial tissue, were no longer visible. Immature bud cells reappeared ten days after irradiation, and looked morphologically normal at 13 to 15 days.BrdU labelling revealed DNA synthesis arrest in of epithelial cells 10 days after irradiation. Cells in the basal layer expressed p21 four hours after irradiation. Prior to that, it, p53 accumulation was observed in the nucleus. Expression of p21 was no longer detectable by on the sixth day or later, and DNA synthesis resumed around the eighth day. No apoptosis was detected at any time. The disappearance and reappearance of taste bud cells after a single 15-Gy irradiation dose can be explained by temporary cell cycle arrest in taste bud stem cells, which is regulated by p21

  13. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a zeta-class ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-27

    Jul 27, 2011 ... sugar-signalling pathway (Chi et al., 2010). All the earlier mentioned ... real-time qPCR analysis was the ABI PRISM7500 real-time PCR system. ... Construction of prokaryotic expression vector of Sc-GST gene. pET29a (+) ...

  14. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of Elite-II synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat by genome DNA fingerprinting as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Ten decamer RAPD primers (OPG-1, OPG-2, OPG-3, OPG-4, OPG-5, OPA-3, OPA-4, OPA-5, OPA-8, and OPA-15) ...

  15. Molecular cloning and characteristic analysis of a thioredoxin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree analysis confirmed NmTrx as a distinct member of thioredoxin. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed a significantly higher expression of NmTrx transcript in the adult stage compared with the egg and oncomiracidium stages. In the egg and adult ...

  16. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and sequence prediction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta as an essential transcriptional factor, regulates the differentiation of adipocytes and the deposition of fat. Herein, we cloned the whole open reading frame (ORF) of bovine C/EBPβ gene and analyzed its putative protein structures via DNA cloning and sequence analysis. Then, the ...

  17. Molecular characterization and diversity analysis in chilli pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    India is considered to be the secondary center of diversity of chilli pepper, especially of Capsicum annuum. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the most widely used marker system for plant variety characterization and diversity analysis especially in cultivated species which have low levels of polymorphism. The diversity ...

  18. Gas chromatographic column for the Viking 1975 molecular analysis experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Bruner, F.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    A gas chromatographic column has been developed for use in the remote analysis of the Martian surface. The column, which utilizes a liquid-modified organic adsorbent (Tenax) as the stationary phase, provides efficient transmission and resolution of nanogram quantities of organic materials in the presence of millionfold excesses of water and carbon dioxide.

  19. Molecular marker analysis to differentiate a clonal selection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lalit Kumar

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to differentiate. Manjari Naveen, a clonal selection of Centennial Seedless variety of grape. Twenty one (21) microsatellite primers could not detect variation between parent variety and its clone. AFLP analysis.

  20. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  1. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of an Mnsuperoxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) play an important role in stress-tolerance in plants. In this study, for the first time, a full-length cDNA sequence of MnSOD gene, termed as Sc-MnSOD (GenBank accession number: GQ246460), was obtained in sugarcane. Sequence analysis revealed that Sc-MnSOD gene was 919 bp long, ...

  2. Molecular Analysis of Microbial Diversity in Advanced Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Chhour, Kim-Ly; Nadkarni, Mangala A.; Byun, Roy; Martin, F. Elizabeth; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Hunter, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Real-time PCR analysis of the total bacterial load in advanced carious lesions has shown that the total load exceeds the number of cultivable bacteria. This suggests that an unresolved complexity exists in bacteria associated with advanced caries. In this report, the profile of the microflora of carious dentine was explored by using DNA extracted from 10 lesions selected on the basis of comparable total microbial load and on the relative abundance of Prevotella spp. Using universal primers fo...

  3. Molecular Analysis of Endolithic Microbial Communities in Volcanic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Meo, C. A.; Giovannoni, S.; Fisk, M.

    2002-12-01

    Terrestrial and marine volcanic glasses become mineralogically and chemically altered, and in many cases this alteration has been attributed to microbial activity. We have used molecular techniques to study the resident microbial communities from three different volcanic environments that may be responsible for this crustal alteration. Total microbial DNA was extracted from rhyolite glass of the 7 million year old Rattlesnake Tuff in eastern Oregon. The DNA was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with bacterial primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rDNA was cloned and screened with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Out of 89 total clones screened, 46 belonged to 13 different clone families containing two or more members, while 43 clones were unique. Sequences of eight clones representing the most dominant clone families in the library were 92 to 97% similar to soil bacterial species. In a separate study, young pillow basalts (rock- and seawater-associated archaea. The six rock community profiles were quite similar to each other, and the background water communities were also similar, respectively. Both the rock and water communities shared the same dominant peak. To identify the T-RFLP peaks corresponding to the individual members of the rock and seawater communities, clone libraries of the archaeal 16S rDNA for one basalt sample (Dive 3718) and its corresponding background water sample were constructed. The most abundant archaeal genes were closely related to uncultured Group I marine Crenarchaeota that have been previously identified from similar deep-sea habitats. These archaeal genes collectively correspond to the dominant T-RFLP peak present in both the rock and water samples. In a third study, we investigated the microbial community residing in a Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Program core collected near Hilo, Hawaii. Total microbial DNA was extracted from a depth of 1351 m in the drill core (ambient temperature in the

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS USING MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH MOLECULAR MICELLES AND FREE ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of four systems available from the literature, based on cyclodextrins, dioctylsulfosuccinate, bile salts, and molecular micelles consisting of oligomers of undecylenic acid, the most successful separation system in our hands is based on the molecular micelles, oligomers of sodiu...

  5. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in water and sediments of Trepça and Sitnica rivers, Kosovo, using pollution indicators and multivariate cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferati, Flora; Kerolli-Mustafa, Mihone; Kraja-Ylli, Arjana

    2015-06-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in water and sediment samples from Trepça and Sitnica rivers were determined to assess the level of contamination. Six water and sediment samples were collected during the period from April to July 2014. Most of the water samples was found within the European and Kosovo permissible limits. The highest concentration of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn originates primarily from anthropogenic sources such discharge of industrial water from mining flotation and from the mine waste eroded from the river banks. Sediment contamination assessment was carried out using the pollution indicators such as contamination factor (CF), degree of contamination (Cd), modified degree of contamination (mCd), pollution load index (PLI), and geo-accumulation index (Igeo). The CF values for the investigated metals indicated a high contaminated nature of sediments, while the Cd values indicated a very high contamination degree of sediments. The mCd values indicate a high degree of contamination of Sitnica river sediment to ultrahigh degree of contamination of Trepça river sediment. The PLI values ranged from 1.89 to 14.1 which indicate that the heavy metal concentration levels in all investigated sites exceeded the background values and sediment quality guidelines. The average values of Igeo revealed the following ranking of intensity of heavy metal contamination of the Trepça and Sitnica river sediments: Cd > As > Pb > Zn > Cu > Co > Cr > Ni. Cluster analysis suggests that As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn are derived from anthropogenic sources, particularly discharges from mining flotation and erosion form waste from a zinc mine plant. In order to protect the sediments from further contamination, the designing of a monitoring network and reducing the anthropogenic discharges are suggested.

  6. Contribution of molecular analysis to the typification of the non-functioning pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Aranda, Francisco Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Aim The WHO Classification of Tumours of Endocrine Organs considers the inmunohistochemical characterization of pituitary adenomas (PA) as mandatory for patient diagnosis. Recent advances in the knowledge of the molecular patterns of these tumours could complement this classification with gene expression profiling. Methods Within the context of the Spanish Molecular Registry of Pituitary Adenomas (REMAH), a multicentre clinical-basic research project, we analysed the molecular phenotype of 142 PAs with complete IHC and clinical information. Gene expression levels of all pituitary hormones, type 1 corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor, dopamine receptors and arginine vasopressin receptor 1b were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we used three housekeeping genes for normalization and a pool of nine healthy pituitary glands from autopsies as calibration reference standard. Results Based on the clinically functioning PA (FPA: somatotroph, corticotroph, thyrotroph and lactotroph adenomas), we established the interquartile range of relative expression for all genes studied in each PA subtype. That allowed molecularly the different PA subtypes, including the clinically non-functioning PA (NFPA). Afterwards, we estimated the concordance of the molecular and immunohistochemical classification with clinical diagnosis in FPA and between them in NFPA. The kappa values were higher in molecular than in immunohistochemical classification in FPA and showed a bad concordance in all NFPA subtypes. Conclusions According to these results, the molecular characterization of the PA complements the IHC analysis, allowing a better typification of the NFPA. PMID:28692683

  7. Contribution of molecular analysis to the typification of the non-functioning pituitary adenomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sanchez-Tejada

    Full Text Available The WHO Classification of Tumours of Endocrine Organs considers the inmunohistochemical characterization of pituitary adenomas (PA as mandatory for patient diagnosis. Recent advances in the knowledge of the molecular patterns of these tumours could complement this classification with gene expression profiling.Within the context of the Spanish Molecular Registry of Pituitary Adenomas (REMAH, a multicentre clinical-basic research project, we analysed the molecular phenotype of 142 PAs with complete IHC and clinical information. Gene expression levels of all pituitary hormones, type 1 corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor, dopamine receptors and arginine vasopressin receptor 1b were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we used three housekeeping genes for normalization and a pool of nine healthy pituitary glands from autopsies as calibration reference standard.Based on the clinically functioning PA (FPA: somatotroph, corticotroph, thyrotroph and lactotroph adenomas, we established the interquartile range of relative expression for all genes studied in each PA subtype. That allowed molecularly the different PA subtypes, including the clinically non-functioning PA (NFPA. Afterwards, we estimated the concordance of the molecular and immunohistochemical classification with clinical diagnosis in FPA and between them in NFPA. The kappa values were higher in molecular than in immunohistochemical classification in FPA and showed a bad concordance in all NFPA subtypes.According to these results, the molecular characterization of the PA complements the IHC analysis, allowing a better typification of the NFPA.

  8. Studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and molecular docking analysis of 3-Methyl-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl 4-aminobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, D. M.; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.; Bena Jothy, V.; Diao, Yun-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational analysis and molecular docking analysis of the 3-Methyl-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl 4-aminobenzoate (MDDNAB) molecule have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques and DFT method. The equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, various bonding features have been computed using density functional method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by using VEDA program. The hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The simulated FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra satisfactorily coincide with the experimental spectra. The PES and charge analysis have been made. The molecular docking was done to identify the binding energy and the Hydrogen bonding with the cancer protein molecule.

  9. Geriatric information analysis of the molecular properties of mexidole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gromova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: by using the pharmacoinformation profiling, to comprehensively assess all possible effects of the molecules of mexidol, choline alfoscerate, piracetam, glycine, and semax in accordance with the anatomical therapeutic and chemical (ATC classification system.Material and methods. Chemoreactomic, pharmacoinformation, and geriatric information analyses of the properties of the molecules are based on chemoreactomic methodology. The chemoreactomic analysis uses the information from the PubChem, HMDB, and String databases; the pharmacoinformation analysis applies the information from the international ATC classification and a combined sample of data from the Therapeutic Target Database (TTD, SuperTarget, Manually Annotated Targets and Drugs Online Resource (MATADOR, and Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD; geriatric information analysis employs the data on the geroprotective effect of individual substances from the PubChem database and the data available in the literature data on geroprotection from the PubMed database, which have been collected through the artificial intelligence system.Results and discussion. Mexidol is characterized by the maximum set of positive effects (the drug is used to treat CNS and cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders and has anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties, etc.. Mexidol and glycine are predicted to cause the lowest frequency of adverse reactions, such as itching, constipation, paresthesia, vomiting, etc. Geriatric information assessments of changes in the life span of model organisms have shown that mexidol contributes to the higher life expectancy of C. elegans (by 22.7±10%, Drosophila (by 14.4±15%, and mice (by 14.6±3%; the control drugs do by no more than 6.1%.Conclusion. The results of the study indicate that mexidol has a high potential to be used as a geroprotector.

  10. Molecular-based recursive partitioning analysis model for glioblastoma in the temozolomide era a correlative analysis based on nrg oncology RTOG 0525

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, Erica Hlavin; Pugh, Stephanie L.; McElroy, Joseph P.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Magliocco, Anthony; Bredel, Markus; Robe, Pierre; Grosu, Anca L.; Stupp, Roger; Curran, Walter; Becker, Aline P.; Salavaggione, Andrea L.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Brown, Paul D.; Glass, Jon; Souhami, Luis; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Brachman, David; Flickinger, John; Won, Minhee; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: There is a need for a more refined, molecularly based classification model for glioblastoma (GBM) in the temozolomide era. OBJECTIVE: To refine the existing clinically based recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) model by incorporating molecular variables. DESIGN, SETTING, AND

  11. Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Farshidfar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.

  12. Systems theoretic analysis of the central dogma of molecular biology: some recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Yu, Juanyi; Zhang, Mingjun; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Li, Jr-Shin

    2010-03-01

    This paper extends our early study on a mathematical formulation of the central dogma of molecular biology, and focuses discussions on recent insights obtained by employing advanced systems theoretic analysis. The goal of this paper is to mathematically represent and interpret the genetic information flow at the molecular level, and explore the fundamental principle of molecular biology at the system level. Specifically, group theory was employed to interpret concepts and properties of gene mutation, and predict backbone torsion angle along the peptide chain. Finite state machine theory was extensively applied to interpret key concepts and analyze the processes related to DNA hybridization. Using the proposed model, we have transferred the character-based model in molecular biology to a sophisticated mathematical model for calculation and interpretation.

  13. Bioinformatics analysis on molecular mechanism of rheum officinale in treatment of jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Si; Tu, Jun; Nie, Peng; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of Rheum officinale in the treatment of Jaundice by building molecular networks and comparing canonical pathways. Methods: Target proteins of Rheum officinale and related genes of Jaundice were searched from Pubchem and Gene databases online respectively. Molecular networks and canonical pathways comparison analyses were performed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results: The molecular networks of Rheum officinale and Jaundice were complex and multifunctional. The 40 target proteins of Rheum officinale and 33 Homo sapiens genes of Jaundice were found in databases. There were 19 common pathways both related networks. Rheum officinale could regulate endothelial differentiation, Interleukin-1B (IL-1B) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in these pathways. Conclusions: Rheum officinale treat Jaundice by regulating many effective nodes of Apoptotic pathway and cellular immunity related pathways.

  14. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction in the analysis of agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ling-Xiao; Fang, Rou; Chen, Guan-Hua

    2013-08-01

    The molecular imprinting technique is a highly predeterminative recognition technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be applied to the cleanup and preconcentration of analytes as the selective adsorbent of solid-phase extraction (SPE). In recent years, a new type of SPE has formed, molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction (MISPE), and has been widely applied to the extraction of agrochemicals. In this review, the mechanism of the molecular imprinting technique and the methodology of MIP preparations are explained. The extraction modes of MISPE, including offline and online, are discussed, and the applications of MISPE in the analysis of agrochemicals such as herbicides, fungicides and insecticides are summarized. It is concluded that MISPE is a powerful tool to selectively isolate agrochemicals from real samples with higher extraction and cleanup efficiency than commercial SPE and that it has great potential for broad applications.

  15. In situ diffraction profile analysis during tensile deformation motivated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swygenhoven, H.; Budrovic, Z.; Derlet, P.M.; Froseth, A.G.; Van Petegem, S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the slip mechanism at the atomic scale and suggest that in nanocrystalline metals dislocations are nucleated and absorbed by the grain boundaries. However, this technique is limited by very short simulation times. Using suggestions from molecular dynamics, we have developed a new in situ X-ray diffraction technique wherein the profile analysis of several Bragg diffraction peaks during tensile deformation is possible. Combining experiment and careful structural analysis the results confirm the suggestions from atomistic simulations

  16. Molecular characterization and analysis of the porcine NURR1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knud Larsen

    2016-12-01

    Here we report the isolation and characterization of porcine NURR1 cDNA. The NURR1 cDNA was RT-PCR cloned using NURR1-specific oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine NURR1 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 598 amino acids, displaying a very high similarity with bovine, human and mouse (99% NURR1 protein. Expression analysis revealed a differential NURR1 mRNA expression in various organs and tissues. NURR1 transcripts could be detected as early as at 60 days of embryo development in different brain tissues. A significant increase in NURR1 transcript in the cerebellum and a decrease in NURR1 transcript in the basal ganglia was observed during embryo development. The porcine NURR1 gene was mapped to chromosome 15. Two missense mutations were found in exon 3, the first coding exon of NURR1. Methylation analysis of the porcine NURR1 gene body revealed a high methylation degree in brain tissue, whereas methylation of the promoter was very low. A decrease in DNA methylation in a discrete region of the NURR1 promoter was observed in pig frontal cortex during pig embryo development. This observation correlated with an increase in NURR1 transcripts. Therefore, methylation might be a determinant of NURR1 expression at certain time points in embryo development.

  17. Molecular neutron activation analysis of selenium metabolites in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Hansen, G.T.; Ebrahim, A.; Rack, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the biological importance of selenium in living biological systems, various analytical procedures have been developed for analysis of microquantities of elemental selenium, in urine, serum, and tissue. For urine selenium, these include atomic absorption spectrometry, solution absorption spectrometry, solution fluorescence spectrometry, volumetry, and neutron activation analysis. Of equal or greater importance is the determination of selenium metabolites present in urine for the purpose of describing the biological pathways for the metabolism of selenium in living organisms. While it is known from previous studies that trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) is a major metabolite in urine, probably the result of reduction and methylation reaction, there are no definitive results in the literature indicating the nature or quantity of other selenium metabolic products in urine. Early techniques to measure TMSe levels in urine involved the use of the radiotracer 75 Se. Because of the long biological half-life of selenium and issues of radiation exposure, its use in humans has been limited. In this paper, the authors report the experimental procedure for the determination of total selenoamino acid concentration in urine and present total selenium values, and, where applicable, TMSe, SeO 2- 3 , and total selenoamino acid concentrations in the urine of normal and diseased subjects

  18. Genomic analysis and selected molecular pathways in rare cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Stephen V; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Evers, Lisa; Holley, Tara; Kiefer, Jeffrey; Demeure, Michael J; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Barrett, Michael T; Ruiz, Christian; Glatz, Katharina; Bubendorf, Lukas; Eng, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that many cancers arise as a result of an acquired genomic instability and the subsequent evolution of tumor cells with variable patterns of selected and background aberrations. The presence and behaviors of distinct neoplastic cell populations within a patient's tumor may underlie multiple clinical phenotypes in cancers. A goal of many current cancer genome studies is the identification of recurring selected driver events that can be advanced for the development of personalized therapies. Unfortunately, in the majority of rare tumors, this type of analysis can be particularly challenging. Large series of specimens for analysis are simply not available, allowing recurring patterns to remain hidden. In this paper, we highlight the use of DNA content-based flow sorting to identify and isolate DNA-diploid and DNA-aneuploid populations from tumor biopsies as a strategy to comprehensively study the genomic composition and behaviors of individual cancers in a series of rare solid tumors: intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, anal carcinoma, adrenal leiomyosarcoma, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. We propose that the identification of highly selected genomic events in distinct tumor populations within each tumor can identify candidate driver events that can facilitate the development of novel, personalized treatment strategies for patients with cancer. (paper)

  19. Molecular analysis of microbial diversity in advanced caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhour, Kim-Ly; Nadkarni, Mangala A; Byun, Roy; Martin, F Elizabeth; Jacques, Nicholas A; Hunter, Neil

    2005-02-01

    Real-time PCR analysis of the total bacterial load in advanced carious lesions has shown that the total load exceeds the number of cultivable bacteria. This suggests that an unresolved complexity exists in bacteria associated with advanced caries. In this report, the profile of the microflora of carious dentine was explored by using DNA extracted from 10 lesions selected on the basis of comparable total microbial load and on the relative abundance of Prevotella spp. Using universal primers for the 16S rRNA gene, PCR amplicons were cloned, and approximately 100 transformants were processed for each lesion. Phylogenetic analysis of 942 edited sequences demonstrated the presence of 75 species or phylotypes in the 10 carious lesions. Up to 31 taxa were represented in each sample. A diverse array of lactobacilli were found to comprise 50% of the species, with prevotellae also abundant, comprising 15% of the species. Other taxa present in a number of lesions or occurring with high abundance included Selenomonas spp., Dialister spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium spp., members of the Lachnospiraceae family, Olsenella spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium sp., and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus. The mechanisms by which such diverse patterns of bacteria extend carious lesions, including the aspect of infection of the vital dental pulp, remain unclear.

  20. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  1. Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Papaver rhoeas and Papaver orientale: Molecular Structures, Comparative Analysis, and Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Papaver rhoeas L. and P. orientale L., which belong to the family Papaveraceae, are used as ornamental and medicinal plants. The chloroplast genome has been used for molecular markers, evolutionary biology, and barcoding identification. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome sequences of P. rhoeas and P. orientale are reported. Results show that the complete chloroplast genomes of P. rhoeas and P. orientale have typical quadripartite structures, which are comprised of circular 152,905 and 152,799-bp-long molecules, respectively. A total of 130 genes were identified in each genome, including 85 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, and 8 rRNA genes. Sequence divergence analysis of four species from Papaveraceae indicated that the most divergent regions are found in the non-coding spacers with minimal differences among three Papaver species. These differences include the ycf1 gene and intergenic regions, such as rpoB-trnC, trnD-trnT, petA-psbJ, psbE-petL, and ccsA-ndhD. These regions are hypervariable regions, which can be used as specific DNA barcodes. This finding suggested that the chloroplast genome could be used as a powerful tool to resolve the phylogenetic positions and relationships of Papaveraceae. These results offer valuable information for future research in the identification of Papaver species and will benefit further investigations of these species.

  2. Analysis of potential groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, S.Y.; Peterson, J.M.; Winters, M.C.B.

    1984-08-01

    Results of the analysis of contaminant migration beneath the raffinate pits at the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits site indicate that during a 10,000-year time period, the maximum concentrations in the water immediately beneath the pit bottoms would be about 4600 pCi/L of radium-226 (Pit 3) and about 12,000 pCi/L of uranium-238 (Pit 1); these concentrations would occur at the centers of the pit bottoms. Based on the assumptions used in this study, the radioactive contaminants in the pits would migrate no more than 2 m (7 ft) below the pit bottoms. Because 6 to 12 m (20 to 40 ft) of silty clays underlie the raffinate pits, the radioactive contaminants would take several tens of thousands of years to reach nearby groundwater supplies. Although the results of these analyses indicate that a high degree of confinement is provided by the four raffinate pits, it should be noted that the validity of such analyses rests on the quality of the parameter values utilized. Due to a lack of current site-specific data for some physical parameters, it has been necessary to use historical and regional data for these values. The values cited are at times inconsistent and contradictory, e.g., the wide range of values indicated for the permeability of clays underlying the pits. However, these were the only data available. The analysis reported herein indicates that within the limitations of the available data, use of the Raffinate Pits site for long-term management of radioactive materials such as those currently being stored in the four pits appears to be feasible. 24 references, 14 figures, 7 tables

  3. Massively Parallel, Molecular Analysis Platform Developed Using a CMOS Integrated Circuit With Biological Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roever, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    A massively parallel, low cost molecular analysis platform will dramatically change the nature of protein, molecular and genomics research, DNA sequencing, and ultimately, molecular diagnostics. An integrated circuit (IC) with 264 sensors was fabricated using standard CMOS semiconductor processing technology. Each of these sensors is individually controlled with precision analog circuitry and is capable of single molecule measurements. Under electronic and software control, the IC was used to demonstrate the feasibility of creating and detecting lipid bilayers and biological nanopores using wild type α-hemolysin. The ability to dynamically create bilayers over each of the sensors will greatly accelerate pore development and pore mutation analysis. In addition, the noise performance of the IC was measured to be 30fA(rms). With this noise performance, single base detection of DNA was demonstrated using α-hemolysin. The data shows that a single molecule, electrical detection platform using biological nanopores can be operationalized and can ultimately scale to millions of sensors. Such a massively parallel platform will revolutionize molecular analysis and will completely change the field of molecular diagnostics in the future.

  4. Adrenocortical carcinoma: the dawn of a new era of genomic and molecular biology analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armignacco, R; Cantini, G; Canu, L; Poli, G; Ercolino, T; Mannelli, M; Luconi, M

    2018-05-01

    Over the last decade, the development of novel and high penetrance genomic approaches to analyze biological samples has provided very new insights in the comprehension of the molecular biology and genetics of tumors. The use of these techniques, consisting of exome sequencing, transcriptome, miRNome, chromosome alteration, genome, and epigenome analysis, has also been successfully applied to adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). In fact, the analysis of large cohorts of patients allowed the stratification of ACC with different patterns of molecular alterations, associated with different outcomes, thus providing a novel molecular classification of the malignancy to be associated with the classical pathological analysis. Improving our knowledge about ACC molecular features will result not only in a better diagnostic and prognostic accuracy, but also in the identification of more specific therapeutic targets for the development of more effective pharmacological anti-cancer approaches. In particular, the specific molecular alteration profiles identified in ACC may represent targetable events by the use of already developed or newly designed drugs enabling a better and more efficacious management of the ACC patient in the context of new frontiers of personalized precision medicine.

  5. Pteros 2.0: Evolution of the fast parallel molecular analysis library for C++ and python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2015-07-15

    Pteros is the high-performance open-source library for molecular modeling and analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories. Starting from version 2.0 Pteros is available for C++ and Python programming languages with very similar interfaces. This makes it suitable for writing complex reusable programs in C++ and simple interactive scripts in Python alike. New version improves the facilities for asynchronous trajectory reading and parallel execution of analysis tasks by introducing analysis plugins which could be written in either C++ or Python in completely uniform way. The high level of abstraction provided by analysis plugins greatly simplifies prototyping and implementation of complex analysis algorithms. Pteros is available for free under Artistic License from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pteros/. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The effect of different aspect ratio and bottom heat flux towards contaminant removal using numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadun, M N A; Manaf, M Z A; Zakaria, M S; Hafidzal, M H M; Azwadi, C S Nor; Malek, Z A A

    2013-01-01

    Cubic Interpolated Pseudo-particle (CIP) numerical simulation scheme has been anticipated to predict the interaction involving fluids and solid particles in an open channel with rectangular shaped cavity flow. The rectangular shaped cavity is looking by different aspect ratio in modelling the real pipeline joints that are in a range of sizes. Various inlet velocities are also being applied in predicting various fluid flow characteristics. In this paper, the constant heat flux is introduced at the bottom wall, showing the buoyancy effects towards the contaminant's removal rate. In order to characterize the fluid flow, the numerical scheme alone is initially tested and validated in a lid driven cavity with a single particle. The study of buoyancy effects and different aspect ratio of rectangular geometry were carried out using a MATLAB govern by Navier-Stokes equation. CIP is used as a model for a numerical scheme solver for fluid solid particles interaction. The result shows that the higher aspect ratio coupled with heated bottom wall give higher percentage of contaminant's removal rate. Comparing with the benchmark results has demonstrated the applicability of the method to reproduce fluid structure which is complex in the system. Despite a slight deviation of the formations of vortices from some of the literature results, the general pattern is considered to be in close agreement with those published in the literature

  7. Expanded target-chemical analysis reveals extensive mixed-organic-contaminant exposure in USA streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Romanok, Kristin; Barber, Larry B.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Jones, Daniel K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66–84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L–1 to greater than 10 μg L–1, with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L–1 and 10 ng L–1, respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4–161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5–102 847 ng L–1, respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71–82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: environment application (pesticides), designed-bioactive organics (median 41 per site at μg L–1 cumulative concentrations) in developed watersheds present aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L–1.

  8. Structural-genetic approach to analysis and mapping of Chernobyl's radionuclide contamination field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskura, N.I.; Bujkov, M.; Nagorsky, V.A.; Tepikin, V.; Poletaev, V.; Solyanke, E.G.; Shkvorets, O.Y.; Shestopalov, V.M.; Skvortsov, V.

    1997-01-01

    As a main tool for revealing and interpreting the internal structure of radionuclide contamination field, around the Chernobyl NPP the reliable and validated detailed scale maps of contamination densities could serve. Such maps should have, on the one hand, a high enough density of initial observation points (not less than 1 to 10 points per 1 sq.cm. of final map) and, on the other hand, a high representativeness of each observation point, i.e. reliability of presentation of its vicinity (0.1 to 1 sq.km). The available analytical data files of soil sampling in the exclusion zone conform neither to the first requirement, nor to the second one: real density of sampling does not exceed 0-2 to 0.5 points per 1 sq.m, and the representativeness of obtained results has a typical variation from medium values (in the neighbourhood of 0.1 to 1 sq.km) to 3 to 5 times

  9. Air analysis in the assessment of fumonisin contamination risk in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Gubiani, Rino; Firrao, Giuseppe; Cividino, Sirio; Locci, Romano; Gobbi, Emanuela

    2010-03-15

    In maize-growing areas where fumonisin contamination is endemic, there is an urgent need for novel methods to assess the quality of grain lots before their delivery to common drying and storage collection centres. Aerobiological samples of fungal spores released during harvest were analysed to establish a relationship between fumonisin contamination and the abundance of pathogen propagules collected in the combine harvester using a cyclone and membrane filters. Filter-captured propagules were analysed by direct plating, immunoenzymatic assay of specific Fusarium extracellular polysaccharides and real time polymerase chain reaction of the extracted DNA using fum1, a gene involved in the biosynthesis of fumonisin, as a target. The results showed that time of harvest and environmental conditions strongly influenced the efficiency and performance of the collection system. The data obtained were informative in comparing individual samples collected under similar conditions. The immunoenzymatic assay provided the most reliable data, which improved the ability of a neural network to predict the fumonisin content of lots, when added to agronomic, environmental and phytosanitary data. This is the first attempt to evaluate the Fusarium propagules dispersed during harvesting as a predictive means to assess maize quality. A method based on cyclone/filter capture and immunological detection has been shown to be feasible and to have the potential for the development of a continuous monitoring system, but the prediction capabilities in the present implementation were limited.

  10. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall number-sign 051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring

  11. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  12. Molecular gas analysis by Raman scattering in intracavity laser configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.E.; Andrade, J.D.; Van Wagenen, R.A.; Westenskow, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for the near simultaneous analysis and quantitation of selected multiple polyatomic gases in a gas sample by Raman light scattering comprising in combination: (a) laser means capable of producing a polarized laser beam of a selected wavelength containing a laser cavity the laser cavity containing a plasma tube and wherein one end of the laser cavity contains a high reflectivity output coupler mirror; (b) a gas sampling cell located within the laser cavity between the plasma tube and the output coupler mirror, the cell having opposing parallel end windows interconnected by a continuous sidewall. The end windows and sidewall define a longitudinal gas chamber oriented such that, when the laser beam is activated, the laser beam is coincident with and traverses the axis of the longitudinal gas chamber, the end windows being positioned to be substantially normal to the axis of the longitudinal gas cell chamber. The cell also has opposing, aligned side windows in the sidewall parallel to and on either side of the axis of the longitudinal gas chamber. The gas cell further contains inlet and outlet means communicating with the chamber to pass a sample gas through the cell

  13. Molecular analysis of sourdough reveals Lactobacillus mindensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Müller, Martin R A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic fingerprinting to analyse the bacterial flora of an industrial sourdough revealed a coherent group of strains which could not be associated with a valid species. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these strains formed a homogeneous cluster distinct from their closest relatives, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius and Lactobacillus kimchii. To characterize them further, physiological (sugar fermentation, formation of DL-lactate, hydrolysis of arginine, growth temperature, CO2 production) and chemotaxonomic properties have been determined. The DNA G +C content was 37.5 0.2 mol%. The peptidoglycan was of the lysine-D-iso-asparagine (L-Lys-D-Asp) type. The strains were homofermentative, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods. They were found as a major stable component of a rye flour sourdough fermentation. Physiological, biochemical as well as genotypic data suggested them to be a new species of the genus Lactobacillus. This was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization of genomic DNA, and the name Lactobacillus mindensis is proposed. The type strain of this species is DSM 14500T (=LMG 21508T).

  14. A Real-Time PCR with Melting Curve Analysis for Molecular Typing of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peiyan; Wang, Henghui; Luo, Jianyong; Yan, Yong; Chen, Zhongwen

    2018-05-23

    Foodborne disease caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a serious public health problem in many countries. Molecular typing has a great scientific significance and application value for epidemiological research of V. parahaemolyticus. In this study, a real-time PCR with melting curve analysis was established for molecular typing of V. parahaemolyticus. Eighteen large variably presented gene clusters (LVPCs) of V. parahaemolyticus which have different distributions in the genome of different strains were selected as targets. Primer pairs of 18 LVPCs were distributed into three tubes. To validate this newly developed assay, we tested 53 Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, which were classified in 13 different types. Furthermore, cluster analysis using NTSYS PC 2.02 software could divide 53 V. parahaemolyticus strains into six clusters at a relative similarity coefficient of 0.85. This method is fast, simple, and conveniently for molecular typing of V. parahaemolyticus.

  15. A 3D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUID FLOW AND CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH A POROUS LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADEGUN, I. K.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigated the flow of incompressible fluid and contaminant transport through a Porous Landfill using a numerical technique. A threedimensional finite element analysis technique was adopted for the solution. The problem was based on the Darcy’s Law and the Advection-Dispersion equation. The solutions of the Darcy’s and Advection-Dispersion equations were generated using Finite Element Analysis Software known as COMSOL Multiphysics. This simulation tool tracked the contaminant transport in the Landfill for 360 days at 10 days interval. It first modeled steady-state fluid flow by employing the Darcy’s Law Application Mode and then followed up with a transient solute-transport simulation by employing the Solute-Transport Application Mode from the Earth Science Module of COMSOL. The solution results obtained from this model were found to be in close agreement with reallife data obtained at the 130- million ton Bukit Tagar Mega Sanitary Landfill site, Selangor near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This showed that the model can effectively predict the trends in the distributions of pollutants from a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill into nearby land and water sources. The model is thus applicable to the issues of environmental protection and safety of groundwater.

  16. Molecular analysis of microbial community in arsenic-rich groundwater of Kolsor, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial community composition within the highly arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater from Kolsur, West Bengal was analyzed over a period of 3 years using 16S rRNA gene clone library and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Molecular phylogenetic study revealed abundance of α-Proteobacteria (56%) and Firmicutes (29%) along with members of β-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria as relatively minor groups. Along with consistent physicochemical environment, a stable microbial community structure comprising of bacterial genera Agrobacterium-Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Anoxybacillus and Penibacillus was recorded over the three years study period. Presence of cytosolic arsenate reductase (arsC) gene was observed within the microbial community. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all the arsC sequences were closely related to the same gene from γ-proteobacterial members while the community was consisted of mainly α-proteobacterial groups. Such phylogenetic incongruence between 16S rRNA and arsC genes possibly indicated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the ars genes within the groundwater community. Overall, the study reported a nearly stable geomicrobial environment and genetic determinant related to As homeostasis gene, and provided a better insight on biogeochemistry of As contaminated aquifer of West Bengal.

  17. Molecular characterization of Giardia psittaci by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Niichiro; Makino, Ikuko; Kojima, Atsushi

    2012-12-01

    Multilocus sequence analyses targeting small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), elongation factor 1 alpha (ef1α), glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and beta giardin (β-giardin) were performed on Giardia psittaci isolates from three Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulates) and four Barred parakeets (Bolborhynchus lineola) kept in individual households or imported from overseas. Nucleotide differences and phylogenetic analyses at four loci indicate the distinction of G. psittaci from the other known Giardia species: Giardia muris, Giardia microti, Giardia ardeae, and Giardia duodenalis assemblages. Furthermore, G. psittaci was related more closely to G. duodenalis than to the other known Giardia species, except for G. microti. Conflicting signals regarded as "double peaks" were found at the same nucleotide positions of the ef1α in all isolates. However, the sequences of the other three loci, including gdh and β-giardin, which are known to be highly variable, from all isolates were also mutually identical at every locus. They showed no double peaks. These results suggest that double peaks found in the ef1α sequences are caused not by mixed infection with genetically different G. psittaci isolates but by allelic sequence heterogeneity (ASH), which is observed in diplomonad lineages including G. duodenalis. No sequence difference was found in any G. psittaci isolates at the gdh and β-giardin, suggesting that G. psittaci is indeed not more diverse genetically than other Giardia species. This report is the first to provide evidence related to the genetic characteristics of G. psittaci obtained using multilocus sequence analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical analysis and genotoxicity of high molecular mass PAH in sediment samples and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarry, B.E.; Marvin, C.H.; Smith, R.W.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) method was used to fractionate the organic extracts of prepared from coal tar-contaminated sediments from hamilton Harbor in Ontario and from Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia into molecular mass classes. Each PAH fraction up to 302 amu was analyzed by GC-MS and fractions containing PAH with molecular masses greater than 302 amu were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) LC-MS.Each fraction was also subjected to Ames bioassays using a TA100-like strain of Salmonella typhimurium (YG1025 + S9). The 300/302 amu, 326/328 and 350/352 amu PAH fractions accounted for 25% of the total genotoxic response of the extract; these PAH constitute a substantial genotoxic burden. A number of 300, 302, 326, 350, 374 and 400 amu PAH were identified using APCI LC-MS and comparison with authentic standards. The non-polar aromatic extracts of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and zebra mussels from Hamilton Harbor were also examined by GC-MS, APCI LC-MS and genotoxicity bioassays. The profiles of the priority and high mass PAH in these samples were identical showing that all PAH up to and exceeding 400 amu were readily bioavailable to biota such as Zebra mussels. In addition, the pseudo faeces of the Zebra mussels and amphipod detritivores which fed on the pseudo faeces had chemical profiles identical to the Zebra mussels. Since many sport fish prize amphipods as food, this observation demonstrates a pathway for organic contaminants adsorbed to suspended sediments to enter the food chain of non-bottom-feeding fish in areas infested by Zebra mussels

  19. Determination of the total mercury in contaminated soils by direct solid sampling atomic absorption spectrometry using an AMA-254 device and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sysalová, J.; Kučera, Jan; Fikrle, Marek; Drtinová, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, SEP (2013), s. 691-694 ISSN 0026-265X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/12/0682; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Mercury * contaminated soils * AMA-254 * RNAA Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.583, year: 2013

  20. Automated Analysis and Classification of Histological Tissue Features by Multi-Dimensional Microscopic Molecular Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Riordan

    Full Text Available Characterization of the molecular attributes and spatial arrangements of cells and features within complex human tissues provides a critical basis for understanding processes involved in development and disease. Moreover, the ability to automate steps in the analysis and interpretation of histological images that currently require manual inspection by pathologists could revolutionize medical diagnostics. Toward this end, we developed a new imaging approach called multidimensional microscopic molecular profiling (MMMP that can measure several independent molecular properties in situ at subcellular resolution for the same tissue specimen. MMMP involves repeated cycles of antibody or histochemical staining, imaging, and signal removal, which ultimately can generate information analogous to a multidimensional flow cytometry analysis on intact tissue sections. We performed a MMMP analysis on a tissue microarray containing a diverse set of 102 human tissues using a panel of 15 informative antibody and 5