WorldWideScience

Sample records for molecular chaperone dnak

  1. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  2. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti K. Jha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2 depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.

  3. Conserved, disordered C terminus of DnaK enhances cellular survival upon stress and DnaK in vitro chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Robert G; Blackburn, Mandy E; Gierasch, Lila M

    2011-09-09

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) function as molecular chaperones through the allosteric coupling of their nucleotide- and substrate-binding domains, the structures of which are highly conserved. In contrast, the roles of the poorly structured, variable length C-terminal regions present on Hsp70s remain unclear. In many eukaryotic Hsp70s, the extreme C-terminal EEVD tetrapeptide sequence associates with co-chaperones via binding to tetratricopeptide repeat domains. It is not known whether this is the only function for this region in eukaryotic Hsp70s and what roles this region performs in Hsp70s that do not form complexes with tetratricopeptide repeat domains. We compared C-terminal sequences of 730 Hsp70 family members and identified a novel conservation pattern in a diverse subset of 165 bacterial and organellar Hsp70s. Mutation of conserved C-terminal sequence in DnaK, the predominant Hsp70 in Escherichia coli, results in significant impairment of its protein refolding activity in vitro without affecting interdomain allostery, interaction with co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, or the binding of a peptide substrate, defying classical explanations for the chaperoning mechanism of Hsp70. Moreover, mutation of specific conserved sites within the DnaK C terminus reduces the capacity of the cell to withstand stresses on protein folding caused by elevated temperature or the absence of other chaperones. These features of the C-terminal region support a model in which it acts as a disordered tether linked to a conserved, weak substrate-binding motif and that this enhances chaperone function by transiently interacting with folding clients.

  4. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Jyoti K.; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba; Dunny, Gary M.

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations inrctBthat reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding. IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication ofVibrio choleraeChr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that

  5. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  6. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    The hsp70 (dnaK) locus of the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was cloned, sequenced, and tested in vitro to measure gene induction by heat and ammonia, i.e., stressors pertinent to the biotechnological ecosystem of this methanogen that plays a key role in anaerobic...... thermoautotrophicum Delta H, from another genus, in which trkA is not part of the locus. The proteins encoded in the TM-1 genes are very similar to the S-6 homologs, but considerably less similar to the Delta H proteins. The TM-1 Hsp70(DnaK) protein has the 23-amino acid deletion-by comparison with homologs from Gram...

  7. GroEL to DnaK chaperone network behind the stability modulation of σ(32) at physiological temperature in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Monobesh; Roy, Sourav Singha; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Basu, Tarakdas

    2015-12-21

    The stability of heat-shock transcription factor σ(32) in Escherichia coli has long been known to be modulated only by its own transcribed chaperone DnaK. Very few reports suggest a role for another heat-shock chaperone, GroEL, for maintenance of cellular σ(32) level. The present study demonstrates in vivo physical association between GroEL and σ(32) in E. coli at physiological temperature. This study further reveals that neither DnaK nor GroEL singly can modulate σ(32) stability in vivo; there is an ordered network between them, where GroEL acts upstream of DnaK.

  8. Gene cloning and sequence analysis of the cold-adapted chaperones DnaK and DnaJ from deep-sea psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913 is a phychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the deep-sea sediment. The genes encoding chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 were cloned by normal PCR and TAIL-PCR (GenBank accession Nos DQ640312, DQ504163). The chaperones DnaJ and DnaK from the strain SM9913 contain such conserved domains as those of many other bacteria, and show some cold-adapted characteristics in their structures when compared with those from psychro-, meso-and themophilic bacteria. It is indicated that chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 may be adapted to low temperature in deep-sea and function well in assisting folding, assembling and translocation of proteins at low temperature. This research lays a foundation for the further study on the cold-adapted mechanism of chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of cold-adapted microorganisms.

  9. Molecular chaperones and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates that result from conformational changes in proteins. These diseases may result from an imbalance between the production of misfolded proteins and normal chaperone capacity. Molecular chaperones provide a first line of defence against misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins and are, therefore, promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. DnaK dependence of mutant ethanol oxidoreductases evolved for aerobic function and protective role of the chaperone against protein oxidative damage in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echave, Pedro; Esparza-Cerón, M. Angel; Cabiscol, Elisa; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    2002-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase (AdhE) that catalyzes successive reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol reversibly at the expense of NADH. Mutant JE52, serially selected for acquired and improved ability to grow aerobically on ethanol, synthesized an AdhEA267T/E568K with two amino acid substitutions that sequentially conferred improved catalytic properties and stability. Here we show that the aerobic growth ability on ethanol depends also on protection of the mutant AdhE against metal-catalyzed oxidation by the chaperone DnaK (a member of the Hsp70 family). No DnaK protection of the enzyme is evident during anaerobic growth on glucose. Synthesis of DnaK also protected E. coli from H2O2 killing under conditions when functional AdhE is not required. Our results therefore suggest that, in addition to the known role of protecting cells against heat stress, DnaK also protects numerous kinds of proteins from oxidative damage. PMID:11917132

  11. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigation of chaperone effects on soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli: effect of free DnaK level on temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagurunathan, Balaji; Jayaraman, Guhan

    2008-06-01

    Modeling and analysis of genetic networks have become increasingly important in the investigation of cellular processes. The genetic networks involved in cellular stress response can have a critical effect on the productivity of recombinant proteins. In this work, it was found that the temperature-inducible expression system for the production of soluble recombinant streptokinase in Escherichia coli resulted in a lower productivity compared to the chemically-induced system. To investigate the effect of the induced cellular response due to temperature up-shift a model-based approach is adopted. The role played by the major molecular chaperone teams DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL-GroES on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase was experimentally determined. Based on these investigations, a detailed mechanistic mathematical model was developed for the cellular response during the temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production. The model simulations were found to have a good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The mechanistic mathematical model was validated with the experiments conducted on a sigma(32) mutant strain. Detailed analysis of the parameter sensitivities of the model indicated that the level of free DnaK chaperone in the cell has the major effect on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase during temperature induction. Analysis of the model simulations also shows that down regulation or selective redirection of the heat shock proteins could be a better way of manipulating the cellular stress response than overexpression or deletion. In other words, manipulating the system properties resulting from the interaction of the components is better than manipulating the individual components. Although our results are specific to a recombinant protein (streptokinase) and the expression system (E. coli), we believe that such a systems-biological approach has several advantages over conventional experimental approaches and could be in

  13. Tracking the Interplay between Bound Peptide and the Lid Domain of DnaK, Using Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Tsfadia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hsp70 chaperones consist of two functional domains: the 44 kDa Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD, that binds and hydrolyses ATP, and the 26 kDa Substrate Binding Domain (SBD, which binds unfolded proteins and reactivates them, utilizing energy obtained from nucleotide hydrolysis. The structure of the SBD of the bacterial Hsp70, DnaK, consists of two sub-domains: A β-sandwich part containing the hydrophobic cavity to which the hepta-peptide NRLLLTG (NR is bound, and a segment made of 5 α-helices, called the “lid” that caps the top of the β-sandwich domain. In the present study we used the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, as a model for Hsp70 proteins, focusing on its SBD domain, examining the changes in the lid conformation. We deliberately decoupled the NBD from the SBD, limiting the study to the structure of the SBD section, with an emphasis on the interaction between the charges of the peptide with the residues located in the lid. Molecular dynamics simulations of the complex revealed significant mobility within the lid structure; as the structure was released from the forces operating during the crystallization process, the two terminal helices established a contact with the positive charge at the tip of the peptide. This contact is manifested only in the presence of electrostatic attraction. The observed internal motions within the lid provide a molecular role for the function of this sub-domain during the reaction cycle of Hsp 70 chaperones.

  14. Identification and characterization of a Hsp70 (DnaK) chaperone system from Meiothermus ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleckaityte, M; Mistiniene, E; Michailoviene, V; Zvirblis, G

    2003-04-01

    We have cloned the genes encoding the chaperones of Meiothermus ruber, Hsp70 (Mru.Hsp70), Hsp40 (Mru.Hsp40) and Hsp22 (Mru.Hsp22). The genes hsp70, hsp22 and hsp40 of M. ruber are organized into an operon. The amino acid sequences of the three M. ruber chaperones show strong similarity with the heat shock proteins of Thermus thermophilus. Both Mru.Hsp40 and its homolog from T. thermophilus lack a cysteine-rich region. However, recombinant Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 associate in an ATP-dependent manner, and assemble into a complex in the absence of other proteins, unlike their counterparts from T. thermophilus, which require DafA for assembly. The analysis revealed that Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 assemble as monomers into the complex, although their homologs from T. thermophilus enter the complex as trimers. The Mru.Hsp70 and Mru.Hsp40 complex increases the spontaneous rate of refolding of denatured mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase by tenfold.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  16. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  17. Monitoring conformational heterogeneity of the lid of DnaK substrate-binding domain during its chaperone cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupa; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Peter, Joshua Jebakumar; Kumar, Vignesh; Mapa, Koyeli

    2016-08-01

    DnaK or Hsp70 of Escherichia coli is a master regulator of the bacterial proteostasis network. Allosteric communication between the two functional domains of DnaK, the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and the C-terminal substrate- or peptide-binding domain (SBD) regulate its activity. X-ray crystallography and NMR studies have provided snapshots of distinct conformations of Hsp70 proteins in various physiological states; however, the conformational heterogeneity and dynamics of allostery-driven Hsp70 activity remains underexplored. In this work, we employed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements to capture distinct intradomain conformational states of a region within the DnaK-SBD known as the lid. Our data conclusively demonstrate prominent conformational heterogeneity of the DnaK lid in ADP-bound states; in contrast, the ATP-bound open conformations are homogeneous. Interestingly, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue, AMP-PNP, imparts heterogeneity to the lid conformations mimicking the ADP-bound state. The cochaperone DnaJ confers ADP-like heterogeneous lid conformations to DnaK, although the presence of the cochaperone accelerates the substrate-binding rate by a hitherto unknown mechanism. Irrespective of the presence of DnaJ, binding of a peptide substrate to the DnaK-SBD leads to prominent lid closure. Lid closure is only partial upon binding to molten globule-like authentic cellular substrates, probably to accommodate non-native substrate proteins of varied structures.

  18. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  19. 5S rRNA-assisted DnaK refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Kyung; Choi, Seong Il; Seong, Baik L

    2010-01-08

    Although accumulating evidence has revealed that most proteins can fold without the assistance of molecular chaperones, little attention has been paid to other types of chaperoning macromolecules. A variety of proteins interact with diverse RNA molecules in vivo, suggesting a potential role of RNAs for folding of their interacting proteins. Here we show that the in vitro refolding of a representative molecular chaperone, DnaK, an Escherichia coli homolog of Hsp70, could be assisted by its interacting 5S rRNA. The folding enhancement occurred in RNA concentration and its size dependent manner whereas neither the RNA with the reverse sequence of 5S rRNA nor the RNase pretreated 5S rRNA stimulated the folding in vitro. Based on our results, we propose that 5S rRNA could exert the chaperoning activity on DnaK during the folding process. The results suggest an interesting possibility that the folding of RNA-interacting proteins could be assisted by their cognate RNA ligands. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DnaK as Antibiotic Target: Hot Spot Residues Analysis for Differential Inhibition of the Bacterial Protein in Comparison with the Human HSP70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chiappori

    Full Text Available DnaK, the bacterial homolog of human Hsp70, plays an important role in pathogens survival under stress conditions, like antibiotic therapies. This chaperone sequesters protein aggregates accumulated in bacteria during antibiotic treatment reducing the effect of the cure. Although different classes of DnaK inhibitors have been already designed, they present low specificity. DnaK is highly conserved in prokaryotes (identity 50-70%, which encourages the development of a unique inhibitor for many different bacterial strains. We used the DnaK of Acinetobacter baumannii as representative for our analysis, since it is one of the most important opportunistic human pathogens, exhibits a significant drug resistance and it has the ability to survive in hospital environments. The E.coli DnaK was also included in the analysis as reference structure due to its wide diffusion. Unfortunately, bacterial DnaK and human Hsp70 have an elevated sequence similarity. Therefore, we performed a differential analysis of DnaK and Hsp70 residues to identify hot spots in bacterial proteins that are not present in the human homolog, with the aim of characterizing the key pharmacological features necessary to design selective inhibitors for DnaK. Different conformations of DnaK and Hsp70 bound to known inhibitor-peptides for DnaK, and ineffective for Hsp70, have been analysed by molecular dynamics simulations to identify residues displaying stable and selective interactions with these peptides. Results achieved in this work show that there are some residues that can be used to build selective inhibitors for DnaK, which should be ineffective for the human Hsp70.

  1. Disaggregases, molecular chaperones that resolubilize protein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Z. Mokry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of folding is a seminal event in the life of a protein, as it is essential for proper protein function and therefore cell physiology. Inappropriate folding, or misfolding, can not only lead to loss of function, but also to the formation of protein aggregates, an insoluble association of polypeptides that harm cell physiology, either by themselves or in the process of formation. Several biological processes have evolved to prevent and eliminate the existence of non-functional and amyloidogenic aggregates, as they are associated with several human pathologies. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins are specialized in controlling the quality of the proteins in the cell, specifically by aiding proper folding, and dissolution and clearance of already formed protein aggregates. The latter is a function of disaggregases, mainly represented by the ClpB/Hsp104 subfamily of molecular chaperones, that are ubiquitous in all organisms but, surprisingly, have no orthologs in the cytosol of metazoan cells. This review aims to describe the characteristics of disaggregases and to discuss the function of yeast Hsp104, a disaggregase that is also involved in prion propagation and inheritance.

  2. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tamás Korcsmáros; István A Kovács; Máté S Szalay; Péter Csermely

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have weak links, connect hubs, are in the overlaps of network modules and may uncouple these modules during stress, which gives an additional protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, after stress chaperones are essential to re-build inter-modular contacts by their low affinity sampling of the potential interaction partners in different modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-aging strategies.

  3. Molecular chaperone genes in the sugarcane expressed sequence database (SUCEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. Borges

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Some newly synthesized proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their correct folding. Chaperones are also involved in the dissolution of protein aggregates making their study significant for both biotechnology and medicine and the identification of chaperones and stress-related protein sequences in different organisms is an important task. We used bioinformatic tools to investigate the information generated by the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST genome project in order to identify and annotate molecular chaperones. We considered that the SUCEST sequences belonged to this category of proteins when their E-values were lower than 1.0e-05. Our annotation shows that 4,164 of the 5’ expressed sequence tag (EST sequences were homologous to molecular chaperones, nearly 1.8% of all the 5’ ESTs sequenced during the SUCEST project. About 43% of the chaperones which we found were Hsp70 chaperones and its co-chaperones, 10% were Hsp90 chaperones and 13% were peptidyl-prolyl cis, trans isomerase. Based on the annotation results we predicted 156 different chaperone gene subclasses in the sugarcane genome. Taken together, our results indicate that genes which encode chaperones were diverse and abundantly expressed in sugarcane cells, which emphasizes their biological importance.Algumas proteínas ao serem sintetizadas necessitam do auxílio de chaperones moleculares para seu correto enovelamento. Chaperones também estão envolvidas na dissolução de agregados protéicos, fazendo com que seu estudo seja de relevância biotecnológica e médica. Portanto, a identificação de seqüências de chaperones moleculares é uma tarefa importante. Nós usamos ferramentas de bioinformática para procurar informações geradas pelo sugarcane EST Genome Project (SUCEST a fim de identificar e anotar chaperones e proteínas relacionas ao estresse. As seqüências do SUCEST eram anotadas como pertencentes a uma categoria de proteínas se o E

  4. The future of molecular chaperones and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, Rona G; Macario, Alberto J L; de Macario, Everly Conway

    2013-08-01

    Protection of hair cells by HSP70 released by supporting cells is reported by May et al. in this issue of the JCI. Their findings suggest a new way to reduce ototoxicity from therapeutic medications and raise larger questions about the role and integration of heat shock proteins in non–cell-autonomous responses to stress. Increasing evidence suggests an important role for extracellular heat shock proteins in both the nervous system and the immune system. The work also suggests that defective chaperones could cause ear disease and supports the potential use of chaperone therapeutics.

  5. Hsp90 molecular chaperone : the effect on breast cancer cell invasion and functional interactions with Aha1 co-chaperone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanski, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of the molecular chaperone Hsp90’s activity is the ATP-ase cycle. The cycle of ATP hydrolysis is an important part of the recycling of Hsp90 and drives its conformational changes. Co-chaperones regulate this ATP-hydrolysis as well as the interactions with

  6. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Niforou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome network (PN. PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer. In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones.

  7. The Hsp90 chaperone in action: following the ATP cycle of a molecular machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagoz, G.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824275

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding in the cell is assisted by molecular chaperones. Hsp90 is the most abundant molecular chaperone in the cytosol. It facilitates the folding and activation of mainly signalling molecules. Its chaperoning of regulatory proteins places Hsp90 in the cross road of several important

  8. Posttranslational modulation on the biological activities of molecular chaperones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are a family of proteins that were first noticed to exist about 45 years ago from their increased transcription under heat shock conditions.As a result,the regulation of their encoding genes has been subject to extensive studies.Recent studies revealed that the biological activities of molecular chaperones can also be effectively modulated at the protein level.The ways of modulation so far elucidated include allosteric effect,covalent modification,protein-protein interaction,and con-formational alteration induced by such macro-environmental conditions as temperature and pH.These latter aspects were reviewed here.Emphasized here is the importance of such immediate structural alterations that lead to an immediate activity increase,providing the immediate protection needed for the cells to survive the stress conditions.

  9. Posttranslational modulation on the biological activities of molecular chaperones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG ZengYi

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are a family of proteins that were first noticed to exist about 45 years ago from their increased transcription under heat shock conditions. As a result, the regulation of their encoding genes has been subject to extensive studies. Recent studies revealed that the biological activities of molecular chaperones can also be effectively modulated at the protein level. The ways of modulation so far elucidated include allosteric effect, covalent modification, protein-protein interaction, and con-formational alteration induced by such macro-environmental conditions as temperature and pH. These latter aspects were reviewed here. Emphasized here is the importance of such immediate structural alterations that lead to an immediate activity increase, providing the immediate protection needed for the cells to survive the stress conditions.

  10. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBracher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1 and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell.

  11. [Immunogenetics--HLA-association, molecular chaperones and "related" diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, I

    2005-09-01

    The association of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with the HLA complex has been well established since 1978. But what does that mean? After reminding the reader of some existing immunological interpretations, a more recent variant is introduced. Antigens and molecular chaperones of the HSP70 family form complexes, which interact with HLA-DR beta-chains, especially of the DRB1*0401 genotype, which is the most common among patients with RA in our region. This mechanism might bring *0401(+) persons an advantage in defence against microorganisms, but a disadvantage concerning autoimmunity. Chaperone machines are upregulated in synovial tissue of RA patients. As their number and variety is huge in humans, there exist many possibilities for function, reaching from antigen presentation to immune regulation. In addition to the HLA complex, the "genetic background" plays an important role for the development of an autoimmune disease. This is demonstrated in families of patients with RA or scleroderma, where a high percentage of first degree relatives suffer from a "related" disease.

  12. HSP-molecular chaperones in cancer biogenesis and tumor therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Francesca; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; David, Sabrina; Campanella, Claudia; Carini, Francesco; Tomasello, Giovanni; Damiani, Provvidenza; Cappello, Francesco; DE Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L

    2012-12-01

    Molecular chaperones, many of which are heat-shock proteins (HSPs), are an important class of molecules with various functions. Pathological conditions in which chaperones become etiological and/or pathogenic factors are called chaperonopathies, and are classified into by defect, by excess, and by 'mistake'. In the latter case, the chaperone is structurally and functionally normal but participates in pathways that favor disease, although in some cases the chaperone may have post-translational modifications that may lead it to change its location and function and, thus, to become pathogenic. For example, HSP-chaperones are involved in carcinogenesis in various ways, so that some forms of cancer may be considered 'chaperonopathies by mistake'. This concept suggests new strategies for anticancer therapy (chaperonotherapy), in which the primary targets or therapeutic agents are chaperones. Chaperonotherapy consists of the utilization of HSP-chaperones for treating chaperonopathies, including cancer. Negative chaperonotherapy is aimed at eliminating or blocking the action of chaperones that favor carcinogenesis or other diseases, whereas positive chaperonotherapy uses chaperones, genes or proteins, to fight against diseases, such as cancer, by stimulating the immune system or the cellular defenses against stress.

  13. Promoting Neuronal Tolerance of Diabetic Stress: Modulating Molecular Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, S M; Dobrowsky, R T

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) involves an interrelated series of metabolic and vascular insults that ultimately contribute to sensory neuron degeneration. In the quest to pharmacologically manage DPN, small-molecule inhibitors have targeted proteins and pathways regarded as "diabetes specific" as well as others whose activity are altered in numerous disease states. These efforts have not yielded any significant therapies, due in part to the complicating issue that the biochemical contribution of these targets/pathways to the progression of DPN does not occur with temporal and/or biochemical uniformity between individuals. In a complex, chronic neurodegenerative disease such as DPN, it is increasingly appreciated that effective disease management may not necessarily require targeting a pathway or protein considered to contribute to disease progression. Alternatively, it may prove sufficiently beneficial to pharmacologically enhance the activity of endogenous cytoprotective pathways to aid neuronal tolerance to and recovery from glucotoxic stress. In pursuing this paradigm shift, we have shown that modulating the activity and expression of molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) may provide translational potential for the effective medical management of insensate DPN. Considerable evidence supports that modulating Hsp70 has beneficial effects in improving inflammation, oxidative stress, and glucose sensitivity. Given the emerging potential of modulating Hsp70 to manage DPN, the current review discusses efforts to characterize the cytoprotective effects of this protein and the benefits and limitations that may arise in drug development efforts that exploit its cytoprotective activity.

  14. Molecular chaperones as therapeutic targets to counteract proteostasis defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Monica; Dominici, Roberto; Cardano, Marina; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Rovida, Ermanna; Biunno, Ida

    2012-03-01

    The health of cells is preserved by the levels and correct folding states of the proteome, which is generated and maintained by the proteostasis network, an integrated biological system consisting of several cytoprotective and degradative pathways. Indeed, the health conditions of the proteostasis network is a fundamental prerequisite to life as the inability to cope with the mismanagement of protein folding arising from genetic, epigenetic, and micro-environment stress appears to trigger a whole spectrum of unrelated diseases. Here we describe the potential functional role of the proteostasis network in tumor biology and in conformational diseases debating on how the signaling branches of this biological system may be manipulated to develop more efficacious and selective therapeutic strategies. We discuss the dual strategy of these processes in modulating the folding activity of molecular chaperones in order to counteract the antithetic proteostasis deficiencies occurring in cancer and loss/gain of function diseases. Finally, we provide perspectives on how to improve the outcome of these disorders by taking advantage of proteostasis modeling.

  15. Experimental Milestones in the Discovery of Molecular Chaperones as Polypeptide Unfolding Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finka, Andrija; Mattoo, Rayees U H; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Molecular chaperones control the cellular folding, assembly, unfolding, disassembly, translocation, activation, inactivation, disaggregation, and degradation of proteins. In 1989, groundbreaking experiments demonstrated that a purified chaperone can bind and prevent the aggregation of artificially unfolded polypeptides and use ATP to dissociate and convert them into native proteins. A decade later, other chaperones were shown to use ATP hydrolysis to unfold and solubilize stable protein aggregates, leading to their native refolding. Presently, the main conserved chaperone families Hsp70, Hsp104, Hsp90, Hsp60, and small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) apparently act as unfolding nanomachines capable of converting functional alternatively folded or toxic misfolded polypeptides into harmless protease-degradable or biologically active native proteins. Being unfoldases, the chaperones can proofread three-dimensional protein structures and thus control protein quality in the cell. Understanding the mechanisms of the cellular unfoldases is central to the design of new therapies against aging, degenerative protein conformational diseases, and specific cancers.

  16. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  17. Induced Levels of Heat Shock Proteins in dnaK mutants of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Hammer, Karin; Vogensen, Finn K.

    1998-01-01

    of the inferred substrate binding site of the DnaK protein, exhibits a pronounced temperature sensitive phenotype and shows altered regulation of the heat shock response. The expression of the heat shock proteins are increased at the normal growth temperature measured both as protein synthesis rates and m......, HrcA , is dependent of the chaperone function of the GroELS complex and that an insertion mutant in dnaK did not have any effect on the expression of the heat shock proteins. The present data from Lactococcus lactis suggest that the DnaK protein could be involved in maturation of the homologous Hrc......The bacterial heat shock response is characterized by the elevated expression of a number of chaperone complexes and proteases including the DnaK-GrpE-DnaJ and the GroELS chaperone complexes. In order to investigate the importance of the DnaK chaperone complex for the growth and the heat shock...

  18. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  19. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  20. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40.

  1. Cloning and expression of dnaK gene from Bacillus pumilus of hot water spring origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of thermotolerant strains isolated from hot springs of Manikaran and Bakreshwar (India were selected with an aim to isolate dnak gene which encodes DnaK protein. The gene dnaK along with its flanking region was successfully amplified from 5 different strains (4 from Bakreshwar and one from Manikaran. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP revealed that amplicons were almost identical in sequence. The dnak gene from one representative, Bacillus pumilus strain B3 isolated from Bakreshwar hot springs was successfully cloned and sequenced. The dnaK gene was flanked by gene grpE on one side. The dnaK gene was 1842 bp in length encoding a polypeptide of 613 amino acid residues. Calculated molecular weight and pI of the protein were 66,128.36 Da and 4.72 respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence of this gene shared high sequence homology with other DnaK proteins and its homologue Hsp 70 from other microorganisms, but possessed 36 substitutions and two insertions, as compared to DnaK protein of Bacillus subtilis. The dnaK gene of B. pumilus was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL 21 (DE3 using pET expression systems. Heterologous expression of dnaK of B. pumilus in E. coli BL 21 (DE3 allowed for the growth of E. coli up to 50 °C and survival up to 60 °C for 16 h, suggesting that dnak from B. pumilus imparts tolerance to host cells under high temperature. This novel gene can be an important component for possible utilization in abiotic stress management of plants.

  2. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  3. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Requena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  4. Hsp90-Tau complex reveals molecular basis for specificity in chaperone action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagöz, G. Elif; Duarte, Afonso M.S.; Akoury, Elias; Ippel, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115343415; Biernat, Jacek; Morán Luengo, Tania|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369406036; Radli, Martina; Didenko, Tatiana|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829455; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Dickey, Chad A.; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus; Boelens, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Madl, Tobias; Rüdiger, Stefan G.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314076662

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding in the cell relies on the orchestrated action of conserved families of molecular chaperones, the Hsp70 and Hsp90 systems. Hsp70 acts early and Hsp90 late in the folding path, yet the molecular basis of this timing is enigmatic, mainly because the substrate specificity of Hsp90 is

  5. Catapult mechanism renders the chaperone action of Hsp70 unidirectional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, S M; Pierpaoli, E V; Christen, P

    1998-06-19

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 type promote the folding and membrane translocation of proteins. The interaction of Hsp70s with polypeptides is linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis. We formed complexes of seven different fluorescence-labeled peptides with DnaK, the Hsp70 homolog of Escherichia coli, and determined the rate of peptide release under two different sets of conditions. (1) Upon addition of ATP to nucleotide-free peptide.DnaK complexes, all tested peptides were released with similar rate constants (2.2 s-1 to 6.7 s-1). (2) In the binding equilibrium of peptide and ATP-liganded DnaK, the dissociation followed one or two-step reactions, depending on the amino acid sequence of the peptide. For the monophasic reactions, the dissociation rate constants diverged by four orders of magnitude from 0.0004 s-1 to 5.7 s-1; for the biphasic reactions, the rate constants of the second, slower isomerization step were in the range from 0.3 s-1 to 0.0005 s-1. The release of the different peptides in case (1) is 1.4 to 14,000 times faster than in case (2). Apparently, binding of ATP induces a transient state of the chaperone which ejects target peptides before the final state of ATP-liganded DnaK is reached. This "catapult" mechanism provides the chaperone cycle with a mode of peptide release that does not correspond with the reverse of peptide binding. By allowing the conformation of the outgoing polypeptide to differ from that of the incoming polypeptide, a futile cycle with respect to conformational work exerted on the target protein is obviated.

  6. Engineering and evolution of molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases with enhanced activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korrie eMack

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector.

  7. Molecular chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Ellgaard, Lars; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins presents a considerable threat to the health of individual cells and has been linked to severe diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Considering that, in nature, cells often are exposed to stress conditions that may lead to aberrant protein...... conformational changes, it becomes clear that they must have an efficient quality control apparatus to refold or destroy misfolded proteins. In general, cells rely on molecular chaperones to seize and refold misfolded proteins. If the native state is unattainable, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation...... the misfolded protein substrate. Thus, by delegating substrate recognition to chaperones, E3s deftly utilize a pre-existing cellular system for selectively targeting misfolded proteins. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the interplay between molecular chaperones and the ubiquitin...

  8. Integrating the cell stress response: a new view of molecular chaperones as immunological and physiological homeostatic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The response of cells to stress was first documented in the 1960s and 1970s and the molecular nature of the families of proteins that subserve this vital response, the molecular chaperones, were identified and subjected to critical study in the period from the late 1980s. This resulted in the rapidly advancing new field of protein folding and its role in cellular function. Emerging at the same time, but initially largely ignored, were reports that molecular chaperones could be released by cells and exist on the outer plasma membrane or in the body fluids. These secreted molecular chaperones were found to have intercellular signalling functions. There is now a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that molecular chaperones have properties ascribed to the Roman god Janus, the god of gates, doors, beginnings and endings, whose two faces point in different directions. Molecular chaperones appear to have one set of key functions within the cell and, potentially, a separate set of functions when they exist on the cell surface or in the various fluid phases of the body. Thus, it is a likely hypothesis that secreted molecular chaperones act as an additional level of homeostatic control possibly linking cellular stress to physiological systems such as the immune system. This review concentrates on three key molecular chaperones: Hsp10, Hsp60 and the Hsp70 family for which most information is available. An important consideration is the role that these proteins may play in human disease and in the treatment of human disease.

  9. Screening Molecular Chaperones Similar to Small Heat Shock Proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiyoung; Kim, Kanghwa; Lee, Songmi

    2015-09-01

    To screen molecular chaperones similar to small heat shock proteins (sHsps), but without α-crystalline domain, heat-stable proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sixteen proteins were identified, and four recombinant proteins, including cofilin, NTF2, pyridoxin biosynthesis protein (Snz1) and Wos2 that has an α-crystalline domain, were purified. Among these proteins, only Snz1 showed the anti-aggregation activity against thermal denaturation of citrate synthase. However, pre-heating of NTF2 and Wos2 at 70℃ for 30 min, efficiently prevented thermal aggregation of citrate synthase. These results indicate that Snz1 and NTF2 possess molecular chaperone activity similar to sHsps, even though there is no α-crystalline domain in their sequences.

  10. A novel protein refolding method integrating ion exchange chromatography with artificial molecular chaperone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Ming Zhang; Chao Zhan Wang; Jiang Feng Liu; Li Li Wang

    2008-01-01

    Artificial molecular chaperone (AMC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEC) were integrated, thus a new refolding method,artificial molecular chaperone-ion exchange chromatography (AMC-IEC) was developed. Compared with AMC and IEC, theactivity recovery of lysozyme obtained by AMC-IEC was much higher in the investigated range of initial protein concentrations,and the results show that AMC-IEC is very efficient for protein refolding at high concentrations. When the initial concentration oflysozyme is 180 mg/mL, its activity recovery obtained by AMC-IEC is still as high as 76.6%, while the activity recoveries obtainedby AMC and IEC are 45.6% and 42.4%, respectively.2008 Chao Zhan Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. A Rational Design Strategy for the Selective Activity Enhancement of a Molecular Chaperone toward a Target Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A; Sormanni, Pietro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-18

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the folding and assembly of proteins and inhibit their aberrant aggregation. They thus offer several opportunities for biomedical and biotechnological applications, as for example they can often prevent protein aggregation more effectively than other therapeutic molecules, including small molecules and antibodies. Here we present a method of designing molecular chaperones with enhanced activity against specific amyloidogenic substrates while leaving unaltered their functions toward other substrates. The method consists of grafting onto a molecular chaperone a peptide designed to bind specifically an epitope in the target substrate. We illustrate this strategy by describing Hsp70 variants with increased affinities for α-synuclein and Aβ42 but otherwise unaltered affinities for other substrates. These designed variants inhibit protein aggregation and disaggregate preformed fibrils significantly more effectively than wild-type Hsp70 indicating that the strategy presented here provides a possible route for tailoring rationally molecular chaperones for specific purposes.

  12. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  13. A primate specific extra domain in the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwadeepak Tripathi

    Full Text Available Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90 is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates folding and quality control of client proteins. Many of them such as protein kinases, steroid receptors and transcription factors are involved in cellular signaling processes. Hsp90 undergoes an ATP hydrolysis dependent conformational cycle to assist folding of the client protein. The canonical Hsp90 shows a typical composition of three distinct domains and interacts with individual cochaperone partners such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase that regulate the reaction cycle of the molecular chaperone. A bioinformatic survey identified an additional domain of 122 amino acids in front of the canonical Hsp90 sequence. This extra domain (E domain is specific to the Catarrhini or drooping nose monkeys, a subdivision of the higher primates that includes man, the great apes and the old world monkeys but is absent from all other species. Our biochemical analysis reveals that Hsp103 associates with cochaperone proteins such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 similar to Hsp90. However, the extra domain reduces the ATP hydrolysis rate to about half when compared to Hsp90 thereby acting as a negative regulator of the molecular chaperonés intrinsic ATPase activity.

  14. The assembly and intermolecular properties of the Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trcka, Filip; Durech, Michal; Man, Petr; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj

    2014-04-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 requires their spatial and functional coordination. The cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp90 is influenced by their interaction with the network of co-chaperone proteins, some of which contain tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. Critical to these interactions are TPR domains that target co-chaperone binding to the EEVD-COOH motif that terminates Hsp70/Hsp90. Recently, the two-TPR domain-containing protein, Tomm34, was reported to bind both Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we characterize the structural basis of Tomm34-Hsp70/Hsp90 interactions. Using multiple methods, including pull-down assays, fluorescence polarization, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and site-directed mutagenesis, we defined the binding activities and specificities of Tomm34 TPR domains toward Hsp70 and Hsp90. We found that Tomm34 TPR1 domain specifically binds Hsp70. This interaction is partly mediated by a non-canonical TPR1 two-carboxylate clamp and is strengthened by so far unidentified additional intermolecular contacts. The two-carboxylate clamp of the isolated TPR2 domain has affinity for both chaperones, but as part of the full-length Tomm34 protein, the TPR2 domain binds specifically Hsp90. These binding properties of Tomm34 TPR domains thus enable simultaneous binding of Hsp70 and Hsp90. Importantly, we provide evidence for the existence of an Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 tripartite complex. In addition, we defined the basic conformational demands of the Tomm34-Hsp90 interaction. These results suggest that Tomm34 represents a novel scaffolding co-chaperone of Hsp70 and Hsp90, which may facilitate Hsp70/Hsp90 cooperation during protein folding.

  15. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  16. Biologic activities of molecular chaperones and pharmacologic chaperone imidazole-containing dipeptide-based compounds: natural skin care help and the ultimate challenge: implication for adaptive responses in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-03-01

    Accumulation of molecular damage and increased molecular heterogeneity are hallmarks of photoaged skin and pathogenesis of human cutaneous disease. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of molecular chaperone proteins and of pharmacologic chaperones to decrease the environmental stress and ameliorate the oxidation stress-related and glycation disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for skin diseases and aging. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for molecular chaperone proteins in the skin and their inducer and protecting agents: pharmacologic chaperone imidazole dipeptide-based agents (carcinine and related compounds) in cosmetics and dermatology. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of skin photoaging diseases and other skin pathologies that have a component of increased glycation and/or free radical-induced oxidation in their genesis. We examine biologic activities of molecular and pharmacologic chaperones, including strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human skin disease. This allows the protein to function and traffic to the appropriate location in the skin, thereby increasing protein activity and cellular function and reducing stress on skin cells. The benefits of imidazole dipeptide antioxidants with transglycating activity (such as carcinine) in skin care are that they help protect and repair cell membrane damage and help retain youthful, younger-looking skin. All skin types will benefit from daily, topical application of pharmacologic chaperone antioxidants, anti-irritants, in combination with water-binding protein agents that work to mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. General strategies are presented addressing ground techniques to improve absorption of usually active chaperone proteins and dipeptide compounds, include

  17. Molecular chaperones as targets to circumvent the CFTR defect in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Chanoux

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive lethal disorder among Caucasian populations. CF results from mutations and resulting dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. CFTR is a cyclic AMP-dependent chloride channel that is localized to the apical membrane in epithelial cells where it plays a key role in salt and water homeostasis. An intricate network of molecular chaperone proteins regulates CFTR’s proper maturation and trafficking to the apical membrane. Understanding and manipulation of this network may lead to therapeutics for Cystic Fibrosis in cases where mutant CFTR has aberrant trafficking.

  18. Important role of class I heat shock genes hrcA and dnaK in the heat shock response and the response to pH and NaCl stress of group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Katja; Lindström, Miia; Somervuo, Panu; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    Class I heat shock genes (HSGs) code for molecular chaperones which play a major role in the bacterial response to sudden increases of environmental temperature by assisting protein folding. Quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR gene expression analysis of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum grown at 37°C showed that the class I HSGs grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groEL, and groES and their repressor, hrcA, were expressed at constant levels in the exponential and transitional growth phases, whereas strong downregulation of all six genes was observed during stationary phase. After heat shock from 37 to 45°C, all HSGs were transiently upregulated. A mutant with insertionally inactivated hrcA expressed higher levels of class I HSGs during exponential growth than the wild type, followed by upregulation of only groES and groES after heat shock. Inactivation of hrcA or of dnaK encoding a major chaperone resulted in lower maximum growth temperatures than for the wild type and reduced growth rates under optimal conditions compared to the wild type. The dnaK mutant showed growth inhibition under all tested temperature, pH, and NaCl stress conditions. In contrast, the growth of an hrcA mutant was unaffected by mild temperature or acid stress compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that induced class I HSGs support growth under moderately nonoptimal conditions. We show that the expression of class I HSGs plays a major role for survival and growth of C. botulinum under the stressful environmental conditions that may be encountered during food processing or growth in food products, in the mammalian intestine, or in wounds.

  19. Purification and biochemical characterization of DnaK and its transcriptional activator RpoH from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Shalini; Beckham, Simone A; Davies, John K; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-12-01

    DnaK plays a central role in stress response in the important human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The genes encoding the DnaK chaperone machine (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE) in N. gonorrhoeae are transcribed from RpoH (σ(32))-dependent promoters. In this study, we cloned, purified and biochemically characterised N. gonorrhoeae DnaK (NgDnaK) and RpoH. The NgDnaK and RpoH sequences are 73 and 50 % identical to the sequences of their respective E. coli counterparts. Similar to EcDnaK, nucleotide-free NgDnaK exists as a mix of monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric species in solution, and dissociates into monomers on addition of ATP. Like E. coli σ(32), RpoH of N. gonorrhoeae is monomeric in solution. Kinetic analysis of the basal ATPase activity of purified NgDnaK revealed a V max of 193 pmol phosphate released per minute per microgram DnaK (which is significantly higher than reported basal ATPase activity of EcDnaK), and the turnover number against ATP was 0.4 min(-1) under our assay conditions. Nucleotide-free NgDnaK bound a short model substrate, NR-peptide, with micromolar affinity close to that reported for EcDnaK. Our analysis showed that interaction between N. gonorrhoeae RpoH and DnaK appears to be ATP-dependent and non-specific, in stark contrast to the E. coli DnaK system where σ(32) and DnaK interact as monomers even in the absence of ATP. Sequence comparison showed that the DnaK-binding site of σ(32) is not conserved in RpoH. Our findings suggest that the mechanism of DnaK/RpoH recognition in N. gonorrhoeae is different from that in E. coli.

  20. Molecular chaperones-related studies using latent stages of invertebrates exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O. A.; Alexeev, V. R.; Sychev, V. N.; Okuda, T.; Saigusa, M.

    The latent stages of certain groups of invertebrates such as Artemia and Daphnia cyst Crustacea tuns of water bears Tardigrada are very perspective material for the investigation of the boundaries of the survival of the living organisms in the space environment While the number of authors showed that exposition the space flight causes the alteration in the survivability of the Artemia cysts there is no data about the changes in the stress response on the molecular level after short and long-termed space flight In this report we present preliminary results of the analysis of the expression of hsp90 chaperon in response to the heat shock in the larvae of the Artemia obtained from the cyst exposed to the real space flight onboard ISS for 1 and 6 month in the frame of the Aquarium program 2005-2006 and control ground group The perspectives of the usage of the molecular chaperons hsp in the studies for elucidation of the influence of the open space environment BIORISK and EXPOSE research programs on the immune response end general physiology of the invertebrates in their latent stages are discussed

  1. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2015-09-16

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2-20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN.

  2. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  3. Molecular Chaperones, Cochaperones, and Ubiquitination/Deubiquitination System: Involvement in the Production of High Quality Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Meccariello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs, their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates.

  4. From molecular chaperones to membrane motors: through the lens of a mass spectrometrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, we obtained our first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands and entered a new field of gas-phase structural biology. It is perhaps now time to pause and reflect, and to ask how many of our initial structure predictions and models derived from mass spectrometry (MS) datasets were correct. With recent advances in structure determination, many of the most challenging complexes that we studied over the years have become tractable by other structural biology approaches enabling such comparisons to be made. Moreover, in the light of powerful new electron microscopy methods, what role is there now for MS? In considering these questions, I will give my personal view on progress and problems as well as my predictions for future directions. PMID:28202679

  5. Single-step Purification of Molecular Chaperone GroEL by Expanded Bed Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟晓冬; 杨征; 董晓燕; 孙彦

    2003-01-01

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is an integrative downstream processing technique for the purification of biological substances directly from unclarified feedstock. In this study, molecular chaperone GroEL, an important protein folding helper both in vivo and in vitro, was purified by the single-step EBA technique from the unclarified homogenate of recombinant E. coli cells. Compared with packed bed adsorption, the EBA technique provided a single-step approach to yield an electrophoretic purity of GroEL. After the homogenate loading and column washing in the expanded bed mode, the GroEL protein was recovered by stepwise salt-gradient elution in packed-bed or expanded-bed modes, respectively. The expanded-bed elution mode was found as efficient as the packed-bed mode in the purification of GroEL from cell disruptate.

  6. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display.

  7. Molecular chaperone CCT3 supports proper mitotic progression and cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuqi; Wei, Youheng; Wu, Jiaxue; Zhang, Pingzhao; Shen, Suqin; Saiyin, Hexige; Wumaier, Reziya; Yang, Xianmei; Wang, Chenji; Yu, Long

    2016-03-01

    CCT3 was one of the subunits of molecular chaperone CCT/TRiC complex, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular proteostasis. We demonstrated that expressions of CCT3 mRNA and protein are highly up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and high level of CCT3 is correlated with poor survival in cancer patients. In HCC cell lines, CCT3 depletion suppresses cell proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest at prometaphase and apoptosis eventually. We also identified CCT3 as a novel regulator of spindle integrity and as a requirement for proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment during mitosis. Moreover, we found that CCT3 depletion sensitizes HCC cells to microtubule destabilizing drug Vincristine. Collectively, our study suggests that CCT3 is indispensible for HCC cell proliferation, and provides a potential drug target for treatment of HCC.

  8. Molecular chaperone activity of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) endoplasmic reticulum-located small heat shock protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Tarlan G; Shono, Mariko

    2008-03-01

    The gene encoding the small heat shock protein (sHSP), LeHSP21.5, has been previously cloned from tomato (GenBank accession no. AB026983). The deduced amino acid sequence of this tomato sHSP was most similar to that of other endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized sHSPs (ER-sHSP) and can be predicted to target the ER. We examined whether the gene product of LeHSP21.5 (probable ER-sHSP) can act as molecular chaperone. For functional analysis, LeHSP21.5 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as His(6)-tagged protein in the C-terminal and purified. We confirmed that ER-sHSP could provide thermal protection of soluble proteins in vitro. We compared the thermal stability of E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) transformed with pET-ER-sHSP with the control E. coli strain BL21(DE3) transformed with only the pET vector under heat shock and IPTG-induced conditions. Most of the protein extracts from E. coli cells expressing ER-sHSP were protected from heat-induced denaturation, whereas extracts from cells not expressing ER-sHSP were very heat-sensitive under these conditions. A similar protective effect was observed when purified ER-sHSP was added to an E. coli cell extract. ER-sHSP prevented the thermal aggregation and inactivation of citrate synthase. These collective findings indicate that ER-sHSP can function as a molecular chaperone in vitro.

  9. Modulation of Molecular Chaperones in Huntington's Disease and Other Polyglutamine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Sara D; Pinho, Brígida R; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2016-09-22

    Polyglutamine expansion mutations in specific proteins underlie the pathogenesis of a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. The different mutant proteins share ubiquitous expression and abnormal proteostasis, with misfolding and aggregation, but nevertheless evoke distinct patterns of neurodegeneration. This highlights the relevance of the full protein context where the polyglutamine expansion occurs and suggests different interactions with the cellular proteostasis machinery. Molecular chaperones are key elements of the proteostasis machinery and therapeutic targets for neurodegeneration. Here, we provide a focused review on Hsp90, Hsp70, and their co-chaperones, and how their genetic or pharmacological modulation affects the proteostasis and disease phenotypes in cellular and animal models of polyglutamine disorders. The emerging picture is that, in principle, Hsp70 modulation may be more amenable for long-term treatment by promoting a more selective clearance of mutant proteins than Hsp90 modulation, which may further decrease the necessary wild-type counterparts. It seems, nevertheless, unlikely that a single Hsp70 modulator will benefit all polyglutamine diseases. Indeed, available data, together with insights from effects on tau and alpha-synuclein in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, indicates that Hsp70 modulators may lead to different effects on the proteostasis of different mutant and wild-type client proteins. Future studies should include the further development of isoform selective inhibitors, namely to avoid off-target effects on Hsp in the mitochondria, and their characterization in distinct polyglutamine disease models to account for client protein-specific differences.

  10. Progress in molecular chaperon GroEL%GroEL分子伴侣研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张经余; 赵志虎; 蔡民华

    2001-01-01

    大肠杆菌的GroEL是同型寡聚复合体,由14个相对分子质量58×103亚基组成背靠背的双环结构。它在新生蛋白质的正确折叠和组装以及在热或化学逆境下变性蛋白质的恢复过程中起重要作用。同时,在大肠杆菌的跨膜转运及插入细胞质膜方面都起重要作用。这些活动依赖于GroEL与底物蛋白的疏水片断的相互作用。综述了Hsp60分子伴侣系统中研究得比较清楚的GroEL的晶体结构、功能及作用机理等方面的研究进展。%Molecular chaperon GroEL of E.coli is a homo-oligomeric complex composed of 14 58kDa subunits arranged in two rings stacked back to back, which is required for correct folding and assambly of newly synthesized proteins and for recovery of the cell after exposure to either thermal or chemical stress .Apart from these functions, GroEL chaperon is able to play a role in protein translocation across or insertion into the cytoplasmic membrane of E.coli. These actions depend on the interaction between GroE chaperionin system and the hydrophobic side chains .

  11. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Qun Kuang

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  12. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yi-Qun; Charette, Nicholle; Frazer, Jennifer; Holland, Patrick J; Attwood, Kathleen M; Dellaire, Graham; Dupré, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x)6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  13. Molecular mechanisms used by chaperones to reduce the toxicity of aberrant protein oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannini, Benedetta; Cascella, Roberta; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Van Waarde-Verhagen, Maria; Meehan, Sarah; Roodveldt, Cintia; Campioni, Silvia; Boninsegna, Matilde; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Kampinga, Harm H.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wilson, Mark R.; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Chaperones are the primary regulators of the proteostasis network and are known to facilitate protein folding, inhibit protein aggregation, and promote disaggregation and clearance of misfolded aggregates inside cells. We have tested the effects of five chaperones on the toxicity of misfolded oligom

  14. Profibrillin-1 Maturation by Human Dermal Fibroblasts: Proteolytic Processing and Molecular Chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Debra D.; Putnam, Elizabeth A.; Cretoiu, Jill S.; Carmical, Sonya G.; Cao, Shi-Nian; Thomas, Gary; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2006-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 is synthesized as a proprotein that undergoes proteolytic processing in the unique C-terminal domain by a member of the PACE/furin family of endoproteases. This family of endoproteases is active in the trans-Golgi network (TGN), but metabolic labeling studies have been controversial as to whether profibrillin-1 is processed intracellularly or after secretion. This report provides evidence that profibrillin-1 processing is not an intracellular event. Bafilomycin A1 and incubation of dermal fibroblasts at 22°C were used to block secretion in the TGN to confirm that profibrillin-1 processing did not occur in this compartment. Profibrillin-1 immunoprecipitation studies revealed that two endoplasmic reticulum-resident molecular chaperones, BiP and GRP94, interacted with profibrillin-1. To determine the proprotein convertase responsible for processing profibrillin-1, a specific inhibitor of furin, α-1-antitrypsin, Portland variant, was both expressed in the cells and added to cells exogenously. In both cases, the inhibitor blocked the processing of profibrillin-1, providing evidence that furin is the enzyme responsible for profibrillin-1 processing. These studies delineate the secretion and proteolytic processing of profibrillin-1, and identify the proteins that interact with profibrillin-1 in the secretory pathway. PMID:14523997

  15. Mechanistic basis for the recognition of a misfolded protein by the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz, Javier; Kim, Jin Hae; Chang, Bliss J; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2017-02-20

    The critical toxic species in over 40 human diseases are misfolded proteins. Their interaction with molecular chaperones such as Hsp90, which preferentially interacts with metastable proteins, is essential for the blocking of disease progression. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the misfolded cytotoxic monomer of the amyloidogenic human protein transthyretin, which is characterized by the release of the C-terminal β-strand and perturbations of the A-B loop. The misfolded transthyretin monomer, but not the wild-type protein, binds to human Hsp90. In the bound state, the Hsp90 dimer predominantly populates an open conformation, and transthyretin retains its globular structure. The interaction surface for the transthyretin monomer comprises the N-terminal and middle domains of Hsp90 and overlaps with that of the Alzheimer's-disease-related protein tau. Taken together, the data suggest that Hsp90 uses a mechanism for the recognition of aggregation-prone proteins that is largely distinct from those of other Hsp90 clients.

  16. Antimyeloma Effects of the Heat Shock Protein 70 Molecular Chaperone Inhibitor MAL3-101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Braunstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is the second most common hematologic malignancy and remains incurable, primarily due to the treatment-refractory/resistant nature of the disease. A rational approach to this compelling challenge is to develop new drugs that act synergistically with existing effective agents. This approach will reduce drug concentrations, avoid treatment resistance, and also improve treatment effectiveness by targeting new and nonredundant pathways in MM. Toward this goal, we examined the antimyeloma effects of MAL3-101, a member of a new class of non-ATP-site inhibitors of the heat shock protein (Hsp 70 molecular chaperone. We discovered that MAL3-101 exhibited antimyeloma effects on MM cell lines in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft plasmacytoma model, as well as on primary tumor cells and bone marrow endothelial cells from myeloma patients. In combination with a proteasome inhibitor, MAL3-101 significantly potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antimyeloma effects. These data support a preclinical rationale for small molecule inhibition of Hsp70 function, either alone or in combination with other agents, as an effective therapeutic strategy for MM.

  17. Crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment reveals the mechanism for its molecular chaperone activity in UPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiahui; Petrova, Kseniya; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-04-16

    P58(IPK) might function as an endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone to maintain protein folding homeostasis during unfolded protein responses. P58(IPK) contains nine tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum, we have determined the crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment to 2.5 A resolution by the SAD method. The crystal structure of P58(IPK) revealed three domains (I-III) with similar folds and each domain contains three TPR motifs. An ELISA assay indicated that P58(IPK) acts as a molecular chaperone by interacting with misfolded proteins such as luciferase and rhodanese. The P58(IPK) structure reveals a conserved hydrophobic patch located in domain I that might be involved in binding the misfolded polypeptides. Structure-based mutagenesis for the conserved hydrophobic residues located in domain I significantly reduced the molecular chaperone activity of P58(IPK).

  18. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  19. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models.

  20. Energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dots vs. labelled molecular chaperone systems by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hiromi; Usukura, Eiji; Sakai, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Resonant energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labelled molecular chaperone systems is observed with single molecule imaging technique. Photonic QDs are the core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on the outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's, and prefoldin (PFD) is used as prototype molecular chaperons. PFD is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portion of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within its central cavity. So the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs can also be captured be cause of its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. We have found one possible reaction pathway to get such artificial complex in aqueous solutions with keeping bioactivities of the proteins. Performance of the complex is evaluated by TIRF imaging microscopy. As the proteins are transparent in visible wavelength region, labeling dyes, Cy5, which also work as acceptors, are connected to detect their behaviors microscopically. Foerster type energy transfer is observed from the QD donors to Cy5-labeled PFD acceptors in single molecule level, which can be a distinct evidence for the complex formation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. An interaction network predicted from public data as a discovery tool: application to the Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo C Echeverría

    Full Text Available Understanding the functions of proteins requires information about their protein-protein interactions (PPI. The collective effort of the scientific community generates far more data on any given protein than individual experimental approaches. The latter are often too limited to reveal an interactome comprehensively. We developed a workflow for parallel mining of all major PPI databases, containing data from several model organisms, and to integrate data from the literature for a protein of interest. We applied this novel approach to build the PPI network of the human Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine (Hsp90Int for which previous efforts have yielded limited and poorly overlapping sets of interactors. We demonstrate the power of the Hsp90Int database as a discovery tool by validating the prediction that the Hsp90 co-chaperone Aha1 is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Thus, we both describe how to build a custom database and introduce a powerful new resource for the scientific community.

  2. Modeling signal propagation mechanisms and ligand-based conformational dynamics of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone full-length dimer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine "hot spots" involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a "conformational selection model" of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may

  3. Molecular chaperone mediated late-stage neuroprotection in the SOD1(G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S Novoselov

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2, mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1(G93A transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1(G93A and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1(G93A aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS.

  4. DARPin-Based Crystallization Chaperones Exploit Molecular Geometry as a Screening Dimension in Protein Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyuk, Alexander; Wu, Yufan; Honegger, Annemarie; Heberling, Matthew M; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-04-24

    DARPin libraries, based on a Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein consensus framework, are a rich source of binding partners for a wide variety of proteins. Their modular structure, stability, ease of in vitro selection and high production yields make DARPins an ideal starting point for further engineering. The X-ray structures of around 30 different DARPin complexes demonstrate their ability to facilitate crystallization of their target proteins by restricting flexibility and preventing undesired interactions of the target molecule. However, their small size (18 kDa), very hydrophilic surface and repetitive structure can limit the DARPins' ability to provide essential crystal contacts and their usefulness as a search model for addressing the crystallographic phase problem in molecular replacement. To optimize DARPins for their application as crystallization chaperones, rigid domain-domain fusions of the DARPins to larger proteins, proven to yield high-resolution crystal structures, were generated. These fusions were designed in such a way that they affect only one of the terminal capping repeats of the DARPin and do not interfere with residues involved in target binding, allowing to exchange at will the binding specificities of the DARPin in the fusion construct. As a proof of principle, we designed rigid fusions of a stabilized version of Escherichia coli TEM-1 β-lactamase to the C-terminal capping repeat of various DARPins in six different relative domain orientations. Five crystal structures representing four different fusion constructs, alone or in complex with the cognate target, show the predicted relative domain orientations and prove the validity of the concept.

  5. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  6. An accessible hydrophobic surface is a key element of the molecular chaperone action of Atp11p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheluho, D; Ackerman, S H

    2001-10-26

    Atp11p is a soluble protein of mitochondria that binds unassembled beta subunits of the F(1)-ATPase and prevents them from aggregating in the matrix. In this report, we show that Atp11p protects the insulin B chain from aggregating in vitro and therefore acts as a molecular chaperone. The chaperone action of Atp11p is mediated by hydrophobic interactions. An accessible hydrophobic surface in Atp11p was identified with the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5-napththalenesulfonic acid (bis-ANS). The spectral changes of bis-ANS in the presence of Atp11p indicate that the probe binds to a nonpolar region of the protein. Furthermore, the dye quenches the fluorescence of Atp11p tryptophan residues in a concentration-dependent manner. Although up to three molecules of bis-ANS can bind cooperatively to Atp11p, the binding of only one dye molecule is sufficient to virtually eliminate the chaperone activity of the protein.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  8. Molecular Chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 Prepares the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Translocon Receptor Tom71 for Preprotein Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Hu, Junbin; Sha, Bingdong; (UAB)

    2010-11-03

    The preproteins targeted to the mitochondria are transported through the translocase of the outer membrane complex. Tom70/Tom71 is a major surface receptor of the translocase of the outer membrane complex for mitochondrial preproteins. The preproteins are escorted to Tom70/Tom71 by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we present the high resolution crystal structures of Tom71 and the protein complexes between Tom71 and the Hsp70/Hsp90 C terminus. The crystal structures indicate that Tom70/Tom71 may exhibit two distinct states. In the closed state, the N-terminal domain of Tom70/Tom71 partially blocks the preprotein-binding pocket. In the open state, the N-terminal domain moves away, and the preprotein-binding pocket is fully exposed. The complex formation between the C-terminal EEVD motif of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 could lock Tom71 in the open state where the preprotein-binding pocket of Tom71 is ready to receive preproteins. The interactions between Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 N-terminal domain generate conformational changes that may increase the volume of the preprotein-binding pocket. The complex formation of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 also generates significant domain rearrangement within Tom71, which may position the preprotein-binding pocket closer to Hsp70/Hsp90 to facilitate the preprotein transfer from the molecular chaperone to Tom71. Therefore, molecular chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 may function to prepare the mitochondrial outer membrane receptor Tom71 for preprotein loading.

  9. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambre eSala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen M. tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin (TA system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  10. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  11. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations : Application in the refinement of de novo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment, spe

  12. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry (Dupont)

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  13. The Role of System-Specific Molecular Chaperones in the Maturation of Molybdoenzymes in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Neumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of prokaryotic molybdoenzymes is a complex process with the final step representing the insertion of a matured molybdenum cofactor (Moco into a folded apoenzyme. Usually, specific chaperones of the XdhC family are required for the maturation of molybdoenzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are characterized to contain an equatorial sulfur ligand at the molybdenum center of Moco. This sulfur ligand is inserted into Moco while bound to the XdhC-like protein and before its insertion into the target enzyme. In addition, enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family bind either the molybdopterin (Mo-MPT form of Moco or the modified molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor (MCD. In both cases, only the matured cofactor is inserted by a proofreading process of XdhC. The roles of these specific XdhC-like chaperones during the biogenesis of enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria are described.

  14. Molecular chaperone activity and biological regulatory actions of the TPR-domain immunophilins FKBP51 and FKBP52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Harris, Diondra C; Cox, Marc B; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-05-01

    Immunophilins comprise a family of intracellular proteins with peptidyl-prolyl-(cis/trans)-isomerase activity. These foldases are abundant, ubiquitous, and able to bind immunosuppressant drugs, from which the term immunophilin derives. Family members are found in abundance in virtually all organisms and subcellular compartments, and their amino acid sequences are conserved phylogenetically. Immunophilins possess the ability to function as molecular chaperones favoring the proper folding and biological regulation of their biological actions. Their ability to interact via their TPR domains with the 90-kDa heat-shock protein, and through this chaperone, with several signalling cascade factors is of particular importance. Among the family members, the highly homologous proteins FKBP51 and FKBP52 were first characterized due to their ability to interact with steroid hormone receptors. Since then, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms by which they regulate receptor signaling and the resulting roles they play not only in endocrine processes, but also in cell architecture, neurodifferentiation, and tumor progression. In this article we review the most relevant features of these two immunophilins and their potential as pharmacologic targets.

  15. CcpA affects expression of the groESL and dnaK operons in Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marasco Rosangela

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in food industry and their growth performance is important for the quality of the fermented product. During industrial processes changes in temperature may represent an environmental stress to be overcome by starters and non-starters LAB. Studies on adaptation to heat shock have shown the involvement of the chaperon system-proteins in various Gram-positive bacteria. The corresponding operons, namely the dnaK and groESL operons, are controlled by a negative mechanism involving the HrcA repressor protein binding to the cis acting element CIRCE. Results We studied adaptation to heat shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum. The LM3-2 strain, carrying a null mutation in the ccpA gene, encoding the catabolite control protein A (CcpA, showed a lower percent of survival to high temperature with respect to the LM3 wild type strain. Among proteins differentially expressed in the two strains, the GroES chaperon was more abundant in the wild type strain compared to the mutant strain under standard growth conditions. Transcriptional studies showed that class I heat shock operons were differentially expressed upon heat shock in both strains. Indeed, the dnaK and groESL operons were induced about two times more in the LM3 strain compared to the LM3-2 strain. Analysis of the regulatory region of the two operons showed the presence of cre sequences, putative binding sites for the CcpA protein. Conclusion The L. plantarum dnaK and groESL operons are characterized by the presence of the cis acting sequence CIRCE in the promoter region, suggesting a negative regulation by the HrcA/CIRCE system, which is a common type of control among the class I heat shock operons of Gram-positive bacteria. We found an additional system of regulation, based on a positive control exerted by the CcpA protein, which would interact with cre sequences present in the regulatory region of the dnaK and gro

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of the molecular chaperone prefoldin from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yoshiki; Kida, Hiroshi; Nishitani, Yuichi; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    Proper protein folding is an essential process for all organisms. Prefoldin (PFD) is a molecular chaperone that assists protein folding by delivering non-native proteins to group II chaperonin. A heterohexamer of eukaryotic PFD has been shown to specifically recognize and deliver non-native actin and tubulin to chaperonin-containing TCP-1 (CCT), but the mechanism of specific recognition is still unclear. To determine its crystal structure, recombinant human PFD was reconstituted, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 4.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 123.2, b = 152.4, c = 105.9 Å.

  17. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Pathogenesis of Lewisite-Induced Cutaneous Blistering and Inflammation: Chemical Chaperones as Potential Novel Antidotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Weng, Zhiping; Croutch, Claire R; Agarwal, Anupam; Elmets, Craig A; Afaq, Farrukh; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Lewisite is a potent arsenic-based chemical warfare agent known to induce painful cutaneous inflammation and blistering. Only a few modestly effective antidotes have so far been described in the literature. However, the discovery of effective antidotes for lewisite was hampered by the paucity of the exact molecular mechanism underlying its cutaneous pathogenesis. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying lewisite-induced cutaneous blistering and inflammation and describe its novel antidotes. On the basis of our initial screening, we used a highly sensitive murine model that recapitulates the known human pathogenesis of arsenicals-induced cutaneous inflammation and blistering. Topically administered lewisite induced potent acute inflammation and microvesication in the skin of Ptch1(+/-)/SKH-1 mice. Even at a very low dose, lewisite up-regulates unfolded protein response signaling, inflammatory response, and apoptosis. These cutaneous lesions were associated with production of reactive oxygen species and extensive apoptosis of the epidermal keratinocytes. We confirmed that activation of reactive oxygen species-dependent unfolded protein response signaling is the underlying molecular mechanism of skin damage. Similar alterations were noticed in lewisite-treated cultured human skin keratinocytes. We discovered that chemical chaperone 4-phenyl butyric acid and antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, which significantly attenuate lewisite-mediated skin injury, can serve as potent antidotes. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying the cutaneous pathogenesis of lewisite-induced lesions. We also identified novel potential therapeutic targets for lewisite-mediated cutaneous injury.

  18. Isolation of a Latimeria menadoensis heat shock protein 70 (Lmhsp70) that has all the features of an inducible gene and encodes a functional molecular chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modisakeng, Keoagile W; Jiwaji, Meesbah; Pesce, Eva-Rachele; Robert, Jacques; Amemiya, Chris T; Dorrington, Rosemary A; Blatch, Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the correct folding of other proteins, and heat shock proteins form one of the major classes of molecular chaperones. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been extensively studied, and shown to be critically important for cellular protein homeostasis in almost all prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems studied to date. Since there have been very limited studies conducted on coelacanth chaperones, the main objective of this study was to genetically and biochemically characterize a coelacanth Hsp70. We have successfully isolated an Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis) hsp70 gene, Lmhsp70, and found that it contained an intronless coding region and a potential upstream regulatory region. Lmhsp70 encoded a typical Hsp70 based on conserved structural and functional features, and the predicted upstream regulatory region was found to contain six potential promoter elements, and three potential heat shock elements (HSEs). The intronless nature of the coding region and the presence of HSEs suggested that Lmhsp70 was stress-inducible. Phylogenetic analyses provided further evidence that Lmhsp70 was probably inducible, and that it branched as a clade intermediate between bony fish and tetrapods. Recombinant LmHsp70 was successfully overproduced, purified and found to be functional using ATPase activity assays. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the first time that the coelacanth encodes a functional molecular chaperone system.

  19. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  20. Xaa-Arg-Gly triplets in the collagen triple helix are dominant binding sites for the molecular chaperone HSP47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Asada, Shinichi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2002-02-22

    HSP47 is an essential procollagen-specific molecular chaperone that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum of procollagen-producing cells. Recent advances have revealed that HSP47 recognizes the (Pro-Pro-Gly)(n) sequence but not (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(n) and that HSP47 recognizes the triple-helical conformation. In this study, to better understand the substrate recognition by HSP47, we synthesized various collagen model peptides and examined their interaction with HSP47 in vitro. We found that the Pro-Arg-Gly triplet forms an HSP47-binding site. The HSP47 binding was observed only when Arg residues were incorporated in the Yaa positions of the Xaa-Yaa-Gly triplets. Amino acids in the Xaa position did not largely affect the interaction. The recognition of the Arg residue by HSP47 was specific to its side-chain structure because replacement of the Arg residue by other basic amino acids decreased the affinity to HSP47. The significance of Arg residues in HSP47 binding was further confirmed by using residue-specific chemical modification of types I and III collagen. Our results demonstrate that Xaa-Arg-Gly sequences in the triple-helical procollagen molecule are dominant binding sites for HSP47 and enable us to predict HSP47-binding sites in homotrimeric procollagen molecules.

  1. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  2. Enhanced recombinant protein production and differential expression of molecular chaperones in sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells after baculovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yiu-Kay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that have examined the potential of RNA inference (RNAi to increase protein production in the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS. Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm (Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells exhibit resistance to apoptosis and enhancement of recombinant protein production. However, the mechanism of recombinant protein augmentation in baculovirus-infected Caspase-repressed insect cells has not been elucidated. Results In the current study, we utilized RNAi-mediated Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells to clarify how the resistance to apoptosis can enhance both intracellular (firefly luciferase and extracellular (secreted alkaline phosphatase [SEAP] recombinant protein production in BEVS. Since the expression of molecular chaperones is strongly associated with the maximal production of exogenous proteins in BEVS, the differential expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected stable cells was also analyzed in this study. Conclusion The data indicated that the retention of expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells give the higher recombinant protein accumulation.

  3. Optimisation of production of a domoic acid-binding scFv antibody fragment in Escherichia coli using molecular chaperones and functional immobilisation on a mesoporous silicate support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuejun; O'Hara, Liam; White, Simon; Magner, Edmond; Kane, Marian; Wall, J Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin that can lead to amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans through ingestion of contaminated shellfish. We have produced and purified an anti-domoic acid single-chain Fragment variable (scFv) antibody fragment from the Escherichia coli periplasm. Yields of functional protein were increased by up to 100-fold upon co-production of E. coli DnaKJE molecular chaperones but co-overproduction of GroESL led to a reduction in solubility of the scFv. Co-production of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase trigger factor resulted in accumulation of unprocessed scFv in the E. coli cytoplasm. This was due to an apparent bottleneck in translocation of the cytoplasmic membrane by the recombinant polypeptide. Co-expression of the E. coli disulfide bond isomerase dsbC increased scFv yields by delaying lysis of the host bacterial cells though this effect was not synergistic with molecular chaperone co-production. Meanwhile, use of a cold-shock promoter for protein production led to accumulation of greater amounts of scFv polypeptide which was predominantly in insoluble form and could not be rescued by chaperones. Purification of the scFv was achieved using an optimised metal affinity chromatography procedure and the purified protein bound domoic acid when immobilised on a mesoporous silicate support. The work outlines the potential benefit of applying a molecular chaperone/folding catalyst screening approach to improve antibody fragment production for applications such as sensor development.

  4. A bacteriophage-encoded J-domain protein interacts with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone and stabilizes the heat-shock factor σ32 of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Perrody

    Full Text Available The universally conserved J-domain proteins (JDPs are obligate cochaperone partners of the Hsp70 (DnaK chaperone. They stimulate Hsp70's ATPase activity, facilitate substrate delivery, and confer specific cellular localization to Hsp70. In this work, we have identified and characterized the first functional JDP protein encoded by a bacteriophage. Specifically, we show that the ORFan gene 057w of the T4-related enterobacteriophage RB43 encodes a bona fide JDP protein, named Rki, which specifically interacts with the Escherichia coli host multifunctional DnaK chaperone. However, in sharp contrast with the three known host JDP cochaperones of DnaK encoded by E. coli, Rki does not act as a generic cochaperone in vivo or in vitro. Expression of Rki alone is highly toxic for wild-type E. coli, but toxicity is abolished in the absence of endogenous DnaK or when the conserved J-domain of Rki is mutated. Further in vivo analyses revealed that Rki is expressed early after infection by RB43 and that deletion of the rki gene significantly impairs RB43 proliferation. Furthermore, we show that mutations in the host dnaK gene efficiently suppress the growth phenotype of the RB43 rki deletion mutant, thus indicating that Rki specifically interferes with DnaK cellular function. Finally, we show that the interaction of Rki with the host DnaK chaperone rapidly results in the stabilization of the heat-shock factor σ(32, which is normally targeted for degradation by DnaK. The mechanism by which the Rki-dependent stabilization of σ(32 facilitates RB43 bacteriophage proliferation is discussed.

  5. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  6. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  7. Detection of the host immune response to Burkholderia mallei heat-shock proteins GroEL and DnaK in a glanders patient and infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Kei; Meyers, Jennifer L; Deshazer, David; Riggins, Renaldo N; Halasohoris, Stephanie; England, Marilyn; Ribot, Wilson; Norris, Sarah L; Waag, David M

    2007-10-01

    We examined, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis, the host immune response to 2 heat-shock proteins (hsps) in a patient and mice previously infected with Burkholderia mallei. The patient was the first reported human glanders case in 50 years in the United States. The expression of the groEL and dnaK operons appeared to be dependent upon a sigma(32) RNA polymerase as suggested by conserved heat-shock promoter sequences, and the groESL operon may be negatively regulated by a controlling invert repeat of chaperone expression (CIRCE) site. In the antisera, the GroEL protein was found to be more immunoreactive than the DnaK protein in both a human patient and mice previously infected with B. mallei. Examination of the supernatant of a growing culture of B. mallei showed that more GroEL protein than DnaK protein was released from the cell. This may occur similarly within an infected host causing an elevated host immune response to the B. mallei hsps.

  8. Altered expression of cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 molecular chaperone affects development and abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Clément, Mathilde; Chiarenza, Serge; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Pochon, Nathalie; Creff, Audrey; Marin, Elena; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Noël, Laurent D

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock cognate 70 kDa (HSC70) family are highly conserved in all living organisms and assist nascent protein folding in normal physiological conditions as well as in biotic and abiotic stress conditions. In the absence of specific inhibitors or viable knockout mutants, cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 overexpression (OE) and mutants in the HSC70 co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of G(2)/M allele of skp1) were used as genetic tools to identify HSC70/SGT1 functions in Arabidopsis development and abiotic stress responses. HSC70-1 OE caused a reduction in root and shoot meristem activities, thus explaining the dwarfism of those plants. In addition, HSC70-1 OE did not impair auxin-dependent phenotypes, suggesting that SGT1 functions previously identified in auxin signalling are HSC70 independent. While responses to abiotic stimuli such as UV-C exposure, phosphate starvation, or seedling de-etiolation were not perturbed by HSC70-1 OE, it specifically conferred gamma-ray hypersensitivity and tolerance to salt, cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As). Cd and As perception was not perturbed, but plants overexpressing HSC70-1 accumulated less Cd, thus providing a possible molecular explanation for their tolerance phenotype. In summary, genetic evidence is provided for HSC70-1 involvement in a limited set of physiological processes, illustrating the essential and yet specific functions of this chaperone in development and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  9. Single molecule FRET detection in CdSe-QD donor and Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone acceptor complex by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro, E-mail: ttani@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Araki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi; Yohda, Masafumi [Division of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    We report single molecule spectroscopic evidence of FRET in CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone systems in buffer solutions. Donor QDs are core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on their outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's. As prototype molecular chaperones, we adopt prefoldins (PFDs), on which Cy5's are labeled as acceptors. Donor QDs possess two-fold degenerate emission dipoles perpendicular to the c-axis, due to their Wurtzite crystal structures, while acceptor Cy5's possess linear absorption and emission dipoles. Thus, their combination provides novel features to those in conventional FRET systems. PFDs are jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperones of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portions of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within their central cavities. Hence, PFDs will also capture the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs due to its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. By introducing simple microscope setup for single QD-PFD-Cy5 spectroscopy, we have successfully captured the emission spectra in FRET regime. We also have observed peculiar features in time evolution profiles of single QD emissions conjugated with Cy5-labeled PFDs under polarization modulation measurements. Notable point of our hybrid conjugates is that they are biochemically in living action. We describe our present results in relation to possible protein reactions.

  10. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  11. The Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Acts as a Molecular Chaperone for mRNP Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Donlin-Asp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that facilitates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. SMN has also been found to associate with mRNA-binding proteins, but the nature of this association was unknown. Here, we have employed a combination of biochemical and advanced imaging methods to demonstrate that SMN promotes the molecular interaction between IMP1 protein and the 3′ UTR zipcode region of β-actin mRNA, leading to assembly of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes that associate with the cytoskeleton to facilitate trafficking. We have identified defects in mRNP assembly in cells and tissues from SMA disease models and patients that depend on the SMN Tudor domain and explain the observed deficiency in mRNA localization and local translation, providing insight into SMA pathogenesis as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP-assembly disorder.

  12. Molecular basis and specificity of H2A.Z-H2B recognition and deposition by the histone chaperone YL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrick, Chrysa M; Marek, Martin; Ouararhni, Khalid; Papin, Christophe; Stoll, Isabelle; Ignatyeva, Maria; Obri, Arnaud; Ennifar, Eric; Dimitrov, Stefan; Romier, Christophe; Hamiche, Ali

    2016-04-01

    H2A.Z, a widely conserved histone variant, is evicted from chromatin by the histone chaperone ANP32E. However, to date, no deposition chaperone for H2A.Z is known in metazoans. Here, we identify YL1 as a specific H2A.Z-deposition chaperone. The 2.7-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human YL1-H2A.Z-H2B complex shows that YL1 binding, similarly to ANP32E binding, triggers an extension of the H2A.Z αC helix. The interaction with YL1 is, however, more extensive and includes both the extended acidic patch and the entire DNA-binding surface of H2A.Z-H2B. Substitution of only four amino acid residues of H2A is sufficient for the formation of an H2A.Z-like interface specifically recognized by YL1. Collectively, our data reveal the molecular basis of H2A.Z-specific recognition by YL1 and shed light on the mechanism of H2A.Z transfer to the nucleosome by the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes SRCAP and P400-TIP60.

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph

    2012-01-01

    support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation...... chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution...

  14. Identification and in silico analysis of the Citrus HSP70 molecular chaperone gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano G. Fietto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the genome sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana model system provided a powerful molecular tool for comparative analysis of gene families present in the genome of economically relevant plant species. In this investigation, we used the sequences of the Arabidopsis Hsp70 gene family to identify and annotate the Citrus Hsp70 genes represented in the CitEST database. Based on sequence comparison analysis, we identified 18 clusters that were further divided into 5 subgroups encoding four mitochondrial mtHsp70s, three plastid csHsp70s, one ER luminal Hsp70 BiP, two HSP110/SSE-related proteins and eight cytosolic Hsp/Hsc70s. We also analyzed the expression profile by digital Northern of each Hsp70 transcript in different organs and in response to stress conditions. The EST database revealed a distinct population distribution of Hsp70 ESTs among isoforms and across the organs surveyed. The Hsp70-5 isoform was highly expressed in seeds, whereas BiP, mitochondrial and plastid HSp70 mRNAs displayed a similar expression profile in the organs analyzed, and were predominantly represented in flowers. Distinct Hsp70 mRNAs were also differentially expressed during Xylella infection and Citrus tristeza viral infection as well as during water deficit. This in silico study sets the groundwork for future investigations to fully characterize functionally the Citrus Hsp70 family and underscores the relevance of Hsp70s in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in Citrus.

  15. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma

  16. dnaK 操纵子研究进展%Advances in dnaK Operon Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴莹; 刘金凤; 牛雪薇(综述); 张志民(审校)

    2015-01-01

    dnaK operon contains grpE, dnaJ and hrcA etc in Gram-positive bacteria. Based on 16S rDNA sequence findings, Streptococcus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus sake and mycobacteria have a close genetic relationship. This review summarizes the structure, function and possible mechanisms of dnaK operon.%dnaK操纵子在G+菌中包含grpE、dnaJ、hrcA等基因成员。基于16S rDNA序列的研究发现,链球菌、乳球菌、清酒乳杆菌、分支杆菌具有密切亲缘关系。本文就己发现的danK操纵子的基因及其结构、功能和可能的作用机制作一综述。

  17. Oolemmal proteomics – identification of highly abundant heat shock proteins and molecular chaperones in the mature mouse egg and their localization on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Meredith E; Digilio, Laura C; Herr, John C; Coonrod, Scott A

    2003-01-01

    Background The mature mouse egg contains the full complement of maternal proteins required for fertilization, the transition to zygotic transcription, and the beginning stages of embryogenesis. Many of these proteins remain to be characterized, therefore in this study we have identified highly abundant egg proteins using a proteomic approach and found that several of these proteins also appear to localize to the egg surface. Characterization of such molecules will provide important insight into the cellular events of fertilization and early development. Methods In order to identify some of the more abundant egg proteins, whole egg extracts were resolved on coomassie-stained two-dimensional (2D) PAGE gels. Several highly abundant protein spots were cored and microsequenced by tandem mass spectrometry (TMS), and determined to be molecular chaperone proteins. Concurrent experiments were performed to identify oolemmal proteins using 2D avidin blotting. Proteins spots that appeared to be surface labeled by biotinylation were correlated with the initial coomassie-stained reference gel. Surprisingly, some of the surface labelled proteins corresponded to those abundant chaperone proteins previously identified. To confirm whether these molecules are accumulating at the oolemmal surface in eggs, we performed immunofluoresence on live, zona-free eggs using antibodies to HSP70, HSP90, GRP94, GRP78, calreticulin and calnexin. Results The putative surface-labeled proteins identified by biotinylation included the molecular chaperones HSP70 (MW 70 KDa, pI 5.5), HSP90a (MW 85 KDa, pI 4.9), GRP94 (MW 92 KDa, pI 4.7), GRP78 (MW 72 KDa, pI 5.0), Oxygen regulated protein 150 (ORP150; MW 111 KDa, pI 5.1), Calreticulin (MW 48 KDa, pI 4.3), Calnexin (MW 65 KDa, pI 4.5), and Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI; MW 57 KDa, pI 4.8). Immunofluoresence results showed that antibodies to HSP90, GRP94, GRP78 and calreticulin were reactive with oolemmal proteins. We were unable to confirm surface

  18. Oolemmal proteomics – identification of highly abundant heat shock proteins and molecular chaperones in the mature mouse egg and their localization on the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herr John C

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mature mouse egg contains the full complement of maternal proteins required for fertilization, the transition to zygotic transcription, and the beginning stages of embryogenesis. Many of these proteins remain to be characterized, therefore in this study we have identified highly abundant egg proteins using a proteomic approach and found that several of these proteins also appear to localize to the egg surface. Characterization of such molecules will provide important insight into the cellular events of fertilization and early development. Methods In order to identify some of the more abundant egg proteins, whole egg extracts were resolved on coomassie-stained two-dimensional (2D PAGE gels. Several highly abundant protein spots were cored and microsequenced by tandem mass spectrometry (TMS, and determined to be molecular chaperone proteins. Concurrent experiments were performed to identify oolemmal proteins using 2D avidin blotting. Proteins spots that appeared to be surface labeled by biotinylation were correlated with the initial coomassie-stained reference gel. Surprisingly, some of the surface labelled proteins corresponded to those abundant chaperone proteins previously identified. To confirm whether these molecules are accumulating at the oolemmal surface in eggs, we performed immunofluoresence on live, zona-free eggs using antibodies to HSP70, HSP90, GRP94, GRP78, calreticulin and calnexin. Results The putative surface-labeled proteins identified by biotinylation included the molecular chaperones HSP70 (MW 70 KDa, pI 5.5, HSP90a (MW 85 KDa, pI 4.9, GRP94 (MW 92 KDa, pI 4.7, GRP78 (MW 72 KDa, pI 5.0, Oxygen regulated protein 150 (ORP150; MW 111 KDa, pI 5.1, Calreticulin (MW 48 KDa, pI 4.3, Calnexin (MW 65 KDa, pI 4.5, and Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI; MW 57 KDa, pI 4.8. Immunofluoresence results showed that antibodies to HSP90, GRP94, GRP78 and calreticulin were reactive with oolemmal proteins. We were unable to

  19. Oolemmal proteomics--identification of highly abundant heat shock proteins and molecular chaperones in the mature mouse egg and their localization on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Meredith E; Digilio, Laura C; Herr, John C; Coonrod, Scott A

    2003-02-14

    The mature mouse egg contains the full complement of maternal proteins required for fertilization, the transition to zygotic transcription, and the beginning stages of embryogenesis. Many of these proteins remain to be characterized, therefore in this study we have identified highly abundant egg proteins using a proteomic approach and found that several of these proteins also appear to localize to the egg surface. Characterization of such molecules will provide important insight into the cellular events of fertilization and early development. In order to identify some of the more abundant egg proteins, whole egg extracts were resolved on coomassie-stained two-dimensional (2D) PAGE gels. Several highly abundant protein spots were cored and microsequenced by tandem mass spectrometry (TMS), and determined to be molecular chaperone proteins. Concurrent experiments were performed to identify oolemmal proteins using 2D avidin blotting. Proteins spots that appeared to be surface labeled by biotinylation were correlated with the initial coomassie-stained reference gel. Surprisingly, some of the surface labelled proteins corresponded to those abundant chaperone proteins previously identified. To confirm whether these molecules are accumulating at the oolemmal surface in eggs, we performed immunofluoresence on live, zona-free eggs using antibodies to HSP70, HSP90, GRP94, GRP78, calreticulin and calnexin. The putative surface-labeled proteins identified by biotinylation included the molecular chaperones HSP70 (MW 70 KDa, pI 5.5), HSP90a (MW 85 KDa, pI 4.9), GRP94 (MW 92 KDa, pI 4.7), GRP78 (MW 72 KDa, pI 5.0), Oxygen regulated protein 150 (ORP150; MW 111 KDa, pI 5.1), Calreticulin (MW 48 KDa, pI 4.3), Calnexin (MW 65 KDa, pI 4.5), and Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI; MW 57 KDa, pI 4.8). Immunofluoresence results showed that antibodies to HSP90, GRP94, GRP78 and calreticulin were reactive with oolemmal proteins. We were unable to confirm surface localization of HSP70 or

  20. Priming the immune system of Penaeid shrimp by bacterial HSP70 (DnaK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuoc, L H; Hu, B; Wille, M; Hien, N T; Phuong, V H; Tinh, N T N; Loc, N H; Sorgeloos, P; Bossier, P

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the effect of DnaK on priming immune responses in Penaeid shrimp. Juvenile-specific pathogen-free (SPF) P. vannamei shrimp were injected with 0.05 μg recombinant DnaK. One hour post-DnaK priming, a non-lethal dose of Vibrio campbellii (10(5) CFU shrimp(-1)) was injected. Other treatments include only DnaK or V. campbellii injection or control with blank inocula. The haemolymph of three shrimp from each treatment was collected at 1.5, 6, 9 and 12 h post-DnaK priming (hpp). It was verified that injection with DnaK and V. campbellii challenge affected the transcription of 3 immune genes, transglutaminase-1 (TGase-1), prophenoloxidase-2 (proPO-2) and endogenous HSP70 (lvHSP70). In P. monodon, shrimp were first injected with DnaK at a dose of 10 μg shrimp(-1) and one hour later with 10(6) CFU of V. harveyi (BB120) shrimp(-1). Shrimp injected with DnaK showed a significant increase in proPO expression compared to the control (P < 0.05). Yet a double injection (DnaK and Vibrio) seemed to cause an antagonistic response at the level of expression, which was not equalled at the level of PO activity. Those results suggest that DnaK is able to modulate immune responses in P. vannamei and P. monodon.

  1. Detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns, elicited by perturbations of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex, by visualizing multiple experiments with an animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To make sense out of gene expression profiles, such analyses must be pushed beyond the mere listing of affected genes. For example, if a group of genes persistently display similar changes in expression levels under particular experimental conditions, and the proteins encoded by these genes interact and function in the same cellular compartments, this could be taken as very strong indicators for co-regulated protein complexes. One of the key requirements is having appropriate tools to detect such regulatory patterns. Results We have analyzed the global adaptations in gene expression patterns in the budding yeast when the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex is perturbed either pharmacologically or genetically. We integrated these results with publicly accessible expression, protein-protein interaction and intracellular localization data. But most importantly, all experimental conditions were simultaneously and dynamically visualized with an animation. This critically facilitated the detection of patterns of gene expression changes that suggested underlying regulatory networks that a standard analysis by pairwise comparison and clustering could not have revealed. Conclusions The results of the animation-assisted detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns make predictions about the potential roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone p23 in regulating whole sets of genes. The simultaneous dynamic visualization of microarray experiments, represented in networks built by integrating one's own experimental with publicly accessible data, represents a powerful discovery tool that allows the generation of new interpretations and hypotheses. PMID:21672238

  2. Munc18-1 is a molecular chaperone for α-synuclein, controlling its self-replicating aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ye Jin; Sierecki, Emma; Tomatis, Vanesa M; Gormal, Rachel S; Giles, Nichole; Morrow, Isabel C; Xia, Di; Götz, Jürgen; Parton, Robert G; Collins, Brett M; Gambin, Yann; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2016-09-12

    Munc18-1 is a key component of the exocytic machinery that controls neurotransmitter release. Munc18-1 heterozygous mutations cause developmental defects and epileptic phenotypes, including infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), suggestive of a gain of pathological function. Here, we used single-molecule analysis, gene-edited cells, and neurons to demonstrate that Munc18-1 EIEE-causing mutants form large polymers that coaggregate wild-type Munc18-1 in vitro and in cells. Surprisingly, Munc18-1 EIEE mutants also form Lewy body-like structures that contain α-synuclein (α-Syn). We reveal that Munc18-1 binds α-Syn, and its EIEE mutants coaggregate α-Syn. Likewise, removal of endogenous Munc18-1 increases the aggregative propensity of α-Syn(WT) and that of the Parkinson's disease-causing α-Syn(A30P) mutant, an effect rescued by Munc18-1(WT) expression, indicative of chaperone activity. Coexpression of the α-Syn(A30P) mutant with Munc18-1 reduced the number of α-Syn(A30P) aggregates. Munc18-1 mutations and haploinsufficiency may therefore trigger a pathogenic gain of function through both the corruption of native Munc18-1 and a perturbed chaperone activity for α-Syn leading to aggregation-induced neurodegeneration.

  3. The chaperone-like activity of rat HspB8/Hsp22 and dynamic molecular transition related to oligomeric architectures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zehong; Lu, Yongzhi; Liu, Jingping; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2012-03-01

    HspB8/Hsp22 is a functionally distinct small heat shock proteins (sHsp) and is preferentially expressed in brain, heart, skeletal, and smooth muscle. HspB8 is also associated with neuromuscular function and protein quality control by proteasomes in cardiac hypertrophy. However, the molecular properties in vitro and molecular oligomerization remain uncertain. In this investigation, the rat HspB8 gene was expressed in E.coli cells, and mature HspB8 protein was efficiently prepared. The chaperone-like activity of HspB8 in vitro was quantitatively analyzed by model substrates. Size exclusion chromatography revealed that HspB8 had polydisperse oligomers and underwent dynamic molecular transition in solution, existing in a dynamic equilibrium between various oligomers. In a nonphysiological solution, HspB8 was predominantly octamers. In a physiological solution (pH 7.4), HspB8 mainly formed tetramers. The dynamic interactive transition maybe was helpful to maintain its molecular complxes in solution. In a FRET assay, subunit exchange occurred frequently between the various oligomers with a rate of 0.12, 0.089, and 0.064 min(-1) at 50°C, 43°C, and 37°C, respectively. It also demonstrated the dynamic molecular properties of HspB8 in solution.

  4. Oxidative modification of the molecular chaperone family in a PC12 cell model of Parkinson's disease induced by Z-lle-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Yimin Yang; Jing Bai; Ming Chang; Linsen Hu

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ubiquitin-proteasome system function is significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients.In the present study, proteasome inhibitor Z-Ile-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal (PSI) was used to inhibit the function of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in PC12 cells to simulate Parkinson's disease.Oxidatively modified proteins were identified to determine pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.Results demonstrated that 24 hours of 10 μmol/L PSI-treatment in PC12 cells simulated pathological characteristics of Parkinson's disease: neuronal degeneration and eosinophilic inclusion formation in neurons.In PSI-treated PC12 cells, three oxidative proteins and a molecular chaperone family member were detected: chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 subunit 3, glucose-regulated protein 58,and heat shock protein 70.This is the first study to demonstrate oxidative modification of a molecule family in a cell model of Parkinson's disease induced with PSI.

  5. Efficient expression of Human papillomavirus 16 E7 oncoprotein fused to C-terminus of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein using molecular chaperones in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folwarczna, Jitka; Moravec, Tomas; Plchova, Helena; Hoffmeisterova, Hana; Cerovska, Noemi

    2012-09-01

    The Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein is a promising candidate for development of anti-cancer therapeutic vaccine. We have prepared the expression construct carrying mutagenized E7 oncoprotein fused to the C-terminus of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein via 15 amino acids β-sheet linker. The fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli MC 1061 cells. We have obtained high level expression, but most of the protein remained in insoluble inclusion bodies. To increase the ratio of soluble protein various molecular chaperones (TF, DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE, GroEL-GroES) were used. The immunological reactivity of expressed recombinant protein was evaluated with anti-E7 and anti-TMV antibodies. The distribution of expressed product during ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient was studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced Mitogenic Activity of Recombinant Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor VEGF121 Expressed in E. coli Origami B (DE3) with Molecular Chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ondřej; Zárubová, Jana; Mikulová, Barbora; Filová, Elena; Bártová, Jiřina; Bačáková, Lucie; Brynda, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We describe the production of a highly-active mutant VEGF variant, α2-PI1-8-VEGF121, which contains a substrate sequence for factor XIIIa at the aminoterminus designed for incorporation into a fibrin gel. The α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 gene was synthesized, cloned into a pET-32a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli Origami B (DE3) host cells. To increase the protein folding and the solubility, the resulting thioredoxin-α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 fusion protein was co-expressed with recombinant molecular chaperones GroES/EL encoded by independent plasmid pGro7. The fusion protein was purified from the soluble fraction of cytoplasmic proteins using affinity chromatography. After cleavage of the thioredoxin fusion part with thrombin, the target protein was purified by a second round of affinity chromatography. The yield of purified α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 was 1.4 mg per liter of the cell culture. The α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 expressed in this work increased the proliferation of endothelial cells 3.9–8.7 times in comparison with commercially-available recombinant VEGF121. This very high mitogenic activity may be caused by co-expression of the growth factor with molecular chaperones not previously used in VEGF production. At the same time, α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 did not elicit considerable inflammatory activation of human endothelial HUVEC cells and human monocyte-like THP-1 cells. PMID:27716773

  7. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations: application in the refinement of de novo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E

    2012-07-01

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment, specifically, the electrostatic interaction between the protein and the solvating water, is varied leading to cycles of partial unfolding and refolding mimicking some aspects of folding chaperones. In 10 of the 15 cases examined, the CH-REMD approach sampled structures in which the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of secondary structure elements (SSE-RMSD) with respect to the experimental structure was more than 1.0 Å lower than the initial de novo model. In 14 of the 15 cases, the improvement was more than 0.5 Å. The ability of three different statistical potentials to identify near-native conformations was also examined. Little correlation between the SSE-RMSD of the sampled structures with respect to the experimental structure and any of the scoring functions tested was found. The most effective scoring function tested was the DFIRE potential. Using the DFIRE potential, the SSE-RMSD of the best scoring structures was on average 0.3 Å lower than the initial model. Overall the work demonstrates that targeted enhanced-sampling techniques such as CH-REMD can lead to the systematic refinement of protein structural models generated de novo but that improved potentials for the identification of near-native structures are still needed.

  8. The aggregation and neurotoxicity of TDP-43 and its ALS-associated 25 kDa fragment are differentially affected by molecular chaperones in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna M Gregory

    Full Text Available Almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and some cases of the familial form, are characterised by the deposition of TDP-43, a member of a family of heteronuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP. Although protein misfolding and deposition is thought to be a causative feature of many of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, a link between TDP-43 aggregation and the dysfunction of motor neurons has yet to be established, despite many correlative neuropathological studies. We have investigated this relationship in the present study by probing the effect of altering TDP-43 aggregation behaviour in vivo by modulating the levels of molecular chaperones in a Drosophila model. More specifically, we quantify the effect of either pharmacological upregulation of the heat shock response or specific genetic upregulation of a small heat shock protein, CG14207, on the neurotoxicity of both TDP-43 and of its disease associated 25 kDa fragment (TDP-25 in a Drosophila model. Inhibition of the aggregation of TDP-43 by either method results in a partial reduction of its neurotoxic effects on both photoreceptor and motor neurons, whereas inhibition of the aggregation of TDP-25 results not only in a complete suppression of its toxicity but also its clearance from the brain in both neuronal subtypes studied. The results demonstrate, therefore, that aggregation plays a crucial role in mediating the neurotoxic effects of both full length and truncated TDP-43, and furthermore reveal that the in vivo propensity of these two proteins to aggregate and their susceptibility to molecular chaperone mediated clearance are quite distinct.

  9. Dynamic impacts of the inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 on the T-cell proteome have implications for anti-cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Fierro-Monti

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90-dependent proteome represents a complex protein network of critical biological and medical relevance. Known to associate with proteins with a broad variety of functions termed clients, Hsp90 maintains key essential and oncogenic signalling pathways. Consequently, Hsp90 inhibitors are being tested as anti-cancer drugs. Using an integrated systematic approach to analyse the effects of Hsp90 inhibition in T-cells, we quantified differential changes in the Hsp90-dependent proteome, Hsp90 interactome, and a selection of the transcriptome. Kinetic behaviours in the Hsp90-dependent proteome were assessed using a novel pulse-chase strategy (Fierro-Monti et al., accompanying article, detecting effects on both protein stability and synthesis. Global and specific dynamic impacts, including proteostatic responses, are due to direct inhibition of Hsp90 as well as indirect effects. As a result, a decrease was detected in most proteins that changed their levels, including known Hsp90 clients. Most likely, consequences of the role of Hsp90 in gene expression determined a global reduction in net de novo protein synthesis. This decrease appeared to be greater in magnitude than a concomitantly observed global increase in protein decay rates. Several novel putative Hsp90 clients were validated, and interestingly, protein families with critical functions, particularly the Hsp90 family and cofactors themselves as well as protein kinases, displayed strongly increased decay rates due to Hsp90 inhibitor treatment. Remarkably, an upsurge in survival pathways, involving molecular chaperones and several oncoproteins, and decreased levels of some tumour suppressors, have implications for anti-cancer therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors. The diversity of global effects may represent a paradigm of mechanisms that are operating to shield cells from proteotoxic stress, by promoting pro-survival and anti-proliferative functions. Data are available via

  10. Complex formation of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystal vs. molecular chaperone in aqueous solution by hydrophobic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Hiromi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)]. E-mail: horihiro@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Iwami, Noriya [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tachibana, Fumi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Iizuka, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Zako, Tamotsu [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tani, Toshiro [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Feasibilities to stabilize CdSe/ZnS/trioctylphosphineoxide (TOPO) nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) in aqueous solutions with prefoldin macromolecules in their bioactive states are reported. Prefoldin is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of the group II chaperonins. As a protein folding intermediate is captured within its central cavity, so CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs would also be included within this cavity. It is also found the QDs can be much more dispersed in aqueous solutions and suspended for certain period of time by adding trace amount of t-butanol in the buffer prior to the mixing of the QDs mother solution. While biochemical procedures are evaluated with ordinary fluorescence measurements, possible complex formations are also evaluated with TIRFM single-molecule detection techniques.

  11. Multi-layered molecular mechanisms of polypeptide holding, unfolding and disaggregation by HSP70/HSP110 chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finka, Andrija; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Members of the HSP70/HSP110 family (HSP70s) form a central hub of the chaperone network controlling all aspects of proteostasis in bacteria and the ATP-containing compartments of eukaryotic cells. The heat-inducible form HSP70 (HSPA1A) and its major cognates, cytosolic HSC70 (HSPA8), endoplasmic reticulum BIP (HSPA5), mitochondrial mHSP70 (HSPA9) and related HSP110s (HSPHs), contribute about 3% of the total protein mass of human cells. The HSP70s carry out a plethora of housekeeping cellular functions, such as assisting proper de novo folding, assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, pulling polypeptides out of the ribosome and across membrane pores, activating and inactivating signaling proteins and controlling their degradation. The HSP70s can induce structural changes in alternatively folded protein conformers, such as clathrin cages, hormone receptors and transcription factors, thereby regulating vesicular trafficking, hormone signaling and cell differentiation in development and cancer. To carry so diverse cellular housekeeping and stress-related functions, the HSP70s act as ATP-fuelled unfolding nanomachines capable of switching polypeptides between different folded states. During stress, the HSP70s can bind (hold) and prevent the aggregation of misfolding proteins and thereafter act alone or in collaboration with other unfolding chaperones to solubilize protein aggregates. Here, we discuss the common ATP-dependent mechanisms of holding, unfolding-by-clamping and unfolding-by-entropic pulling, by which the HSP70s can apparently convert various alternatively folded and misfolded polypeptides into differently active conformers. Understanding how HSP70s can prevent the formation of cytotoxic protein aggregates, pull, unfold, and solubilize them into harmless species is central to the design of therapies against protein conformational diseases. PMID:26097841

  12. Chaperone effects on prion and nonprion aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhvanov, Eugene G; Romanova, Nina V; Chernoff, Yury O

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to high temperature or other stresses induces a synthesis of heat shock proteins. Many of these proteins are molecular chaperones, and some of them help cells to cope with heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of other proteins. In the last decade, chaperones have received increased attention in connection with their role in maintenance and propagation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prions, infectious or heritable agents transmitted at the protein level. Recent data suggest that functioning of the chaperones in reactivation of heat-damaged proteins and in propagation of prions is based on the same molecular mechanisms but may lead to different consequences depending on the type of aggregate. In both cases the concerted and balanced action of "chaperones' team," including Hsp104, Hsp70, Hsp40 and possibly other proteins, determines whether a misfolded protein is to be incorporated into an aggregate, rescued to the native state or targeted for degradation.

  13. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  14. The molecular chaperone HSPA2 plays a key role in regulating the expression of sperm surface receptors that mediate sperm-egg recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Nixon, Brett; Baker, Mark A; Hetherington, Louise; Baker, Gordon; Liu, De-Yi; Aitken, R John

    2012-01-01

    A common defect encountered in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. In order to resolve the molecular basis of this condition we have compared the proteomic profiles of spermatozoa exhibiting an impaired capacity for sperm-egg recognition with normal cells using label free mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantification. This analysis indicated that impaired sperm-zona binding was associated with reduced expression of the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2), from the sperm proteome. Western blot analysis confirmed this observation in independent patients and demonstrated that the defect did not extend to other members of the HSP70 family. HSPA2 was present in the acrosomal domain of human spermatozoa as a major component of 5 large molecular mass complexes, the most dominant of which was found to contain HSPA2 in close association with just two other proteins, sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and arylsulfatase A (ARSA), both of which that have previously been implicated in sperm-egg interaction. The interaction between SPAM1, ARSA and HSPA2 in a multimeric complex mediating sperm-egg interaction, coupled with the complete failure of this process when HSPA2 is depleted in infertile patients, provides new insights into the mechanisms by which sperm function is impaired in cases of male infertility.

  15. The molecular chaperone Hsp70 activates protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) by binding the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Assimon, Victoria A; Reed, Rebecca A; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Gestwicki, Jason E; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-31

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development.

  16. Redox signaling via the molecular chaperone BiP protects cells against endoplasmic reticulum-derived oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Pareja, Kristeen A; Kaiser, Chris A; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a potentially significant source of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies suggest that levels of ROS generated as a byproduct of oxidative folding rival those produced by mitochondrial respiration. Mechanisms that protect cells against oxidant accumulation within the ER have begun to be elucidated yet many questions still remain regarding how cells prevent oxidant-induced damage from ER folding events. Here we report a new role for a central well-characterized player in ER homeostasis as a direct sensor of ER redox imbalance. Specifically we show that a conserved cysteine in the lumenal chaperone BiP is susceptible to oxidation by peroxide, and we demonstrate that oxidation of this conserved cysteine disrupts BiP's ATPase cycle. We propose that alteration of BiP activity upon oxidation helps cells cope with disruption to oxidative folding within the ER during oxidative stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03496.001 PMID:25053742

  17. Oligodendroglioma cells shed microvesicles which contain TRAIL as well as molecular chaperones and induce cell death in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Schiera, Gabriella; Proia, Patrizia; Saladino, Patrizia; Savettieri, Giovanni; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Di Liegro, Italia

    2011-12-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) shed from G26/24 oligodendroglioma cells were previously reported to cause a reproducible, dose-dependent, inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth, and eventually neuronal apoptosis, when added to primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. These effects were reduced but not abolished by functional monoclonal antibodies against Fas-L. In order to investigate whether MVs contain other factors able to induce cell death, we tested them for TRAIL and found clear evidence of its presence in the vesicles. This finding suggests the possibility that Fas-L and TRAIL cooperate in inducing brain cell death. Aimed at understanding the route through which the vesicles deliver their messages to the target cells, we labeled oligodendroglioma cells with radioactive methionine and then added the labeled vesicles shed from tumor cells to unlabeled astrocytes in culture. Here we report that labeled proteins were delivered to the test cells. In order to investigate whether astrocytes, like neurons, are sensitive to oligodendroglioma-derived vesicles, MVs were prepared from media conditioned by G26/24 oligodendroglioma cells and added to primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. These cells were clearly more resistant than neurons to microvesicle-induced damage: a high dose (40 µg) of shed MVs induced cell death in only about 40% of astrocytes. Finally, we demonstrated that Hsp70 is specifically enriched in MVs which also contain, even if at lower level, the Hsc70 constitutive chaperone.

  18. Water-structuring technology with the molecular chaperone proteins: indicated application of the α-crystallin domains and imidazole-containing peptidomimetics in cosmetic skin care systems or dermatological therapeutic drug carrier formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-01-01

    Changes in structural proteins and hydration during aging are responsible for altered skin morphologic and mechanical properties manifested as wrinkling, sagging, loss of elasticity, and apparent dryness. Impairment in protein hydration may add to the ultrastructural, mechanical, and biochemical changes in structural proteins in the aged skin. At Innovative Vision Products, Inc., we have pioneered a molecular chaperone protein-activated therapeutic or cosmetic platform to enable simultaneous analysis of water-binding and structuring characteristics for biology-related or skin aging and skin disease-related pathways. This cutting-edge technology has changed the hydration of proteins in photoaged skin which so that they are more compact and interact with water to limited degree. The mechanisms of skin diseases, aging, and cellular and signaling pathways mediated by targeting with molecular chaperone protein(s) are considered. Skin lesions that are growing, spreading, or pigmented, and those that occur on exposed areas of skin are likely to be treated by these emerging pharmacological chaperones that could have cosmetic or dermatological benefits. Examples of such chaperones are anti-/trans-glycation-imidazole-containing peptidomimetic(s) (natural L-carnosine derivatives and mimetics) combined with the molecular chaperone protein α-crystallin derived from a natural source, brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts, or with recombinant human αA-crystallin. This patented biotechnology represents an efficient tool with which to mitigate the consequences of free radical-induced skin damage. The article is organized to provide in one place all of the relevant technical information, such as high-performance nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance application tools, and to describe the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis, which is moving from biological studies to biotechnology batches of the product. The proposed biotechnology results in

  19. Extracellular mycobacterial DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael L Lopes

    Full Text Available Macrophages are myeloid cells that play an essential role in inflammation and host defense, regulating immune responses and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Depending on the microenvironment, macrophages can polarize to two distinct phenotypes. The M1 phenotype is activated by IFN-γ and bacterial products, and displays an inflammatory profile, while M2 macrophages are activated by IL-4 and tend to be anti-inflammatory or immunosupressive. It was observed that DnaK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has immunosuppressive properties, inducing a tolerogenic phenotype in dendritic cells and MDSCs, contributing to graft acceptance and tumor growth. However, its role in macrophage polarization remains to be elucidated. We asked whether DnaK was able to modulate macrophage phenotype. Murine macrophages, derived from bone marrow, or from the peritoneum, were incubated with DnaK and their phenotype compared to M1 or M2 polarized macrophages. Treatment with DnaK leads macrophages to present higher arginase I activity, IL-10 production and FIZZ1 and Ym1 expression. Furthermore, DnaK increased surface levels of CD206. Importantly, DnaK-treated macrophages were able to promote tumor growth in an allogeneic melanoma model. Our results suggest that DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype and could constitute a virulence factor and is an important immunomodulator of macrophage responses.

  20. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Stetz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allosteric interactions in the Hsp70 proteins are linked with their regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions. Despite significant progress in structural and functional characterization of the Hsp70 proteins fundamental questions concerning modularity of the allosteric interaction networks and hierarchy of signaling pathways in the Hsp70 chaperones remained largely unexplored and poorly understood. In this work, we proposed an integrated computational strategy that combined atomistic and coarse-grained simulations with coevolutionary analysis and network modeling of the residue interactions. A novel aspect of this work is the incorporation of dynamic residue correlations and coevolutionary residue dependencies in the construction of allosteric interaction networks and signaling pathways. We found that functional sites involved in allosteric regulation of Hsp70 may be characterized by structural stability, proximity to global hinge centers and local structural environment that is enriched by highly coevolving flexible residues. These specific characteristics may be necessary for regulation of allosteric structural transitions and could distinguish regulatory sites from nonfunctional conserved residues. The observed confluence of dynamics correlations and coevolutionary residue couplings with global networking features may determine modular organization of allosteric interactions and dictate localization of key mediating sites. Community analysis of the residue interaction networks revealed that concerted rearrangements of local interacting modules at the inter-domain interface may be responsible for global structural changes and a population shift in the DnaK chaperone. The inter-domain communities in the Hsp70 structures harbor the majority of regulatory residues involved in allosteric signaling, suggesting that these sites could be integral to the network organization and coordination of structural changes. Using a network-based formalism of

  1. Chaperone receptors: guiding proteins to intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; von Löffelholz, Ottilie; Abell, Ben M

    2012-01-01

    Despite mitochondria and chloroplasts having their own genome, 99% of mitochondrial proteins (Rehling et al., Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 5:519-530, 2004) and more than 95% of chloroplast proteins (Soll, Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:529-535, 2002) are encoded by nuclear DNA, synthesised in the cytosol and imported post-translationally. Protein targeting to these organelles depends on cytosolic targeting factors, which bind to the precursor, and then interact with membrane receptors to deliver the precursor into a translocase. The molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 have been widely implicated in protein targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts, and receptors capable of recognising these chaperones have been identified at the surface of both these organelles (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007). The role of these chaperone receptors is not fully understood, but they have been shown to increase the efficiency of protein targeting (Young et al., Cell 112:41-50, 2003; Qbadou et al., EMBO J 25:1836-1847, 2006). Whether these receptors contribute to the specificity of targeting is less clear. A class of chaperone receptors bearing tetratricopeptide repeat domains is able to specifically bind the highly conserved C terminus of Hsp70 and/or Hsp90. Interestingly, at least of one these chaperone receptors can be found on each organelle (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007), which suggests a universal role in protein targeting for these chaperone receptors. This review will investigate the role that chaperone receptors play in targeting efficiency and specificity, as well as examining recent in silico approaches to find novel chaperone receptors.

  2. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  3. BAG-2 Acts as an Inhibitor of the Chaperone-associated Ubiquitin Ligase CHIP

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Verena; Daniel, Christina; Nastainczyk, Wolfgang; Alberti, Simon; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control involves a close interplay between molecular chaperones and the ubiquitin/proteasome system. We recently identified a degradation pathway, on which the chaperone Hsc70 delivers chaperone clients, such as misfolded forms of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), to the proteasome. The cochaperone CHIP is of central importance on this pathway, because it acts as a chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase. CHIP mediates the attachment of a u...

  4. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly.

  5. The Molecular Chaperone HSP70 Binds to and Stabilizes NOD2, an Important Protein Involved in Crohn Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are detected by the pathogen-associated molecular patterns through specific host pattern recognition receptors. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that recognizes fragments of the bacterial cell wall. NOD2 is important to human biology; when it is mutated it loses the ability to respond properly to bacterial cell wall fragments. To determine the mechanisms of misactivation in the NOD2 Crohn mutants, we developed a cell-based system to screen for protein-protein interactors of NOD2. We identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a protein interactor of both wild type and Crohn mutant NOD2. HSP70 has previously been linked to inflammation, especially in the regulation of anti-inflammatory molecules. Induced HSP70 expression in cells increased the response of NOD2 to bacterial cell wall fragments. In addition, an HSP70 inhibitor, KNK437, was capable of decreasing NOD2-mediated NF-κB activation in response to bacterial cell wall stimulation. We found HSP70 to regulate the half-life of NOD2, as increasing the HSP70 level in cells increased the half-life of NOD2, and down-regulating HSP70 decreased the half-life of NOD2. The expression levels of the Crohn-associated NOD2 variants were less compared with wild type. The overexpression of HSP70 significantly increased NOD2 levels as well as the signaling capacity of the mutants. Thus, our study shows that restoring the stability of the NOD2 Crohn mutants is sufficient for rescuing the ability of these mutations to signal the presence of a bacterial cell wall ligand. PMID:24790089

  6. The molecular chaperone HSP70 binds to and stabilizes NOD2, an important protein involved in Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2014-07-04

    Microbes are detected by the pathogen-associated molecular patterns through specific host pattern recognition receptors. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that recognizes fragments of the bacterial cell wall. NOD2 is important to human biology; when it is mutated it loses the ability to respond properly to bacterial cell wall fragments. To determine the mechanisms of misactivation in the NOD2 Crohn mutants, we developed a cell-based system to screen for protein-protein interactors of NOD2. We identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a protein interactor of both wild type and Crohn mutant NOD2. HSP70 has previously been linked to inflammation, especially in the regulation of anti-inflammatory molecules. Induced HSP70 expression in cells increased the response of NOD2 to bacterial cell wall fragments. In addition, an HSP70 inhibitor, KNK437, was capable of decreasing NOD2-mediated NF-κB activation in response to bacterial cell wall stimulation. We found HSP70 to regulate the half-life of NOD2, as increasing the HSP70 level in cells increased the half-life of NOD2, and down-regulating HSP70 decreased the half-life of NOD2. The expression levels of the Crohn-associated NOD2 variants were less compared with wild type. The overexpression of HSP70 significantly increased NOD2 levels as well as the signaling capacity of the mutants. Thus, our study shows that restoring the stability of the NOD2 Crohn mutants is sufficient for rescuing the ability of these mutations to signal the presence of a bacterial cell wall ligand.

  7. The heat-shock DnaK protein is required for plasmid R1 replication and it is dispensable for plasmid ColE1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Suárez, R; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Díaz-Orejas, R; Malki, A; Kohiyama, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid R1 replication in vitro is inactive in extracts prepared from a dnaK756 strain but is restored to normal levels upon addition of purified DnaK protein. Replication of R1 in extracts of a dnaKwt strain can be specifically inhibited with polyclonal antibodies against DnaK. RepA-dependent replication of R1 in dnaK756 extracts supplemented with DnaKwt protein at maximum concentration is partially inhibited by rifampicin and it is severely inhibited at sub-optimal concentrations of DnaK protein. The copy number of a run-away R1 vector is reduced in a dnaK756 background at 30 degrees C and at 42 degrees C the amplification of the run-away R1 vector is prevented. However a runaway R1 vector containing dnaK gene allows the amplification of the plasmid at high temperature. These data indicate that DnaK is required for both in vitro and in vivo replication of plasmid R1 and show a partial compensation for the low level of DnaK by RNA polymerase. In contrast ColE1 replication is not affected by DnaK as indicated by the fact that ColE1 replicates with the same efficiency in extracts from dnaKwt and dnaK756 strains. Images PMID:8265367

  8. Principles of Quantitative Estimation of the Chaperone-Like Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are able to interact with unfolded states of the protein molecule preventing their aggregation and facilitating folding of the polypeptide chain into the native structure. An understanding of the mechanism of protein aggregation is required to estimate the efficiency of action of chaperones in the test-systems based on the suppression of aggregation of protein substrates. The kinetic regimes of aggregation of proteins are discussed. The analysis of the aggregation kinetics of proteins shows that after passing the lag phase, aggregation follows, as a rule, first order kinetics. The quantitative characterization methods of the ability of chaperones to prevent aggregation of protein substrates have been elaborated.

  9. Influence of the conserved disulphide bond, exposed to the putative binding pocket, on the structure and function of the immunoglobulin-like molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Chernovskaya, T V; Chapman, D A; Karlyshev, A V; MacIntyre, S; Zavialov, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Denesyuk, A I; Zav'yalova, G A; Dudich, I V; Korpela, T; Abramov, V M

    1997-06-01

    The Yersinia pestis protein Caf1M is a typical representative of a subfamily of periplasmic molecular chaperones with characteristic structural and functional features, one of which is the location of two conserved cysteine residues close to the putative binding pocket. We show that these residues form a disulphide bond, the reduction and alkylation of which significantly increases the dissociation constant of the Caf1M-Caf1 (where Caf 1 is a polypeptide subunit of the capsule) complex [from a Kd of (4.77+/-0.50)x10(-9) M for the intact protein to one of (3.68+/-0.68)x10(-8) M for the modified protein]. The importance of the disulphide bond for the formation of functional Caf1M in vivo was demonstrated using an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant carrying the Y. pestis f1 operon. In accordance with the CD and fluorescence measurements, the disulphide bond is not important for maintenance of the overall structure of the Caf1M molecule, but would appear to affect the fine structural properties of the subunit binding site. A three-dimensional model of the Caf1M-Caf1 complex was designed based on the published crystal structure of PapD (a chaperone required for Pap pili assembly) complexed with a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of the papG subunit. In the model the disulphide bond is in close proximity to the invariant Caf1M Arg-23 and Lys-142 residues that are assumed to anchor the C-terminal group of the subunit. The importance of this characteristic disulphide bond for the orchestration of the binding site and subunit binding, as well as for the folding of the protein in vivo, is likely to be a common feature of this subfamily of Caf1M-like chaperones. A possible model for the role of the disulphide bond in Caf1 assembly is discussed.

  10. Immune Reactivity of Brucella Melitensis–Vaccinated Rabbit Serum with Recombinant Omp31 and Dnak Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Jeddi-Tehrani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Brucella melitensis infection is still a major health problem for human and cattle in developing countries and the Middle East.Materials and Methods: In this study, in order to screen immunogenic candidate antigens for the development of a Brucella subunit vaccine, a cytoplasmic protein (DnaK and an outer membrane protein (Omp31 of B. melitensis were cloned, expressed in E.coli BL21 and then purified using Ni-NTA agarose. Immunized serum was prepared from a rabbit inoculated with attenuated B. melitensis.Results and Conclusion: It was proved that immunized serum contains antibodies against recombinant Omp31 (rOmp31 and DnaK (rDnaK by Western blot and ELISA assays. The results may suggest the importance of these proteins as subunit vaccines against B. melitensis as well as targets for immunotherapy.

  11. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit......Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length...... and composition. A large set of available synthetic peptides (n=127) was tested for binding to calreticulin and the results analysed by multivariate data analysis. The parameter that correlated best with binding was hydrophobicity while beta-turn potential disfavoured binding. Only hydrophobic peptides longer...... a peptide-binding specificity for hydrophobic sequences and delineate the fine specificity of calreticulin for hydrophobic amino acid residues....

  12. Chaperoning roles of macromolecules interacting with proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Lim, Keo-Heun; Seong, Baik L

    2011-01-01

    The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  13. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  14. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-01-01

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor – Sil1 – can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24141.001 PMID:28257000

  15. Chaperoning Proteins for Destruction: Diverse Roles of Hsp70 Chaperones and their Co-Chaperones in Targeting Misfolded Proteins to the Proteasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Shiber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones were originally discovered as heat shock-induced proteins that facilitate proper folding of proteins with non-native conformations. While the function of chaperones in protein folding has been well documented over the last four decades, more recent studies have shown that chaperones are also necessary for the clearance of terminally misfolded proteins by the Ub-proteasome system. In this capacity, chaperones protect misfolded degradation substrates from spontaneous aggregation, facilitate their recognition by the Ub ligation machinery and finally shuttle the ubiquitylated substrates to the proteasome. The physiological importance of these functions is manifested by inefficient proteasomal degradation and the accumulation of protein aggregates during ageing or in certain neurodegenerative diseases, when chaperone levels decline. In this review, we focus on the diverse roles of stress-induced chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins to the proteasome and the consequences of their compromised activity. We further discuss the implications of these findings to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  16. 利用膨胀床吸附技术单步纯化分子伴侣—GroEL%Single-step Purification of Molecular Chaperone GroEL by Expanded Bed Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟晓冬; 杨征; 董晓燕; 孙彦

    2003-01-01

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is an integrative downstream processing technique for the purificationof biological substances directly from unclarified feedstock. In this study, molecular chaperone GroEL, an importantprotein folding helper both in vivo and in vitro, was purified by the single-step EBA technique from the unclarifiedhomogenate of recombinant E. coli cells. Compared with packed bed adsorption, the EBA technique provideda single-step approach to yield an electrophoretic purity of GroEL. After the homogenate loading and columnwashing in the expanded bed mode, the GroEL protein was recovered by stepwise salt-gradient elution in packed-bed or expanded-bed modes, respectively. The expanded-bed elution mode was found as efficient as the packed-bedmode in the purification of GroEL from cell disruptate.

  17. Advances in molecular chaperones regulating yeast prion [ PSI+] propagation%分子伴侣对酵母朊病毒[ PSI+]增殖影响的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林康伟; 连惠勇; 蔡澎

    2015-01-01

    The finding and research on yeast prion are of great values for biology and medical sciences.Research advances in molecular chaperones, especially in Hsp104p, Hsp70p and Hsp40p, regulating yeast prion [PSI+] propaga-tion,are reviewed.%酵母朊病毒( prion)的发现和研究在生物学和医学上有着极其重要的理论价值和实际应用价值。该文综述了分子伴侣对酵母prion[PSI+]增殖影响的研究进展,重点介绍了热休克蛋白Hsp104p、Hsp70p和Hsp40p在其中发挥的重要作用。

  18. Chaperone-assisted refolding of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subhankar; Punam, Shashikala; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2007-11-01

    In vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase, a 69 kDa monomeric Escherichia coli protein, was studied in the presence of glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, ethylene glycol, trehalose, proline and chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Different osmolytes, namely proline, glycerol, trimethylamine-N-oxide and dimethylsulfoxide, also known as chemical chaperones, assist in protein folding through effective inhibition of the aggregation process. In the present study, it was observed that a few chemical chaperones effectively reduced the aggregation process of maltodextrin glucosidase and hence the in vitro refolding was substantially enhanced, with ethylene glycol being the exception. Although, the highest recovery of active maltodextrin glucosidase was achieved through the ATP-mediated GroEL/GroES-assisted refolding of denatured protein, the yield of correctly folded protein from glycerol- or proline-assisted spontaneous refolding process was closer to the chaperonin-assisted refolding. It was also observed that the combined application of chemical chaperones and molecular chaperone was more productive than their individual contribution towards the in vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase. The chemical chaperones, except ethylene glycol, were found to provide different degrees of protection to maltodextrin glucosidase from thermal denaturation, whereas proline caused the highest protection. The observations from the present studies conclusively demonstrate that chemical or molecular chaperones, or the combination of both chaperones, could be used in the efficient refolding of recombinant E. coli maltodextrin glucosidase, which enhances the possibility of identifying or designing suitable small molecules that can act as chemical chaperones in the efficient refolding of various aggregate-prone proteins of commercial and medical importance.

  19. Natural products triptolide, celastrol, and withaferin A inhibit the chaperone activity of peroxiredoxin i

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Qian; Ding, Yu; Deng, Zhangshuang; Lee, On Yi; Gao, Peng; Chen, Pin; Rose, Rebecca J.; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Zhehao; Tao, Xin Pei; Heck, Albert J R; Kao, Richard; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) plays an important role in cancer development and inflammation. It is a dual-functional protein which acts as both an antioxidant enzyme and a molecular chaperone. While there have been intensive studies on its peroxidase activity, Prx I's chaperone activity remains elusive,

  20. A [Cu]rious Ribosomal Profiling Pattern Leads to the Discovery of Ribosomal Frameshifting in the Synthesis of a Copper Chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Baranov, Pavel V

    2017-01-19

    In many bacteria, separate genes encode a copper binding chaperone and a copper efflux pump, but in some the chaperone encoding gene has been elusive. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Meydan et al. (2017) report that ribosomes translating the ORF that encodes the copper pump frequently frameshift and terminate to produce the copper chaperone.

  1. Induction of DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins by fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizushima, T.; Matsuo, M.; Sekimizu, K

    1997-01-01

    Various fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and sparfloxacin) induce DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins in Escherichia coli. The induction is transient, consistent with the kinetics of cellular DNA relaxation. The concentrations of fluoroquinolones required for induction are similar to those required for DNA relaxation and much higher than those required for cell death.

  2. Induction of Boosted Immune Response in Mice by Leptospiral Surface Proteins Expressed in Fusion with DnaK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Atzingen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important global disease of human and veterinary concern. Caused by pathogenic Leptospira, the illness was recently classified as an emerging infectious disease. Currently available veterinarian vaccines do not induce long-term protection against infection and do not provide cross-protective immunity. Several studies have suggested the use of DnaK as an antigen in vaccine formulation, due to an exceptional degree of immunogenicity. We focused on four surface proteins: rLIC10368 (Lsa21, rLIC10494, rLIC12690 (Lp95, and rLIC12730, previously shown to be involved in host-pathogen interactions. Our goal was to evaluate the immunogenicity of the proteins genetically fused with DnaK in animal model. The chosen genes were amplified by PCR methodology and cloned into pAE, an E. coli vector. The recombinant proteins were expressed alone or in fusion with DnaK at the N-terminus. Our results demonstrate that leptospiral proteins fused with DnaK have elicited an enhanced immune response in mice when compared to the effect promoted by the individual proteins. The boosted immune effect was demonstrated by the production of total IgG, lymphocyte proliferation, and significant amounts of IL-10 in supernatant of splenocyte cell cultures. We believe that this approach could be employed in vaccines to enhance presentation of antigens of Leptospira to professional immune cells.

  3. ATPase domain and interdomain linker play a key role in aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-02-12

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Delta hep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer.

  4. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their i

  5. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  6. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L.; Champion, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  7. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress.

  8. The conformational dynamics of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, Koyeli; Sikor, Martin; Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Waegemann, Karin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Seidel, Claus A M; Neupert, Walter; Lamb, Don C; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2010-04-09

    Heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) represent a ubiquitous and conserved family of molecular chaperones involved in a plethora of cellular processes. The dynamics of their ATP hydrolysis-driven and cochaperone-regulated conformational cycle are poorly understood. We used fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze, in real time and at single-molecule resolution, the effects of nucleotides and cochaperones on the conformation of Ssc1, a mitochondrial member of the family. We report that the conformation of its ADP state is unexpectedly heterogeneous, in contrast to a uniform ATP state. Substrates are actively involved in determining the conformation of Ssc1. The J protein Mdj1 does not interact transiently with the chaperone, as generally believed, but rather is released slowly upon ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of the major bacterial Hsp70 revealed important differences between highly homologous members of the family, possibly explaining tuning of Hsp70 chaperones to meet specific functions in different organisms and cellular compartments.

  9. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierling, Elizabeth [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  10. Systems analysis of chaperone networks in the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soundara Raghavan Pavithra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones participate in the maintenance of cellular protein homeostasis, cell growth and differentiation, signal transduction, and development. Although a vast body of information is available regarding individual chaperones, few studies have attempted a systems level analysis of chaperone function. In this paper, we have constructed a chaperone interaction network for the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. P. falciparum is responsible for several million deaths every year, and understanding the biology of the parasite is a top priority. The parasite regularly experiences heat shock as part of its life cycle, and chaperones have often been implicated in parasite survival and growth. To better understand the participation of chaperones in cellular processes, we created a parasite chaperone network by combining experimental interactome data with in silico analysis. We used interolog mapping to predict protein-protein interactions for parasite chaperones based on the interactions of corresponding human chaperones. This data was then combined with information derived from existing high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assays. Analysis of the network reveals the broad range of functions regulated by chaperones. The network predicts involvement of chaperones in chromatin remodeling, protein trafficking, and cytoadherence. Importantly, it allows us to make predictions regarding the functions of hypothetical proteins based on their interactions. It allows us to make specific predictions about Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in the parasite and assign functions to members of the Hsp90 and Hsp100 families. Analysis of the network provides a rational basis for the anti-malarial activity of geldanamycin, a well-known Hsp90 inhibitor. Finally, analysis of the network provides a theoretical basis for further experiments designed toward understanding the involvement of this important class of molecules in parasite biology.

  11. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78031 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bya sp. PCC 8106 MGRWGDGEMGRWGGGEMGRWGDGEMGRWGDGEVARWGDGEMGRWGVGEMGRWGGGEMGRWGDGEMERWGDGEMGRWGDGEMGRWRDGEMGRWGVGELGRWGDGEVGRWRDGEMG...RWRDGEMGRWGDGEMGRWGGGEMGRWGDGEVGSWGDGEMGRWGGGEMGRWGDGEKEVVMSVVRSLELPFALLDTIK ... ...ZP_01620064.1 1117:1464 1150:372 28073:416 313612:416 molecular chaperone DnaK Lyng

  13. N-terminal domain of human Hsp90 triggers binding to the co-chaperone p23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagöz, G.E.; dos santos Duarte, A.M.; Ippel, J.H.; Uetrecht, C.; Sinnige, T.; van Rosmalen, M.; Hausmann, J.; Heck, A.J.R.; Boelens, R.; Rüdiger, S.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is a protein folding machine that is conserved from bacteria to man. Human, cytosolic Hsp90 is dedicated to folding of chiefly signal transduction components. The chaperoning mechanism of Hsp90 is controlled by ATP and various cochaperones, but is poorly understood and

  14. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Chaperones Accelerates Evolutionary Dynamics in Adapting Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cetinbaş; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly f...

  15. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  16. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  17. Heat shock protein 90 acts as a molecular chaperone in late-phase acti-vation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 stimulated by oxida-tive stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-hua LIU; Hao-yu YUAN; Chun-ya CAO; Zhi-ping GAO; Bing-yang ZHU; Hong-lin HUANG; Duan-fang LIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) acts as a molecular chaperone on the activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and cell proliferation stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods: VSMC were exposed to 1 μmol/L LY83583 (6-anilinoquinoline-5,8-quinolinedione, producer of ROS) for 120 min in the presence or absence of 5 μmol/L geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of HSP90. Then the total, soluble, and insoluble proteins of the ceils were collected. HSP90, ERK1/2, and phosphor-ERK 1/2 in the cell lysate were measured by Western blotting. The interaction of HSP90 and phosphor-ERK1/2 was analyzed by immunoprecipi- tation assay, and the nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2 was measured by Western blot- ting and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation was tested by cell counting and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-di-phenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT). Results: The cytosolic HSP90 of VSMC was upregulated by LY83583 in a time-dependent man- ner with the peak at 120 min, which is consistent with the late peak of phosphor- ERK1/2. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting analyses showed that LY83583 increased the interaction of HSP90 with phosphor-ERK1/2, the phosphor-ERK1/2 level, and the soluble phosphor-ERK1/2 level by 1.8-, 2.5-, and 2.9-fold, respectively. In contrast, the insoluble phosphor-ERK1/2 of VSMC was decreased. Interestingly, LY83583 treatment promoted the nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2 by 7.6-fold as con- finned by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. Furthermore, cell counting and the MTT assay showed that LY83583 stimulated VSMC prolifera- tion with the increased expression of HSP90 and levels of soluble and nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2. Pretreatment of geldanamycin antagonized the effect of LY83583. Conclusion: HSP90 could mediate the oxidative stress-stimulated, late- phase activation of ERK1/2 and VSMC proliferation by promoting the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, the

  18. Chaperone-interacting TPR proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Eckl, Julia M; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Papsdorf, Katharina; Hessling, Martin; Richter, Klaus

    2013-08-23

    The ATP-hydrolyzing molecular chaperones Hsc70/Hsp70 and Hsp90 bind a diverse set of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing cofactors via their C-terminal peptide motifs IEEVD and MEEVD. These cochaperones contribute to substrate turnover and confer specific activities to the chaperones. Higher eukaryotic genomes encode a large number of TPR-domain-containing proteins. The human proteome contains more than 200 TPR proteins, and that of Caenorhabditis elegans, about 80. It is unknown how many of them interact with Hsc70 or Hsp90. We systematically screened the C. elegans proteome for TPR-domain-containing proteins that likely interact with Hsc70 and Hsp90 and ranked them due to their similarity with known chaperone-interacting TPRs. We find C. elegans to encode many TPR proteins, which are not present in yeast. All of these have homologs in fruit fly or humans. Highly ranking uncharacterized open reading frames C33H5.8, C34B2.5 and ZK370.8 may encode weakly conserved homologs of the human proteins RPAP3, TTC1 and TOM70. C34B2.5 and ZK370.8 bind both Hsc70 and Hsp90 with low micromolar affinities. Mutation of amino acids involved in EEVD binding disrupts the interaction. In vivo, ZK370.8 is localized to mitochondria in tissues with known chaperone requirements, while C34B2.5 colocalizes with Hsc70 in intestinal cells. The highest-ranking open reading frame with non-conserved EEVD-interacting residues, F52H3.5, did not show any binding to Hsc70 or Hsp90, suggesting that only about 15 of the TPR-domain-containing proteins in C. elegans interact with chaperones, while the many others may have evolved to bind other ligands.

  19. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Len Neckers

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple cellular signalling pathways. By inhibiting nodal points in multiple overlapping survival pathways utilized by cancer cells, combination of an Hsp90 inhibitor with standard chemotherapeutic agents may dramatically increase the in vivo efficacy of the standard agent. Hsp90 inhibitors may circumvent the characteristic genetic plasticity that has allowed cancer cells to eventually evade the toxic effects of most molecularly targeted agents. The mechanism-based use of Hsp90 inhibitors, both alone and in combination with other drugs, should be effective toward multiple forms of cancer. Further, because Hsp90 inhibitors also induce Hsf-1-dependent expression of Hsp70, and because certain mutated Hsp90 client proteins are neurotoxic, these drugs display ameliorative properties in several neurodegenerative disease models, suggesting a novel role for Hsp90 inhibitors in treating multiple pathologies involving neurodegeneration.

  20. Insight into the assembly of chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Stegmann, R.; Manakova, E.; Roessle, M.; Hermann, T.; Heumann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany); Axmann, S.; Plueckthun, A. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland); Wiedenmann, A. [HMI, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Chaperones are proteins that help other proteins (substrate proteins) to acquire a `good` conformation. The folding is a dynamic process and involves repetitive binding and release of the chaperone components and of the substrate protein. Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structural changes that appear to happen during the folding process. (author). 2 refs.

  1. Division of Labor: ER-Resident BiP Co-Chaperones Match Substrates to Fates Based on Specific Binding Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Daniel N; Clerico, Eugenia M; Gierasch, Lila M

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Behnke et al. (2016) describe a novel cell-based peptide-binding assay and use it to analyze the binding specificities of the endoplasmic reticulum Hsp70 chaperone and its co-chaperones and to probe their different roles in protein quality control.

  2. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  3. DnaK from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis is a surface-exposed human plasminogen receptor upregulated in response to bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Orrico, Catia; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2010-06-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis lives in the gastrointestinal tract of most mammals, including humans. Recently, for the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07, a dose-dependent plasminogen-binding activity was demonstrated and five putative plasminogen-binding proteins were identified. Here we investigated the role of surface DnaK as a B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 plasminogen receptor. DnaK was visualized on the bacterial cell surface by transmission electron microscopy. The His-tagged recombinant DnaK protein showed a high affinity for human plasminogen, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. The capability to tolerate physiological concentrations of bile salts is a crucial feature for an intestinal symbiont micro-organism. By proteome analysis we demonstrated that the long-term exposure of B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 to bile salts results in the upregulation of important surface plasminogen receptors such as DnaK and enolase. Moreover, adaptation of B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 to physiological concentrations of bile salts significantly increased its capacity to interact with the host plasminogen system. By enhancing the bacterial capacity to interact with the host plasminogen, the gut bile environment may facilitate the colonization of the human host by B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07.

  4. RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yang; Hongjie Xia; Qi Qian; Xi Zhou

    2015-01-01

    RNAs are functionally diverse macromolecules whose proper functions rely strictly upon their correct tertiary structures. However, because of their high structural flexibility, correct folding of RNAs is challenging and slow. Therefore, cells and viruses encode a variety of RNA remodeling proteins, including helicases and RNA chaperones. In RNA viruses, these proteins are believed to play pivotal roles in all the processes involving viral RNAs during the life cycle. RNA helicases have been studied extensively for decades, whereas RNA chaperones, particularly virus-encoded RNA chaperones, are often overlooked. This review describes the activities of RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses, particularly the ones identified and characterized in recent years, and the functions of these proteins in different steps of viral life cycles, and presents an overview of this unique group of proteins.

  5. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme.

  6. Polypeptide binding properties of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C S; Heegaard, N H; Holm, A;

    2000-01-01

    Calreticulin is a highly conserved eukaryotic ubiquitious protein located mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Two major characteristics of calreticulin are its chaperone activity and its lectin properties, but its precise function in intracellular protein and peptide processing remains to be elu......Calreticulin is a highly conserved eukaryotic ubiquitious protein located mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Two major characteristics of calreticulin are its chaperone activity and its lectin properties, but its precise function in intracellular protein and peptide processing remains...

  7. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation: Beyond the Q-Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the main driving force for the disease onset. Interestingly, there is marked interpatient variability in expansion thresholds for a given disease. Between different polyQ diseases the repeat length vs. AO also indicates the existence of modulatory effects on aggregation of the upstream and downstream amino acid sequences flanking the Q expansion. This can be either due to intrinsic modulation of aggregation by the flanking regions, or due to differential interaction with other proteins, such as the components of the cellular protein quality control network. Indeed, several lines of evidence suggest that molecular chaperones have impact on the handling of different polyQ proteins. Here, we review factors differentially influencing polyQ aggregation: the Q-stretch itself, modulatory flanking sequences, interaction partners, cleavage of polyQ-containing proteins, and post-translational modifications, with a special focus on the role of molecular chaperones. By discussing typical examples of how these factors influence aggregation, we provide more insight on the variability of AO between different diseases as well as within the same polyQ disorder, on the molecular level. PMID:28386214

  8. Sequence and domain conservation of the coelacanth Hsp40 and Hsp90 chaperones suggests conservation of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Edkins, Adrienne Lesley; Blatch, Gregory Lloyd

    2014-09-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones play an important role in preserving and regulating the active conformational state of cellular proteins. The chaperone complement of the Indonesian Coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, was elucidated using transcriptomic sequences. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) chaperones, and associated co-chaperones were focused on, and homologous human sequences were used to search the sequence databases. Coelacanth homologs of the cytosolic, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of human Hsp90 were identified, as well as all of the major co-chaperones of the cytosolic isoform. Most of the human Hsp40s were found to have coelacanth homologs, and the data suggested that all of the chaperone machinery for protein folding at the ribosome, protein translocation to cellular compartments such as the ER and protein degradation were conserved. Some interesting similarities and differences were identified when interrogating human, mouse, and zebrafish homologs. For example, DnaJB13 is predicted to be a non-functional Hsp40 in humans, mouse, and zebrafish due to a corrupted histidine-proline-aspartic acid (HPD) motif, while the coelacanth homolog has an intact HPD. These and other comparisons enabled important functional and evolutionary questions to be posed for future experimental studies.

  9. `The HSP70 chaperone machinery : J proteins as drivers of functional specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, Harm H.; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    Heat shock 70 kDa proteins (HSP70s) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that function in a myriad of biological processes, modulating polypeptide folding, degradation and translocation across membranes, and protein-protein interactions. This multitude of roles is not easily reconciled with the

  10. Dynamic changes in the localization of thermally unfolded nuclear proteins associated with chaperone-dependent protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, E A; Salomons, F A; Brunsting, J F; van der Want, J J; Sibon, O C; Kampinga, H H

    2001-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in the protection of cells against protein damage through their ability to hold, disaggregate, and refold damaged proteins or their ability to facilitate degradation of damaged proteins. Little is known about how these processes are spatially coordinated in cells. U

  11. Comparison of intra-organellar chaperone capacity for dealing with stress-induced protein unfolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential for cells to prevent that partially unfolded proteins form non-functional, toxic aggregates. This requirement is increased when cells experience protein unfolding stresses and such could affect all compartments in the eukaryotic cell. Whether all organelles are equ

  12. The Malarial Exported PFA0660w Is an Hsp40 Co-Chaperone of PfHsp70-x.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Daniyan

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum, the human pathogen responsible for the most dangerous malaria infection, survives and develops in mature erythrocytes through the export of proteins needed for remodelling of the host cell. Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (Hsp family are prominent members of the exportome, including a number of Hsp40s and a Hsp70. PFA0660w, a type II Hsp40, has been shown to be exported and possibly form a complex with PfHsp70-x in the infected erythrocyte cytosol. However, the chaperone properties of PFA0660w and its interaction with human and parasite Hsp70s are yet to be investigated. Recombinant PFA0660w was found to exist as a monomer in solution, and was able to significantly stimulate the ATPase activity of PfHsp70-x but not that of a second plasmodial Hsp70 (PfHsp70-1 or a human Hsp70 (HSPA1A, indicating a potential specific functional partnership with PfHsp70-x. Protein binding studies in the presence and absence of ATP suggested that the interaction of PFA0660w with PfHsp70-x most likely represented a co-chaperone/chaperone interaction. Also, PFA0660w alone produced a concentration-dependent suppression of rhodanese aggregation, demonstrating its chaperone properties. Overall, we have provided the first biochemical evidence for the possible role of PFA0660w as a chaperone and as co-chaperone of PfHsp70-x. We propose that these chaperones boost the chaperone power of the infected erythrocyte, enabling successful protein trafficking and folding, and thereby making a fundamental contribution to the pathology of malaria.

  13. Protein plasticity underlines activation and function of ATP-independent chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suss, Ohad; Reichmann, Dana

    2015-01-01

    One of the key issues in biology is to understand how cells cope with protein unfolding caused by changes in their environment. Self-protection is the natural immediate response to any sudden threat and for cells the critical issue is to prevent aggregation of existing proteins. Cellular response to stress is therefore indistinguishably linked to molecular chaperones, which are the first line of defense and function to efficiently recognize misfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation. One of the major protein families that act as cellular guards includes a group of ATP-independent chaperones, which facilitate protein folding without the consumption of ATP. This review will present fascinating insights into the diversity of ATP-independent chaperones, and the variety of mechanisms by which structural plasticity is utilized in the fine-tuning of chaperone activity, as well as in crosstalk within the proteostasis network. Research into this intriguing class of chaperones has introduced new concepts of stress response to a changing cellular environment, and paved the way to uncover how this environment affects protein folding.

  14. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  15. Soft nanotube hydrogels functioning as artificial chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2012-06-26

    Self-assembly of rationally designed asymmetric amphiphilic monomers in water produced nanotube hydrogels in the presence of chemically denatured proteins (green fluorescent protein, carbonic anhydrase, and citrate synthase) at room temperature, which were able to encapsulate the proteins in the one-dimensional channel of the nanotube consisting of a monolayer membrane. Decreasing the concentrations of the denaturants induced refolding of part of the encapsulated proteins in the nanotube channel. Changing the pH dramatically reduced electrostatic attraction between the inner surface mainly covered with amino groups of the nanotube channel and the encapsulated proteins. As a result, the refolded proteins were smoothly released into the bulk solution without specific additive agents. This recovery procedure also transformed the encapsulated proteins from an intermediately refolding state to a completely refolded state. Thus, the nanotube hydrogels assisted the refolding of the denatured proteins and acted as artificial chaperones. Introduction of hydrophobic sites such as a benzyloxycarbony group and a tert-butoxycarbonyl group onto the inner surface of the nanotube channels remarkably enhanced the encapsulation and refolding efficiencies based on the hydrophobic interactions between the groups and the surface-exposed hydrophobic amino acid residues of the intermediates in the refolding process. Refolding was strongly dependent on the inner diameters of the nanotube channels. Supramolecular nanotechnology allowed us to not only precisely control the diameters of the nanotube channels but also functionalize their surfaces, enabling us to fine-tune the biocompatibility. Hence, these nanotube hydrogel systems should be widely applicable to various target proteins of different molecular weights, charges, and conformations.

  16. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  17. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Andrea; Ehling, Josef; Franz, Susanne; Simon, Verena; Bravo, Ignacio G; Tessmer, Claudia; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lyer, Stefan; Schneider, Ursula; Köster, Jan; Raupach, Kerstin; Kämmerer, Elke; Klaus, Christina; Tischendorf, Jens J W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Alonso, Angel; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2010-03-07

    Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  18. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Jacobsen, Susanne; Hammer, Karin

    1997-01-01

    laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain, After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shack repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase......, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels, Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress, Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction...... proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress, Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling...

  19. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  20. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  1. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani Nagpal

    Full Text Available Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS. Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor chaperones in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrass, Michael J; Klauer, Neal R; De Credico, Nicole E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are molecular chaperones that reside mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but exist also in the proximity of the plasma membrane. Sig-1Rs are highly expressed in the CNS and are involved in many cellular processes including cell differentiation, neuritogenesis, microglia activation, protein quality control, calcium-mediated ER stress and ion channel modulation. Disturbance in any of the above cellular processes can accelerate the progression of many neurological disorders; therefore, the Sig-1R has been implicated in several neurological diseases. Areas covered This review broadly covers the functions of Sig-1Rs including several neurodegenerative disorders in humans and drug addiction-associated neurological disturbance in the case of HIV infection. We discuss how several Sig-1R ligands could be utilized in therapeutic approaches to treat those disorders. Expert opinion Emerging understanding of the cellular functions of this unique transmembrane chaperone may lead to the use of new agents or broaden the use of certain available ligands as therapeutic targets in those neurological disorders. PMID:25331742

  3. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  4. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase misfolding and pharmacological chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhaug, Jarl; Aubi, Oscar; Martinez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a loss-of-function inborn error of metabolism. As many other inherited diseases the main pathologic mechanism in PKU is an enhanced tendency of the mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) to misfold and undergo ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Recent alternative approaches with therapeutic potential for PKU aim at correcting the PAH misfolding, and in this respect pharmacological chaperones are the focus of increasing interest. These compounds, which often resemble the natural ligands and show mild competitive inhibition, can rescue the misfolded proteins by stimulating their renaturation in vivo. For PKU, a few studies have proven the stabilization of PKU-mutants in vitro, in cells, and in mice by pharmacological chaperones, which have been found either by using the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor as query structure for shape-focused virtual screening or by high-throughput screening of small compound libraries. Both approaches have revealed a number of compounds, most of which bind at the iron-binding site, competitively with respect to BH(4). Furthermore, PAH shares a number of ligands, such as BH(4), amino acid substrates and inhibitors, with the other aromatic amino acid hydroxylases: the neuronal/neuroendocrine enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the tryptophan hydroxylases (TPHs). Recent results indicate that the PAH-targeted pharmacological chaperones should also be tested on TH and the TPHs, and eventually be derivatized to avoid unwanted interactions with these other enzymes. After derivatization and validation in animal models, the PAH-chaperoning compounds represent novel possibilities in the treatment of PKU.

  6. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  7. The role of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in diseases caused by misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason C

    2014-03-01

    Protein-folding diseases are an ongoing medical challenge. Many diseases within this group are genetically determined, and have no known cure. Among the examples in which the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are well understood are diseases driven by misfolding of transmembrane proteins that normally function as cell-surface ion channels. Wild-type forms are synthesized and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane system and, upon correct folding, are trafficked by the secretory pathway to the cell surface. Misfolded mutant forms traffic poorly, if at all, and are instead degraded by the ER-associated proteasomal degradation (ERAD) system. Molecular chaperones can assist the folding of the cytosolic domains of these transmembrane proteins; however, these chaperones are also involved in selecting misfolded forms for ERAD. Given this dual role of chaperones, diseases caused by the misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels (referred to here as ion-channel-misfolding diseases) can be regarded as a consequence of insufficiency of the pro-folding chaperone activity and/or overefficiency of the chaperone ERAD role. An attractive idea is that manipulation of the chaperones might allow increased folding and trafficking of the mutant proteins, and thereby partial restoration of function. This Review outlines the roles of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in the best-studied paradigms of ion-channel-misfolding disease--the CFTR chloride channel in cystic fibrosis and the hERG potassium channel in cardiac long QT syndrome type 2. In addition, other ion channels implicated in ion-channel-misfolding diseases are discussed.

  8. Structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence of the periplasmic chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D A; Zavialov, A V; Chernovskaya, T V; Karlyshev, A V; Zav'yalova, G A; Vasiliev, A M; Dudich, I V; Abramov, V M; Zav'yalov, V P; MacIntyre, S

    1999-04-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 beta-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 beta-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones.

  9. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  10. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  11. Chaperone binding at the ribosomal exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Gajhede, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The exit tunnel region of the ribosome is well established as a focal point for interaction between the components that guide the fate of nascent polypeptides. One of these, the chaperone trigger factor (TF), associates with the 50S ribosomal subunit through its N-terminal domain. Targeting of TF...... to ribosomes is crucial to achieve its remarkable efficiency in protein folding. A similar tight coupling to translation is found in signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent protein translocation. Here, we report crystal structures of the E. coli TF ribosome binding domain. TF is structurally related...... to the Hsp33 chaperone but has a prominent ribosome anchor located as a tip of the molecule. This tip includes the previously established unique TF signature motif. Comparison reveals that this feature is not found in SRP structures. We identify a conserved helical kink as a hallmark of the TF structure...

  12. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% ofthe world population or more than 185 million peopleworldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseasesincluding cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV isthe most common indication for liver transplantation inpatients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an envelopedRNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in theFlaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cellcan be divided into six phases (1) binding and internalization;(2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3)viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNAgenome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) andassembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation)and secretion. Many host factors are involved in theHCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group ofhost cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerouscellular processes including protein folding, multimericprotein assembly, protein trafficking, and proteindegradation. All phases of the viral life cycle requirechaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteinswith chaperones. This review will present our currentknowledge and understanding of the role of chaperonesin the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCVinfection will provide further insights into viral/hostinteractions and potential therapeutic targets for bothHCV and other viruses.

  13. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank (Wyeth)

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  14. The Hsp60 protein of helicobacter pylori displays chaperone activity under acidic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Mendoza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock protein, Hsp60, is one of the most abundant proteins in Helicobacter pylori. Given its sequence homology to the Escherichia coli Hsp60 or GroEL, Hsp60 from H. pylori would be expected to function as a molecular chaperone in this organism. H. pylori is an organism that grows on the gastric epithelium, where the pH can fluctuate between neutral and 4.5 and the intracellular pH can be as low as 5.0. This study was performed to test the ability of Hsp60 from H. pylori to function as a molecular chaperone under mildly acidic conditions. We report here that Hsp60 could suppress the acid-induced aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH in the 7.0–5.0 pH range. Hsp60 was found to undergo a conformational change within this pH range. It was also found that exposure of hydrophobic surfaces of Hsp60 is significant and that their exposure is increased under acidic conditions. Although, alcohol dehydrogenase does not contain exposed hydrophobic surfaces, we found that their exposure is triggered at low pH. Our results demonstrate that Hsp60 from H. pylori can function as a molecular chaperone under acidic conditions and that the interaction between Hsp60 and other proteins may be mediated by hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly...

  16. Conformational Selection Underlies Recognition of a Molybdoenzyme by Its Dedicated Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Magali; Sylvi, Léa; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Mileo, Elisabetta; Halgand, Frédéric; Walburger, Anne; Vezin, Hervé; Belle, Valérie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to all biological processes. Understanding the key role played by dedicated chaperones in metalloprotein folding and assembly requires the knowledge of their conformational ensembles. In this study, the NarJ chaperone dedicated to the assembly of the membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase complex NarGHI, a molybdenum-iron containing metalloprotein, was taken as a model of dedicated chaperone. The combination of two techniques ie site-directed spin labeling followed by EPR spectroscopy and ion mobility mass spectrometry, was used to get information about the structure and conformational dynamics of the NarJ chaperone upon binding the N-terminus of the NarG metalloprotein partner. By the study of singly spin-labeled proteins, the E119 residue present in a conserved elongated hydrophobic groove of NarJ was shown to be part of the interaction site. Moreover, doubly spin-labeled proteins studied by pulsed double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy revealed a large and composite distribution of inter-label distances that evolves into a single preexisting one upon complex formation. Additionally, ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments fully support these findings by revealing the existence of several conformers in equilibrium through the distinction of different drift time curves and the selection of one of them upon complex formation. Taken together our work provides a detailed view of the structural flexibility of a dedicated chaperone and suggests that the exquisite recognition and binding of the N-terminus of the metalloprotein is governed by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:23185350

  17. Conformational selection underlies recognition of a molybdoenzyme by its dedicated chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Lorenzi

    Full Text Available Molecular recognition is central to all biological processes. Understanding the key role played by dedicated chaperones in metalloprotein folding and assembly requires the knowledge of their conformational ensembles. In this study, the NarJ chaperone dedicated to the assembly of the membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase complex NarGHI, a molybdenum-iron containing metalloprotein, was taken as a model of dedicated chaperone. The combination of two techniques ie site-directed spin labeling followed by EPR spectroscopy and ion mobility mass spectrometry, was used to get information about the structure and conformational dynamics of the NarJ chaperone upon binding the N-terminus of the NarG metalloprotein partner. By the study of singly spin-labeled proteins, the E119 residue present in a conserved elongated hydrophobic groove of NarJ was shown to be part of the interaction site. Moreover, doubly spin-labeled proteins studied by pulsed double electron-electron resonance (DEER spectroscopy revealed a large and composite distribution of inter-label distances that evolves into a single preexisting one upon complex formation. Additionally, ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments fully support these findings by revealing the existence of several conformers in equilibrium through the distinction of different drift time curves and the selection of one of them upon complex formation. Taken together our work provides a detailed view of the structural flexibility of a dedicated chaperone and suggests that the exquisite recognition and binding of the N-terminus of the metalloprotein is governed by a conformational selection mechanism.

  18. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  19. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picking Wendy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. Results In this study, we present the 3.3 Å crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155 of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC1-151. Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric "head-to- head" dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC1-151. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II

  20. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  1. Chaperone-mediated autophagy is defective in mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Bhuvarahamurthy; Mesires, Nicholas T; Kennedy, John C; Curcio-Morelli, Cyntia; Laplante, Janice M; Dice, J Fred; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2009-05-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family. The encoded protein, transient receptor potential mucolipin-1 (TRPML1), has been localized to lysosomes and late endosomes but the pathogenic mechanism by which loss of TRPML1 leads to abnormal cellular storage and neuronal cell death is still poorly understood. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) experiments identified interactions between TRPML1 and Hsc70 as well as TRPML1 and Hsp40. Hsc70 and Hsp40 are members of a molecular chaperone complex required for protein transport into the lysosome during chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). To determine the functional relevance of this interaction, we compared fibroblasts from MLIV patients to those from sex- and age-matched controls and show a defect in CMA in response to serum withdrawal. This defect in CMA was subsequently confirmed in purified lysosomes isolated from control and MLIV fibroblasts. We further show that the amount of lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A) is reduced in lysosomal membranes of MLIV fibroblasts. As a result of decreased CMA, MLIV fibroblasts have increased levels of oxidized proteins compared to control fibroblasts. We hypothesize that TRPML1 may act as a docking site for intralysosomal Hsc70 (ly-Hsc70) allowing it to more efficiently pull in substrates for CMA. It is also possible that TRPML1 channel activity may be required for CMA. Understanding the role of TRPML1 in CMA will undoubtedly help to characterize the pathogenesis of MLIV.

  2. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  3. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  4. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  5. Yeast prions help identify and define chaperone interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Michael; Masison, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Proteins in the cell experience various stressful conditions that can affect their ability to attain and maintain the structural conformations they need to perform effectively. Protein chaperones are an important part of a cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome in the face of such challenges. Chaperones from different conserved families have multiple members that cooperate to regulate each other's activity and produce machines that perform a variety of tasks. The large numbers of related chaperones with both functionally overlapping and distinct activities allows fine-tuning of the machinery for specific tasks, but presents a daunting degree of complexity. Yeast prions are misfolded forms of cellular proteins whose propagation depends on the action of protein chaperones. Studying how propagation of yeast prions is affected by alterations in functions of various chaperones provides an approach to understanding this complexity.

  6. Quantifying the role of chaperones in protein translocation by computational modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore eAssenza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp70 plays a central role in the import of cytoplasmic proteins into organelles,driving their translocation by binding them from the organellar interior. Starting from the experimentally-determined structure of the E. coli Hsp70, we computed, by means of molecular simulations,the effective free-energy profile for substrate translocation uponchaperone binding. We then used the resulting free energy to quantitatively characterize the kinetics of the import process, whose comparison with unassisted translocation highlights the essential role played by Hsp70 in importing cytoplasmic proteins.

  7. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  8. CCT2 Mutations Evoke Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to Chaperone Complex Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minegishi, Yuriko; Sheng, XunLun; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Sergeev, Yuri; Iejima, Daisuke; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Furuno, Masaaki; Zhuang, Wenjun; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Hattori, Seisuke; Iwata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a hereditary early-onset retinal dystrophy that is accompanied by severe macular degeneration. In this study, novel compound heterozygous mutations were identified as LCA-causative in chaperonin-containing TCP-1, subunit 2 (CCT2), a gene that encodes the molecular chaperone protein, CCTβ. The zebrafish mutants of CCTβ are known to exhibit the eye phenotype while its mutation and association with human disease have been unknown. The CCT proteins (CCT α-θ) forms ring complex for its chaperon function. The LCA mutants of CCTβ, T400P and R516H, are biochemically instable and the affinity for the adjacent subunit, CCTγ, was affected distinctly in both mutants. The patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), carrying these CCTβ mutants, were less proliferative than the control iPSCs. Decreased proliferation under Cct2 knockdown in 661W cells was significantly rescued by wild-type CCTβ expression. However, the expression of T400P and R516H didn’t exhibit the significant effect. In mouse retina, both CCTβ and CCTγ are expressed in the retinal ganglion cells and connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells. The Cct2 knockdown decreased its major client protein, transducing β1 (Gβ1). Here we report the novel LCA mutations in CCTβ and the impact of chaperon disability by these mutations in cellular biology. PMID:27645772

  9. The crystal structure of the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cpr7 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu; Ge, Qiangqiang; Wang, Mingxing; Lv, Hui; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2017-02-09

    The versatility of Hsp90 can be attributed to the variety of co-chaperone proteins that modulate the role of Hsp90 in many cellular processes. As a co-chaperone of Hsp90, Cpr7 is essential for accelerating the cell growth in an Hsp90-containing trimeric complex. Here, we report the crystal structure of Cpr7 at a resolution of 1.8Å. It consists of an N-terminal PPI domain and a C-terminal TPR domain, and exhibits a U-shape conformation. Our studies revealed the aggregation state of Cpr7 in solution and the interaction properties between Cpr7 and the MEEVD sequence from the C-terminus of Hsp90. In addition, the structure and sequence analysis between Cpr7 and homologues revealed the structure basis both for the function differences between Cpr6 and Cpr7 and the functional complements between Cns1 and Cpr7. Our studies facilitate the understanding of Cpr7 and provide decent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 co-chaperone pathway.

  10. Cellular mechanotransduction relies on tension-induced and chaperone-assisted autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Anna; Eppler, Felix J; Tapia, Victor E; van der Ven, Peter F M; Hampe, Nico; Hersch, Nils; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Stadel, Daniela; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul; Behrends, Christian; Fürst, Dieter O; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kolanus, Waldemar; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2013-03-04

    Mechanical tension is an ever-present physiological stimulus essential for the development and homeostasis of locomotory, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Tension sensing contributes to stem cell differentiation, immune cell recruitment, and tumorigenesis. Yet, how mechanical signals are transduced inside cells remains poorly understood. Here, we identify chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) as a tension-induced autophagy pathway essential for mechanotransduction in muscle and immune cells. The CASA complex, comprised of the molecular chaperones Hsc70 and HspB8 and the cochaperone BAG3, senses the mechanical unfolding of the actin-crosslinking protein filamin. Together with the chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP, the complex initiates the ubiquitin-dependent autophagic sorting of damaged filamin to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagosome formation during CASA depends on an interaction of BAG3 with synaptopodin-2 (SYNPO2). This interaction is mediated by the BAG3 WW domain and facilitates cooperation with an autophagosome membrane fusion complex. BAG3 also utilizes its WW domain to engage in YAP/TAZ signaling. Via this pathway, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription to maintain actin anchoring and crosslinking under mechanical tension. By integrating tension sensing, autophagosome formation, and transcription regulation during mechanotransduction, the CASA machinery ensures tissue homeostasis and regulates fundamental cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Procollagen triple helix assembly: an unconventional chaperone-assisted folding paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makareeva, Elena; Leikin, Sergey

    2007-10-10

    Fibers composed of type I collagen triple helices form the organic scaffold of bone and many other tissues, yet the energetically preferred conformation of type I collagen at body temperature is a random coil. In fibers, the triple helix is stabilized by neighbors, but how does it fold? The observations reported here reveal surprising features that may represent a new paradigm for folding of marginally stable proteins. We find that human procollagen triple helix spontaneously folds into its native conformation at 30-34 degrees C but not at higher temperatures, even in an environment emulating Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). ER-like molecular crowding by nonspecific proteins does not affect triple helix folding or aggregation of unfolded chains. Common ER chaperones may prevent aggregation and misfolding of procollagen C-propeptide in their traditional role of binding unfolded polypeptide chains. However, such binding only further destabilizes the triple helix. We argue that folding of the triple helix requires stabilization by preferential binding of chaperones to its folded, native conformation. Based on the triple helix folding temperature measured here and published binding constants, we deduce that HSP47 is likely to do just that. It takes over 20 HSP47 molecules to stabilize a single triple helix at body temperature. The required 50-200 microM concentration of free HSP47 is not unusual for heat-shock chaperones in ER, but it is 100 times higher than used in reported in vitro experiments, which did not reveal such stabilization.

  12. [Structure and function of histone chaperone FACT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, M T; Maluchenko, N V; Valieva, M E; Gerasimova, N S; Kulaeva, O I; Georgiev, P G; Studitsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    FACT is heterodimer protein complex and histone chaperone that plays an important role in maintaining and modifying chromatin structure during various DNA-dependent processes. FACT is involved in nucleosome assembly de novo and in the preservation and recovery of the nucleosome structure during and after transcription, replication and repair of DNA. During transcript elongation FACT reduces the height of the nucleosome barrier and supports survival of the nucleosomes during and after passage of RNA polymerase II. In this process FACT interacts with histone H2A-H2B dimer in nucleosomes, thus facilitating uncoiling of nucleosomal DNA from the octamer of histones; it also facilitates subsequent recovery of the canonical structure of the nucleosome after transcription. FACT also plays an important role in transformation of human cells and in maintaining the viability of the tumor cells.

  13. Multiscale modeling of a conditionally disordered pH-sensing chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan S; Law, Sean M; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-04-24

    The pH-sensing chaperone HdeA promotes the survival of enteropathogenic bacteria during transit through the harshly acidic environment of the mammalian stomach. At low pH, HdeA transitions from an inactive, folded, dimer to chaperone-active, disordered, monomers to protect against the acid-induced aggregation of periplasmic proteins. Toward achieving a detailed mechanistic understanding of the pH response of HdeA, we develop a multiscale modeling approach to capture its pH-dependent thermodynamics. Our approach combines pK(a) (logarithmic acid dissociation constant) calculations from all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained modeling and yields new, atomic-level, insights into HdeA chaperone function that can be directly tested by experiment. "pH triggers" that significantly destabilize the dimer are each located near the N-terminus of a helix, suggesting that their neutralization at low pH destabilizes the helix macrodipole as a mechanism of monomer disordering. Moreover, we observe a non-monotonic change in the pH-dependent stability of HdeA, with maximal stability of the dimer near pH5. This affect is attributed to the protonation Glu37, which exhibits an anomalously high pK(a) value and is located within the hydrophobic dimer interface. Finally, the pH-dependent binding pathway of HdeA comprises a partially unfolded, dimeric intermediate that becomes increasingly stable relative to the native dimer at lower pH values and displays key structural features for chaperone-substrate interaction. We anticipate that the insights from our model will help inform ongoing NMR and biochemical investigations.

  14. Genetic mapping and biochemical characterization of suppressor mutations sukA and sukB for a dnaK7(Ts) mutation of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itikawa, H; Mishina, Y; Wada, M; Fujita, H

    1992-02-01

    Temperature-resistant pseudorevertants were isolated from a dnaK7(Ts) mutant of Escherichia coli K-12. Two of these pseudorevertants were shown to carry suppressor mutations, sukA and sukB, respectively. Genetic mapping by conjugation and P1-transduction revealed that these suppressor mutations were located at two distinct sites between 76 and 77 min close to the suhA and rpoH genes. Labeled cellular proteins were extracted from suppressor mutants grown at various temperatures and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of the gels indicated that these suppressor mutations each resulted in increased synthesis of the heat shock protein Lon (an ATP-dependent protease, La) at both permissive and nonpermissive temperatures.

  15. Withaferin A Analogs That Target the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Xu, Ya-ming; Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Eric C.; Mesa, Celestina; Mason, Damian J.; Brown, Robert V.; Clair, James J. La; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; Zhang, Donna D.; Chapman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action (MOA) of many natural products can be puzzling with mechanistic clues that seem to lack a common thread. One such puzzle lies in the evaluation of the antitumor properties of the natural product withaferin A (WFA). A variety of seemingly unrelated pathways have been identified to explain its activity, suggesting a lack of selectivity. We now show that WFA acts as an inhibitor of the chaperone, p97, both in vitro and in cell models in addition to inhibiting the proteasome in vitro. Through medicinal chemistry, we have refined the activity of WFA toward p97 and away from the proteasome. Subsequent studies indicated that these WFA analogs retained p97 activity and cytostatic activity in cell models, suggesting that the modes of action reported for WFA could be connected by proteostasis modulation. Through this endeavor, we highlight how the parallel integration of medicinal chemistry with chemical biology offers a potent solution to one of natures’ intriguing molecular puzzles. PMID:26006219

  16. FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weihuan Cao; Mary Konsolaki

    2011-08-01

    The FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family of immunophilins consists of proteins with a variety of protein–protein interaction domains and versatile cellular functions. Analysis of the functions of immunophilins has been the focus of studies in recent years and has led to the identification of various molecular pathways in which FKBPs play an active role. All FKBPs contain a domain with prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Binding of the immunosuppressant molecule FK506 to this domain inhibits their PPIase activity while mediating immune suppression through inhibition of calcineurin. The larger members, FKBP51 and FKBP52, interact with Hsp90 and exhibit chaperone activity that is shown to regulate steroid hormone signalling. From these studies it is clear that FKBP proteins are expressed ubiquitously but show relatively high levels of expression in the nervous system. Consistent with this expression, FKBPs have been implicated with both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on recent studies involving FKBP immunophilins in Alzheimer’s-disease-related pathways.

  17. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: should a chaperone accompany our therapeutic approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin L; Li, Chengyuan; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors.

  18. Fab Chaperone-Assisted RNA Crystallography (Fab CARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eileen; Archer, Jennifer; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Recent discovery of structured RNAs such as ribozymes and riboswitches shows that there is still much to learn about the structure and function of RNAs. Knowledge learned can be employed in both biochemical research and clinical applications. X-ray crystallography gives unparalleled atomic-level structural detail from which functional inferences can be deduced. However, the difficulty in obtaining high-quality crystals and their phasing information make it a very challenging task. RNA crystallography is particularly arduous due to several factors such as RNA's paucity of surface chemical diversity, lability, repetitive anionic backbone, and flexibility, all of which are counterproductive to crystal packing. Here we describe Fab chaperone assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), a systematic technique to increase RNA crystallography success by facilitating crystal packing as well as expediting phase determination through molecular replacement of conserved Fab domains. Major steps described in this chapter include selection of a synthetic Fab library displayed on M13 phage against a structured RNA crystallization target, ELISA for initial choice of binding Fabs, Fab expression followed by protein A affinity then cation exchange chromatography purification, final choice of Fab by binding specificity and affinity as determined by a dot blot assay, and lastly gel filtration purification of a large quantity of chosen Fabs for crystallization.

  19. The histone chaperones Vps75 and Nap1 form ring-like, tetrameric structures in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowman, Andrew; Hammond, Colin M; Stirling, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    NAP-1 fold histone chaperones play an important role in escorting histones to and from sites of nucleosome assembly and disassembly. The two NAP-1 fold histone chaperones in budding yeast, Vps75 and Nap1, have previously been crystalized in a characteristic homodimeric conformation. In this study...... fold histone chaperones. The tetramerisation of NAP-1 fold histone chaperones may act to shield acidic surfaces in the absence of histone cargo thus providing a 'self-chaperoning' type mechanism....

  20. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  1. Molecular chaperone dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases and effects of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Panchanan; Manna, Jayeeta; Veleri, Shobi; Frautschy, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, and Huntington's diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  2. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  3. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanan Maiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, tauopathies, and Huntington’s diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  4. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW); (UC)

    2008-11-24

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0 A crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX(9-13)FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals.

  5. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Tyagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  6. Chemical chaperones mitigate experimental asthma by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Lokesh; Krishnan, Veda; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Chakraborty, Samarpana; Maity, Shuvadeep; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Chakraborty, Kausik; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag

    2014-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and consequent unfolded protein response (UPR) are important in inflammation but have been poorly explored in asthma. We used a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) with features of asthma to understand the role of ER stress and to explore potential therapeutic effects of inhaled chemical chaperones, which are small molecules that can promote protein folding and diminish UPR. UPR markers were initially measured on alternate days during a 7-day daily allergen challenge model. UPR markers increased within 24 hours after the first allergen challenge and peaked by the third challenge, before AAI was fully established (from the fifth challenge onward). Three chemical chaperones-glycerol, trehalose, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-were initially administered during allergen challenge (preventive regimen). TMAO, the most effective of these chemical chaperones and 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone currently in clinical trials, were further tested for potential therapeutic activities after AAI was established (therapeutic regimen). Chemical chaperones showed a dose-dependent reduction in UPR markers, airway inflammation, and remodeling in both regimens. Our results indicate an early and important role of the ER stress pathway in asthma pathogenesis and show therapeutic potential for chemical chaperones.

  7. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  8. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  9. Probing nucleation, reverse annealing, and chaperone function along the reaction path of HIV-1 single-strand transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yining; Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Landes, Christy F.; Kim, Yoen Joo; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhu, Yongjin; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps that are catalyzed (chaperoned) by the nucleocapsid protein (NC), including the annealing of the transactivation response region (TAR) RNA of the genome to the complementary sequence (TAR DNA) in minus-strand strong-stop DNA. It has been extremely challenging to obtain unambiguous mechanistic details on the annealing process at the molecular level because of the kinetic involvement of a complex and het...

  10. NMR structure of chaperone Chz1 complexed with histones H2A.Z-H2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Hansen, D Flemming; Kato, Hidenori; Luk, Ed; Freedberg, Daron I; Kay, Lewis E; Wu, Carl; Bai, Yawen

    2008-08-01

    The NMR structure of budding yeast chaperone Chz1 complexed with histones H2A.Z-H2B has been determined. Chz1 forms a long irregular chain capped by two short alpha-helices, and uses both positively and negatively charged residues to stabilize the histone dimer. A molecular model that docks Chz1 onto the nucleosome has implications for its potential functions.

  11. Blocking the chaperone kinome pathway: Mechanistic insights into a novel dual inhibition approach for supra-additive suppression of malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Abhinav [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Shandilya, Ashutosh [Supercomputing Facility for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Agrawal, Vibhuti; Pratik, Piyush; Bhasme, Divya; Bisaria, Virendra S. [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sundar, Durai, E-mail: sundar@dbeb.iitd.ac.in [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Withaferin A and 17-DMAG synergistically inhibit the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone pair. {yields} Binding of WA to Cdc37 cleft suppresses its kinase binding activity. {yields} 17-DMAG binding to the association complex results in H-bonds with 60% clustering. {yields} The ligands' bound complex was found structurally and thermodynamically stable. -- Abstract: The chaperone Hsp90 is involved in regulating the stability and activation state of more than 200 'client' proteins and takes part in the cancer diseased states. The major clientele-protein kinases depend on Hsp90 for their proper folding and functioning. Cdc37, a kinase targeting co-chaperone of Hsp90, mediates the interactions between Hsp90 and protein kinases. Targeting of Cdc37 has the prospect of delivering predominantly kinase-selective molecular responses as compared to the current pharmacologic Hsp90 inhibitors. The present work reports a bio-computational study carried out with the aim of exploring the dual inhibition of Hsp90/Cdc37 chaperone/co-chaperone association complex by the naturally occurring drug candidates withaferin A and 17-DMAG along with their possible modes of action. Our molecular docking studies reveal that withaferin A in combination with 17-DMAG can act as potent chaperone system inhibitors. The structural and thermodynamic stability of the ligands' bound complex was also observed from molecular dynamics simulations in water. Our results suggest a novel tumor suppressive action mechanism of herbal ligands which can be looked forward for further clinical investigations for possible anticancer drug formulations.

  12. Chaperone-like activity of alpha-cyclodextrin via hydrophobic nanocavity to protect native structure of ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Mahnam, Karim; Ashtiani, Saman Hosseini

    2010-01-26

    The chaperone action of alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CyD), based on providing beneficial microenvironment of hydrophobic nanocavity to form molecular complex with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was examined by experimental and computational techniques. The results of UV-vis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that the chaperone-like activity of alpha-CyD depends on molecular complex formation between alpha-CyD and ADH, which caused to decrease the amount and size of polymerized molecules. Computational calculations of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and blind docking (BD) demonstrated that alpha-CyD acts as an artificial chaperone because of its high affinity to the region of ADH's two chains interface. The hydrophobic nanocavity of alpha-CyD has the ability to form inclusion complex due to the presence of phenyl ring of aromatic phenylalanine (Phe) residue in the dimeric intersection area. Delocalization of ADH subunits, which causes the exposure of Phe110, takes part in the enzyme polymerization and has proven to be beneficial for aggregation inhibition and solubility enhancement within the host alpha-CyD-nanocavity.

  13. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for v

  14. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for

  15. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups fo...

  16. The G Protein α Chaperone Ric-8 as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasergi, Makaía M.; Patel, Bharti R.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase (Ric-8)A and Ric-8B are essential genes that encode positive regulators of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits. Controversy persists surrounding the precise way(s) that Ric-8 proteins affect G protein biology and signaling. Ric-8 proteins chaperone nucleotide-free Gα-subunit states during biosynthetic protein folding prior to G protein heterotrimer assembly. In organisms spanning the evolutionary window of Ric-8 expression, experimental perturbation of Ric-8 genes results in reduced functional abundances of G proteins because G protein α subunits are misfolded and degraded rapidly. Ric-8 proteins also act as Gα-subunit guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in vitro. However, Ric-8 GEF activity could strictly be an in vitro phenomenon stemming from the ability of Ric-8 to induce partial Gα unfolding, thereby enhancing GDP release. Ric-8 GEF activity clearly differs from the GEF activity of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). G protein βγ is inhibitory to Ric-8 action but obligate for receptors. It remains an open question whether Ric-8 has dual functions in cells and regulates G proteins as both a molecular chaperone and GEF. Clearly, Ric-8 has a profound influence on heterotrimeric G protein function. For this reason, we propose that Ric-8 proteins are as yet untested therapeutic targets in which pharmacological inhibition of the Ric-8/Gα protein–protein interface could serve to attenuate the effects of disease-causing G proteins (constitutively active mutants) and/or GPCR signaling. This minireview will chronicle the understanding of Ric-8 function, provide a comparative discussion of the Ric-8 molecular chaperoning and GEF activities, and support the case for why Ric-8 proteins should be considered potential targets for development of new therapies. PMID:25319541

  17. Rescue of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) mutants with chemical chaperones: purification and characterization of eight CBS mutant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtan, Tomas; Liu, Lu; Carpenter, John F; Kraus, Jan P

    2010-05-21

    Missense mutations represent the most common cause of many genetic diseases including cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency. Many of these mutations result in misfolded proteins, which lack biological function. The presence of chemical chaperones can sometimes alleviate or even restore protein folding and activity of mutant proteins. We present the purification and characterization of eight CBS mutants expressed in the presence of chemical chaperones such as ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine-N-oxide. Preliminary screening in Escherichia coli crude extracts showed that their presence during protein expression had a significant impact on the amount of recovered CBS protein, formation of tetramers, and catalytic activity. Subsequently, we purified eight CBS mutants to homogeneity (P49L, P78R, A114V, R125Q, E176K, P422L, I435T, and S466L). The tetrameric mutant enzymes fully saturated with heme had the same or higher specific activities than wild type CBS. Thermal stability measurements demonstrated that the purified mutants are equally or more thermostable than wild type CBS. The response to S-adenosyl-L-methionine stimulation or thermal activation varied. The lack of response of R125Q and E176K to both stimuli indicated that their specific conformations were unable to reach the activated state. Increased levels of molecular chaperones in crude extracts, particularly DnaJ, indicated a rather indirect effect of the chemical chaperones on folding of CBS mutants. In conclusion, the chemical chaperones present in the expression medium were able to fully restore the activity of eight CBS mutants by improving their protein folding. This finding could have direct implications for the development of a therapeutical approach to pyridoxine unresponsive homocystinuria.

  18. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Chapman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®, which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and

  19. Inhibitors of the AAA+ chaperone p97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J

    2015-02-12

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology.

  20. Chaperone potential of Pulicaria undulata extract in preventing aggregation of stressed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahghaei, Arezou; Valizadeh, Jafar; Nazari, Shahrzad; Ravandeh, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effect of an aqueous extract of Pulicaria undulata on the 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of proteins. The effects of the chaperone properties of P. undulata extract on protein aggregation were determined by measuring light scattering absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The aqueous extract of P. undulata possesses good chaperone properties but the protection effect was varied in different protein. The extract showed a higher level of protection in high molecular weight proteins than in those of low molecular weight. Using a fluorescence study, the present study provides information on the hydrophobic area of proteins interacting with the P. undulata extract. In fact, by increasing the concentration of the P. undulata extract, the hydrophic area of the protein decreased. CD spectroscopy also revealed that DTT caused changes in both the tertiary and the secondary structure of the proteins, while in the presence of P. undulata extract, there was little change. Our finding suggests the possibility of using P. undulata extract for the inhibition of aggregation and the deposition of protein in disease.

  1. A mathematical model of the dynamics of prion aggregates with chaperone-mediated fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason K; Sindi, Suzanne S

    2016-05-01

    Prions are proteins most commonly associated with fatal neurodegenerative diseases in mammals but are also responsible for a number of harmless heritable phenotypes in yeast. These states arise when a misfolded form of a protein appears and, rather than be removed by cellular quality control mechanisms, persists. The misfolded prion protein forms aggregates and is capable of converting normally folded protein to the misfolded state through direct interaction between the two forms. The dominant mathematical model for prion aggregate dynamics has been the nucleated polymerization model (NPM) which considers the dynamics of only the normal protein and the aggregates. However, for yeast prions the molecular chaperone Hsp104 is essential for prion propagation. Further, although mammals do not express Hsp104, experimental assays have shown Hsp104 also interacts with mammalian prion aggregates. In this study, we generalize the NPM to account for molecular chaperones and develop what we call the enzyme-limited nucleated polymerization model (ELNPM). We discuss existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions to our model and demonstrate that the NPM represents a quasi-steady-state reduction of our model. We validate the ELNPM by demonstrating agreement with experimental results on the yeast prion PSI(+) that could not be supported by the NPM. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the NPM, the ELNPM permits the coexistence of multiple prion strains.

  2. 分子伴侣CsaA过表达及wprA蛋白酶的缺失对枯草芽孢杆菌分泌表达外源蛋白的影响%The Influence of Over-expression Molecular Chaperone of CsaA and Deletion WprA Protease on the Bacillus subtilis Sereting Foreign Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋红亮; 张虹; 赵辅昆; 丁明

    2011-01-01

    The alkaline pectinase of Bacillus halodurans C-125 and the Penicillin acylase of bacillus megaterium is expressed in the B.subtilis168 strain and the transformation strain (B.subtilis168wprA-, B.subtilis168/wprA:: csaA).Alkaline pectinase secretion level is decreased by 36% when knocking out the wprA gene, while the csaA integrated into the B.subtilis168wprA- strain makes the expression capability to return to the level as well as the wide type B.subtilis168 strain.There is no difference between B.subtilis168wprA- strain and the wide type B.subtilis168 strain in penicillin acylase expression.With the integration of csaA into wprA sites, the expression levels higher than that of wild-type is by 66%.It can be concluded that the molecular chaperones csaA can significantly promote the enzyme expression, and show general inffluence on protein expression.While the protease wprA deletion can decrease some foreign protein secret expression levels, there is no general inffluence on protein expression.While, the stability of expression foreign protein is significantly improved when wprA gene is deleted.In this study, the penicillin acylase enzyme activity (14.7U/mL) is higher than that in industrial application (10 U/mL) by 47%.%在枯草芽孢杆菌B.subtilis168菌株,以及在其改造菌株B.subtilis168wprA和B.subtilis168/wprA::csaA中表达来自碱性芽孢杆菌C-125的碱性果胶酶和来自巨大芽孢杆菌的青霉素酰化酶.碱性果胶酶在B.subtilis中分泌表达时,敲除了wprA蛋白酶基因的B.subtilis168wprA菌株相对于其野生型菌株B.subtilis168分泌表达的总的酶活力下降了36%,再次整合csaA进wprA位点后的B.subtilis168/wprA::csaA菌株,其表达量又恢复到相当于野生型菌株的表达水平.青霉素酰化酶在B.subtilis168wprA-菌株中的表达与野生型相比没有明显差异;而整合csaA分子伴侣进wprA位点后的菌株(B.subtilis168/wprA::csaA),相对于野生型其总的酶活力高出66%,

  3. Modulation of the chaperone heat shock cognate 70 by embryonic (pro)insulin correlates with prevention of apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Vega-Núñez, Elena; Morales, Aixa V.; Serna, José; Rubio, Eva; de Pablo, Flora

    1998-01-01

    Insights have emerged concerning insulin function during development, from the finding that apoptosis during chicken embryo neurulation is prevented by prepancreatic (pro)insulin. While characterizing the molecules involved in this survival effect of insulin, we found insulin-dependent regulation of the molecular chaperone heat shock cognate 70 kDa (Hsc70), whose cloning in chicken is reported here. This chaperone, generally considered constitutively expressed, showed regulation of its mRNA and protein levels in unstressed embryos during early development. More important, Hsc70 levels were found to depend on endogenous (pro)insulin, as shown by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against (pro)insulin mRNA in cultured neurulating embryos. Further, in the cultured embryos, apoptosis affected mainly cells with the lowest level of Hsc70, as shown by simultaneous Hsc70 immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling. These results argue in favor of Hsc70 involvement, modulated by embryonic (pro)insulin, in the prevention of apoptosis during early development and suggest a role for a molecular chaperone in normal embryogenesis. PMID:9707581

  4. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Suhonen, P M

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain $\\beta \\approx 1.26$ for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be ...

  5. The Chaperone ClpX Stimulates Expression of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A by Rot Dependent and Independent Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás;

    2010-01-01

    The Clp ATPases (Hsp100) constitute a family of closely related proteins that have protein reactivating and remodelling activities typical of molecular chaperones. In Staphylococcus aureus the ClpX chaperone is essential for virulence and for transcription of spa encoding Protein A. The present...... study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which ClpX stimulates expression of Protein A. For this purpose, we prepared antibodies directed against Rot, an activator of spa transcription, and demonstrated that cells devoid of ClpX contain three-fold less Rot than wild-type cells. By varying Rot...... expression from an inducible promoter we showed that expression of Protein A requires a threshold level of Rot. In the absence of ClpX the Rot content is reduced below this threshold level, hence, explaining the substantially reduced Protein A expression in the clpX mutant. Experiments addressed...

  6. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Layne Myhre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis.

  7. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  8. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chlenski

    Full Text Available Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+ concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+ activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+ concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide

  9. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  10. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Jacobsen, Susanne; Hammer, Karin;

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during lie in excess nutrients, by compari......The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during lie in excess nutrients......, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (daily) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L,. lactis subsp. cremoris...... laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain, After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shack repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...

  12. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z, an Hsp110 homologue, exhibits independent chaperone activity and interacts with Hsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zininga, Tawanda; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Hoppe, Heinrich; Prinsloo, Earl; Dirr, Heini W; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-05-01

    The role of molecular chaperones, among them heat shock proteins (Hsps), in the development of malaria parasites has been well documented. Hsp70s are molecular chaperones that facilitate protein folding. Hsp70 proteins are composed of an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD), which confers them with ATPase activity and a C-terminal substrate binding domain (SBD). In the ADP-bound state, Hsp70 possesses high affinity for substrate and releases the folded substrate when it is bound to ATP. The two domains are connected by a conserved linker segment. Hsp110 proteins possess an extended lid segment, a feature that distinguishes them from canonical Hsp70s. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z (PfHsp70-z) is a member of the Hsp110 family of Hsp70-like proteins. PfHsp70-z is essential for survival of malaria parasites and is thought to play an important role as a molecular chaperone and nucleotide exchange factor of its cytosolic canonical Hsp70 counterpart, PfHsp70-1. Unlike PfHsp70-1 whose functions are fairly well established, the structure-function features of PfHsp70-z remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we established that PfHsp70-z possesses independent chaperone activity. In fact, PfHsp70-z appears to be marginally more effective in suppressing protein aggregation than its cytosol-localized partner, PfHsp70-1. Furthermore, based on coimmunoaffinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses, PfHsp70-z associated with PfHsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that besides serving as a molecular chaperone, PfHsp70-z could facilitate the nucleotide exchange function of PfHsp70-1. These dual functions explain why it is essential for parasite survival.

  13. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  14. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lavado-Roldán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2 acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation.

  15. Gamma-irradiation effects to posttranslational modification and chaperon function of bovine {alpha}-crystalline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroki, K; Matsumoto, S.; Awakura, M. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Science, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, N. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    The formation of D-asparate (D-Asp) in {alpha}A-crystallin of the aged human eye and the cataract crystalline lens has been reported. Crystalline lens keeps the transparency by forming {alpha}-crystallin which consists of a high order association of {alpha}A-and {alpha}B-crystallin. Bovine {alpha}-crystallin for investigating a chaperone function which protects the crystalline lens from getting to opaque or disordered agglutination with heat or light, is irradiated by gamma-ray (Co-60) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy, respectively. The irradiated bovine {alpha}-crystallin are analyzed with electrophoresis, gel permeation chromatograph, and UV absorption spectrometer for checking on the agglutination and the isomerization of macromolecules. Oxidation of methionine residues (Met-1) and isomerization of asparagine residues (Asp-151) in the {alpha}A-crystallin are ascertained in molecular levels with reversed phase liquid chromatography. The Met-1 oxidation and the Asp-151 isomerization depend on gamma-irradiation doses. It is thought that OH radical and H radical in water generated by the irradiation lead to the oxidation and the isomerization. Stereoinversion in the {alpha}-crystallin following to such a chemical change are considered to lead to the agglutination of polymer and the reduction of chaperon function. (M. Suetake)

  16. Beyond genetic factors in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: protein glycation and the loss of fibrinogen's chaperone activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP is a systemic conformational disease characterized by extracellular amyloid fibril formation from plasma transthyretin (TTR. This is a crippling, fatal disease for which liver transplantation is the only effective therapy. More than 80 TTR point mutations are associated with amyloidotic diseases and the most widely accepted disease model relates TTR tetramer instability with TTR point mutations. However, this model fails to explain two observations. First, native TTR also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis, a geriatric disease. Second, age at disease onset varies by decades for patients bearing the same mutation and some mutation carrier individuals are asymptomatic throughout their lives. Hence, mutations only accelerate the process and non-genetic factors must play a key role in the molecular mechanisms of disease. One of these factors is protein glycation, previously associated with conformational diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The glycation hypothesis in FAP is supported by our previous discovery of methylglyoxal-derived glycation of amyloid fibrils in FAP patients. Here we show that plasma proteins are differentially glycated by methylglyoxal in FAP patients and that fibrinogen is the main glycation target. Moreover, we also found that fibrinogen interacts with TTR in plasma. Fibrinogen has chaperone activity which is compromised upon glycation by methylglyoxal. Hence, we propose that methylglyoxal glycation hampers the chaperone activity of fibrinogen, rendering TTR more prone to aggregation, amyloid formation and ultimately, disease.

  17. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by Tousled-like kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Pilyugin

    Full Text Available Histone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK-mediated phosphorylation triggers hASF1a and dASF1 degradation by proteasome-dependent and independent mechanisms respectively. Consistent with this notion, introduction of phosphorylation-mimicking mutants inhibits hASF1a and dASF1 degradation. Human hASF1b is also targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation, but its stability is not affected by phosphorylation indicating that other mechanisms are likely to be involved in control of hASF1b levels. Together, these results suggest that ASF1 cellular levels are tightly controlled by distinct pathways and provide a molecular mechanism for post-translational regulation of dASF1 and hASF1a by TLK kinases.

  18. Morgana/CHP-1 is a novel chaperone able to protect cells from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michowski, Wojciech; Ferretti, Roberta; Wisniewska, Marta B; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz; Beresewicz, Malgorzata; Fusella, Federica; Skibinska-Kijek, Anna; Zablocka, Barbara; Brancaccio, Mara; Tarone, Guido; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2010-09-01

    Morgana/CHP-1 (CHORD containing protein-1) has been recently shown to be necessary for proper cell divisions. However, the presence of the protein in postmitotic tissues such as brain and striated muscle suggests that morgana/CHP-1 has additional cellular functions. Here we show that morgana/CHP-1 behaves like an HSP90 co-chaperone and possesses an independent molecular chaperone activity towards denatured proteins. The expression time profile of morgana/Chp-1 in NIH3T3 cells in response to heat stress is similar to that of Hsp70, a classical effector of Heat Shock Factor-1 mediated stress response. Moreover, overexpression of morgana/CHP-1 in NIH3T3 cells leads to the increased stress resistance of the cells. Interestingly, morgana/Chp-1 upregulation in response to transient global brain ischemia lasts longer in ischemia-resistant regions of the gerbil hippocampus than in vulnerable ones, suggesting the involvement of morgana/CHP-1 in natural protective mechanisms in vivo. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the isomerase and chaperone-like activities of an amebic PDI (EhPDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Rosa E; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Villagrana, Salvador; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) are eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the formation and rearrangement of disulfide bonds during folding of substrate proteins. Structurally, PDI enzymes share as a common feature the presence of at least one active thioredoxin-like domain. PDI enzymes are also involved in holding, refolding, and degradation of unfolded or misfolded proteins during stressful conditions. The EhPDI enzyme (a 38 kDa polypeptide with two active thioredoxin-like domains) has been used as a model to gain insights into protein folding and disulfide bond formation in E. histolytica. Here, we performed a functional complementation assay, using a ΔdsbC mutant of E. coli, to test whether EhPDI exhibits isomerase activity in vivo. Our preliminary results showed that EhPDI exhibits isomerase activity; however, further mutagenic analysis revealed significant differences in the functional role of each thioredoxin-like domain. Additional studies confirmed that EhPDI protects heat-labile enzymes against thermal inactivation, extending our knowledge about its chaperone-like activity. The characterization of EhPDI, as an oxidative folding catalyst with chaperone-like function, represents the initial step to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in protein folding in E. histolytica.

  20. Allosteric drugs: the interaction of antitumor compound MKT-077 with human Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousaki, Aikaterini; Miyata, Yoshinari; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-08-19

    Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70 kDa) chaperones are key to cellular protein homeostasis. However, they also have the ability to inhibit tumor apoptosis and contribute to aberrant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neuronal cells affected by tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Hence, Hsp70 chaperones are increasingly becoming identified as targets for therapeutic intervention in these widely abundant diseases. Hsp70 proteins are allosteric machines and offer, besides classical active-site targets, also opportunities to target the mechanism of allostery. In this work, it is demonstrated that the action of the potent anticancer compound MKT-077 (1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride) occurs through a differential interaction with Hsp70 allosteric states. MKT-077 is therefore an "allosteric drug." Using NMR spectroscopy, we identify the compound's binding site on human HSPA8 (Hsc70). The binding pose is obtained from NMR-restrained docking calculations, subsequently scored by molecular-dynamics-based energy and solvation computations. Suggestions for the improvement of the compound's properties are made on the basis of the binding location and pose.

  1. Chaperones are necessary for the expression of catalytically active potato apyrases in prokaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowińska, Dorota; Czarnecka, Joanna; Komoszyński, Michał

    2014-07-01

    NTPDases (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases) (also called in plants apyrases) hydrolyze nucleoside 5'-tri- and/or diphosphate bonds producing nucleosides di or monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. For years, studies have been carried out to use both plant and animal enzymes for medicine. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient method for the quick production of large amounts of homogeneous proteins with high catalytic activity. Expression of proteins in prokaryotic cells is the most common way for the protein production. The aim of our study was to develop a method of expression of potato apyrase (StAPY4, 5, and 6) genes in bacterial cells under conditions that allowed the production of catalytically active form of these enzymes. Apyrase 4 and 6 were overexpressed in BL21-CodonPlus (DE3) bacteria strain but they were accumulated in inclusion bodies, regardless of the culture conditions and induction method. Co-expression of potato apyrases with molecular chaperones allowed the expression of catalytically active apyrase 5. However, its high nucleotidase activity could be toxic for bacteria and is therefore synthesized in small amounts in cells. Our studies show that each protein requires other conditions for maturation and even small differences in amino acid sequence can essentially affect protein folding regardless of presence of chaperones.

  2. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation.

  3. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt C-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α ring1–4. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit5–10. We report that the base subassembly of the proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6, and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3 pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α pocket in mature proteasomes2–4, it inserts into the α2/α3 pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme. PMID:23644457

  4. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl At; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James Ca

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These "Super Spy" variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001.

  5. Challenging muscle homeostasis uncovers novel chaperone interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Anna; Dror, Shiran; Pokrzywa, Wojciech; Bar-Lavan, Yael; Karady, Ido; Hoppe, Thorsten; Ben-Zvi, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Proteome stability is central to cellular function and the lifespan of an organism. This is apparent in muscle cells, where incorrect folding and assembly of the sarcomere contributes to disease and aging. Apart from the myosin-assembly factor UNC-45, the complete network of chaperones involved in assembly and maintenance of muscle tissue is currently unknown. To identify additional factors required for sarcomere quality control, we performed genetic screens based on suppressed or synthetic motility defects in Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to ethyl methyl sulfonate-based mutagenesis, we employed RNAi-mediated knockdown of candidate chaperones in unc-45 temperature-sensitive mutants and screened for impaired movement at permissive conditions. This approach confirmed the cooperation between UNC-45 and Hsp90. Moreover, the screens identified three novel co-chaperones, CeHop (STI-1), CeAha1 (C01G10.8) and Cep23 (ZC395.10), required for muscle integrity. The specific identification of Hsp90 and Hsp90 co-chaperones highlights the physiological role of Hsp90 in myosin folding. Our work thus provides a clear example of how a combination of mild perturbations to the proteostasis network can uncover specific quality control modules. PMID:25988162

  6. Chaperone-like effect of the linker on the isolated C-terminal domain of rabbit muscle creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Xia, Mengdie; He, Hua-Wei; Wang, Sha; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Intramolecular chaperones (IMCs), which are specific domains/segments encoded in the primary structure of proteins, exhibit chaperone-like activity against the aggregation of the other domains in the same molecule. In this research, we found that the truncation of the linker greatly promoted the thermal aggregation of the isolated C-terminal domain (CTD) of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (RMCK). Either the existence of the linker covalently linked to CTD or the supply of the synthetic linker peptide additionally could successfully protect the CTD of RMCK against aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Truncated fragments of the linker also behaved as a chaperone-like effect with lower efficiency, revealing the importance of its C-terminal half in the IMC function of the linker. The aggregation sites in the CTD of RMCK were identified by molecular dynamics simulations. Mutational analysis of the three key hydrophobic residues resulted in opposing effects on the thermal aggregation between the CTD with intact or partial linker, confirming the role of linker as a lid to protect the hydrophobic residues against exposure to solvent. These observations suggested that the linkers in multidomain proteins could act as IMCs to facilitate the correct folding of the aggregation-prone domains. Furthermore, the intactness of the IMC linker after proteolysis modulates the production of off-pathway aggregates, which may be important to the onset of some diseases caused by the toxic effects of aggregated proteolytic fragments.

  7. Chaperonopathies of senescence and the scrambling of interactions between the chaperoning and the immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2010-06-01

    Aging entails progressive deterioration of molecules and supramolecular structures, including Hsp chaperones and their complexes, paralleled by functional decline. Recent research has changed our views on Hsp chaperones. They work inside and outside cells in many locations, alone or forming teams, interacting with cells, receptors, and molecules that are not chaperones, in roles that are not typically attributed to chaperones, such as protein folding. Hsp chaperones form a physiological system with a variety of functions and interactions with other systems, for example, the immune system. We propose that chaperone malfunctioning due to structural damage or gene dysregulation during aging has an impact on the immune system, creating the conditions for an overall malfunction of both systems. Pathological chaperones cannot interact with the immune system as normal ones do, and this leads to an overall readjustment of the interactions that is apparent during senescence and is likely to cause many of its manifestations.

  8. Chaperons expressions and search for new gravity-related genes in the embryos of crabs and amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O.; Kashiwagi, A.; Saigusa, M.

    Molecular mechanism of influence of gravity on living system is a subject of controversy for many years. Influence of gravity directly or indirectly affects to wide variety of biological processes, including biological clocks and general patterns in development of vertebrates and invertebrates. cDNA subtraction method was used for detection of the genes related to the hatching of the embryos semi-terrestrial crab Chiromantes haematocheir. Timing of the hatching of the embryos is highly synchronized with Moon phase and tides. While no new genes were found, we found that expression of chaperon hsp-90 increase in the embryos within two days before hatching, while expression of other stress proteins doesn't show any significant difference. Another model we used -- is a development of amphibian embryos. In order to clarify the effect of high gravity environment on development of Xenopus laevis, embryos on several developmental stages were subjected to the short-time high-gravity pulses (3G, 5G, and 9G). Analysis of stress-protein expression level and cDNA subtraction among high-gravity stressed embryos and control group revealed some changes in level of RNA expression of stress-proteins in experimental group. At the same time, we found two new genes expressed exclusively in the embryos under high gravity stress. The expression of the genes dramatically increased within several hours after the gravity stress, while the expression of the typical chaperons showed just slight difference. The genes expression pattern and its comparison with previously reported chaperons let us assume the presence physiological mechanism of specific gravity-stress response using previously unreported, special type of chaperons.

  9. Proteomic analysis of exported chaperone/co-chaperone complexes of P. falciparum reveals an array of complex protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Ma, Cheng; Oberli, Alexander; Zinz, Astrid; Engels, Sonja; Przyborski, Jude M.

    2017-01-01

    Malaria parasites modify their human host cell, the mature erythrocyte. This modification is mediated by a large number of parasite proteins that are exported to the host cell, and is also the underlying cause for the pathology caused by malaria infection. Amongst these proteins are many Hsp40 co-chaperones, and a single Hsp70. These proteins have been implicated in several processes in the host cell, including a potential role in protein transport, however the further molecular players in this process remain obscure. To address this, we have utilized chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting to isolate and characterize proteins complexes containing an exported Hsp40 (PFE55), and the only known exported Hsp70 (PfHsp70x). Our data reveal that both of these proteins are contained in high molecular weight protein complexes. These complexes are found both in the infected erythrocyte, and within the parasite-derived compartment referred to as the parasitophorous vacuole. Surprisingly, our data also reveal an association of PfHsp70x with components of PTEX, a putative protein translocon within the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole. Our results suggest that the P. falciparum- infected human erythrocyte contains numerous high molecular weight protein complexes, which may potentially be involved in host cell modification. PMID:28218284

  10. Expression of endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperon in gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori%内质网分子伴侣家族成员在幽门螺杆菌感染者胃黏膜中的表达和意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孟春; 郭静波; 刘明华; 高娜; 方文刚; 李岩

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨内质网分子伴侣家族成员Grp94、Grp78和PDI在幽门螺杆菌感染者胃黏膜组织中的表达及意义.方法 应用半定量RT-PCR方法及Western blot方法分别检测感染与未感染幽门螺杆菌的人胃黏膜组织中Grp94、Grp78和PDI的mRNA及蛋白的表达情况.结果 未感染组28例,Grp94、Grp78和PDI的mRNA表达量分别为(0.427±0.0360)、(0.8038±0.500)和(0.5198±0.0379),感染组32例,Grp94、Grp78和PDI mRNA表达量为(0.882±0.082)、(1.1586±0.0839)和(1.0642±0.1533).两组相比,感染组的Grp94、Grp78和PDI mRNA的表达量明显高于未感染组(P<0.01);未感染组Grp94、Grp78和PDI蛋白表达量分别为(0.427±0.0360)、(0.4345±0.0545)和(0.5198±0.0379),感染组Grp94、Grp78和PDI蛋白表达量为(0.671±0.072)、(0.6204±0.0412)和(0.8252±0.032).两组相比,感染组Grp94蛋白的表达量明显高于未感染组(P<0.01).结论 幽门螺杆菌感染可使人胃黏膜增加Grp94、Grp78和PDI mRNA的表达及蛋白的合成,这可能有利于胃黏膜的自身保护作用.%[Objective] To study the expression of endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperon in gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori. [Methods] Semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to examine the mRNA expression of Grp94, Grp78 and PDI in H. pylori infected and non-infected gastric mucosa. Western blot method was used to examine the expression level of Grp94, Grp78 and PDI protein in infected and uninfected gastric mucosa. [Results] The expression of Grp94 mRNA , Grp78 mRNA and PDI mRNA were (0.424±0.055), (0.8038±0.0500), (0.5704±0.0794) in uninfected group(28 cases) respectively; Grp94 mRNA, Grp78 mRNA, PDI mRNA were (0.882±0.082), (1.1586±0.0839), (1.0642±0.1533) in infected group(32 cases) respectively. The expression amounts of Grp94, Grp78 and PDI protein were (0.427±0.0360), (0.4345±0.0545), (0.5198±0.0379) in uninfected group. In infected group the expression of protein amounts of Grp94, Grp78, PDI

  11. Direct observation of the uptake of outer membrane proteins by the periplasmic chaperone Skp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Lyu

    Full Text Available The transportation of membrane proteins through the aqueous subcellular space is an important and challenging process. Its molecular mechanism and the associated structural change are poorly understood. Periplasmic chaperones, such as Skp in Escherichia coli, play key roles in the transportation and protection of outer membrane proteins (OMPs in Gram-negative bacteria. The molecular mechanism through which Skp interacts with and protects OMPs remains mysterious. Here, a combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study was performed to gain the structural and dynamical information in the process of OMPs and Skp binding. Stopped-flow experiments on site specific mutated and labeled Skp and several OMPs, namely OmpC, the transmembrane domain of OmpA, and OmpF, allowed us to obtain the mechanism of OMP entering the Skp cavity, and molecular dynamics simulations yielded detailed molecular interactions responsible for this process. Both experiment and simulation show that the entrance of OMP into Skp is a highly directional process, which is initiated by the interaction between the N-terminus of OMP and the bottom "tentacle" domain of Skp. The opening of the more flexible tentacle of Skp, the non-specific electrostatic interactions between OMP and Skp, and the constant formation and breaking of salt bridges between Skp and its substrate together allow OMP to enter Skp and gradually "climb" into the Skp cavity in the absence of an external energy supply.

  12. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  13. Off-pathway assembly of fimbria subunits is prevented by chaperone CfaA of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Liu, Yang; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2016-12-01

    The assembly of the class 5 colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae of enterotoxigenic E. coli was proposed to proceed via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway. Here, we show that in the absence of the chaperone CfaA, CfaB, the major pilin subunit of CFA/I fimbriae, is able to spontaneously refold and polymerize into cyclic trimers. CfaA kinetically traps CfaB to form a metastable complex that can be stabilized by mutations. Crystal structure of the stabilized complex reveals distinctive interactions provided by CfaA to trap CfaB in an assembly competent state through donor-strand complementation (DSC) and cleft-mediated anchorage. Mutagenesis indicated that DSC controls the stability of the chaperone-subunit complex and the cleft-mediated anchorage of the subunit C-terminus additionally assist in subunit refolding. Surprisingly, over-stabilization of the chaperone-subunit complex led to delayed fimbria assembly, whereas destabilizing the complex resulted in no fimbriation. Thus, CfaA acts predominantly as a kinetic trap by stabilizing subunit to avoid its off-pathway self-polymerization that results in energetically favorable trimers and could serve as a driving force for CFA/I pilus assembly, representing an energetic landscape unique to class 5 fimbria assembly. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  15. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0Å crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX9–13FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals. PMID:18713742

  16. Chaperone use during intimate examinations in primary care: postal survey of family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians have long been advised to have a third party present during certain parts of a physical examination; however, little is known about the frequency of chaperone use for those specific intimate examinations regularly performed in primary care. We aimed to determine the frequency of chaperone use among family physicians across a variety of intimate physical examinations for both male and female patients, and also to identify the factors associated with chaperone use. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 500 Ontario members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Participants were asked about their use of chaperones when performing a variety of intimate examinations, namely female pelvic, breast, and rectal exams and male genital and rectal exams. Results 276 of 500 were returned (56%, of which 257 were useable. Chaperones were more commonly used with female patients than with males (t = 9.09 [df = 249], p Conclusion Clinical practice concerning the use of chaperones during intimate exams continues to be discordant with the recommendations of medical associations and medico-legal societies. Chaperones are used by only a minority of Ontario family physicians. Chaperone use is higher for examinations of female patients than of male patients and is highest for female pelvic exams. The availability of a nurse in the clinic to act as a chaperone is associated with more frequent use of chaperones.

  17. Chaperone-mediated specificity in Ras and Rap signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Mor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that share similar effector-binding domains but operate in a very different signaling networks; Ras has a dominant role in cell proliferation, while Rap mediates cell adhesion. Ras and Rap proteins are regulated by several shared processes such as post-translational modification, phosphorylation, activation by guanine exchange factors and inhibition by GTPase-activating proteins. Sub-cellular localization and trafficking of these proteins to and from the plasma membrane are additional important regulatory features that impact small GTPases function. Despite its importance, the trafficking mechanisms of Ras and Rap proteins are not completely understood. Chaperone proteins play a critical role in trafficking of GTPases and will be the focus of the discussion in this work. We will review several aspects of chaperone biology focusing on specificity toward particular members of the small GTPase family. Understanding this specificity should provide key insights into drug development targeting individual small GTPases.

  18. DnaK and DnaJ facilitated the folding process and reduced inclusion body formation of magnesium transporter CorA overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Song, Jinmei; Sui, Sen-fang; Wang, Da-Neng

    2003-12-01

    Overexpression of CorA, the major magnesium transporter from bacterial inner membrane, in Escherichia coli resulted in the synthesis of 60mg of protein per liter of culture, most of which however was in the form of inclusion bodies. The levels of inclusion body formation were reduced by lowering the cell culture temperature. To dissect CorA inclusion body formation and the folding process involved, we co-expressed the protein with various chaperones and other folding modulators. Expression of DnaK/DnaJ (Hsp70) prevented inclusion bodies from forming and resulted in the integration of more CorA into the membrane. GroEL/GroES (Hsp60/Hsp10) were less effective at reducing CorA inclusion body formation. Co-expression with either Ffh/4.5S-RNA, the signal recognition particle, or SecA, the ATPase that drives protein insertion into the membrane, had little effect on CorA folding. These results indicate: (1) that CorA inclusion bodies form immediately after synthesis at 37 degrees C, (2) that CorA solubility in the cytosol can be increased by co-expressing a chaperone system, (3) membrane targeting is probably not a rate-limiting factor, and (4) that membrane insertion becomes a limitation only when large amounts of soluble CorA are present in the cytosol. These co-expression systems can be used for producing other membrane proteins in large quantities.

  19. Universal Stress Protein exhibits a redox-dependent chaperone function in Arabidopsis and enhances plant tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung eYoung Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs is available from many organisms, their biochemical and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990 from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW species to high molecular weight (HMW complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function.

  20. Tetrahydrobiopterin shows chaperone activity for tyrosine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöny, Beat; Calvo, Ana C; Scherer, Tanja; Svebak, Randi M; Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. Primary inherited defects in TH have been associated with l-DOPA responsive and non-responsive dystonia and infantile parkinsonism. In this study, we show that both the cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the feedback inhibitor and catecholamine product dopamine increase the kinetic stability of human TH isoform 1 in vitro. Activity measurements and synthesis of the enzyme by in vitro transcription-translation revealed a complex regulation by the cofactor including both enzyme inactivation and conformational stabilization. Oral BH(4) supplementation to mice increased TH activity and protein levels in brain extracts, while the Th-mRNA level was not affected. All together our results indicate that the molecular mechanisms for the stabilization are a primary folding-aid effect of BH(4) and a secondary effect by increased synthesis and binding of catecholamine ligands. Our results also establish that orally administered BH(4) crosses the blood-brain barrier and therapeutic regimes based on BH(4) supplementation should thus consider the effect on TH. Furthermore, BH(4) supplementation arises as a putative therapeutic agent in the treatment of brain disorders associated with TH misfolding, such as for the human TH isoform 1 mutation L205P.

  1. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  2. Roles of Intramolecular and Intermolecular Interactions in Functional Regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein Co-Chaperone Sis1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-10

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at heir C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways, Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interactions between the J-domain and glycine-rich region control co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD binding adaptor proteins. These interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  3. Cataract-causing defect of a mutant γ-crystallin proceeds through an aggregation pathway which bypasses recognition by the α-crystallin chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Moreau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transparency of the eye lens depends upon maintenance of the native state of the γ- and β-crystallins, which is aided by the abundant chaperones αA- and αB-crystallin. Mature onset cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, involves the polymerization of covalently damaged or partially unfolded crystallins into light-scattering aggregates. A number of single amino acid substitutions and truncations of γ-crystallins result in congenital cataract in both humans and mice, though in many cases the coupling between the protein alterations and the accumulation of aggregates is poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have studied the aggregation properties and chaperone interactions of human γD-crystallin carrying substitutions of two buried core mutants, I90F and V75D, which cause congenital cataract in mice. The in vitro aggregation pathway competing with productive refolding was not altered by either substitution. Furthermore, this aggregation pathway for both mutant proteins--originating from a partially folded intermediate--was efficiently suppressed by αB-crystallin. Thus the cataract pathology was unlikely to be associated with a direct folding defect. The native state of wild-type human γD-crystallin exhibited no tendency to aggregate under physiological conditions. However both I90F and V75D native-like proteins exhibited slow (days aggregation to high molecular weight aggregates under physiological conditions. The perturbed conformation of I90F was recognized and bound by both αA and αB chaperones. In contrast, the aggregation derived from the perturbed state of V75D was not suppressed by either chaperone, and the aggregating species were not bound by the chaperone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The cataract phenotype of I90F in mice may be due to premature saturation of the finite α- crystallin pool. The V75D aggregation pathway and its escape from chaperone surveillance and aggregation suppression

  4. A Role of Metastable Regions and Their Connectivity in the Inactivation of a Redox-Regulated Chaperone and Its Inter-Chaperone Crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimon, Oded; Suss, Ohad; Goldenberg, Mor; Fassler, Rosi; Yogev, Ohad; Amartely, Hadar; Propper, Guy; Friedler, Assaf; Reichmann, Dana

    2017-04-10

    A recently discovered group of conditionally disordered chaperones share a very unique feature; they need to lose structure to become active as chaperones. This activation mechanism makes these chaperones particularly suited to respond to protein-unfolding stress conditions, such as oxidative unfolding. However, the role of this disorder in stress-related activation, chaperone function, and the crosstalk with other chaperone systems is not yet clear. Here, we focus on one of the members of the conditionally disordered chaperones, a thiol-redox switch of the bacterial proteostasis system, Hsp33. By modifying the Hsp33's sequence, we reveal that the metastable region has evolved to abolish redox-dependent chaperone activity, rather than enhance binding affinity for client proteins. The intrinsically disordered region of Hsp33 serves as an anchor for the reduced, inactive state of Hsp33, and it dramatically affects the crosstalk with the synergetic chaperone system, DnaK/J. Using mass spectrometry, we describe the role that the metastable region plays in determining client specificity during normal and oxidative stress conditions in the cell. Innovation and Conclusion: We uncover a new role of protein plasticity in Hsp33's inactivation, client specificity, crosstalk with the synergistic chaperone system DnaK/J, and oxidative stress-specific interactions in bacteria. Our results also suggest that Hsp33 might serve as a member of the house-keeping proteostasis machinery, tasked with maintaining a "healthy" proteome during normal conditions, and that this function does not depend on the metastable linker region. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  5. The crystal structure of the human co-chaperone P58(IPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Svärd

    Full Text Available P58(IPK is one of the endoplasmic reticulum- (ER- localised DnaJ (ERdj proteins which interact with the chaperone BiP, the mammalian ER ortholog of Hsp70, and are thought to contribute to the specificity and regulation of its diverse functions. P58(IPK, expression of which is upregulated in response to ER stress, has been suggested to act as a co-chaperone, binding un- or misfolded proteins and delivering them to BiP. In order to give further insights into the functions of P58(IPK, and the regulation of BiP by ERdj proteins, we have determined the crystal structure of human P58(IPK to 3.0 Å resolution using a combination of molecular replacement and single wavelength anomalous diffraction. The structure shows the human P58(IPK monomer to have a very elongated overall shape. In addition to the conserved J domain, P58(IPK contains nine N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motifs, divided into three subdomains of three motifs each. The J domain is attached to the C-terminal end via a flexible linker, and the structure shows the conserved Hsp70-binding histidine-proline-aspartate (HPD motif to be situated on the very edge of the elongated protein, 100 Å from the putative binding site for unfolded protein substrates. The residues that comprise the surface surrounding the HPD motif are highly conserved in P58(IPK from other organisms but more varied between the human ERdj proteins, supporting the view that their regulation of different BiP functions is facilitated by differences in BiP-binding.

  6. Regulation and Quality Control of Adiponectin Assembly by Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone ERp44*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampe, Lutz; Radjainia, Mazdak; Xu, Cheng; Harris, Paul W. R.; Bashiri, Ghader; Goldstone, David C.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Wang, Yu; Mitra, Alok K.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, a collagenous hormone secreted abundantly from adipocytes, possesses potent antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. Mediated by the conserved Cys39 located in the variable region of the N terminus, the trimeric (low molecular weight (LMW)) adiponectin subunit assembles into different higher order complexes, e.g. hexamers (middle molecular weight (MMW)) and 12–18-mers (high molecular weight (HMW)), the latter being mostly responsible for the insulin-sensitizing activity of adiponectin. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone ERp44 retains adiponectin in the early secretory compartment and tightly controls the oxidative state of Cys39 and the oligomerization of adiponectin. Using cellular and in vitro assays, we show that ERp44 specifically recognizes the LMW and MMW forms but not the HMW form. Our binding assays with short peptide mimetics of adiponectin suggest that ERp44 intercepts and converts the pool of fully oxidized LMW and MMW adiponectin, but not the HMW form, into reduced trimeric precursors. These ERp44-bound precursors in the cis-Golgi may be transported back to the ER and released to enhance the population of adiponectin intermediates with appropriate oxidative state for HMW assembly, thereby underpinning the process of ERp44 quality control. PMID:26060250

  7. Corticosteroid Receptors, Their Chaperones and Cochaperones: How Do They Modulate Adipogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Toneatto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids are part of the list of hormones that control adipogenesis as well as different aspects of the physiology of the adipose tissue. Their actions are mediated through their binding to the glucocorticoid and the mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR, respectively, in complex with heat shock proteins (Hsps and high molecular weight immunophilins (IMMs. Albeit many aspects of the molecular mechanism of the corticosteroid receptors are not fully elucidated yet, it was not until recently that the first evidences of the functional importance of Hsps and IMMs in the process of adipocyte differentiation have been described. Hsp90 and the high molecular weight IMM FKBP51 modulate GR and MR activity at multiple levels, that is, hormone binding affinity, their subcellular distribution, and the transcriptional status, among other aspects of the NR function. Interestingly, it has recently been described that Hsp90 and FKBP51 also participate in the control of PPARγ, a key transcription factor in the control of adipogenesis and the maintenance of the adipocyte phenotype. In addition, novel roles have been uncovered for FKBP51 in the organization of the nuclear architecture through its participation in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina and the control of the subnuclear distribution of GR. Thus, the aim of this review is to integrate and discuss the actual understanding of the role of corticosteroid receptors, their chaperones and cochaperones, in the process of adipocyte differentiation.

  8. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  9. In silico identification of carboxylate clamp type tetratricopeptide repeat proteins in Arabidopsis and rice as putative co-chaperones of Hsp90/Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishun D Prasad

    Full Text Available The essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone Hsp90 operates with the help of different co-chaperones, which regulate its ATPase activity and serve as adaptors to recruit client proteins and other molecular chaperones, such as Hsp70, to the Hsp90 complex. Several Hsp90 and Hsp70 co-chaperones contain the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain, which interacts with the highly conserved EEVD motif at the C-terminal ends of Hsp90 and Hsp70. The acidic side chains in EEVD interact with a subset of basic residues in the TPR binding pocket called a 'carboxylate clamp'. Since the carboxylate clamp residues are conserved in the TPR domains of known Hsp90/Hsp70 co-chaperones, we carried out an in silico search for TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice comprising of at least one three-motif TPR domain with conserved amino acid residues required for Hsp90/Hsp70 binding. This approach identified in Arabidopsis a total of 36 carboxylate clamp (CC-TPR proteins, including 24 novel proteins, with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70. The newly identified CC-TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice contain additional protein domains such as ankyrin, SET, octicosapeptide/Phox/Bem1p (Phox/PB1, DnaJ-like, thioredoxin, FBD and F-box, and protein kinase and U-box, indicating varied functions for these proteins. To provide proof-of-concept of the newly identified CC-TPR proteins for interaction with Hsp90, we demonstrated interaction of AtTPR1 and AtTPR2 with AtHsp90 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull down assays. These findings indicate that the in silico approach used here successfully identified in a genome-wide context CC-TPR proteins with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70, and further suggest that the Hsp90/Hsp70 system relies on TPR co-chaperones more than it was previously realized.

  10. The heat shock protein-90 co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40, promotes ALK-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma viability and its expression is regulated by the NPM-ALK oncoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Joel D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL is a T cell lymphoma defined by the presence of chromosomal translocations involving the ALK tyrosine kinase gene. These translocations generate fusion proteins (e.g. NPM-ALK with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity, which activate numerous signalling pathways important for ALK+ ALCL pathogenesis. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90 plays a critical role in allowing NPM-ALK and other signalling proteins to function in this lymphoma. Co-chaperone proteins are important for helping Hsp90 fold proteins and for directing Hsp90 to specific clients; however the importance of co-chaperone proteins in ALK+ ALCL has not been investigated. Our preliminary findings suggested that expression of the immunophilin co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40 (Cyp40, is up-regulated in ALK+ ALCL by JunB, a transcription factor activated by NPM-ALK signalling. In this study we examined the regulation of the immunophilin family of co-chaperones by NPM-ALK and JunB, and investigated whether the immunophilin co-chaperones promote the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines. Methods NPM-ALK and JunB were knocked-down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with siRNA, and the effect on the expression of the three immunophilin co-chaperones: Cyp40, FK506-binding protein (FKBP 51, and FKBP52 examined. Furthermore, the effect of knock-down of the immunophilin co-chaperones, either individually or in combination, on the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines and NPM-ALK levels and activity was also examined. Results We found that NPM-ALK promoted the transcription of Cyp40 and FKBP52, but only Cyp40 transcription was promoted by JunB. We also observed reduced viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA, but not with siRNAs directed against FKBP52 or FKBP51. Finally, we demonstrate that the decrease in the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA does not appear to

  11. Information encoded in non-native states drives substrate-chaperone pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, Koyeli; Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik

    2012-09-05

    Many proteins refold in vitro through kinetic folding intermediates that are believed to be by-products of native-state centric evolution. These intermediates are postulated to play only minor roles, if any, in vivo because they lack any information related to translation-associated vectorial folding. We demonstrate that refolding intermediate of a test protein, generated in vitro, is able to find its cognate chaperone, from the whole complement of Escherichia coli soluble chaperones. Cognate chaperone-binding uniquely alters the conformation of non-native substrate. Importantly, precise chaperone targeting of substrates are maintained as long as physiological molar ratios of chaperones remain unaltered. Using a library of different chaperone substrates, we demonstrate that kinetically trapped refolding intermediates contain sufficient structural features for precise targeting to cognate chaperones. We posit that evolution favors sequences that, in addition to coding for a functional native state, encode folding intermediates with higher affinity for cognate chaperones than noncognate ones.

  12. Structure of Spa15, a type III secretion chaperone from Shigella flexneri with broad specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, André van; Hamiaux, Cyril; Pérez, Javier; Parsot, Claude; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2004-01-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence proteins into the cells of their hosts. Several of these virulence effectors require TTS chaperones that maintain them in a secretion-competent state. Whereas most chaperones bind only one effector, Spa15 f

  13. Structure of Spa15, a type III secretion chaperone from Shigella flexneri with broad specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, André van; Hamiaux, Cyril; Pérez, Javier; Parsot, Claude; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2004-01-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence proteins into the cells of their hosts. Several of these virulence effectors require TTS chaperones that maintain them in a secretion-competent state. Whereas most chaperones bind only one effector, Spa15

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Escherichia coli common pilus chaperone EcpB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, James A; Diallo, Mamou; Matthews, Steve J

    2015-06-01

    Pili are key cell-surface components that allow the attachment of bacteria to both biological and abiotic solid surfaces, whilst also mediating interactions between themselves. In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone-usher (CU) pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. The chaperone EcpB is involved in the biogenesis of the filament, which is composed of EcpA and EcpD. Initial attempts at crystallizing EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. Diffraction data have been processed to 2.4 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.65, c = 121.14 Å and one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was unsuccessful, but selenomethionine-substituted protein and heavy-atom derivatives are being prepared for phasing. The three-dimensional structure of EcpB will provide invaluable information on the subtle mechanistic differences in biogenesis between the alternative and classical CU pathways. Furthermore, this is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones, and it could be implemented in similar systems where it has not been possible to obtain highly ordered crystals.

  15. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  16. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  17. The cellular chaperone hsc70 is specifically recruited to reovirus viral factories independently of its chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Susanne; Coffey, Caroline M; Parker, John S L

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses replicate and assemble in the cytosol of infected cells. A viral nonstructural protein, μNS, forms large inclusion-like structures called viral factories (VFs) in which assembling viral particles can be identified. Here we examined the localization of the cellular chaperone Hsc70 and found that it colocalizes with VFs in infected cells and also with viral factory-like structures (VFLs) formed by ectopically expressed μNS. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Hsc70 did not affect the formation or maintenance of VFLs. We further showed that dominant negative mutants of Hsc70 were also recruited to VFLs, indicating that Hsc70 recruitment to VFLs is independent of the chaperone function. In support of this finding, μNS was immunoprecipitated with wild-type Hsc70, with a dominant negative mutant of Hsc70, and with the minimal substrate-binding site of Hsc70 (amino acids 395 to 540). We identified a minimal region of μNS between amino acids 222 and 271 that was sufficient for the interaction with Hsc70. This region of μNS has not been assigned any function previously. However, neither point mutants with alterations in this region nor the complete deletion of this domain abrogated the μNS-Hsc70 interaction, indicating that a second portion of μNS also interacts with Hsc70. Taken together, these findings suggest a specific chaperone function for Hsc70 within viral factories, the sites of reovirus replication and assembly in cells.

  18. Pharmacological chaperone approaches for rescuing GPCR mutants: Current state, challenges, and screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerepoot, Pieter; Nazari, Reza; Salahpour, Ali

    2017-03-01

    A substantial number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) genetic disorders are due to mutations that cause misfolding or dysfunction of the receptor product. Pharmacological chaperoning approaches can rescue such mutant receptors by stabilizing protein conformations that behave similar to the wild type protein. For example, this can be achieved by improving folding efficiency and/or interaction with chaperone proteins. Although efficacy of pharmacological chaperones has been demonstrated in vitro for a variety of GPCRs, translation to clinical use has been limited. In this paper we discuss the history of pharmacological chaperones of GPCR's and other membrane proteins, the challenges in translation to the clinic, and the use of different assays for pharmacological chaperone discovery.

  19. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SR BHARATHI DEVI; DHIVYA M ALOYSIUS; KN SULOCHANA

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studieshave reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate coppertrafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesishas to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations ofcopper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study ofthese chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role incellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenicand metabolic signalling and their function.

  20. Chaperone-assisted assembly of the proteasome core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Ana C; Ramos, Paula C; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is a non-lysosomal protease in the cytosol and nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Its main function is to mediate ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. The 26S proteasome is a multimeric complex composed by the 20S proteasome CP (core particle) and the 19S RPs (regulatory particles). Although the atomic structure of the 26S proteasome has not yet been determined, high-resolution structures are available for its CP. Studies on the complicated assembly pathway of the proteasome have revealed that it involves an unprecedented number of dedicated chaperones. Assembly of the CP alone involves three conserved proteasome-assembly chaperones [PAC1-PAC2, PAC3-PAC4 and UMP1 (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis 1)]. Whereas the two heterodimeric PACs have been implicated in the formation of rings of the seven distinct alpha subunits, UMP1 is important for the formation and dimerization of proteasome precursor complexes containing beta subunits. Dimerization coincides with the incorporation of the last beta subunit (beta7). Additional modules important for the assembly of precursor complexes and their dimerization reside in the beta subunits themselves, either as transient or as permanent extensions. Particularly important domains are the propeptide of beta5 and the C-terminal extensions of beta2 and beta7. Upon maturation of the active sites by autocatalytic processing, UMP1 is degraded by the native proteasome.

  1. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Escherichia coli common pilus chaperone EcpB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, James A.; Diallo, Mamou; Matthews, Steve J., E-mail: s.j.matthews@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-20

    In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. Initial attempts at crystallizing the chaperone EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. This is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones. Pili are key cell-surface components that allow the attachment of bacteria to both biological and abiotic solid surfaces, whilst also mediating interactions between themselves. In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher (CU) pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. The chaperone EcpB is involved in the biogenesis of the filament, which is composed of EcpA and EcpD. Initial attempts at crystallizing EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. Diffraction data have been processed to 2.4 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.65, c = 121.14 Å and one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was unsuccessful, but selenomethionine-substituted protein and heavy-atom derivatives are being prepared for phasing. The three-dimensional structure of EcpB will provide invaluable information on the subtle mechanistic differences in biogenesis between the alternative and classical CU pathways. Furthermore, this is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones, and it

  3. One out of four: HspL but no other small heat shock protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens acts as efficient virulence-promoting VirB8 chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Long Tsai

    Full Text Available Alpha-crystallin-type small heat shock proteins (sHsps are ubiquitously distributed in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Four sHsp genes named hspL, hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 were identified in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogenic bacterium capable of unique interkingdom DNA transfer via type IV secretion system (T4SS. HspL is highly expressed in virulence-induced growth condition and functions as a VirB8 chaperone to promote T4SS-mediated DNA transfer. Here, we used genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the involvement of the other three sHsps in T4SS and discovered the molecular basis underlying the dominant function of HspL in promoting T4SS function. While single deletion of hspL but no other sHsp gene reduced T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis efficiency, additional deletion of other sHsp genes in the hspL deletion background caused synergistic effects in the virulence phenotypes. This is correlated with the high induction of hspL and only modest increase of hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 at their mRNA and protein abundance in virulence-induced growth condition. Interestingly, overexpression of any single sHsp gene alone in the quadruple mutant caused increased T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis. Thermal aggregation protecting assays in vitro indicated that all four sHsps exhibit chaperone activity for the model substrate citrate synthase but only HspL functions as efficient chaperone for VirB8. The higher VirB8 chaperone activity of HspL was also demonstrated in vivo, in which lower amounts of HspL than other sHsps were sufficient in maintaining VirB8 homeostasis in A. tumefaciens. Domain swapping between HspL and HspAT2 indicated that N-terminal, central alpha-crystallin, and C-terminal domains of HspL all contribute to HspL function as an efficient VirB8 chaperone. Taken together, we suggest that the dominant role of HspL in promoting T4SS function is based on its higher expression in virulence

  4. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody S Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp. In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. CONCLUSIONS: This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding

  5. Hsp70 chaperone systems: diversity of cellular functions and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M P; Bukau, B

    1998-03-01

    Hsp70 chaperone systems play an essential role in the life cycle of many proteins not only in an hostile environment but also under normal growth conditions. In the course of evolution the diversification of functions was accompanied by an amplification of components of the Hsp70 system. Here strategies are reviewed how different Hsp70 systems work independently or cooperate with each other in a functional network to perform their housekeeping tasks even under stress conditions. We further discuss how co-chaperones which act as targeting factors regulate the cycle of substrate binding and release upon which the Hsp70 chaperone activity depends.

  6. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds.

  7. A Chemical Disruptor of the ClpX Chaperone Complex Attenuates Multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Christian; Korotkov, Vadim S; Thänert, Robert; Lee, Kyu Myung; Neuenschwander, Martin; von Kries, Jens Peter; Medina, Eva; Sieber, Stephan Axel

    2017-09-14

    The Staphylococcus aureus ClpXP protease is an important regulator of cell homeostasis and virulence. Here we utilize a high-throughput screen against the ClpXP complex and identify a specific inhibitor of the ClpX chaperone that disrupts its oligomeric state. Synthesis of 34 derivatives revealed that the molecular scaffold is restrictive for diversification with only minor changes tolerated. Subsequent analysis of the most active compound revealed strong attenuation of S. aureus toxin production which was quantified via a customized MS-based assay platform. Transcriptome and whole proteome studies further confirmed the global reduction of virulence and unraveled characteristic signatures of protein expression in compound treated cells. Although these partially matched the pattern of ClpX knockout cells, further depletion of toxins was observed leading to the intriguing perspective that additional virulence pathways may be directly or indirectly addressed by the small molecule. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. An erythroid chaperone that facilitates folding of α-globin subunits for hemoglobin synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Kong, Yi; Dore, Louis C.; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Katein, Anne M.; Zhou, Suiping; Choi, John K.; Gell, David; Mackay, Joel P.; Gow, Andrew J.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2007-01-01

    Erythrocyte precursors produce abundant α- and β-globin proteins, which assemble with each other to form hemoglobin A (HbA), the major blood oxygen carrier. αHb-stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds free α subunits reversibly to maintain their structure and limit their ability to generate reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, loss of AHSP aggravates the toxicity of excessive free α-globin caused by β-globin gene disruption in mice. Surprisingly, we found that AHSP also has important functions when free α-globin is limited. Thus, compound mutants lacking both Ahsp and 1 of 4 α-globin genes (genotype Ahsp–/–α-globin*α/αα) exhibited more severe anemia and Hb instability than mice with either mutation alone. In vitro, recombinant AHSP promoted folding of newly translated α-globin, enhanced its refolding after denaturation, and facilitated its incorporation into HbA. Moreover, in erythroid precursors, newly formed free α-globin was destabilized by loss of AHSP. Therefore, in addition to its previously defined role in detoxification of excess α-globin, AHSP also acts as a molecular chaperone to stabilize nascent α-globin for HbA assembly. Our findings illustrate what we believe to be a novel adaptive mechanism by which a specialized cell coordinates high-level production of a multisubunit protein and protects against various synthetic imbalances. PMID:17607360

  9. Evolution of mitochondrial chaperones utilized in Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Brenda; Williams, Barry; Knieszner, Helena; Pukszta, Sebastian; D'Silva, Patrick; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2006-08-22

    Biogenesis of Fe-S clusters is an essential process [1]. In both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, insertion of clusters into an apoprotein requires interaction between a scaffold protein on which clusters are assembled and a molecular chaperone system--an unusually specialized mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) and its J protein cochaperone [2]. It is generally assumed that mitochondria inherited their Fe-S cluster assembly machinery from prokaryotes via the endosymbiosis of a bacterium that led to formation of mitochondria. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae J protein, Jac1, and the scaffold, Isu, are orthologous to their bacterial counterparts [3, 4]. However, our analyses indicate that the specialized mtHsp70, Ssq1, is only present in a subset of fungi; most eukaryotes have a single mtHsp70, Ssc1. We propose that an Hsp70 having a role limited to Fe-S cluster biogenesis arose twice during evolution. In the fungal lineage, the gene encoding multifunctional mtHsp70, Ssc1, was duplicated, giving rise to specialized Ssq1. Therefore, Ssq1 is not orthologous to the specialized Hsp70 from E. coli (HscA), but shares a striking level of convergence at the biochemical level. Thus, in the vast majority of eukaryotes, Jac1 and Isu function with the single, multifunctional mtHsp70 in Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

  10. NMR and Mutational Identification of the Collagen-Binding Site of the Chaperone Hsp47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nishi, Yohei; Kurimoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yoshihito; Homma, Takayuki; Hoseki, Jun; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Koide, Takaki; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kato, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47) acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective 15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases. PMID:23049894

  11. NMR and mutational identification of the collagen-binding site of the chaperone Hsp47.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Yagi-Utsumi

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47 acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective (15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases.

  12. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    -casein on the enzymatic activity of three targets was tested by monitoring enzyme activity after heat treatment and by measuring the intensity of scattered light during and after heat treatment. β-Casein was shown to interact at elevated temperatures with three selected targets:horseradish peroxidase, tyrosinase from...... Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly......, peroxidase activity of cytochrome c was increasing after heat treatment with β-casein (up to 518±9%). This indicates loss of the cytochrome c native conformation. Presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) during heat treatment did not affect residual activity of tyrosinase and cytochrome c. Surprisingly...

  13. Large-Scale Conformational Transitions and Dimerization Are Encoded in the Amino-Acid Sequences of Hsp70 Chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, Duccio; Marsili, Simone; Barducci, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s are a class of ubiquitous and highly conserved molecular chaperones playing a central role in the regulation of proteostasis in the cell. Hsp70s assist a myriad of cellular processes by binding unfolded or misfolded substrates during a complex biochemical cycle involving large-scale structural rearrangements. Here we show that an analysis of coevolution at the residue level fully captures the characteristic large-scale conformational transitions of this protein family, and predicts an evolutionary conserved–and thus functional–homo-dimeric arrangement. Furthermore, we highlight that the features encoding the Hsp70 dimer are more conserved in bacterial than in eukaryotic sequences, suggesting that the known Hsp70/Hsp110 hetero-dimer is a eukaryotic specialization built on a pre-existing template. PMID:26046683

  14. Gene cloning and soluble expression of Aspergillus niger phytase in E. coli cytosol via chaperone co-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushasree, Mrudula Vasudevan; Vidya, Jalaja; Pandey, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    A phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was isolated and two Escherichia coli expression systems, based on T7 RNA polymerase promoter and tac promoter, were used for its recombinant expression. Co-expression of molecular chaperone, GroES/EL, aided functional cytosolic expression of the phytase in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Untagged and maltose-binding protein-tagged recombinant phytase showed an activity band of ~49 and 92 kDa, respectively, on a zymogram. Heterologously-expressed phytase was fractionated from endogenous E. coli phytase by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The enzyme had optimum activity at 50 °C and pH 6.5.

  15. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  16. Patients attitudes to vaginal examination and use of chaperones at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical chaperones, however, varies among countries. Higher utilization rates are ..... S, Agnihotri S, editors. Oxford Specialty Training: Training in ... Determinants of women's choice of their obstetrician and gynecologist provider in the UAE.

  17. FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins: anti-immune armament of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialov, Anton; Zav'yalova, Galina; Korpela, Timo; Zav'yalov, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge on the structure, function, assembly, and biomedical applications of the family of adhesive fimbrial organelles assembled on the surface of Gram-negative pathogens via the FGL chaperone/usher pathway. Recent studies revealed the unique structural and functional properties of these organelles, distinguishing them from a related family, FGS chaperone-assembled adhesive pili. The FGL chaperone-assembled organelles consist of linear polymers of one or two types of protein subunits, each possessing one or two independent adhesive sites specific to different host cell receptors. This structural organization enables these fimbrial organelles to function as polyadhesins. Fimbrial polyadhesins may ensure polyvalent fastening of bacteria to the host cells, aggregating their receptors and triggering subversive signals that allow pathogens to evade immune defense. The FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins are attractive targets for vaccine and drug design.

  18. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C A

    2011-03-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. The structure of Spy is unlike that of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors.

  19. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  20. BiPPred: Combined sequence- and structure-based prediction of peptide binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus; Rosam, Mathias; Glaser, Manuel; Patronov, Atanas; Shah, Harpreet; Back, Katrin Christiane; Daake, Marina Angelika; Buchner, Johannes; Antes, Iris

    2016-10-01

    Substrate binding to Hsp70 chaperones is involved in many biological processes, and the identification of potential substrates is important for a comprehensive understanding of these events. We present a multi-scale pipeline for an accurate, yet efficient prediction of peptides binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP by combining sequence-based prediction with molecular docking and MMPBSA calculations. First, we measured the binding of 15mer peptides from known substrate proteins of BiP by peptide array (PA) experiments and performed an accuracy assessment of the PA data by fluorescence anisotropy studies. Several sequence-based prediction models were fitted using this and other peptide binding data. A structure-based position-specific scoring matrix (SB-PSSM) derived solely from structural modeling data forms the core of all models. The matrix elements are based on a combination of binding energy estimations, molecular dynamics simulations, and analysis of the BiP binding site, which led to new insights into the peptide binding specificities of the chaperone. Using this SB-PSSM, peptide binders could be predicted with high selectivity even without training of the model on experimental data. Additional training further increased the prediction accuracies. Subsequent molecular docking (DynaDock) and MMGBSA/MMPBSA-based binding affinity estimations for predicted binders allowed the identification of the correct binding mode of the peptides as well as the calculation of nearly quantitative binding affinities. The general concept behind the developed multi-scale pipeline can readily be applied to other protein-peptide complexes with linearly bound peptides, for which sufficient experimental binding data for the training of classical sequence-based prediction models is not available. Proteins 2016; 84:1390-1407. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Role of Co-chaperones in Synaptic Proteostasis and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L. Gorenberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Synapses must be preserved throughout an organism's lifespan to allow for normal brain function and behavior. Synapse maintenance is challenging given the long distances between the termini and the cell body, reliance on axonal transport for delivery of newly synthesized presynaptic proteins, and high rates of synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Hence, synapses rely on efficient proteostasis mechanisms to preserve their structure and function. To this end, the synaptic compartment has specific chaperones to support its functions. Without proper synaptic chaperone activity, local proteostasis imbalances lead to neurotransmission deficits, dismantling of synapses, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we address the roles of four synaptic chaperones in the maintenance of the nerve terminal, as well as their genetic links to neurodegenerative disease. Three of these are Hsp40 co-chaperones (DNAJs: Cysteine String Protein alpha (CSPα; DNAJC5, auxilin (DNAJC6, and Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis 8 (RME-8; DNAJC13. These co-chaperones contain a conserved J domain through which they form a complex with heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70, enhancing the chaperone's ATPase activity. CSPα is a synaptic vesicle protein known to chaperone the t-SNARE SNAP-25 and the endocytic GTPase dynamin-1, thereby regulating synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis. Auxilin binds assembled clathrin cages, and through its interactions with Hsc70 leads to the uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles, a process necessary for the regeneration of synaptic vesicles. RME-8 is a co-chaperone on endosomes and may have a role in clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis on this organelle. These three co-chaperones maintain client function by preserving folding and assembly to prevent client aggregation, but they do not break down aggregates that have already formed. The fourth synaptic chaperone we will discuss is Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110, which interacts with Hsc70, DNAJAs, and

  2. PDI-, PPI- and chaperone-catalyzed refolding of recombinant human IL-2 and GM-CSF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐明波; 孟文华; 马贤凯

    1995-01-01

    The studies on PDI-, PP1- and chaperone-catalyzed refolding of recombinant human IL-2 and GM-CSF show that PDI can prevent the mismatch of disalfide bonds and formation of aggregates by interchains linkage, furthermore, PDI can correct, the mismatching of disulflde bonds in IL-2 isomers. PPI can increase the rate of folding reaction while chaperone can prevent the aggregation during the folding process. In addition, there is a synergistic effect between them.

  3. Investigation of original multivalent iminosugars as pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigre, Eugénie; Hazelard, Damien; Casas, Josefina; Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Compain, Philippe

    2016-06-24

    Multivalent iminosugars conjugated with a morpholine moiety and/or designed as prodrugs have been prepared and evaluated as new classes of pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease. This study further confirms the interest of the prodrug concept and shows that the addition of a lysosome-targeting morpholine unit into iminosugar cluster structures has no significant impact on the chaperone activity on Gaucher cells.

  4. The heat-shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pierre; Hirt, Heribert; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2017-04-01

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multistress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat-shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone 'client proteins', many are primary metabolism enzymes and signal transduction components with essential roles for the proper functioning of a cell. HSPs/chaperones are controlled by the action of diverse heat-shock factors, which are recruited under stress conditions. In this review, we give an overview of the regulation of the HSP/chaperone network with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana. We illustrate the role of HSPs/chaperones in regulating diverse signalling pathways and discuss several basic principles that should be considered for engineering multiple stress resistance in crops through the HSP/chaperone network. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Expressional patterns of chaperones in ten human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavc Irene

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperones (CH play an important role in tumor biology but no systematic work on expressional patterns has been reported so far. The aim of the study was therefore to present an analytical method for the concomitant determination of several CH in human tumor cell lines, to generate expressional patterns in the individual cell lines and to search for tumor and non-tumor cell line specific CH expression. Human tumor cell lines of neuroblastoma, colorectal and adenocarcinoma of the ovary, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma, lung, cervical and breast cancer, promyelocytic leukaemia were homogenised, proteins were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of proteins and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis was carried out for the identification of CH. Results A series of CH was identified including the main CH groups as HSP90/HATPas_C, HSP70, Cpn60_TCP1, DnaJ, Thioredoxin, TPR, Pro_isomerase, HSP20, ERP29_C, KE2, Prefoldin, DUF704, BAG, GrpE and DcpS. Conclusions The ten individual tumor cell lines showed different expression patterns, which are important for the design of CH studies in tumor cell lines. The results can serve as a reference map and form the basis of a concomitant determination of CH by a protein chemical rather than an immunochemical method, independent of antibody availability or specificity.

  6. The small co-chaperone p23 overexpressing transgenic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Spilman, Patricia; Chen, Sylvia; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Niazi, Kayvan; Bredesen, Dale E; Rao, Rammohan V

    2013-01-30

    Studies from multiple laboratories have identified the roles of several ER stress-induced cell death modulators and effectors. Earlier, we described the role of p23 a small co-chaperone protein in preventing ER stress-induced cell death. p23 is cleaved by caspases at D142 to yield p19 (a 19 kDa product) during ER stress-induced cell death. Mutation of the caspase cleavage site not only blocks formation of the 19 kDa product but also attenuates the cell death process triggered by various ER stressors. Thus, uncleavable p23 (p23D142N) emerges as a reasonable candidate to test for potential inhibition of neurodegenerative disease phenotype that features misfolded proteins and ER stress. In the present work we report the generation of transgenic mouse lines that overexpress wild-type p23 or uncleavable p23 under the control of a ROSA promoter. These mice should prove useful for studying the role of p23 and/or uncleavable p23 in cellular stress-induced cell death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ras chaperones: new targets for cancer and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloog, Yoel; Elad-Sfadia, Galit; Haklai, Roni; Mor, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Ras inhibitor S-trans,trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS, Salirasib®) interferes with Ras membrane interactions that are crucial for Ras-dependent signaling and cellular transformation. FTS had been successfully evaluated in clinical trials of cancer patients. Interestingly, its effect is mediated by targeting Ras chaperones that serve as key coordinators for Ras proper folding and delivery, thus offering a novel target for cancer therapy. The development of new FTS analogs has revealed that the specific modifications to the FTS carboxyl group by esterification and amidation yielded compounds with improved growth inhibitory activity. When FTS was combined with additional therapeutic agents its activity toward Ras was significantly augmented. FTS should be tested not only in cancer but also for genetic diseases associated with abnormal Ras signaling, as well as for various inflammatory and autoimmune disturbances, where Ras plays a major role. We conclude that FTS has a great potential both as a safe anticancer drug and as a promising immune modulator agent. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein chaperones: a composition of matter review (2008 – 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taldone, Tony; Patel, Hardik J; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are proteins with important functions in regulating disease phenotypes. Historically, Hsp90 has first received recognition as a target in cancer, with consequent efforts extending its potential role to other diseases. Hsp70 has also attracted interest as a therapeutic target for its role as a co-chaperone to Hsp90 as well as its own anti-apoptotic roles. Areas covered Herein, patents from 2008 to 2013 are reviewed to identify those that disclose composition of matter claimed to inhibit Hsp90 or Hsp70. Expert opinion For Hsp90, there has been considerable creativity in the discovery of novel pharmacophores that fall outside the three initially discovered scaffolds (i.e., ansamycins, resorcinols and purines). Nonetheless, much of the patent literature appears to build on previously reported structure activity relationship through slight modifications of Hsp90 inhibitor space by finding weaknesses in existing patents. The major goal of future development of Hsp90 inhibitors is not necessarily identifying better molecules but rather understanding how to rationally use these agents in the clinic. The development of Hsp70 inhibitors has lagged behind. It will require a more concerted effort from the drug discovery community in order to begin to realize the potential of this target. PMID:24742089

  9. Investigation of the chaperone function of the small heat shock protein — AgsA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamune Hideaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small heat shock protein AgsA was originally isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We previously demonstrated that AgsA was an effective chaperone that could reduce the amount of heat-aggregated proteins in an Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. AgsA appeared to promote survival at lethal temperatures by cooperating with other chaperones in vivo. To investigate the aggregation prevention mechanisms of AgsA, we constructed N- or C-terminal truncated mutants and compared their properties with wild type AgsA. Results AgsA showed significant overall homology to wheat sHsp16.9 allowing its three-dimensional structure to be predicted. Truncations of AgsA until the N-terminal 23rd and C-terminal 11th amino acid (AA from both termini preserved its in vivo chaperone activity. Temperature-controlled gel filtration chromatography showed that purified AgsA could maintain large oligomeric complexes up to 50°C. Destabilization of oligomeric complexes was observed for N-terminal 11- and 17-AA truncated AgsA; C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA could not form large oligomeric complexes. AgsA prevented the aggregation of denatured lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase (MDH and citrate synthase (CS but did not prevent the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. N-terminal 17-AA truncated AgsA showed no chaperone activity towards MDH. C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA showed weak or no chaperone activity towards lysozyme, MDH and CS although it prevented the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. When the same amount of AgsA and C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA were mixed (half of respective amount required for efficient chaperone activities, good chaperone activity for all substrates and temperatures was observed. Detectable intermolecular exchanges between AgsA oligomers at 25°C were not observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis; however, significant exchanges between AgsA oligomers and C-terminal truncated AgsA were observed at 25

  10. The histone chaperone protein Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1 binds HIV-1 Tat and promotes viral transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the large amount of data available on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 transcription, crucial information is still lacking about the interplay between chromatin conformation and the events that regulate initiation and elongation of viral transcription. During transcriptional activation, histone acetyltransferases and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes cooperate with histone chaperones in altering chromatin structure. In particular, human Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1 is known to act as a histone chaperone that shuttles histones H2A/H2B into the nucleus, assembles nucleosomes and promotes chromatin fluidity, thereby affecting transcription of several cellular genes. Results Using a proteomic screening, we identified hNAP-1 as a novel cellular protein interacting with HIV-1 Tat. We observed that Tat specifically binds hNAP1, but not other members of the same family of factors. Binding between the two proteins required the integrity of the basic domain of Tat and of two separable domains of hNAP-1 (aa 162–290 and 290–391. Overexpression of hNAP-1 significantly enhanced Tat-mediated activation of the LTR. Conversely, silencing of the protein decreased viral promoter activity. To explore the effects of hNAP-1 on viral infection, a reporter HIV-1 virus was used to infect cells in which hNAP-1 had been either overexpressed or knocked-down. Consistent with the gene expression results, these two treatments were found to increase and inhibit viral infection, respectively. Finally, we also observed that the overexpression of p300, a known co-activator of both Tat and hNAP-1, enhanced hNAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation as well as its interaction with Tat. Conclusion Our study reveals that HIV-1 Tat binds the histone chaperone hNAP-1 both in vitro and in vivo and shows that this interaction participates in the regulation of Tat-mediated activation of viral gene expression.

  11. Quantifying chaperone-mediated transitions in the proteostasis network of E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Dickson

    Full Text Available For cells to function, the concentrations of all proteins in the cell must be maintained at the proper levels (proteostasis. This task--complicated by cellular stresses, protein misfolding, aggregation, and degradation--is performed by a collection of chaperones that alter the configurational landscape of a given client protein through the formation of protein-chaperone complexes. The set of all such complexes and the transitions between them form the proteostasis network. Recently, a computational model was introduced (FoldEco that synthesizes experimental data into a system-wide description of the proteostasis network of E. coli. This model describes the concentrations over time of all the species in the system, which include different conformations of the client protein, as well as protein-chaperone complexes. We apply to this model a recently developed analysis tool to calculate mediation probabilities in complex networks. This allows us to determine the probability that a given chaperone system is used to mediate transitions between client protein conformations, such as folding, or the correction of misfolded conformations. We determine how these probabilities change both across different proteins, as well as with system parameters, such as the synthesis rate, and in each case reveal in detail which factors control the usage of one chaperone system over another. We find that the different chaperone systems do not operate orthogonally and can compensate for each other when one system is disabled or overworked, and that this can complicate the analysis of "knockout" experiments, where the concentration of native protein is compared both with and without the presence of a given chaperone system. This study also gives a general recipe for conducting a transition-path-based analysis on a network of coupled chemical reactions, which can be useful in other types of networks as well.

  12. Detection of Heat Shock Protein (DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE Horizontal Gene Transfers Among Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Acanthamoeba Polyphaga Mimivirus (APMV, Amoeba-Infecting Bacteria and Sputnik Virophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Haghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV was isolated in 1992. . It’s large size, gram positivity and unique genome features attracted many scientists attention in evolutinary and clinical terms since it’s discovery. APMV shares its A.polyphaga host environment with other intracellular bacteria including mpylobacter jejuni, Vibrio cholerae, Legionella pneumophila, Listeria monocytogenes. It has been known that the giant viruses have adopted cellular genes during evolutionary process via horizontal gene transfer (HGT from bacteria and their eukaryotic host. In this study we aim to detect bacterial Heat shock protein (Dnak, DnaJ and GrpE genes which are a group of evolutionary conserved proteins that are produced by cellular organisms under stress conditions.As a result of BLAST, significant matches have been found between APMV genome and bacterial genome. Therefore, our results support the adoption of Hsp genes via HGT from bacteria. However, any significant match was not found among APMV, A. polyphaga and Sputnik virophage.

  13. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  14. Selective chaperone effect of aminocyclitol derivatives on G202R and other mutant glucocerebrosidases causing Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Díaz, Lucía; Guitiérrez-de Terán, Hugo; Sánchez-Ollé, Gessamí; Bujons, Jordi; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Casas, Josefina

    2014-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterized by the accumulation of glucosylceramide as a result of a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Several competitive glucocerebrosidase inhibitors are able to act as pharmacological chaperones for an efficient rescue of the mutated, misfolded forms of the enzyme. Along this line, we report in this work on the ability of several aminocyclitols to increase the residual glucocerebrosidase activity in patient fibroblasts with different genotypes. Some of the compounds were slightly active on fibroblasts bearing some mutations, including the highly prevalent N370S mutation. All compounds were highly active as enzyme activity enhancers on fibroblasts from Gaucher disease patients containing the G202R mutation. Moreover, using the novel tagged sphingolipid ω-azidosphingosine, a reduction in the tagged glucosylceramide accumulation was also observed for selected aminocyclitols. Attempts to explain the activity impairment observed in glucocerebrosidase bearing the G202R mutation by comparative molecular dynamic studies on wild type and the G202R mutated proteins (free and isofagomine-bound, in both cases) were unsuccessful. Under the simulation conditions used, no clear effect of the G202R mutation neither over the global structure of the protein nor on the loops that constitute the glucocerebrosidase active site was observed. Since the G202R residue is located on the protein surface, altered protein-membrane or protein-protein interactions could account for the observed differences. In conclusion, we have tested novel compounds that have shown some chaperone effect on particular glucocerebrosidase mutant enzymes, supporting the enhancement therapy as an alternative approach for Gaucher disease.

  15. Cloning, expression and nuclear localization of human NPM3, a member of the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family of nuclear chaperones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguly Amit

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies suggest that the related proteins nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin (also called B23, NO38 or numatrin are nuclear chaperones that mediate the assembly of nucleosomes and ribosomes, respectively, and that these activities are accomplished through the binding of basic proteins via their acidic domains. Recently discovered and less well characterized members of this family of acidic phosphoproteins include mouse nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin 3 (Npm3 and Xenopus NO29. Here we report the cloning and initial characterization of the human ortholog of Npm3. Results Human genomic and cDNA clones of NPM3 were isolated and sequenced. NPM3 lies 5.5 kb upstream of FGF8 and thus maps to chromosome 10q24-26. In addition to amino acid similarities, NPM3 shares many physical characteristics with the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family, including an acidic domain, multiple potential phosphorylation sites and a putative nuclear localization signal. Comparative analyses of 14 members of this family from various metazoans suggest that Xenopus NO29 is a candidate ortholog of human and mouse NPM3, and they further group both proteins closer with the nucleoplasmins than with the nucleophosmins. Northern blot analysis revealed that NPM3 was strongly expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with especially robust expression in pancreas and testis; lung displayed the lowest level of expression. An analysis of subcellular fractions of NIH3T3 cells expressing epitope-tagged NPM3 revealed that NPM3 protein was localized solely in the nucleus. Conclusions Human NPM3 is an abundant and widely expressed protein with primarily nuclear localization. These biological activities, together with its physical relationship to the chaparones nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin, are consistent with the proposed function of NPM3 as a molecular chaperone functioning in the nucleus.

  16. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  17. The role of chaperone-mediated autophagy in huntingtin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qi

    Full Text Available Huntington Disease (HD is caused by an abnormal expansion of polyQ tract in the protein named huntingtin (Htt. HD pathology is featured by accumulation and aggregation of mutant Htt in striatal and cortical neurons. Aberrant Htt degradation is implicated in HD pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA components, heat shock protein cognate 70 (Hsc70 and lysosome-associated protein 2A (LAMP-2A in degradation of Htt fragment 1-552aa (Htt-552. A cell model of HD was produced by overexpression of Htt-552 with adenovirus. The involvement of CMA components in degradation of Htt-552 was determined with over-expression or silencing of Hsc70 and LAMP-2A. The results confirmed previous reports that both macroautophagy and CMA were involved in degradation of Htt-552. Changing the levels of CMA-related proteins affected the accumulation of Htt-552. The lysosomal binding and luminal transport of Htt-552 was demonstrated by incubation of Htt-552 with isolated lysosomes. Expansion of the polyQ tract in Htt-552 impaired its uptake and degradation by lysosomes. Mutation of putative KFERQ motif in wild-type Htt-552 interfered with interactions between Htt-552 and Hsc70. Endogenous Hsc70 and LAMP-2A interacted with exogenously expressed Htt-552. Modulating the levels of CMA related proteins degraded endogenous full-length Htt. These studies suggest that Hsc70 and LAMP-2A through CMA play a role in the clearance of Htt and suggest a novel strategy to target the degradation of mutant Htt.

  18. Therapy of Fabry disease with pharmacological chaperones: from in silico predictions to in vitro tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cammisa Marco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is a rare disorder caused by a large variety of mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha-galactosidase. Many of these mutations are unique to individual families. Fabry disease can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, but a promising novel strategy relies on small molecules, so called "pharmacological chaperones", which can be administered orally. Unfortunately only 42% of genotypes respond to pharmacological chaperones. Results A procedure to predict which genotypes responsive to pharmacological chaperones in Fabry disease has been recently proposed. The method uses a position-specific substitution matrix to score the mutations. Using this method, we have screened public databases for predictable responsive cases and selected nine representative mutations as yet untested with pharmacological chaperones. Mutant lysosomal alpha galactosidases were produced by site directed mutagenesis and expressed in mammalian cells. Seven out of nine mutations responded to pharmacological chaperones. Nineteen other mutations that were tested with pharmacological chaperones, but were not included in the training of the predictive method, were gathered from literature and analyzed in silico. In this set all five mutations predicted to be positive were responsive to pharmacological chaperones, bringing the percentage of responsive mutations among those predicted to be positive and not used to train the classifier to 86% (12/14. This figure differs significantly from the percentage of responsive cases observed among all the Fabry mutants tested so far. Conclusions In this paper we provide experimental support to an "in silico" method designed to predict missense mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha galactosidase responsive to pharmacological chaperones. We demonstrated that responsive mutations can be predicted with a low percentage of false positive cases. Most of the mutations tested to validate the method

  19. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  20. Order out of disorder: working cycle of an intrinsically unfolded chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Dana; Xu, Ying; Cremers, Claudia M; Ilbert, Marianne; Mittelman, Roni; Fitzgerald, Michael C; Jakob, Ursula

    2012-03-02

    The redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33 protects organisms against oxidative stress that leads to protein unfolding. Activation of Hsp33 is triggered by the oxidative unfolding of its own redox-sensor domain, making Hsp33 a member of a recently discovered class of chaperones that require partial unfolding for full chaperone activity. Here we address the long-standing question of how chaperones recognize client proteins. We show that Hsp33 uses its own intrinsically disordered regions to discriminate between unfolded and partially structured folding intermediates. Binding to secondary structure elements in client proteins stabilizes Hsp33's intrinsically disordered regions, and this stabilization appears to mediate Hsp33's high affinity for structured folding intermediates. Return to nonstress conditions reduces Hsp33's disulfide bonds, which then significantly destabilizes the bound client proteins and in doing so converts them into less-structured, folding-competent client proteins of ATP-dependent foldases. We propose a model in which energy-independent chaperones use internal order-to-disorder transitions to control substrate binding and release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSimmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER. However, solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response (UPR upregulate ER chaperones and oxidoreductases. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the production of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  2. Candidate autoantigens identified by mass spectrometry in early rheumatoid arthritis are chaperones and citrullinated glycolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goëb, Vincent; Thomas-L'Otellier, Marlène; Daveau, Romain; Charlionet, Roland; Fardellone, Patrice; Le Loët, Xavier; Tron, François; Gilbert, Danièle; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to identify new early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) autoantibodies. Methods Sera obtained from 110 early untreated RA patients (citrullination in each of these proteins was evaluated. FT-ICR mass spectrometry was used to verify experimentally the effect of citrullination upon the mass profile observed by MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The 110 1-DE patterns allowed detection of 10 recurrent immunoreactive bands of 33, 39, 43, 46, 51, 54, 58, 62, 67 and 70 kDa, which were further characterized by 2-DE and proteomic analysis. Six proteins were already described RA antigens: heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, aldolase, α-enolase, calreticulin, 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) and BiP. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and the far upstream element-binding proteins (FUSE-BP) 1 and 2 were identified as new antigens. Post-translational protein modifications were analyzed and potentially deiminated peptides were found on aldolase, α-enolase, PGK1, calreticulin, HSP60 and the FUSE-BPs. We compared the reactivity of RA sera with citrullinated and noncitrullinated α-enolase and FUSE-BP linear peptides, and showed that antigenicity of the FUSE-BP peptide was highly dependent on citrullination. Interestingly, the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP2) status in RA serum at inclusion was not correlated to the reactivity directed against FUSE-BP citrullinated peptide. Conclusions Two categories of antigens, enzymes of the glycolytic family and molecular chaperones are also targeted by the early untreated RA autoantibody response. For some of them, and notably the FUSE-BPs, citrullination is involved in the immunological tolerance breakdown observed earlier in RA patients. Autoantibodies recognizing a citrullinated peptide from FUSE-BP may enhance the sensibility for RA of the currently available anti-CCP2 test. PMID:19284558

  3. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the TCP-1 Tubulin Chaperone Complex [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J; Rogala, Kacper B; Deane, Charlotte M; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G

    2015-06-29

    Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies, but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs.

  4. Evolutionary origins of Hsp90 chaperones and a deep paralogy in their bacterial ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechmann, Alexandra; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The 82-90 kD family of molecular chaperone proteins has homologs in eukaryotes (Hsp90) and many eubacteria (HtpG) but not in Archaebacteria. We used representatives of all four different eukaryotic paralogs (cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), chloroplast, mitochondrial) together with numerous eubacterial HtpG proteins for phylogenetic analyses to investigate their evolutionary origins. Our trees confirm that none of the organellar Hsp90s derives from the endosymbionts of early eukaryotes. Contrary to previous suggestions of distant origins through lateral gene transfer (LGT) all eukaryote Hsp90s are related to Gram-positive eubacterial HtpG proteins. The nucleocytosolic, ER and chloroplast Hsp90 paralogs are clearly mutually related. The origin of mitochondrial Hsp90 is more obscure, as these sequences are deeply nested within eubacteria. Our trees also reveal a deep split within eubacteria into a group of mainly long-branching sequences (including the eukaryote mitochondrial Hsp90s) and another group comprising exclusively short-branching HtpG proteins, from which the cytosolic/ER versions probably arose. Both versions are present in several eubacterial phyla, suggesting gene duplication very early in eubacterial evolution and multiple independent losses thereafter. We identified one probable case of LGT within eubacteria. However, multiple losses can simply explain the evolutionary pattern of the eubacterial HtpG paralogs and predominate over LGT. We suggest that the actinobacterial ancestor of eukaryotes harbored genes for both eubacterial HtpG paralogs, as the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor still does; one could have given rise to the mitochondrial Hsp90 and the other, following another duplication event in the ancestral eukaryote, to the cytosolic and ER Hsp90 homologs.

  5. Artemin, a diapause-specific chaperone, contributes to the stress tolerance of Artemia franciscana cysts and influences their release from females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2014-05-15

    Females of the crustacean Artemia franciscana produce either motile nauplii or gastrula stage embryos enclosed in a shell impermeable to nonvolatile compounds and known as cysts. The encysted embryos enter diapause, a state of greatly reduced metabolism and profound stress tolerance. Artemin, a diapause-specific ferritin homolog in cysts has molecular chaperone activity in vitro. Artemin represents 7.2% of soluble protein in cysts, approximately equal to the amount of p26, a small heat shock protein. However, there is almost twice as much artemin mRNA in cysts as compared with p26 mRNA, suggesting that artemin mRNA is translated less efficiently. RNA interference employing the injection of artemin double-stranded RNA into the egg sacs of A. franciscana females substantially reduced artemin mRNA and protein in cysts. Decreasing artemin diminished desiccation and freezing tolerance of cysts, demonstrating a role for this protein in stress resistance. Knockdown of artemin increased the time required for complete discharge of a brood of cysts carried within a female from a few hours up to 4 days, an effect weakened in successive broods. Artemin, an abundant molecular chaperone, contributes to stress tolerance of A. franciscana cysts while influencing their development and/or exit from females.

  6. Loss of function mutation in LARP7, chaperone of 7SK ncRNA, causes a syndrome of facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Owain, Mohammad; Alzahrani, Fatema; Shuaib, Taghreed; Al-Shamrani, Hussain; Al-Falki, Yahya H; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Alsheddi, Tarfa; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-10-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition. Various molecular mechanisms are known to underlie the disease including impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. Here, we describe a syndromic form of PD associated with severe intellectual disability and distinct facial features in a large multiplex Saudi family. Analysis reveals a novel underlying mechanism for PD involving depletion of 7SK, an abundant cellular noncoding RNA (ncRNA), due to mutation of its chaperone LARP7. We show that 7SK levels are tightly linked to LARP7 expression across cell lines, and that this chaperone is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse embryo. The 7SK is known to influence the expression of a wide array of genes through its inhibitory effect on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) as well as its competing role in HMGA1-mediated transcriptional regulation. This study documents a critical role played by ncRNA in human development and adds to the growing list of molecular mechanisms that, when perturbed, converge on the PD phenotype. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The fictile coordination chemistry of cuprous-thiolate sites in copper chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Zhang, Limei; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2012-06-01

    Copper plays vital roles in the active sites of cytochrome oxidase and in several other enzymes essential for human health. Copper is also highly toxic when dysregulated; because of this an elaborate array of accessory proteins have evolved which act as intracellular carriers or chaperones for the copper ions. In most cases chaperones transport cuprous copper. This review discusses some of the chemistry of these copper sites, with a view to some of the structural factors in copper coordination which are important in the biological function of these chaperones. The coordination chemistry and accessible geometries of the cuprous oxidation state are remarkably plastic and we discuss how this may relate to biological function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  8. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Kurt

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1, which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired.To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment.HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate and unsaturated (oleate long-chain free fatty acids (FFA. Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α and Type III IFN (IFN-λ was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated.FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ, which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture

  9. Quantification of interaction strengths between chaperones and tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Regina; Soll, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten; Heermann, Ralf; Schwenkert, Serena

    2013-10-18

    The three tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing docking proteins Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 reside in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. They are suggested to act during post-translational protein import by association with chaperone-bound preprotein complexes. Here, we performed a detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational analysis of the interaction between Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 and the five cytosolic chaperones HSP70.1, HSP90.1, HSP90.2, HSP90.3, and HSP90.4. We used surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with Interaction Map® analysis to distinguish between chaperone oligomerization and docking protein-chaperone interactions and to calculate binding affinities for all tested interactions. Complementary to this, we applied pulldown assays as well as microscale thermophoresis as surface immobilization independent techniques. The data revealed that OM64 prefers HSP70 over HSP90, whereas Toc64 binds all chaperones with comparable affinities. We could further show that AtTPR7 is able to bind HSP90 in addition to HSP70. Moreover, differences between the HSP90 isoforms were detected and revealed a weaker binding for HSP90.1 to AtTPR7 and OM64, showing that slight differences in the amino acid composition or structure of the chaperones influence binding to the tetratricopeptide repeat domain. The combinatory approach of several methods provided a powerful toolkit to determine binding affinities of similar interaction partners in a highly quantitative manner.

  10. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  11. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  12. The Salmonella type III effector SspH2 specifically exploits the NLR co-chaperone activity of SGT1 to subvert immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit P Bhavsar

    Full Text Available To further its pathogenesis, S. Typhimurium delivers effector proteins into host cells, including the novel E3 ubiquitin ligase (NEL effector SspH2. Using model systems in a cross-kingdom approach we gained further insight into the molecular function of this effector. Here, we show that SspH2 modulates innate immunity in both mammalian and plant cells. In mammalian cell culture, SspH2 significantly enhanced Nod1-mediated IL-8 secretion when transiently expressed or bacterially delivered. In addition, SspH2 also enhanced an Rx-dependent hypersensitive response in planta. In both of these nucleotide-binding leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR model systems, SspH2-mediated phenotypes required its catalytic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and interaction with the conserved host protein SGT1. SGT1 has an essential cell cycle function and an additional function as an NLR co-chaperone in animal and plant cells. Interaction between SspH2 and SGT1 was restricted to SGT1 proteins that have NLR co-chaperone function and accordingly, SspH2 did not affect SGT1 cell cycle functions. Mechanistic studies revealed that SspH2 interacted with, and ubiquitinated Nod1 and could induce Nod1 activity in an agonist-independent manner if catalytically active. Interestingly, SspH2 in vitro ubiquitination activity and protein stability were enhanced by SGT1. Overall, this work adds to our understanding of the sophisticated mechanisms used by bacterial effectors to co-opt host pathways by demonstrating that SspH2 can subvert immune responses by selectively exploiting the functions of a conserved host co-chaperone.

  13. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  14. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  15. Copy-choice recombination by reverse transcriptases: Reshuffling of genetic markers mediated by RNA chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Matteo; Buc, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Copy-choice recombination efficiently reshuffles genetic markers in retroviruses. In vivo, the folding of the genomic RNA is controlled by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). We show that binding of NC onto the acceptor RNA molecule is sufficient to enhance recombination, providing evidence for a mechanism where the structure of the acceptor template determines the template switch. NC as well as another RNA chaperone (StpA) converts recombination into a widespread process no longer restricted to rare hot spots, an effect maximized when both the NC and the reverse transcriptase come from HIV-1. These data suggest that RNA chaperones confer a higher genetic flexibility to retroviruses. PMID:10829081

  16. The histone chaperones Nap1 and Vps75 bind histones H3 and H4 in a tetrameric conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; El-Mkami, Hassane; Norman, David George; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2011-02-18

    Histone chaperones physically interact with histones to direct proper assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes regulating diverse nuclear processes such as DNA replication, promoter remodeling, transcription elongation, DNA damage, and histone variant exchange. Currently, the best-characterized chaperone-histone interaction is that between the ubiquitous chaperone Asf1 and a dimer of H3 and H4. Nucleosome assembly proteins (Nap proteins) represent a distinct class of histone chaperone. Using pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements and protein crosslinking, we show that two members of this class, Nap1 and Vps75, bind histones in the tetrameric conformation also observed when they are sequestered within the nucleosome. Furthermore, H3 and H4 trapped in their tetrameric state can be used as substrates in nucleosome assembly and chaperone-mediated lysine acetylation. This alternate mode of histone interaction provides a potential means of maintaining the integrity of the histone tetramer during cycles of nucleosome reassembly.

  17. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  18. Periplasmic expression of soluble single chain T cell receptors is rescued by the chaperone FkpA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogen Bjarne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient expression systems exist for antibody (Ab molecules, which allow for characterization of large numbers of individual Ab variants. In contrast, such expression systems have been lacking for soluble T cell receptors (TCRs. Attempts to generate bacterial systems have generally resulted in low yields and material which is prone to aggregation and proteolysis. Here we present an optimized periplasmic bacterial expression system for soluble single chain (sc TCRs. Results The effect of 1 over-expression of the periplasmic chaperon FkpA, 2 culture conditions and 3 molecular design was investigated. Elevated levels of FkpA allowed periplasmic soluble scTCR expression, presumably by preventing premature aggregation and inclusion body formation. Periplasmic expression enables disulphide bond formation, which is a prerequisite for the scTCR to reach its correct fold. It also enables quick and easy recovery of correctly folded protein without the need for time-consuming downstream processing. Expression without IPTG induction further improved the periplasmic expression yield, while addition of sucrose to the growth medium showed little effect. Shaker flask yield of mg levels of active purified material was obtained. The Vαβ domain orientation was far superior to the Vβα domain orientation regarding monomeric yield of functionally folded molecules. Conclusion The general expression regime presented here allows for rapid production of soluble scTCRs and is applicable for 1 high yield recovery sufficient for biophysical characterization and 2 high throughput screening of such molecules following molecular engineering.

  19. Prognostic value of histone chaperone FACT subunits expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Kristopher; Fleyshman, Daria; Prendergast, Laura; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine; Omilian, Angela R; Bshara, Wiam; Gurova, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the underlying reasons for tumor aggressiveness, such as why some tumors grow slowly and locally, while others rapidly progress to a lethal metastatic disease, is still limited. This is especially critical in breast cancer (BrCa) due to its high prevalence and also due to the possibility that it can be detected early. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressors have been identified and are used in the prognosis and treatment of BrCa. However, even with these markers, the outcome within BrCa subtypes is highly variable. Chromatin organization has long been acknowledged as a factor that plays an important role in tumor progression, but molecular mechanisms defining chromatin dynamics are largely missing. We have recently found that histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is overexpressed in ~18-20% of BrCa cases. FACT is elevated upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells and is essential for viability of tumor cells. BrCa cells with high FACT have a more aggressive transcriptional program than those with low FACT cells. Based on this we propose that FACT may be a marker of aggressive BrCa. In this study, we aimed to comprehensively characterize the pattern of FACT expression in BrCa in relation to other molecular and clinical prognostic markers. We developed and tested an assay for the detection and quantitation of protein levels of both FACT subunits, SSRP1, and SPT16, in clinical samples. We compared the value of mRNA and protein as potential markers of disease aggressiveness using a large cohort of patients (n=1092). We demonstrated that only SSRP1 immunohistochemical staining is a reliable indicator of FACT levels in tumor samples. High SSRP1 correlated with known markers of poor prognosis, such as negative hormone receptor status, presence of Her2, high-grade tumors, and tumors of later clinical stage. At the same time, no strong correlation between SSRP1 expression and survival was detected when all samples were analyzed

  20. The myosin-binding UCS domain but not the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of the UNC-45 chaperone is essential for function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weiming; Hutagalung, Alex H; Li, Shumin; Epstein, Henry F

    2011-09-15

    The UNC-45 family of molecular chaperones is expressed in metazoan organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The UNC-45 protein is essential in C. elegans for early body-wall muscle cell development and A-band assembly. We show that the myosin-binding UCS domain of UNC-45 alone is sufficient to rescue lethal unc-45 null mutants arrested in embryonic muscle development and temperature-sensitive loss-of-function unc-45 mutants defective in worm A-band assembly. Removal of the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of UNC-45 does not affect rescue. Similar results were obtained with overexpression of the same fragments in wild-type nematodes when assayed for diminution of myosin accumulation and assembly. Titration experiments show that, on a per molecule basis, UCS has greater activity in C. elegans muscle in vivo than full-length UNC-45 protein, suggesting that UNC-45 is inhibited by either the TPR domain or its interaction with the general chaperone Hsp90. In vitro experiments with purified recombinant C. elegans Hsp90 and UNC-45 proteins show that they compete for binding to C. elegans myosin. Our in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical experiments are consistent with a novel inhibitory role for Hsp90 with respect to UNC-45 action.

  1. Stability of the human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 chaperone complex against nucleotides and Hsp90 inhibitors, and the influence of phosphorylation by casein kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H; Ingles, Donna J; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I; Tash, Joseph S; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-19

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  2. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne H. Olesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein–protein interaction (PPI inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2 did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM, while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  3. Pahenu1 is a mouse model for tetrahydrobiopterin-responsive phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and promotes analysis of the pharmacological chaperone mechanism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersting, Søren W; Lagler, Florian B; Eichinger, Anna; Kemter, Kristina F; Danecka, Marta K; Messing, Dunja D; Staudigl, Michael; Domdey, Katharina A; Zsifkovits, Clemens; Fingerhut, Ralph; Glossmann, Hartmut; Roscher, Adelbert A; Muntau, Ania C

    2010-05-15

    The recent approval of sapropterin dihydrochloride, the synthetic form of 6[R]-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), for the treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) as the first pharmacological chaperone drug initiated a paradigm change in the treatment of monogenetic diseases. Symptomatic treatment is now replaced by a causal pharmacological therapy correcting misfolding of the defective phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) in numerous patients. Here, we disclose BH(4) responsiveness in Pah(enu1), a mouse model for PAH deficiency. Loss of function resulted from loss of PAH, a consequence of misfolding, aggregation, and accelerated degradation of the enzyme. BH(4) attenuated this triad by conformational stabilization augmenting the effective PAH concentration. This led to the rescue of the biochemical phenotype and enzyme function in vivo. Combined in vitro and in vivo analyses revealed a selective pharmaceutical action of BH(4) confined to the pathological metabolic state. Our data provide new molecular-level insights into the mechanisms underlying protein misfolding with loss of function and support a general model of pharmacological chaperone-induced stabilization of protein conformation to correct this intracellular phenotype. Pah(enu1) will be essential for pharmaceutical drug optimization and to design individually tailored therapies.

  4. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H.; Ingles, Donna J.; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P.; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I.; Tash, Joseph S.; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in-vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands. PMID:25608045

  5. Specificity of Lipoprotein Chaperones for the Characteristic Lipidated Structural Motifs of their Cognate Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; van Hattum, Hilde; Triola, Gemma; Jaiswal, Mamta; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-binding chaperones mediate intracellular transport of lipidated proteins and determine their proper localisation and functioning. Understanding of the exact structural parameters that determine recognition and transport by different chaperones is of major interest. We have synthesised several lipid-modified peptides, representative of different lipoprotein classes, and have investigated their binding to the relevant chaperones PDEδ, UNC119a, UNC119b, and galectins-1 and -3. Our results demonstrate that PDEδ recognises S-isoprenylated C-terminal peptidic structures but not N-myristoylated peptides. In contrast, UNC119 proteins bind only mono-N-myristoylated, but do not recognise doubly lipidated and S-isoprenylated peptides at the C terminus. For galectins-1 and -3, neither binding to N-acylated, nor to C-terminally prenylated peptides could be determined. These results shed light on the specificity of the chaperone-mediated cellular lipoprotein transport systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Conserved TRAM Domain Functions as an Archaeal Cold Shock Protein via RNA Chaperone Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold shock proteins (Csps enable organisms to acclimate to and survive in cold environments and the bacterial CspA family exerts the cold protection via its RNA chaperone activity. However, most Archaea do not contain orthologs to the bacterial csp. TRAM, a conserved domain among RNA modification proteins ubiquitously distributed in organisms, occurs as an individual protein in most archaeal phyla and has a structural similarity to Csp proteins, yet its biological functions remain unknown. Through physiological and biochemical studies on four TRAM proteins from a cold adaptive archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, this work demonstrated that TRAM is an archaeal Csp and exhibits RNA chaperone activity. Three TRAM encoding genes (Mpsy_0643, Mpsy_3043, and Mpsy_3066 exhibited remarkable cold-shock induced transcription and were preferentially translated at lower temperature (18°C, while the fourth (Mpsy_2002 was constitutively expressed. They were all able to complement the cspABGE mutant of Escherichia coli BX04 that does not grow in cold temperatures and showed transcriptional antitermination. TRAM3066 (gene product of Mpsy_3066 and TRAM2002 (gene product of Mpsy_2002 displayed sequence-non-specific RNA but not DNA binding activity, and TRAM3066 assisted RNases in degradation of structured RNA, thus validating the RNA chaperone activity of TRAMs. Given the chaperone activity, TRAM is predicted to function beyond a Csp.

  7. Chaperone driven polymer translocation through Nanopore: spatial distribution and binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Abdolvahab, Rouhollah Haji

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are binding proteins which work as a driving force to bias the biopolymer translocation by binding to it near the pore and preventing its backsliding. Chaperones may have different spatial distribution. Recently we show the importance of their spatial distribution in translocation and how it effects on sequence dependency of the translocation time. Here we focus on homopolymers and exponential distribution. As a result of the exponential distribution of chaperones, energy dependency of the translocation time will changed and one see a minimum in translocation time versus effective energy curve. The same trend can be seen in scaling exponent of time versus polymer length, $\\beta$ ($T\\sim\\beta$). Interestingly in some special cases e.g. chaperones of size $\\lambda=6$ and with exponential distribution rate of $\\alpha=5$, the minimum reaches even to amount of less than $1$ ($\\beta<1$). We explain the possibility of this rare result and base on a theoretical discussion we show that by taking into acc...

  8. Orf1/SpcS Chaperones ExoS for Type Three Secretion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-KANG SHEN; LAURIANE QUENEE; MARIETTE BONNET; LAURIANE KUHN; MADIHA DEROUAZI; DANIELE LAMOTTE; BERTRAND TOUSSAINT; BENOIT POLACK

    2008-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic pathogen that uses the type III secretion system (TTSS)to inject effector proteins directly into the cytosol of target cells to subvert the host cell's functions.Specialized bacterial chaperones are required for effective secretion of some effectors.To identify the chaperone of ExoS,the representative effector secreted by the TTSS of P. aeruginosa,we analyzed the role of a postulated chaperone termed Orfl.Methods By allelic exchange,we constructed the mutant with the deletion of gene Orfl.Analysis of secreted and cell-associated fractions was performed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting.Using strain expressing in trans Orfl,tagged by V5 polypeptide and histidine,protein-protein interaction Was determined by affinity resin pull-down assay in combination with MALDI-TOF. The role of Orfl in the expression of eroS was evaluated by genel reporter analysis.Results Pull-down assay showed that Orfl binds to ExoS and ExoT.Secretion profile analysis showedthat Orfl was necessary for the optimal secretion of ExoS and ExoT.However,Orfl had no effect on the expression of eroS.Conclusion Orfl is important for the secretion of ExoS probablY by mamtauung ExoS in a secretion-competent conformation.We propose to name Orfl as SpcS for "specific Pseudomonas chaperone for ExoS".

  9. Promiscuous histone mis-assembly is actively prevented by chaperones | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    About the Cover Chaperone HJURP drives the proper loading of protein CENP-A to the centromere of a chromosome. The effect of HJURP on CENP-A's structural dynamics are observed and explained using dual-resolution in silico simulations, while in vivo experiments demonstrate how CENP-A mutations influence its specific localization in human cells. Abstract

  10. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  11. Modulating molecular chaperones improves sensory fiber recovery and mitochondrial function in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J; Pan, Pan; Farmer, Kevin L; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2012-05-01

    Quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (iENFs) is an important approach to stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and is a promising clinical endpoint for identifying beneficial therapeutics. Mechanistically, diabetes decreases neuronal mitochondrial function and enhancing mitochondrial respiratory capacity may aid neuronal recovery from glucotoxic insults. We have proposed that modulating the activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) may be of benefit in treating DPN. KU-32 is a C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor that improved thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice but it was not determined if this was associated with an increase in iENF density and mitochondrial function. After 16 weeks of diabetes, Swiss Webster mice showed decreased electrophysiological and psychosensory responses and a >30% loss of iENFs. Treatment of the mice with ten weekly doses of 20mg/kg KU-32 significantly reversed pre-existing deficits in nerve conduction velocity and responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli. KU-32 therapy significantly reversed the pre-existing loss of iENFs despite the identification of a sub-group of drug-treated diabetic mice that showed improved thermal sensitivity but no increase in iENF density. To determine if the improved clinical indices correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activity, sensory neurons were isolated and mitochondrial bioenergetics assessed ex vivo using extracellular flux technology. Diabetes decreased maximal respiratory capacity in sensory neurons and this deficit was improved following KU-32 treatment. In conclusion, KU-32 improved physiological and morphologic markers of degenerative neuropathy and drug efficacy may be related to enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics in sensory neurons.

  12. From flexibility to function: Molecular dynamics simulations of conformational changes in chaperones and photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singhal, K.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are uniquely-shaped macromolecules that function as biological machines, and regulate a living cell’s behavior. Crucial to protein function is the folding of the polypeptide chain into a unique well-defined three-dimensional conformation. In complex cell environments, the spontaneous unassi

  13. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bandura

    Full Text Available The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+ reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C, suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis.

  14. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W; Edgar, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+) reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis.

  15. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  16. Adaptogens exert a stress-protective effect by modulation of expression of molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Georg; Kaur, Punit; Asea, Alexzander

    2009-06-01

    Adaptogens are medicinal plants that augment resistance to stress, and increase concentration, performance and endurance during fatigue. Experiments were carried out with BALB/c mice taking ADAPT-232 forte, a fixed combination of three genuine (native) extracts of Eleutherococcus senticocus, Schisandra chinensis and Rhodiola rosea, characterised for the content of active markers eleutherosides, schisandrins, salidroside, tyrosol and rosavin and in doses of about 30, 90 and 180 mg/kg for seven consecutive days followed by forced swimming test to exhaustion. ADAPT-232 forte strongly augments endurance of mice, increasing the time taken to exhaustion (TTE) in a dose-dependent manner from 3.0+/-0.5 to 21.1+/-1.7 min, approximately seven fold. Serum Hsp72 was measured by EIA both in normal and stressful conditions before and after swimming test. Repeated administration of adaptogen dose dependently increases basal level of Hsp72 in serum of mice from 0.8-1.5 to 5.5-6.3 pg/ml. This effect is even stronger than the effect of stress, including both physical (swimming) and emotional impacts: 3.2+/-1.2 pg/ml. Cumulative effect of stress and adaptogen was clearly observed in groups of animals treated with adaptogen after swimming to exhaustion, when serum Hsp72 increased to 15.1+/-1 pg/ml and remained at almost the same level during the 7 days. It can be concluded that adaptogens induce increase of serum Hsp72, regarded as a defense response to stress, and increase tolerance to stress (in our model combination of physical and emotional stresses). It can be suggested that increased tolerance to stress induced by adaptogen is associated with its stimulation of expression of Hsp70 and particularly with Hsp72 production and release into systemic circulation, which is known as a mediator of stress response involved in reparation of proteins during physical load. Our studies suggest that this could be one of the mechanisms of action of plant adaptogens.

  17. The Unfolded Protein Response and Chemical Chaperones Reduce Protein Misfolding and Colitis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAO, STEWART SIYAN; ZIMMERMANN, ELLEN M.; CHUANG, BRANDY–MENGCHIEH; SONG, BENBO; NWOKOYE, ANOSIKE; WILKINSON, J. ERBY; EATON, KATHRYN A.; KAUFMAN, RANDAL J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with development of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of ER stress–induced chaperone response and the orally active chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), which facilitate protein folding and reduce ER stress, in mice with colitis. METHODS We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis in mice that do not express the transcription factor ATF6α or the protein chaperone P58IPK. We examined the effects of TUDCA and PBA in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IECs); in wild-type, P58IPK−/−, and Atf6α−/− mice with colitis; and in Il10−/− mice. RESULTS P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice developed more severe colitis following administration of DSS than wild-type mice. IECs from P58IPK−/− mice had excessive ER stress, and apoptotic signaling was activated in IECs from Atf6α−/− mice. Inflammatory stimuli induced ER stress signals in cultured IECs, which were reduced by incubation with TUDCA or PBA. Oral administration of either PBA or TUDCA reduced features of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis in wild-type mice, the colitis that develops in Il10−/− mice, and DSS-induced colitis in P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice. Reduced signs of colonic inflammation in these mice were associated with significantly decreased ER stress in colonic epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS The unfolded protein response induces expression of genes that encode chaperones involved in ER protein folding; these factors prevent induction of colitis in mice. Chemical chaperones such as TUDCA and PBA alleviate different forms of colitis in mice and might be developed for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23336977

  18. Oxidative stress induces monocyte necrosis with enrichment of cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Tang

    Full Text Available In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine, gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment.

  19. Differential capacity of chaperone-rich lysates in cross-presenting human endogenous and exogenous melanoma differentiation antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleifuss, Elke; Bendz, Henriette; Sirch, Birgit; Thompson, Sylvia; Brandl, Anna; Milani, Valeria; Graner, Michael W; Drexler, Ingo; Kuppner, Maria; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Noessner, Elfriede; Issels, Rolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    The goal of immune-based tumor therapies is the activation of immune cells reactive against a broad spectrum of tumor-expressed antigens. Vaccines based on chaperone proteins appear promising as these proteins naturally exist as complexes with various protein fragments including those derived from tumor-associated antigens. Multi-chaperone systems are expected to have highest polyvalency as different chaperones can carry distinct sets of antigenic fragments. A free-solution isoelectric focusing (FS-IEF) technique was established to generate chaperone-rich cell lysates (CRCL). Results from murine systems support the contention that CRCL induce superior anti-tumor responses than single chaperone vaccines. We established an in vitro model for human melanoma to evaluate the capacity of CRCL to transfer endogenously expressed tumor antigens to the cross-presentation pathway of dendritic cells (DC) for antigen-specific T cell stimulation. CRCL prepared from human melanoma lines contained the four major chaperone proteins Hsp/Hsc70, Hsp90, Grp94/gp96 and calreticulin. The chaperones within the melanoma cell-derived CRCL were functionally active in that they enhanced cross-presentation of exogenous peptides mixed into the CRCL preparation. Superior activity was observed for Hsp70-rich CRCL obtained from heat-stressed melanoma cells. Despite the presence of active chaperones, melanoma cell-derived CRCL failed to transfer endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens to DC for cross-presentation and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) recognition, even after increasing intracellular protein levels of tumor antigen or chaperones. These findings reveal limitations of the CRCL approach regarding cross-presentation of endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens. Yet, CRCL may be utilized as vehicles to enhance the delivery of exogenous antigens for DC-mediated cross-presentation and T cell stimulation.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the interplay between hsc70 and its co-chaperone HspBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Mahboubi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chaperones and their co-factors are components of a cellular network; they collaborate to maintain proteostasis under normal and harmful conditions. In particular, hsp70 family members and their co-chaperones are essential to repair damaged proteins. Co-chaperones are present in different subcellular compartments, where they modulate chaperone activities.Methods and Results. Our studies assessed the relationship between hsc70 and its co-factor HspBP1 in human cancer cells. HspBP1 promotes nucleotide exchange on hsc70, but has also chaperone-independent functions. We characterized the interplay between hsc70 and HspBP1 by quantitative confocal microscopy combined with automated image analyses and statistical evaluation. Stress and the recovery from insult changed significantly the subcellular distribution of hsc70, but had little effect on HspBP1. Single-cell measurements and regression analysis revealed that the links between the chaperone and its co-factor relied on (i the physiological state of the cell and (ii the subcellular compartment. As such, we identified a linear relationship and strong correlation between hsc70 and HspBP1 distribution in control and heat-shocked cells; this correlation changed in a compartment-specific fashion during the recovery from stress. Furthermore, we uncovered significant stress-induced changes in the colocalization between hsc70 and HspBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm.Discussion. Our quantitative approach defined novel properties of the co-chaperone HspBP1 as they relate to its interplay with hsc70. We propose that changes in cell physiology promote chaperone redistribution and thereby stimulate chaperone-independent functions of HspBP1.

  1. Chaperone Function in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    molecular mechanism by which FKBP51 regulates AR activity. Using recombi - nant proteins, we show that FKBP51 stimulates recruitment of the cochaperone...organization that includes an N-terminal AF-1 domain, a central DNA -binding domain, a hinge region, and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). AR

  2. MITRAC7 Acts as a COX1-Specific Chaperone and Reveals a Checkpoint during Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Sven; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jans, Daniel; Hellwig, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Jakobs, Stefan; Deckers, Markus; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter

    2015-09-08

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, is assembled from mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits. The MITRAC complex represents the central assembly intermediate during this process as it receives imported subunits and regulates mitochondrial translation of COX1 mRNA. The molecular processes that promote and regulate the progression of assembly downstream of MITRAC are still unknown. Here, we identify MITRAC7 as a constituent of a late form of MITRAC and as a COX1-specific chaperone. MITRAC7 is required for cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. Surprisingly, loss of MITRAC7 or an increase in its amount causes selective cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells. We demonstrate that increased MITRAC7 levels stabilize and trap COX1 in MITRAC, blocking progression in the assembly process. In contrast, MITRAC7 deficiency leads to turnover of newly synthesized COX1. Accordingly, MITRAC7 affects the biogenesis pathway by stabilizing newly synthesized COX1 in assembly intermediates, concomitantly preventing turnover.

  3. Purification and in vitro chaperone activity of a class I small heat-shock protein abundant in recalcitrant chestnut seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collada, C; Gomez, L; Casado, R; Aragoncillo, C

    1997-09-01

    A 20-kD protein has been purified from cotyledons of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, where it accumulates at levels comparable to those of major seed storage proteins. This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources. In vitro evidence has been obtained that the isolated protein can function as a molecular chaperone; it increases, at stoichiometric levels, the renaturation yields of chemically denatured citrate synthase and also prevents the irreversible thermal inactivation of this enzyme. Although a role in desiccation tolerance has been hypothesized for seed smHSPs, this does not seem to be the case for Cs smHSP 1. We have investigated the presence of immunologically related proteins in orthodox and recalcitrant seeds of 13 woody species. Our results indicate that the presence of Cs smHSP 1-like proteins, even at high levels, is not enough to confer desiccation tolerance, and that the amount of these proteins does not furnish a reliable criterion to identify desiccation-sensitive seeds. Additional proteins or mechanisms appear necessary to keep the viability of orthodox seeds upon shedding.

  4. Sulforaphane Potentiates the Efficacy of 17-Allylamino 17-Demethoxygeldanamycin Against Pancreatic Cancer Through Enhanced Abrogation of Hsp90 Chaperone Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao; Schwartz, Steven J.; Sun, Duxin

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an essential molecular chaperone that regulates the stability of a wide range of oncogenic proteins, is a promising target for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the combination efficacy and potential mechanisms of sulforaphane, a dietary component from broccoli and broccoli sprouts, and 17-allylamino 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, in pancreatic cancer. MTS assay demonstrated that sulforaphane sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to 17-AAG in vitro. Caspase-3 was activated to 6.4-fold in response to simultaneous treatment with sulforaphane and 17-AAG, whereas 17-AAG alone induced caspase-3 activity to 2-fold compared to control. ATP binding assay and coimmunoprecipitation revealed that sulforaphane disrupted Hsp90-p50Cdc37 interaction, whereas 17-AAG inhibited ATP binding to Hsp90. Concomitant use of sulforaphane and 17-AAG synergistically downregulated Hsp90 client proteins in Mia Paca-2 cells. Co-administration of sulforaphane and 17-AAG in pancreatic cancer xenograft model led to more than 70% inhibition of the tumor growth, whereas 17-AAG alone only suppressed the tumor growth by 50%. Our data suggest that sulforaphane potentiates the efficacy of 17-AAG against pancreatic cancer through enhanced abrogation of Hsp90 function. These findings provide a rationale for further evaluation of broccoli/broccoli sprout preparations combined with 17-AAG for better efficacy and lower dose-limiting toxicity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21875325

  5. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP78/BiP Modulates Prion Propagation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Eun Kim, Gyoung; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Lee, Amy S; Hetz, Claudio; Soto, Claudio

    2017-03-23

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting several mammalian species, characterized by the accumulation of the misfolded form of the prion protein, which is followed by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). GRP78, also called BiP, is a master regulator of the UPR, reducing ER stress levels and apoptosis due to an enhancement of the cellular folding capacity. Here, we studied the role of GRP78 in prion diseases using several in vivo and in vitro approaches. Our results show that a reduction in the expression of this molecular chaperone accelerates prion pathogenesis in vivo. In addition, we observed that prion replication in cell culture was inversely related to the levels of expression of GRP78 and that both proteins interact in the cellular context. Finally, incubation of PrP(Sc) with recombinant GRP78 led to the dose-dependent reduction of protease-resistant PrP(Sc) in vitro. Our results uncover a novel role of GRP78 in reducing prion pathogenesis, suggesting that modulating its levels/activity may offer a novel opportunity for designing therapeutic approaches for these diseases. These findings may also have implications for other diseases involving the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  6. Acetobacter sicerae sp. nov., isolated from cider and kefir, and identification of species of the genus Acetobacter by dnaK, groEL and rpoB sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leilei; Wieme, Anneleen; Spitaels, Freek; Balzarini, Tom; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vuyst, Luc; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Five acetic acid bacteria isolates, awK9_3, awK9_4 ( = LMG 27543), awK9_5 ( = LMG 28092), awK9_6 and awK9_9, obtained during a study of micro-organisms present in traditionally produced kefir, were grouped on the basis of their MALDI-TOF MS profile with LMG 1530 and LMG 1531(T), two strains currently classified as members of the genus Acetobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences as well as on concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB indicated that these isolates were representatives of a single novel species together with LMG 1530 and LMG 1531(T) in the genus Acetobacter, with Acetobacter aceti, Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, Acetobacter oeni and Acetobacter estunensis as nearest phylogenetic neighbours. Pairwise similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequences between LMG 1531(T) and the type strains of the above-mentioned species were 99.7%, 99.1%, 98.4% and 98.2%, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed that status, while amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) data indicated that LMG 1531(T), LMG 1530, LMG 27543 and LMG 28092 represent at least two different strains of the novel species. The major fatty acid of LMG 1531(T) and LMG 27543 was C18 : 1ω7c. The major ubiquinone present was Q-9 and the DNA G+C contents of LMG 1531(T) and LMG 27543 were 58.3 and 56.7 mol%, respectively. The strains were able to grow on D-fructose and D-sorbitol as a single carbon source. They were also able to grow on yeast extract with 30% D-glucose and on standard medium with pH 3.6 or containing 1% NaCl. They had a weak ability to produce acid from d-arabinose. These features enabled their differentiation from their nearest phylogenetic neighbours. The name Acetobacter sicerae sp. nov. is proposed with LMG 1531(T) ( = NCIMB 8941(T)) as the type strain. © 2014 IUMS.

  7. Different contributions of HtrA protease and chaperone activities to Campylobacter jejuni stress tolerance and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Skórko-Glonek, Joanna;

    2011-01-01

    The microaerophilic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne infections in the developed world. Tolerance to environmental stress relies on proteases and chaperones in the cell envelope such as HtrA and SurA. HtrA displays both chaperone and protease activity......, but little is known about how each of these activities contributes to stress tolerance in bacteria. In vitro experiments showed temperature dependent protease and chaperone activities of C. jejuni HtrA. A C. jejuni mutant lacking only the protease activity of HtrA was used to show that the HtrA chaperone...... activity is sufficient for growth at high temperature or oxidative stress, whereas the HtrA protease activity is only essential at conditions close to the growth limit for C. jejuni. However, the protease activity was required to prevent induction of the cytoplasmic heat-shock response even at optimal...

  8. Accurate prediction of DnaK-peptide binding via homology modelling and experimental data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Van Durme

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are essential elements of the protein quality control machinery that governs translocation and folding of nascent polypeptides, refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins, and activation of a wide range of client proteins. The prokaryotic heat-shock protein DnaK is the E. coli representative of the ubiquitous Hsp70 family, which specializes in the binding of exposed hydrophobic regions in unfolded polypeptides. Accurate prediction of DnaK binding sites in E. coli proteins is an essential prerequisite to understand the precise function of this chaperone and the properties of its substrate proteins. In order to map DnaK binding sites in protein sequences, we have developed an algorithm that combines sequence information from peptide binding experiments and structural parameters from homology modelling. We show that this combination significantly outperforms either single approach. The final predictor had a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.819 when assessed over the 144 tested peptide sequences to detect true positives and true negatives. To test the robustness of the learning set, we have conducted a simulated cross-validation, where we omit sequences from the learning sets and calculate the rate of repredicting them. This resulted in a surprisingly good MCC of 0.703. The algorithm was also able to perform equally well on a blind test set of binders and non-binders, of which there was no prior knowledge in the learning sets. The algorithm is freely available at http://limbo.vib.be.

  9. Conserved region 2.1 of Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma32 is required for modulating both metabolic stability and transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Mina; Yura, Takashi; Tsuchimoto, Sachie; Fukumori, Yoshihiro; Kanemori, Masaaki

    2004-11-01

    Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma32 is rapidly degraded in vivo, with a half-life of about 1 min. A set of proteins that includes the DnaK chaperone team (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE) and ATP-dependent proteases (FtsH, HslUV, etc.) are involved in degradation of sigma32. To gain further insight into the regulation of sigma32 stability, we isolated sigma32 mutants that were markedly stabilized. Many of the mutants had amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal half (residues 47 to 55) of region 2.1, a region highly conserved among bacterial sigma factors. The half-lives ranged from about 2-fold to more than 10-fold longer than that of the wild-type protein. Besides greater stability, the levels of heat shock proteins, such as DnaK and GroEL, increased in cells producing stable sigma32. Detailed analysis showed that some stable sigma32 mutants have higher transcriptional activity than the wild type. These results indicate that the N-terminal half of region 2.1 is required for modulating both metabolic stability and the activity of sigma32. The evidence suggests that sigma32 stabilization does not result from an elevated affinity for core RNA polymerase. Region 2.1 may, therefore, be involved in interactions with the proteolytic machinery, including molecular chaperones.

  10. Evolutionary silence of the acid chaperone protein HdeB in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periplasmic chaperones HdeA and HdeB are known to be important for cell survival at low pH (pH<3) in E. coli and Shigella spp. Here we investigated the roles of these two acid chaperones in survival of various enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) following exposure to pH 2.0. Similar to K-12 strains, th...

  11. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Chingakham R. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan [University of Kansas, Del Shankel Structural Biology Center, Lawrence, KS 66047 (United States); Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P. [IMCA-CAT Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 435A, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Roelofs, Jeroen, E-mail: jroelofs@ksu.edu [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  12. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  13. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  14. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis.

  15. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  16. The Hsp90/Cdc37p chaperone system is a determinant of molybdate resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millson, Stefan H; Nuttall, James M; Mollapour, Mehdi; Piper, Peter W

    2009-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks enzymes that contain the molybdopterin co-factor and therefore any requirement for molybdenum as a trace mineral supplement. Instead, high molybdate levels are inhibitory to its growth. Low cellular levels of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an essential chaperone, were found to enhance this sensitivity to molybdate. Certain Hsp90 point mutations and co-chaperone protein defects that partially compromise the function of the Hsp90/Cdc37p chaperone system also rendered S. cerevisiae hypersensitive to high molybdate levels. Sensitivity was especially apparent with mutations close to the Hsp90 nucleotide binding site, with the loss of the non-essential co-chaperone Sti1p (the equivalent of mammalian Hop), and with the abolition of residue Ser14 phosphorylation on the essential co-chaperone Cdc37p. While it remains to be proved that these effects reflect direct inhibition of the Hsp90 of the cell by the MoO(4) (2+) oxyanion in vivo; this possibility is suggested by molybdate sensitivity arising with a mutation in the Hsp90 nucleotide binding site that does not generate stress sensitivity or an impaired stress response. Molybdate sensitivity may therefore be a useful phenotype to score when studying mutations in this chaperone system.

  17. Increased expression of Hsp40 chaperones, transcriptional factors, and ribosomal protein Rpp0 can cure yeast prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry S; Smirnov, Vladimir N; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D; Kushnirov, Vitaly V

    2002-06-28

    The Sup35 (eRF3) translation termination factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo a prion-like conformational conversion, thus resulting in the [PSI(+)] nonsense-suppressor determinant. In vivo this process depends critically on the chaperone Hsp104, whose lack or overexpression can cure [PSI(+)]. The use of artificial prion [PSI(+)PS] based on a hybrid Sup35PS with prion domain from the yeast Pichia methanolica allowed us to uncover three more chaperones, Ssb1, Ssa1, and Ydj1, whose overexpression can cure prion determinants. Here, we used the [PSI(+)PS] to search a multicopy yeast genomic library for novel factors able to cure prions. It was found that overexpression of the Hsp40 family chaperones Sis1 and Ynl077w, chaperone Sti1, transcriptional factors Sfl1 and Ssn8, and acidic ribosomal protein Rpp0 can interfere with propagation and manifestation of [PSI(+)PS] in a prion strain-specific manner. Some of these factors also affected the manifestation and propagation of conventional [PSI(+)]. Excess of Sfl1, Ssn8, and Rpp0 influenced at least one of the tested chaperone-specific promoters, SSA4, HSP104, and model promoters, with either the heat shock or stress response elements. Thus, the induction of chaperone expression by these proteins could explain their prion-curing effects.

  18. Metabolic and chaperone gene loss marks the origin of animals: evidence for Hsp104 and Hsp78 chaperones sharing mitochondrial enzymes as clients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Erives

    Full Text Available The evolution of animals involved acquisition of an emergent gene repertoire for gastrulation. Whether loss of genes also co-evolved with this developmental reprogramming has not yet been addressed. Here, we identify twenty-four genetic functions that are retained in fungi and choanoflagellates but undetectable in animals. These lost genes encode: (i sixteen distinct biosynthetic functions; (ii the two ancestral eukaryotic ClpB disaggregases, Hsp78 and Hsp104, which function in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively; and (iii six other assorted functions. We present computational and experimental data that are consistent with a joint function for the differentially localized ClpB disaggregases, and with the possibility of a shared client/chaperone relationship between the mitochondrial Fe/S homoaconitase encoded by the lost LYS4 gene and the two ClpBs. Our analyses lead to the hypothesis that the evolution of gastrulation-based multicellularity in animals led to efficient extraction of nutrients from dietary sources, loss of natural selection for maintenance of energetically expensive biosynthetic pathways, and subsequent loss of their attendant ClpB chaperones.

  19. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation.

  20. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sao, Kentaro [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Murata, Masaharu, E-mail: m-murata@dem.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hashizume, Makoto [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  1. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  2. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK facilitates its chaperone-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Raychaudhuri; Rachana Banerjee; Subhasish Mukhopadhyay; Nitai P Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Human HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast-two-hybrid Protein K) is an intrinsically unstructured chaperone-like protein with no sequence homology to known chaperones. HYPK is also known to be a part of ribosome-associated protein complex and present in polysomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the evolutionary influence on HYPK primary structure and its impact on the protein’s function. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying its importance in the structural and functional evolution. NPAA domain of human HYPK has unique amino acid composition preferring glutamic acid and happens to be more stable from a conformational point of view having higher content of -helices than the rest. Cell biology studies indicate that overexpressed C-terminal human HYPK can interact with nascent proteins, co-localizes with huntingtin, increases cell viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington’s disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required for the chaperone-like activity of HYPK in vivo. Our study suggested that by virtue of its flexibility and nascent peptide binding activity, HYPK may play an important role in assisting protein (re)folding.

  3. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  4. Efficient antibody production in the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta by overexpression of chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Baba, Satoshi; Ono, Minako; Nonaka, Koichi; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Yabuta, Masayuki; Ito, Rie; Chiba, Yasunori

    2017-08-01

    A production system for a therapeutic monoclonal antibody was developed using the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea minuta IFO10746. The genetically engineered O. minuta secreted a detectable amount of anti-TRAIL receptor antibody into the culture supernatant, and the secreted antibody was purified by multiple column chromatography steps. In the purification process, both fully and partially assembled antibodies were detected and isolated. The fully assembled antibody from O. minuta showed almost the same biological activity as that derived from mammalian cells despite the distinct glycosylation profile, whereas the partially assembled antibody showed no cytotoxic activity. To increase the production of active antibody in O. minuta, we overexpressed selected chaperone proteins (included protein disulfide isomerase (OmPDI1), thiol oxidase (OmERO1), and immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (OmKAR2)) known to assist in the proper folding (in the endoplasmic reticulum) of proteins destined for secretion. Each of these chaperones enhanced antibody secretion, and together these three factors yielded 16-fold higher antibody accumulation while increasing the ratio of the fully assembled antibody compared to that from the parental strain. Supplementation of a rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivative (R3AD_1c), an inhibitor of O-mannosylation, further increased the secretion of the correctly assembled antibody. These results indicated that the co-overexpression of chaperones is an effective way to produce the correctly assembled antibody in O. minuta. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of the Spt16 Middle Domain Reveals Functional Features of the Histone Chaperone FACT*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemble, David J.; Whitby, Frank G.; Robinson, Howard; McCullough, Laura L.; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is an essential and abundant heterodimer found in all eukaryotes. Here we report a crystal structure of the middle domain of the large subunit of FACT (Spt16-M) to reveal a double pleckstrin homology architecture. This structure was found previously in the Pob3-M domain of the small subunit of FACT and in the related histone chaperone Rtt106, although Spt16-M is distinguished from these structures by the presence of an extended α-helix and a C-terminal addition. Consistent with our finding that the double pleckstrin homology structure is common to these three histone chaperones and reports that Pob3 and Rtt106 double pleckstrin homology domains bind histones H3-H4, we also find that Spt16-M binds H3-H4 with low micromolar affinity. Our structure provides a framework for interpreting a large body of genetic data regarding the physiological functions of FACT, including the identification of potential interaction surfaces for binding histones or other proteins. PMID:23417676

  6. The yeast histone chaperone hif1p functions with RNA in nucleosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Knapp

    Full Text Available Hif1p is an H3/H4-specific histone chaperone that associates with the nuclear form of the Hat1p/Hat2p complex (NuB4 complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While not capable of depositing histones onto DNA on its own, Hif1p can act in conjunction with a yeast cytosolic extract to assemble nucleosomes onto a relaxed circular plasmid.To identify the factor(s that function with Hif1p to carry out chromatin assembly, multiple steps of column chromatography were carried out to fractionate the yeast cytosolic extract. Analysis of partially purified fractions indicated that Hif1p-dependent chromatin assembly activity resided in RNA rather than protein. Fractionation of isolated RNA indicated that the chromatin assembly activity did not simply purify with bulk RNA. In addition, the RNA-mediated chromatin assembly activity was blocked by mutations in the human homolog of Hif1p, sNASP, that prevent the association of this histone chaperone with histone H3 and H4 without altering its electrostatic properties.These results suggest that specific RNA species may function in concert with histone chaperones to assemble chromatin.

  7. Structures of GRP94-Nucleotide Complexes Reveal Mechanistic Differences Between the Hsp90 Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollins, D.E.; Warren, J.J.; Immormino, R.M.; Gewirth, D.T.

    2009-06-02

    GRP94, an essential endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, is required for the conformational maturation of proteins destined for cell-surface display or export. The extent to which GRP94 and its cytosolic paralog, Hsp90, share a common mechanism remains controversial. GRP94 has not been shown conclusively to hydrolyze ATP or bind cochaperones, and both activities, by contrast, result in conformational changes and N-terminal dimerization in Hsp90 that are critical for its function. Here, we report the 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of mammalian GRP94 in complex with AMPPNP and ADP. The chaperone is conformationally insensitive to the identity of the bound nucleotide, adopting a 'twisted V' conformation that precludes N-terminal domain dimerization. We also present conclusive evidence that GRP94 possesses ATPase activity. Our observations provide a structural explanation for GRP94's observed rate of ATP hydrolysis and suggest a model for the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the GRP94 chaperone cycle.

  8. Progress and potential of non-inhibitory small molecule chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease and its implications for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Olive; Patnaik, Samarjit; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen; Westbroek, Wendy

    2016-05-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by pathological mutations GBA1, encodes the lysosome-resident enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves glucosylceramide into glucose and ceramide. In Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of substrate, primarily in cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Gaucher disease has broad clinical heterogeneity, and mutations in GBA1 are a risk factor for the development of different synucleinopathies. Insights into the cell biology and biochemistry of glucocerebrosidase have led to new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease including small chemical chaperones. Such chaperones facilitate proper enzyme folding and translocation to lysosomes, thereby preventing premature breakdown of the enzyme in the proteasome. This review discusses recent progress in developing chemical chaperones as a therapy for Gaucher disease, with implications for the treatment of synucleinopathies. It focuses on the development of non-inhibitory glucocerebrosidase chaperones and their therapeutic advantages over inhibitory chaperones, as well as the challenges involved in identifying and validating chemical chaperones.

  9. In silico identification of potential chaperone genes that belong to type III and type IV secretion systems in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Khater

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretion of bacterial virulence factors and flagellar components requires the assistance of specific type III and flagellar chaperones. Standard computational annotation of the genome of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri, a plant pathogen that causes citrus canker, initially did not identify any genes belonging to these chaperone categories since the primary sequence homology between them was very low. However, in a search for hypothetical proteins with characteristics similar to these chaperones, we have now identified 30 chromosomal and 10 plasmidial potential genes encoding chaperones belonging to types III/IV, and flagellar secretion systems in this organism. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  10. A Glutaredoxin·BolA Complex Serves as an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Chaperone for the Cytosolic Cluster Assembly Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Avery G; Palenchar, Daniel J; Wildemann, Justin D; Philpott, Caroline C

    2016-10-21

    Cells contain hundreds of proteins that require iron cofactors for activity. Iron cofactors are synthesized in the cell, but the pathways involved in distributing heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and ferrous/ferric ions to apoproteins remain incompletely defined. In particular, cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins and BolA-like proteins have been identified as [2Fe-2S]-coordinating complexes in vitro and iron-regulatory proteins in fungi, but it is not clear how these proteins function in mammalian systems or how this complex might affect Fe-S proteins or the cytosolic Fe-S assembly machinery. To explore these questions, we use quantitative immunoprecipitation and live cell proximity-dependent biotinylation to monitor interactions between Glrx3, BolA2, and components of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly system. We characterize cytosolic Glrx3·BolA2 as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex in human cells. Unlike complexes formed by fungal orthologs, human Glrx3-BolA2 interaction required the coordination of Fe-S clusters, whereas Glrx3 homodimer formation did not. Cellular Glrx3·BolA2 complexes increased 6-8-fold in response to increasing iron, forming a rapidly expandable pool of Fe-S clusters. Fe-S coordination by Glrx3·BolA2 did not depend on Ciapin1 or Ciao1, proteins that bind Glrx3 and are involved in cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly and distribution. Instead, Glrx3 and BolA2 bound and facilitated Fe-S incorporation into Ciapin1, a [2Fe-2S] protein functioning early in the cytosolic Fe-S assembly pathway. Thus, Glrx3·BolA is a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex capable of transferring [2Fe-2S] clusters to apoproteins in human cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Indole and synthetic derivative activate chaperone expression to reduce polyQ aggregation in SCA17 neuronal cell and slice culture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pin-Jui Kung,1,* Yu-Chen Tao,1,* Ho-Chiang Hsu,1 Wan-Ling Chen,1 Te-Hsien Lin,1 Donala Janreddy,2 Ching-Fa Yao,2 Kuo-Hsuan Chang,3 Jung-Yaw Lin,1 Ming-Tsan Su,1 Chung-Hsin Wu,1 Guey-Jen Lee-Chen,1 Hsiu-Mei Hsieh-Li1 1Department of Life Science, 2Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, the expansion of a translated CAG repeat in the TATA box binding protein (TBP gene results in a long polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the TBP protein, leading to intracellular accumulation of aggregated TBP and cell death. The molecular chaperones act in preventing protein aggregation to ameliorate downstream harmful events. In this study, we used Tet-On SH-SY5Y cells with inducible SCA17 TBP/Q79-green fluorescent protein (GFP expression to test indole and synthetic derivative NC001-8 for neuroprotection. We found that indole and NC001-8 up-regulated chaperone expression to reduce polyQ aggregation in neuronal differentiated TBP/Q79 cells. The effects on promoting neurite outgrowth and on reduction of aggregation on Purkinje cells were also confirmed with cerebellar primary and slice cultures of SCA17 transgenic mice. Our results demonstrate how indole and derivative NC001-8 reduce polyQ aggregation to support their therapeutic potentials in SCA17 treatment. Keywords: spinocerebellar ataxia type 17, TATA box binding protein, polyQ aggregation, indole and derivative, therapeutics

  12. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression.

  13. Enhanced expression of membrane proteins in E. coli with a PBAD promoter mutant: synergies with chaperone pathway engineering strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannenga Brent L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins (MPs populate 20-30% of genomes sequenced to date and hold potential as therapeutic targets as well as for practical applications in bionanotechnology. However, MP toxicity and low yields in normally robust expression hosts such as E. coli has curtailed progress in our understanding of their structure and function. Results Using the seven transmembrane segments H. turkmenica deltarhodopsin (HtdR as a reporter, we isolated a spontaneous mutant in the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter leading to improved cell growth and a twofold increase in the recovery of active HtdR at 37°C. A single transversion in a conserved region of the cyclic AMP receptor protein binding site caused the phenotype by reducing htdR transcript levels by 65%. When the mutant promoter was used in conjunction with a host lacking the molecular chaperone Trigger Factor (Δtig cells, toxicity was further suppressed and the amount of correctly folded HtdR was 4-fold that present in the membranes of control cells. More importantly, while improved growth barely compensated for the reduction in transcription rates when another polytopic membrane protein (N. pharonis sensory rhodopsin II was expressed under control of the mutant promoter in wild type cells, a 4-fold increase in productivity could be achieved in a Δtig host. Conclusions Our system, which combines a downregulated version of the tightly repressed PBAD promoter with a TF-deficient host may prove a valuable alternative to T7-based expression for the production of membrane proteins that have so far remained elusive targets.

  14. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  15. Inducible Hsp70 in the Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival: Analysis of Chaperone Induction, Expression and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Zorzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that control stress is central to realize how cells respond to environmental and physiological insults. All the more important is to reveal how tumour cells withstand their harsher growth conditions and cope with drug-induced apoptosis, since resistance to chemotherapy is the foremost complication when curing cancer. Intensive research on tumour biology over the past number of years has provided significant insights into the molecular events that occur during oncogenesis, and resistance to anti-cancer drugs has been shown to often rely on stress response and expression of inducible heat shock proteins (HSPs. However, with respect to the mechanisms guarding cancer cells against proteotoxic stresses and the modulatory effects that allow their survival, much remains to be defined. Heat shock proteins are molecules responsible for folding newly synthesized polypeptides under physiological conditions and misfolded proteins under stress, but their role in maintaining the transformed phenotype often goes beyond their conventional chaperone activity. Expression of inducible HSPs is known to correlate with limited sensitivity to apoptosis induced by diverse cytotoxic agents and dismal prognosis of several tumour types, however whether cancer cells survive because of the constitutive expression of heat shock proteins or the ability to induce them when adapting to the hostile microenvironment remains to be elucidated. Clear is that tumours appear nowadays more “addicted” to heat shock proteins than previously envisaged, and targeting HSPs represents a powerful approach and a future challenge for sensitizing tumours to therapy. This review will focus on the anti-apoptotic role of heat shock 70kDa protein (Hsp70, and how regulatory factors that control inducible Hsp70 synthesis, expression and activity may be relevant for response to stress and survival of cancer cells.

  16. Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis Chaperones: Evidence for Emergence of Mutational Robustness of a Highly Specific Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delewski, Wojciech; Paterkiewicz, Bogumiła; Manicki, Mateusz; Schilke, Brenda; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Nierzwicki, Lukasz; Czub, Jacek; Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2016-03-01

    Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters (FeS) is a highly conserved process involving Hsp70 and J-protein chaperones. However, Hsp70 specialization differs among species. In most eukaryotes, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, FeS biogenesis involves interaction between the J-protein Jac1 and the multifunctional Hsp70 Ssc1. But, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and closely related species, Jac1 interacts with the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, which emerged through duplication of SSC1. As little is known about how gene duplicates affect the robustness of their protein interaction partners, we analyzed the functional and evolutionary consequences of Ssq1 specialization on the ubiquitous J-protein cochaperone Jac1, by comparing S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Although deletion of JAC1 is lethal in both species, alanine substitutions within the conserved His-Pro-Asp (HPD) motif, which is critical for Jac1:Hsp70 interaction, have species-specific effects. They are lethal in S. pombe, but not in S. cerevisiae. These in vivo differences correlated with in vitro biochemical measurements. Charged residues present in the J-domain of S. cerevisiae Jac1, but absent in S. pombe Jac1, are important for tolerance of S. cerevisiae Jac1 to HPD alterations. Moreover, Jac1 orthologs from species that encode Ssq1 have a higher sequence divergence. The simplest interpretation of our results is that Ssq1's coevolution with Jac1 resulted in expansion of their binding interface, thus increasing the efficiency of their interaction. Such an expansion could in turn compensate for negative effects of HPD substitutions. Thus, our results support the idea that the robustness of Jac1 emerged as consequence of its highly efficient and specific interaction with Ssq1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    ABSTRACT

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains ofEscherichia coliuse this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function.

    IMPORTANCEPili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. UropathogenicE. colirelies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to

  18. Tah1 helix-swap dimerization prevents mixed Hsp90 co-chaperone complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Pal, Mohinder; Roe, S. Mark; Pearl, Laurence H., E-mail: laurence.pearl@sussex.ac.uk; Prodromou, Chrisostomos, E-mail: laurence.pearl@sussex.ac.uk [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    A helix swap involving the fifth helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules restores the normal binding environment of the conserved MEEVD peptide of Hsp90. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes with Hsp90 and Tah1. Specific co-chaperone adaptors facilitate the recruitment of client proteins to the Hsp90 system. Tah1 binds the C-terminal conserved MEEVD motif of Hsp90, thus linking an eclectic set of client proteins to the R2TP complex for their assembly and regulation by Hsp90. Rather than the normal complement of seven α-helices seen in other tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, Tah1 unusually consists of the first five only. Consequently, the methionine of the MEEVD peptide remains exposed to solvent when bound by Tah1. In solution Tah1 appears to be predominantly monomeric, and recent structures have failed to explain how Tah1 appears to prevent the formation of mixed TPR domain-containing complexes such as Cpr6–(Hsp90){sub 2}–Tah1. To understand this further, the crystal structure of Tah1 in complex with the MEEVD peptide of Hsp90 was determined, which shows a helix swap involving the fifth α-helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules. Dimerization of Tah1 restores the normal binding environment of the bound Hsp90 methionine residue by reconstituting a TPR binding site similar to that in seven-helix-containing TPR domain proteins. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes.

  19. Chaperone therapy for homocystinuria: the rescue of CBS mutations by heme arginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenovská, Petra; Kopecká, Jana; Krijt, Jakub; Hnízda, Aleš; Raková, Kateřina; Janošík, Miroslav; Wilcken, Bridget; Kožich, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Classical homocystinuria is caused by mutations in the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) gene. Previous experiments in bacterial and yeast cells showed that many mutant CBS enzymes misfold and that chemical chaperones enable proper folding of a number of mutations. In the present study, we tested the extent of misfolding of 27 CBS mutations previously tested in E. coli under the more folding-permissive conditions of mammalian CHO-K1 cells and the ability of chaperones to rescue the conformation of these mutations. Expression of mutations in mammalian cells increased the median activity 16-fold and the amount of tetramers 3.2-fold compared with expression in bacteria. Subsequently, we tested the responses of seven selected mutations to three compounds with chaperone-like activity. Aminooxyacetic acid and 4-phenylbutyric acid exhibited only a weak effect. In contrast, heme arginate substantially increased the formation of mutant CBS protein tetramers (up to sixfold) and rescued catalytic activity (up to ninefold) of five out of seven mutations (p.A114V, p.K102N, p.R125Q, p.R266K, and p.R369C). The greatest effect of heme arginate was observed for the mutation p.R125Q, which is non-responsive to in vivo treatment with vitamin B(6). Moreover, the heme responsiveness of the p.R125Q mutation was confirmed in fibroblasts derived from a patient homozygous for this genetic variant. Based on these data, we propose that a distinct group of heme-responsive CBS mutations may exist and that the heme pocket of CBS may become an important target for designing novel therapies for homocystinuria.

  20. Chaperone-dependent E3 ligase CHIP ubiquitinates and mediates proteasomal degradation of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Zeng, Jingmin; Antonova, Galina N; Snead, Connie; Venema, Richard C; Fulton, David; Qian, Shuibing; Patterson, Cam; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Catravas, John D

    2007-11-01

    The nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) exists in multimeric protein complexes, including heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Inhibition of HSP90 by geldanamycin causes proteasomal degradation of sGC protein. In this study, we have investigated whether COOH terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP), a co-chaperone molecule that is involved in protein folding but is also a chaperone-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase, could play a role in the process of degradation of sGC. Transient overexpression of CHIP in COS-7 cells degraded heterologous sGC in a concentration-related manner; this downregulation of sGC was abrogated by the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Transfection of tetratricopeptide repeats and U-box domain CHIP mutants attenuated sGC degradation, suggesting that both domains are indispensable for CHIP function. Results from immunoprecipitation and indirect immunofluorescent microscopy experiments demonstrated that CHIP is associated with sGC, HSP90, and HSP70 in COS-7 cells. Furthermore, CHIP increased the association of HSP70 with sGC. In in vitro ubiquitination assays using purified proteins and ubiquitin enzymes, E3 ligase CHIP directly ubiquitinated sGC; this ubiquitination was potentiated by geldanamycin in COS-7 cells, followed by proteasomal degradation. In rat aortic smooth muscle cells, endogenous sGC was also degraded by adenovirus-infected wild-type CHIP but not by the chaperone interaction-deficient K30A CHIP, whereas CHIP, but not K30A, attenuated sGC expression in, and nitric oxide donor-induced relaxation of, rat aortic rings, suggesting that CHIP plays a regulatory role under physiological conditions. This study reveals a new mechanism for the regulation of sGC, an important mediator of cellular and vascular function.

  1. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  2. HSP33 in eukaryotes - an evolutionary tale of a chaperone adapted to photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2015-06-01

    HSP33 was originally identified in bacteria as a redox-sensitive chaperone that protects unfolded proteins from aggregation. Here, we describe a eukaryote ortholog of HSP33 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which appears to play a protective role under light-induced oxidizing conditions. The algal HSP33 exhibits chaperone activity, as shown by citrate synthase aggregation assays. Studies from the Jakob laboratory established that activation of the bacterial HSP33 upon its oxidation initiates by the release of pre-bound Zn from the well conserved Zn-binding motif Cys-X-Cys-Xn -Cys-X-X-Cys, and is followed by significant structural changes (Reichmann et al., ). Unlike the bacterial protein, the HSP33 from C. reinhardtii had lost the first cysteine residue of its center, diminishing Zn-binding activity under all conditions. As a result, the algal protein can be easily activated by minor structural changes in response to oxidation and/or excess heat. An attempt to restore the missing first cysteine did not have a major effect on Zn-binding and on the mode of activation. Replacement of all remaining cysteines abolished completely any residual Zn binding, although the chaperone activation was maintained. A phylogenetic analysis of the algal HSP33 showed that it clusters with the cyanobacterial protein, in line with its biochemical localization to the chloroplast. Indeed, expression of the algal HSP33 increases in response to light-induced oxidative stress, which is experienced routinely by photosynthetic organisms. Despite the fact that no ortholog could be found in higher eukaryotes, its abundance in all algal species examined could have a biotechnological relevance.

  3. Lack of the RNA chaperone hfq attenuates pathogenicity of several Escherichia coli pathotypes towards Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Jakobsen, Henrik; Struve, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    as a model for virulence characterization and screening for novel antimicrobial entities. Several E. coli human pathotypes are also pathogenic towards C. elegans, and we show here that lack of the RNA chaperone Hfq significantly reduces pathogenicity of VTEC, EAEC, and UPEC in the nematode model. Thus, Hfq...... is intrinsically essential to pathogenic E. coli for survival and virulence exerted in the C. elegans host.......Escherichia coli is an important agent of Gram-negative bacterial infections worldwide, being one of the leading causes of diarrhoea and urinary tract infections. Strategies to understand pathogenesis and develop therapeutic compounds include the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans...

  4. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant ...

  5. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; (Harvard-Med); (Brandeis)

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  6. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  7. Targeting Hsp90-Cdc37: a promising therapeutic strategy by inhibiting Hsp90 chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Li; Gu, Kai; Xu, Xiao-Li; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-05-27

    The Hsp90 chaperone protein regulates the folding, maturation and stability of a wide variety of oncoproteins. In recent years, many Hsp90 inhibitors have entered into the clinical trials while all of them target ATPase showing similar binding capacity and kinds of side-effects so that none have reached to the market. During the regulation progress, numerous protein-protein interactions (PPI) such as Hsp90 and client proteins or cochaperones are involved. With the Hsp90-cochaperones PPI networks being more and more clear, many cancerous proteins have been reported to be tightly correlated to Hsp90-cochaperones PPI. Among them, Hsp90-Cdc37 PPI has been widely reported to associate with numerous protein kinases, making it a novel target for the treatment of cancers. In this paper, we briefly review the strategies and modulators targeting Hsp90-Cdc37 complex including direct and indirect regulation mechanism. Through these discussions we expect to present inspirations for new insights into an alternative way to inhibit Hsp90 chaperone function.

  8. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. © FASEB.

  9. Streptococcus mutans copper chaperone, CopZ, is critical for biofilm formation and competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S S; Du, Q; Wu, H

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is a dynamic environment characterized by hundreds of bacterial species, saliva, and an influx of nutrients and metal ions such as copper. Although there is a physiologic level of copper in the saliva, the oral cavity is often challenged with an influx of copper ions. At high concentrations copper is toxic and must therefore be strictly regulated by pathogens for them to persist and cause disease. The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans manages excess copper using the copYAZ operon that encodes a negative DNA-binding repressor (CopY), the P1-ATPase copper exporter (CopA), and the copper chaperone (CopZ). These hypothetical roles of the copYAZ operon in regulation and copper transport to receptors led us to investigate their contribution to S. mutans virulence. Mutants defective in the copper chaperone CopZ, but not CopY or CopA, were impaired in biofilm formation and competitiveness against commensal streptococci. Characterization of the CopZ mutant biofilm revealed a decreased secretion of glucosyltransferases and reduced expression of mutacin genes. These data suggest that the function of copZ on biofilm and competitiveness is independent of copper resistance and CopZ is a global regulator for biofilm and other virulence factors. Further characterization of CopZ may lead to the identification of new biofilm pathways. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Contributions of chaperone and glycosyltransferase activities of O-fucosyltransferase 1 to Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine Kenneth D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-fucosyltransferase1 (OFUT1 is a conserved ER protein essential for Notch signaling. OFUT1 glycosylates EGF domains, which can then be further modified by the N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe. OFUT1 also possesses a chaperone activity that promotes the folding and secretion of Notch. Here, we investigate the respective contributions of these activities to Notch signaling in Drosophila. Results We show that expression of an isoform lacking fucosyltransferase activity, Ofut1R245A, rescues the requirement for Ofut1 in embryonic neurogenesis. Lack of requirement for O-fucosylation is further supported by the absence of embryonic phenotypes in Gmd mutants, which lack all forms of fucosylation. Requirements for O-fucose during imaginal development were evaluated by characterizing clones of cells expressing only Ofut1R245A. These clones phenocopy fringe mutant clones, indicating that the absence of O-fucose is functionally equivalent to the absence of elongated O-fucose. Conclusion Our results establish that Notch does not need to be O-fucosylated for fringe-independent Notch signaling in Drosophila; the chaperone activity of OFUT1 is sufficient for the generation of functional Notch.

  11. The CENP-T/-W complex is a binding partner of the histone chaperone FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Lisa; Müller, Sebastian; Liu, Yiwei; Huang, Hongda; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Vassias, Isabelle; Patel, Dinshaw J; Sullivan, Kevin F; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-06-01

    The CENP-T/-W histone fold complex, as an integral part of the inner kinetochore, is essential for building a proper kinetochore at the centromere in order to direct chromosome segregation during mitosis. Notably, CENP-T/-W is not inherited at centromeres, and new deposition is absolutely required at each cell cycle for kinetochore function. However, the mechanisms underlying this new deposition of CENP-T/-W at centromeres are unclear. Here, we found that CENP-T deposition at centromeres is uncoupled from DNA synthesis. We identified Spt16 and SSRP1, subunits of the H2A-H2B histone chaperone facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT), as CENP-W binding partners through a proteomic screen. We found that the C-terminal region of Spt16 binds specifically to the histone fold region of CENP-T/-W. Furthermore, depletion of Spt16 impairs CENP-T and CENP-W deposition at endogenous centromeres, and site-directed targeting of Spt16 alone is sufficient to ensure local de novo CENP-T accumulation. We propose a model in which the FACT chaperone stabilizes the soluble CENP-T/-W complex in the cell and promotes dynamics of exchange, enabling CENP-T/-W deposition at centromeres.

  12. Heterologous gln/asn-rich proteins impede the propagation of yeast prions by altering chaperone availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi; Hong, Joo Y; Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating conformations of proteins that can cause heritable phenotypic traits. Most yeast prions contain glutamine (Q)/asparagine (N)-rich domains that facilitate the accumulation of the protein into amyloid-like aggregates. Efficient transmission of these infectious aggregates to daughter cells requires that chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, continually sever the aggregates into smaller "seeds." We previously identified 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains that, when overproduced, facilitate the de novo aggregation of the Sup35 protein into the [PSI(+)] prion state. Here, we show that overexpression of many of the same 11 Q/N-rich proteins can also destabilize pre-existing [PSI(+)] or [URE3] prions. We explore in detail the events leading to the loss (curing) of [PSI(+)] by the overexpression of one of these proteins, the Q/N-rich domain of Pin4, which causes Sup35 aggregates to increase in size and decrease in transmissibility to daughter cells. We show that the Pin4 Q/N-rich domain sequesters Hsp104 and Sis1 chaperones away from the diffuse cytoplasmic pool. Thus, a mechanism by which heterologous Q/N-rich proteins impair prion propagation appears to be the loss of cytoplasmic Hsp104 and Sis1 available to sever [PSI(+)].

  13. Hsp40s specify functions of Hsp104 and Hsp90 protein chaperone machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reidy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hsp100 family chaperones of microorganisms and plants cooperate with the Hsp70/Hsp40/NEF system to resolubilize and reactivate stress-denatured proteins. In yeast this machinery also promotes propagation of prions by fragmenting prion polymers. We previously showed the bacterial Hsp100 machinery cooperates with the yeast Hsp40 Ydj1 to support yeast thermotolerance and with the yeast Hsp40 Sis1 to propagate [PSI+] prions. Here we find these Hsp40s similarly directed specific activities of the yeast Hsp104-based machinery. By assessing the ability of Ydj1-Sis1 hybrid proteins to complement Ydj1 and Sis1 functions we show their C-terminal substrate-binding domains determined distinctions in these and other cellular functions of Ydj1 and Sis1. We find propagation of [URE3] prions was acutely sensitive to alterations in Sis1 activity, while that of [PIN+] prions was less sensitive than [URE3], but more sensitive than [PSI+]. These findings support the ideas that overexpressing Ydj1 cures [URE3] by competing with Sis1 for interaction with the Hsp104-based disaggregation machine, and that different prions rely differently on activity of this machinery, which can explain the various ways they respond to alterations in chaperone function.

  14. Heterologous gln/asn-rich proteins impede the propagation of yeast prions by altering chaperone availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yang

    Full Text Available Prions are self-propagating conformations of proteins that can cause heritable phenotypic traits. Most yeast prions contain glutamine (Q/asparagine (N-rich domains that facilitate the accumulation of the protein into amyloid-like aggregates. Efficient transmission of these infectious aggregates to daughter cells requires that chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, continually sever the aggregates into smaller "seeds." We previously identified 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains that, when overproduced, facilitate the de novo aggregation of the Sup35 protein into the [PSI(+] prion state. Here, we show that overexpression of many of the same 11 Q/N-rich proteins can also destabilize pre-existing [PSI(+] or [URE3] prions. We explore in detail the events leading to the loss (curing of [PSI(+] by the overexpression of one of these proteins, the Q/N-rich domain of Pin4, which causes Sup35 aggregates to increase in size and decrease in transmissibility to daughter cells. We show that the Pin4 Q/N-rich domain sequesters Hsp104 and Sis1 chaperones away from the diffuse cytoplasmic pool. Thus, a mechanism by which heterologous Q/N-rich proteins impair prion propagation appears to be the loss of cytoplasmic Hsp104 and Sis1 available to sever [PSI(+].

  15. A Salmonella type three secretion effector/chaperone complex adopts a hexameric ring-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Pierre; Dewitte, Frédérique; Villeret, Vincent; Biondi, Emanuele G; Bompard, Coralie

    2015-02-15

    Many bacterial pathogens use type three secretion systems (T3SS) to inject virulence factors, named effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Most of the T3SS components are conserved among plant and animal pathogens, suggesting a common mechanism of recognition and secretion of effectors. However, no common motif has yet been identified for effectors allowing T3SS recognition. In this work, we performed a biochemical and structural characterization of the Salmonella SopB/SigE chaperone/effector complex by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results showed that the SopB/SigE complex is assembled in dynamic homohexameric-ring-shaped structures with an internal tunnel. In this ring, the chaperone maintains a disordered N-terminal end of SopB molecules, in a good position to be reached and processed by the T3SS. This ring dimensionally fits the ring-organized molecules of the injectisome, including ATPase hexameric rings; this organization suggests that this structural feature is important for ATPase recognition by T3SS. Our work constitutes the first evidence of the oligomerization of an effector, analogous to the organization of the secretion machinery, obtained in solution. As effectors share neither sequence nor structural identity, the quaternary oligomeric structure could constitute a strategy evolved to promote the specificity and efficiency of T3SS recognition.

  16. Histone Chaperone FACT Coordinates Nucleosome Interaction through Multiple Synergistic Binding Events*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Duane D.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Hieb, Aaron R.; Luger, Karolin

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA maintenance requires ordered disassembly and re-assembly of chromatin templates. These processes are highly regulated and require extrinsic factors such as chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones. The histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a large heterodimeric complex with roles in transcription, replication, and repair. FACT promotes and subsequently restricts access to DNA as a result of dynamic nucleosome reorganization. However, until now, there lacked a truly quantitative assessment of the critical contacts mediating FACT function. Here, we demonstrate that FACT binds histones, DNA, and intact nucleosomes at nanomolar concentrations. We also determine roles for the histone tails in free histone and nucleosome binding by FACT. Furthermore, we propose that the conserved acidic C-terminal domain of the FACT subunit Spt16 actively displaces nucleosomal DNA to provide access to the histone octamer. Experiments with tri-nucleosome arrays indicate a possible mode for FACT binding within chromatin. Together, the data reveal that specific FACT subunits synchronize interactions with various target sites on individual nucleosomes to generate a high affinity binding event and promote reorganization. PMID:21969370

  17. Histone chaperone FACT coordinates nucleosome interaction through multiple synergistic binding events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Duane D; Muthurajan, Uma M; Hieb, Aaron R; Luger, Karolin

    2011-12-02

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA maintenance requires ordered disassembly and re-assembly of chromatin templates. These processes are highly regulated and require extrinsic factors such as chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones. The histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a large heterodimeric complex with roles in transcription, replication, and repair. FACT promotes and subsequently restricts access to DNA as a result of dynamic nucleosome reorganization. However, until now, there lacked a truly quantitative assessment of the critical contacts mediating FACT function. Here, we demonstrate that FACT binds histones, DNA, and intact nucleosomes at nanomolar concentrations. We also determine roles for the histone tails in free histone and nucleosome binding by FACT. Furthermore, we propose that the conserved acidic C-terminal domain of the FACT subunit Spt16 actively displaces nucleosomal DNA to provide access to the histone octamer. Experiments with tri-nucleosome arrays indicate a possible mode for FACT binding within chromatin. Together, the data reveal that specific FACT subunits synchronize interactions with various target sites on individual nucleosomes to generate a high affinity binding event and promote reorganization.

  18. Crystal Structure and Function of Human Nucleoplasmin (Npm2): A Histone Chaperone in Oocytes and Embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O Platonova; I Akey; J Head; C Akey

    2011-12-31

    Human Npm2 is an ortholog of Xenopus nucleoplasmin (Np), a chaperone that binds histones. We have determined the crystal structure of a truncated Npm2-core at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and show that the N-terminal domains of Npm2 and Np form similar pentamers. This allowed us to model an Npm2 decamer which may be formed by hydrogen bonds between quasi-conserved residues in the interface between two pentamers. Interestingly, the Npm2 pentamer lacks a prototypical A1-acidic tract in each of its subunits. This feature may be responsible for the inability of Npm2-core to bind histones. However, Npm2 with a large acidic tract in its C-terminal tail (Npm2-A2) is able to bind histones and form large complexes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments and biochemical analysis of loop mutations support the premise that nucleoplasmins form decamers when they bind H2A-H2B dimers and H3-H4 tetramers simultaneously. In the absence of histone tetramers, these chaperones bind H2A-H2B dimers with a single pentamer forming the central hub. When taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism of histone binding by nucleoplasmins.

  19. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2011-09-20

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant proteins derived from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The contacts of Scm3 with Cse4 explain its selectivity for the centromere-specific histone; key residues at the interface are conserved in HJURP, indicating a common mechanism for centromeric-histone deposition. We also report the structure of a (Cse4 : H4)2 heterotetramer; comparison with the structure of the Scm3:Cse4:H4 complex shows that tetramer formation and DNA-binding require displacement of Scm3 from the nucleosome core. The two structures together suggest that specific contacts between the chaperone and Cse4, rather than an altered overall structure of the nucleosome core, determine the selective presence of Cse4 at centromeres.

  20. In vivo Study of the Histone Chaperone Activity of Nucleolin by FRAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is a major nucleolar protein involved in various aspects of ribosome biogenesis such as regulation of polymerase I transcription, pre-RNA maturation, and ribosome assembly. Nucleolin is also present in the nucleoplasm suggesting that its functions are not restricted to nucleoli. Nucleolin possesses, in vitro, chromatin co-remodeler and histone chaperone activities which could explain numerous functions of nucleolin related to the regulation of gene expression. The goal of this report was to investigate the consequences of nucleolin depletion on the dynamics of histones in live cells. Changes in histone dynamics occurring in nucleolin silenced cells were measured by FRAP experiments on eGFP-tagged histones (H2B, H4, and macroH2A. We found that nuclear histone dynamics was impacted in nucleolin silenced cells; in particular we measured higher fluorescence recovery kinetics for macroH2A and H2B but not for H4. Interestingly, we showed that nucleolin depletion also impacted the dissociation constant rate of H2B and H4. Thus, in live cells, nucleolin could play a role in chromatin accessibility by its histone chaperone and co-remodeling activities.

  1. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented.

  2. The archaic chaperone-usher pathways may depend on donor strand exchange for intersubunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Shihui; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Subunit-subunit interactions of the classical and alternate chaperone-usher (CU) systems have been shown to proceed through a donor strand exchange (DSE) mechanism. However, it is not known whether DSE is required for intersubunit interactions in the archaic CU system. We have previously shown that the Myxococcus xanthus Mcu system, a member of the archaic CU family that functions in spore coat formation, is likely to use the principle of donor strand complementation to medicate chaperone-subunit interactions analogous to the classical CU pathway. Here we describe the results of studies on Mcu subunit-subunit interactions. We constructed a series of N-terminal-deleted, single amino acid-mutated and donor strand-complemented Mcu subunits, and characterized their abilities to participate in subunit-subunit interactions. It appears that certain residues in both the N and C termini of McuA, a subunit of the Mcu system, play a critical role in intersubunit interactions and these interactions may involve the general principle of DSE of the classical and alternate CU systems. In addition, the specificity of the M. xanthus CU system for Mcu subunits over other spore coat proteins is demonstrated.

  3. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ranieri-Raggi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua(μ-carboxylatodizinc(II core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated.

  4. Acetylation-induced TDP-43 pathology is suppressed by an HSF1-dependent chaperone program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Wander, Connor M; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Bereman, Michael S; Cohen, Todd J

    2017-07-19

    TDP-43 pathology marks a spectrum of multisystem proteinopathies including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Surprisingly, it has been challenging to recapitulate this pathology, highlighting an incomplete understanding of TDP-43 regulatory mechanisms. Here we provide evidence supporting TDP-43 acetylation as a trigger for disease pathology. Using cultured cells and mouse skeletal muscle, we show that TDP-43 acetylation-mimics promote TDP-43 phosphorylation and ubiquitination, perturb mitochondria, and initiate degenerative inflammatory responses that resemble sporadic inclusion body myositis pathology. Analysis of functionally linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins revealed recruitment of p62, ubiquilin-2, and optineurin to TDP-43 aggregates. We demonstrate that TDP-43 acetylation-mimic pathology is potently suppressed by an HSF1-dependent mechanism that disaggregates TDP-43. Our study illustrates bidirectional TDP-43 processing in which TDP-43 aggregation is targeted by a coordinated chaperone response. Thus, activation or restoration of refolding mechanisms may alleviate TDP-43 aggregation in tissues that are uniquely susceptible to TDP-43 proteinopathies.TDP-43 aggregation is linked to various diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here the authors show that acetylation of the protein triggers TDP-43 pathology in cultured cells and mouse skeletal muscle, which can be cleared through an HSF1-dependent chaperone mechanism that disaggregates the protein.

  5. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

  6. Improvement of the crystallizability and expression of an RNA crystallization chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, P.; Heroux, A.; Ye, J.-D.

    2011-11-01

    Crystallizing RNA has been an imperative and challenging task in the world of RNA research. Assistive methods such as chaperone-assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), employing monoclonal antibody fragments (Fabs) as crystallization chaperones have enabled us to obtain RNA crystal structures by forming crystal contacts and providing initial phasing information. Despite the early successes, the crystallization of large RNA-Fab complex remains a challenge in practice. The possible reason for this difficulty is that the Fab scaffold has not been optimized for crystallization in complex with RNA. Here, we have used the surface entropy reduction (SER) technique for the optimization of {Delta}C209 P4-P6/Fab2 model system. Protruding lysine and glutamate residues were mutated to a set of alanines or serines to construct Fab2SMA or Fab2SMS. Expression with the shake flask approach was optimized to allow large scale production for crystallization. Crystal screening shows that significantly higher crystal-forming ratio was observed for the mutant complexes. As the chosen SER residues are far away from the CDR regions of the Fab, the same set of mutations can now be directly applied to other Fabs binding to a variety of ribozymes and riboswitches to improve the crystallizability of Fab-RNA complex.

  7. Glutathione selectively modulates the binding of platinum drugs to human copper chaperone Cox17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linhong; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Han; Xi, Zhaoyong; Liu, Yangzhong

    2015-12-01

    The copper chaperone Cox17 (cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone) has been shown to facilitate the delivery of cisplatin to mitochondria, which contributes to the overall cytotoxicity of the drug [Zhao et al. (2014) Chem. Commun. 50: , 2667-2669]. Kinetic data indicate that Cox17 has reactivity similar to glutathione (GSH), the most abundant thiol-rich molecule in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that GSH significantly modulates the reaction of platinum complexes with Cox17. GSH enhances the reactivity of three anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) to Cox17, but suppresses the reaction of transplatin. Surprisingly, the pre-formed cisplatin-GSH adducts are highly reactive to Cox17; over 90% platinum transfers from GSH to Cox17. On the other hand, transplatin-GSH adducts are inert to Cox17. These different effects are consistent with the drug activity of these platinum complexes. In addition, GSH attenuates the protein aggregation of Cox17 induced by platination. These results indicate that the platinum-protein interactions could be substantially influenced by the cellular environment.

  8. Oridonin Triggers Chaperon-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of BCR-ABL in Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huilin; Weng, Hengyou; Dong, Bowen; Zhao, Panpan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Lianghu

    2017-01-01

    Inducing degradation of oncoproteins by small molecule compounds has the potential to avoid drug resistance and therefore deserves to be exploited for new therapies. Oridonin is a natural compound with promising antitumor efficacy that can trigger the degradation of oncoproteins; however, the direct cellular targets and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that oridonin depletes BCR-ABL through chaperon-mediated proteasomal degradation in leukemia. Mechanistically, oridonin poses oxidative stress in cancer cells and directly binds to cysteines of HSF1, leading to the activation of this master regulator of the chaperone system. The resulting induction of HSP70 and ubiquitin proteins and the enhanced binding to CHIP E3 ligase hence target BCR-ABL for ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Both wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL can be efficiently degraded by oridonin, supporting its efficacy observed in cultured cells as well as mouse tumor xenograft assays with either imatinib-sensitive or -resistant cells. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism by which oridonin induces rapid degradation of BCR-ABL as well as a novel pharmaceutical activator of HSF1 that represents a promising treatment for leukemia. PMID:28128329

  9. Chemical modulators of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) by sequential, microwave-accelerated reactions on solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisén, Susanne; Androsavich, John; Evans, Christopher G; Chang, Lyra; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2008-01-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as Hsp70 and Hsp90, are responsible for a variety of protective, anti-apoptotic functions. While inhibitors of Hsp90, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG, are well known and important anti-cancer leads, Hsp70 has received less attention. Interesting lead candidates for Hsp70 share a dihydropyrimidine core; however, the preferred display of pendant functionality is still not clear. Here, we take advantage of the versatility of peptides to explore the requirements for activity. An exploratory compound collection was assembled by performing a Biginelli cyclocondensation at the terminus of a resin-bound beta-peptide. Liberation from solid support yielded peptide-modified dihydropyrimidines and, within this series, we uncovered compounds that alter the ATPase activity of Hsp70 and its bacterial ortholog, DnaK. Moreover, we identified important contributions made by aromatic, hydrophobic groups. These chemical probes could be used to study the roles of this molecular chaperone in disease.

  10. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  11. Expression and chaperone-assisted refolding of a new cold-active lipase from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novototskaya-Vlasova, Ksenia; Petrovskaya, Lada; Kryukova, Elena; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    We describe cloning and expression of genes coding for lipase Lip2Pc and lipase-specific foldase LifPc from a psychrotrophic microorganism Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T) isolated from a Siberian cryopeg (the lense of overcooled brine within permafrost). Upon expression in Escherichiacoli Lip2Pc accumulated in inclusion bodies while chaperone was synthesized in a soluble form. An efficient protocol for solubilization and subsequent refolding of the recombinant lipase in the presence of the truncated chaperone was developed. Using this procedure Lip2Pc with specific activity of 6900U/mg was obtained. Contrary to published data on other lipase-chaperone complexes, refolded Lip2Pc was mostly recovered from the complex with chaperone by metal-affinity chromatography. Recombinant Lip2Pc displayed maximum lipolytic activity at 25°C and pH 8.0 with p-nitrophenyl palmitate (C16) as a substrate. Activity assays conducted at different temperatures revealed that the recombinant Lip2Pc is a cold-adapted lipase with ability to utilize substrates with long (C10-C16) hydrocarbon chains in the temperature range from +5 to +65°C. It demonstrated relatively high stability at temperatures above 60°C and in the presence of various metal ions or organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, etc.). Non-ionic detergents, such as Triton X-100 and Tween 20 decreased Lip2Pc activity and SDS completely inhibited it.

  12. c-Abl Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Aha1 Activates Its Co-chaperone Function in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Dunn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 to hydrolyze ATP is essential for its chaperone function. The co-chaperone Aha1 stimulates Hsp90 ATPase activity, tailoring the chaperone function to specific “client” proteins. The intracellular signaling mechanisms directly regulating Aha1 association with Hsp90 remain unknown. Here, we show that c-Abl kinase phosphorylates Y223 in human Aha1 (hAha1, promoting its interaction with Hsp90. This, consequently, results in an increased Hsp90 ATPase activity, enhances Hsp90 interaction with kinase clients, and compromises the chaperoning of non-kinase clients such as glucocorticoid receptor and CFTR. Suggesting a regulatory paradigm, we also find that Y223 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination and degradation of hAha1 in the proteasome. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of c-Abl prevents hAha1 interaction with Hsp90, thereby hypersensitizing cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors both in vitro and ex vivo.