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Sample records for molecular antiferromagnet copper

  1. Mn2Au: Body-centered-tetragonal bimetallic antiferromagnets grown by molecular beam epitataxy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, H.C.; Liao, Z.M.; Sofin, R.G.S.; Feng, G.; Ma, X.M.; Shick, Alexander; Mryasov, O. N.; Shvets, I.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 47 (2012), s. 6374-6379 ISSN 0935-9648 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : antiferromagnets * antiferromagnetic spintronics * exchange bias * molecular beam epitaxy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 14.829, year: 2012

  2. XAFS Study of the Ferro- and Antiferromagnetic Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes of Azomethine Based Tridentate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, Valery G.; Vasilchenko, Igor S.; Shestakova, Tatiana E.; Uraev, Ali I.; Burlov, Anatolii S.; Garnovskii, Alexander D.; Pirog, Irina V.

    2007-01-01

    Binuclear copper complexes are known to be models for metalloenzymes containing copper active sites, and some of them are of considerable interest due to their magnetic and charge transfer properties. The reactions of the complex formation of bibasic tridentate heterocyclic imines with copper acetate leads to two types of chelates with mono deprotonated ligands and with totally deprotonated ligands. Cu K-edge EXAFS has been applied to determine the local structure around the metal center in copper(II) azomethine complexes with five tridentate ligands: 1-(salycilideneimino)- or 1-(2-tosylaminobenzilideneimino)-2-amino(oxo, thio)benzimidazoles. It has been found that some of the chelates studied are bridged binuclear copper complexes, and others are mononuclear complexes. The copper-copper interatomic distances in the bridged binuclear copper complexes were found to be 2.85-3.01 A. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicate the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions within the dimer, the former is dominating at low temperatures and the latter at high temperatures

  3. Characterisation of spin-waves in copper(II) deuteroformate tetradeuterate: A square ¤S¤=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, S.J.; Harrison, A.; Mason, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate (CFTH) is a model square S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with T-N = 16.54 +/- 0.05 K. The dispersion of spin-waves in the magnetic layers of a fully deuterated sample of this material has been mapped at 4.3 K by inelastic neutron scattering from the zone centre ...

  4. Antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state in the single-component molecular material Pd(tmdt)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Rina; Sari, Dita Puspita; Mohd-Tajudin, Saidah Sakinah; Ashi, Retno; Watanabe, Isao; Ishibashi, Shoji; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Ogura, Satomi; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    A family of compounds built by a single molecular species, M (tmdt) 2, with a metal ion, M , and organic ligands, tmdt, affords diverse electronic phases due to M -dependent interplays between d electrons in M , and π electrons in tmdt. We investigated the spin state in Pd (tmdt) 2 , a π -electron system without a d -electron contribution, through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon-spin resonance experiments. The temperature profiles of the NMR linewidth, relaxation rate, and asymmetry parameter in muon decay show an inhomogeneous antiferromagnetic order with moments distributed around ˜0.1 μB that onsets at above 100 K. This result provides an example of the antiferromagnetic order in a pure π -electron system in M (tmdt) 2, and it demonstrates that correlation among the π electrons is so strong as to give the Néel temperature over 100 K. The small and inhomogeneous moments are understandable as the crucial disorder effect in correlated electrons situated near the Mott transition.

  5. Resolving distinct molecular origins for copper effects on PAI-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Joel C; McClintock, Carlee S; Chu, Yuzhuo; Ware, Gregory L; McConnell, Kayla D; Emerson, Joseph P; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2017-10-01

    Components of the fibrinolytic system are subjected to stringent control to maintain proper hemostasis. Central to this regulation is the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which is responsible for specific and rapid inhibition of fibrinolytic proteases. Active PAI-1 is inherently unstable and readily converts to a latent, inactive form. The binding of vitronectin and other ligands influences stability of active PAI-1. Our laboratory recently observed reciprocal effects on the stability of active PAI-1 in the presence of transition metals, such as copper, depending on the whether vitronectin was also present (Thompson et al. Protein Sci 20:353-365, 2011). To better understand the molecular basis for these copper effects on PAI-1, we have developed a gel-based copper sensitivity assay that can be used to assess the copper concentrations that accelerate the conversion of active PAI-1 to a latent form. The copper sensitivity of wild-type PAI-1 was compared with variants lacking N-terminal histidine residues hypothesized to be involved in copper binding. In these PAI-1 variants, we observed significant differences in copper sensitivity, and these data were corroborated by latency conversion kinetics and thermodynamics of copper binding by isothermal titration calorimetry. These studies identified a copper-binding site involving histidines at positions 2 and 3 that confers a remarkable stabilization of PAI-1 beyond what is observed with vitronectin alone. A second site, independent from the two histidines, binds metal and increases the rate of the latency conversion.

  6. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel layered copper-lithium phosphonate with antiferromagnetic intrachain Cu(II)···Cu(II) interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S.M. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Amghouz, Zakariae [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus Universitario, 33203 Gijón (Spain); Blanco, David Martínez [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    Novel metal phosphonate [CuLi(PPA)] [H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid] was synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It crystallizes in the space group C2/c, with cell parameters a=21.617(2) Å, b=4.9269(2) Å, c=14.342(1) Å, β=132.3(2)°, and Z=8. Its framework is built up from a main trimer, acting as a secondary building unit (SBU), which is formed by vertex-shared between two (LiO{sub 4}) and one (Cu(1)O{sub 4}) polyhedra. These units repeat along b-axis forming infinite inorganic chains, these chains are in turn cross-linked by corner sharing with (Cu(2)O{sub 4}) polyhedra to produce inorganic layers lying in the bc-plane. The neighboring layers are connected through the PPA ligand, leading to a 3D pillared-layered structure. The topological analysis reveals that the compound exhibits 3,4,10-c net. Finally, magnetic susceptibility measurement of this compound over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic intrachain interactions. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of a novel lithium-copper phosphonate, formulated as [CuLi(PPA)] (H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid), have been reported. This compound has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. The magnetic susceptibility data over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • Novel metal phosphonate, [CuLi(PPA)] (1), has been synthesized and characterized. • Compound 1 has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. • Magnetic susceptibility data reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions.

  7. High-field spin dynamics of the one-dimensional spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetα-bis (N-methylsalicylaldiminato copper) (II) (α-CuNSal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, L.J.; Narath, A.; Richards, P.M.; Soos, Z.G.

    1980-01-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation rates in the one-dimensional (1D) spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet α-bis (N-methylsalicylaldiminato) copper (II), α-CuNSal, have been measured in applied fields up to 125 kOe in the temperature range 1-- 4 K. The strong coupling of protons close to the antiferromagnetic (AF) chain serves as a convenient probe to study the dynamics of the AF chain through the field-induced antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic (F) phase transition. The magnetization of the AF chain, as measured by the proton field shift, is in close agreement with calculations by Bonner and Fisher and yields an exchange interaction J/k/sub B/=3.04 +- 0.04 K. The proton relaxation rate has isotropic (hyperfine coupled) and anisotropic (dipolar) components. We identify the isotropic relaxation rate with a creation or destruction of one-spin excitations (magnons) and the anisotropic rate with two-magnon processes. The measured one-magnon relaxation rate shows an enhancement near the critical field for the AF → F transition and a strong decrease of more than four decades as the critical field is exceeded. A no-adjustable-parameter calculation based on the fermion model quantitatively agrees with the measured one-magnon relaxation rate, both above and below the critical field H/sub c/. The enhanced relaxation at H/sub c/ is correctly predicted as a consequence of the divergence of the 1D density of magnon states, where a gap in the spin-wave spectrum exists. Above H/sub c/ a finite magnon lifetime must be included in order to produce a nonzero one-magnon relaxation rate. This is also calculated with no adjustable parameters. The two-magnon relaxation rate also shows a decrease as the critical field is exceeded and the calculated relaxation rate agrees well with experiment at low temperatures, provided, however, that one uses a boson rather than fermion picture

  8. Antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, V.; Manchon, A.; Tsoi, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials could represent the future of spintronic applications thanks to the numerous interesting features they combine: they are robust against perturbation due to magnetic fields, produce no stray fields, display ultrafast dynamics, and are capable of generating large magnetotransport effects. Intense research efforts over the past decade have been invested in unraveling spin transport properties in antiferromagnetic materials. Whether spin transport can be used to drive the antiferromagnetic order and how subsequent variations can be detected are some of the thrilling challenges currently being addressed. Antiferromagnetic spintronics started out with studies on spin transfer and has undergone a definite revival in the last few years with the publication of pioneering articles on the use of spin-orbit interactions in antiferromagnets. This paradigm shift offers possibilities for radically new concepts for spin manipulation in electronics. Central to these endeavors are the need for predictive models, relevant disruptive materials, and new experimental designs. This paper reviews the most prominent spintronic effects described based on theoretical and experimental analysis of antiferromagnetic materials. It also details some of the remaining bottlenecks and suggests possible avenues for future research. This review covers both spin-transfer-related effects, such as spin-transfer torque, spin penetration length, domain-wall motion, and "magnetization" dynamics, and spin-orbit related phenomena, such as (tunnel) anisotropic magnetoresistance, spin Hall, and inverse spin galvanic effects. Effects related to spin caloritronics, such as the spin Seebeck effect, are linked to the transport of magnons in antiferromagnets. The propagation of spin waves and spin superfluids in antiferromagnets is also covered.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tensile Behavior of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Sainath, G.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Choudhary, B. K.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations on tensile deformation of initially defect free single crystal copper nanowire oriented in {100} has been carried out at 10 K under adiabatic and isothermal loading conditions. The tensile behaviour was characterized by sharp rise in stress in elastic regime followed by sudden drop at the point of dislocation nucleation. The important finding is that the variation in dislocation density is correlated with the observed stress-strain response. Several interesting ...

  10. Cloning and molecular characterization of a copper chaperone gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cDNA encoding a copper chaperone, designated as HbCCH1, was isolated from Hevea brasiliensis. HbCC1 was 589 bp long containing a 261 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 86 amino acids, flanked by a 103 bp 5'UTR and a 225 bp 3'UTR. The predicted molecular mass of HbCCH1 was 9.2 kDa, ...

  11. Superconductivity proximate to antiferromagnetism in a copper-oxide monolayer grown on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Long; Wang, Fa

    2018-01-01

    A nodeless superconducting (SC) gap was reported in a recent scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiment of a copper-oxide monolayer grown on a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ (Bi2212) substrate [Zhong et al., Sci. Bull. 61, 1239 (2016), 10.1007/s11434-016-1145-4], which is in stark contrast to the nodal d -wave pairing gap in the bulk cuprates. Motivated by this experiment, we first show with first-principles calculations that the tetragonal CuO (T-CuO) monolayer on the Bi2212 substrate is more stable than the commonly postulated CuO2 structure. The T-CuO monolayer is composed of two CuO2 layers sharing the same O atoms. The band structure is obtained by first-principles calculations, and its strong electron correlation is treated with the renormalized mean-field theory. We argue that one CuO2 sublattice is hole doped while the other sublattice remains half filled and may have antiferromagnetic (AF) order. The doped Cu sublattice can show d -wave SC; however, its proximity to the AF Cu sublattice induces a spin-dependent hopping, which splits the Fermi surface and may lead to a full SC gap. Therefore, the nodeless SC gap observed in the experiment could be accounted for by the d -wave SC proximity to an AF order, thus it is extrinsic rather than intrinsic to the CuO2 layers.

  12. Antiferromagnetic spintronics

    KAUST Repository

    Baltz, V.; Manchon, Aurelien; Tsoi, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials could represent the future of spintronic applications thanks to the numerous interesting features they combine: they are robust against perturbation due to magnetic fields, produce no stray fields, display ultrafast dynamics, and are capable of generating large magnetotransport effects. Intense research efforts over the past decade have been invested in unraveling spin transport properties in antiferromagnetic materials. Whether spin transport can be used to drive the antiferromagnetic order and how subsequent variations can be detected are some of the thrilling challenges currently being addressed. Antiferromagnetic spintronics started out with studies on spin transfer and has undergone a definite revival in the last few years with the publication of pioneering articles on the use of spin-orbit interactions in antiferromagnets. This paradigm shift offers possibilities for radically new concepts for spin manipulation in electronics. Central to these endeavors are the need for predictive models, relevant disruptive materials, and new experimental designs. This paper reviews the most prominent spintronic effects described based on theoretical and experimental analysis of antiferromagnetic materials. It also details some of the remaining bottlenecks and suggests possible avenues for future research. This review covers both spin-transfer-related effects, such as spin-transfer torque, spin penetration length, domain-wall motion, and

  13. Antiferromagnetic spintronics

    KAUST Repository

    Baltz, V.

    2018-02-15

    Antiferromagnetic materials could represent the future of spintronic applications thanks to the numerous interesting features they combine: they are robust against perturbation due to magnetic fields, produce no stray fields, display ultrafast dynamics, and are capable of generating large magnetotransport effects. Intense research efforts over the past decade have been invested in unraveling spin transport properties in antiferromagnetic materials. Whether spin transport can be used to drive the antiferromagnetic order and how subsequent variations can be detected are some of the thrilling challenges currently being addressed. Antiferromagnetic spintronics started out with studies on spin transfer and has undergone a definite revival in the last few years with the publication of pioneering articles on the use of spin-orbit interactions in antiferromagnets. This paradigm shift offers possibilities for radically new concepts for spin manipulation in electronics. Central to these endeavors are the need for predictive models, relevant disruptive materials, and new experimental designs. This paper reviews the most prominent spintronic effects described based on theoretical and experimental analysis of antiferromagnetic materials. It also details some of the remaining bottlenecks and suggests possible avenues for future research. This review covers both spin-transfer-related effects, such as spin-transfer torque, spin penetration length, domain-wall motion, and

  14. Field-dependent antiferromagnetism and ferromagnetism of the two copper sublattices in Sr2Cu3O4Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, M.A.; Aharony, A.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Chou, F.C.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Greven, M.; Harris, A.B.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, Y.S.; Parks, M.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1999-01-01

    The Cu 3 O 4 layer in Sr 2 Cu 3 O 4 Cl 2 is a variant of the square CuO 2 lattice of the high-temperature superconductors, in which the center of every second plaquette contains an extra Cu 2+ ion. The ions that make up the conventional CuO 2 network, called CuI, have CuI-CuI exchange energy ∼130meV, and order antiferromagnetically at about 380 K; the CuII-CuII exchange is only ∼10meV, and the CuII close-quote s order at ∼40K. A study is reported here of the dependence of the magnetization on field, temperature, and crystallographic orientation for this interesting system. We show that the small permanent ferromagnetic moment, that appears when the CuI spins order, and the unusual spin rotation transitions seen most clearly for one particular direction of the magnetic field, are the result of several small bond-dependent anisotropic terms in the spin Hamiltonian that are revealed because of the frustration of the isotropic Heisenberg interaction between CuI and CuII spins. These include a term which favors collinearity of the CuI and CuII spins, which originates from quantum fluctuations, and also the pseudodipolar interaction. Some of these small interactions also come into play in other lamellar cuprates, connected with the high-T c superconductivity materials, and in many spin-chain and spin-ladder compounds. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Antiferromagnetic skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Barker, Joseph

    Skyrmions are topologically protected entities in magnetic materials which have the potential to be used in spintronics for information storage and processing. However, skyrmions in ferromagnets have some intrinsic difficulties which must be overcome to use them for spintronic applications, such as the inability to move straight along current. We show that skyrmions can also be stabilized and manipulated in antiferromagnetic materials. An antiferromagnetic skyrmion is a compound topological object with a similar but of opposite sign spin texture on each sublattice, which e.g. results in a complete cancelation of the Magnus force. We find that the composite nature of antiferromagnetic skyrmions gives rise to different dynamical behavior, both due to an applied current and temperature effects. O.A.T. and J.B. acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Nos. 25800184, 25247056, 25220910 and 15H01009) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and SpinNet.

  16. Fullerene/layered antiferromagnetic reconstructed spinterface: Subsurface layer dominates molecular orbitals' spin-split and large induced magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yangfan; Pang, Rui; Pan, Hui; Shi, Xingqiang

    2018-03-01

    The interfaces between organic molecules and magnetic metals have gained increasing interest for both fundamental reasons and applications. Among them, the C60/layered antiferromagnetic (AFM) interfaces have been studied only for C60 bonded to the outermost ferromagnetic layer [S. L. Kawahara et al., Nano Lett. 12, 4558 (2012) and D. Li et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085425 (2016)]. Here, via density functional theory calculations combined with evidence from the literature, we demonstrate that C60 adsorption can reconstruct the layered-AFM Cr(001) surface at elevated annealing temperatures so that C60 bonds to both the outermost and the subsurface Cr layers in opposite spin directions. Surface reconstruction drastically changes the adsorbed molecule spintronic properties: (1) the spin-split p-d hybridization involves multi-orbitals of C60 and top two layers of Cr with opposite spin-polarization, (2) the subsurface Cr atom dominates the C60 electronic properties, and (3) the reconstruction induces a large magnetic moment of 0.58 μB in C60 as a synergistic effect of the top two Cr layers. The induced magnetic moment in C60 can be explained by the magnetic direct-exchange mechanism, which can be generalized to other C60/magnetic metal systems. Understanding these complex hybridization behaviors is a crucial step for molecular spintronic applications.

  17. Some features of the molecular assembly of copper porphyrazines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkova, L.; Borovkov, N.; Kopranenkov, V.; Pisani, M.; Bossi, M.; Rustichelli, F.

    2002-01-01

    Floating layers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of copper porphyrazine (CuPaz) and its tetra-tert-butyl-substituted homologue (CuPaz') are studied. Contrary to phthalocyanines, the monolayer phase in the porphyrazine layers is metastable and transforms directly into the tetralayer one under moderate compression. In diffraction patterns and electronic spectra of the LB films, supramolecular peaks indicating collectivizing of the molecular electron density in direction perpendicular to the main axis of the macrocycle are found. The data obtained indicate the prismatic 3-D supermolecule to be the simplest structural unit of the porphyrazine assembly

  18. Antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Martí, Xavier; Wadley, P.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), 231-241 ISSN 1748-3387 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnets * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 38.986, year: 2016

  19. Hole Mobility of Molecular β-Copper Phthalocyanine Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengmanayol, S.; Osotchan, T.; Suewattana, M.; Ingadapa, N.; Girdpun, J.

    2011-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate hole mobilities in molecular β-copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystal for different applied electric field directions. Due to the crystal symmetry, the twelve neighboring molecules in the three-dimensional crystal are selected in the hopping rate calculation. Density functional theory is employed to derive the molecular interaction between the central and neighboring molecules for various applied electric fields. The derived molecular hopping rate is applied to 80 × 80 × 80 lattice sites under periodic boundary conditions. In order to achieve accurate statistics, each calculation includes 6561 particles with more than 10000 hopping steps under an applied electric field of 0.5–3.5 MV/cm. The results indicate that the molecular hopping strongly depends on the molecular orientation and neighboring sites related to the applied electric field direction. The estimated carrier mobility can be described by the percentage occupation in each neighboring site and the obtained hole mobility value is in the same range of the measured values of single crystal CuPc. The calculated mobility for applied electric field along the c crystal axis exhibits the highest values while the mobility along the b axis has the smallest value. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Low temperature magnetic properties and spin dynamics in single crystals of Cr{sub 8}Zn antiferromagnetic molecular rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Chiesa, Alessandro; Bordignon, Sara; Carretta, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Parma, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Ghirri, Alberto; Candini, Andrea [CNR Institute Nanosciences S3, I- 41125 Modena (Italy); Cervetti, Christian [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche, Matematiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Evangelisti, Marco [CNR Institute Nanosciences S3, I- 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche, Matematiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Affronte, Marco [CNR Institute Nanosciences S3, I- 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche, Matematiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Sheikin, Ilya [Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory, CNRS-LNCMI, 25, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [The Lewis Magnetism Laboratory, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); and others

    2015-12-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of the effects giving rise to the magnetic energy level structure in the vicinity of the level crossing (LC) at low temperature is reported for the open antiferromagnetic molecular ring Cr{sub 8}Zn. The study is conducted by means of thermodynamic techniques (torque magnetometry, magnetization and specific heat measurements) and microscopic techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance line width, nuclear spin lattice, and spin-spin relaxation measurements). The experimental results are shown to be in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations based on a minimal spin model Hamiltonian, which includes a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The first ground state level crossing at μ{sub 0}H{sub c1} = 2.15 T is found to be an almost true LC while the second LC at μ{sub 0}H{sub c2} = 6.95 T has an anti-crossing gap of Δ{sub 12} = 0.19 K. In addition, both NMR and specific heat measurements show the presence of a level anti-crossing between excited states at μ{sub 0}H = 4.5 T as predicted by the theory. In all cases, the fit of the experimental data is improved by introducing a distribution of the isotropic exchange couplings (J), i.e., using a J strain model. The peaks at the first and second LCs in the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate are dominated by inelastic scattering and a value of Γ ∼ 10{sup 10} rad/s is inferred for the life time broadening of the excited state of the open ring, due to spin phonon interaction. A loss of NMR signal (wipe-out effect) is observed for the first time at LC and is explained by the enhancement of the spin-spin relaxation rate due to the inelastic scattering.

  1. Molecular Diagnostics of Copper-Transporting Protein Mutations Allows Early Onset Individual Therapy of Menkes Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králík, L; Flachsová, E; Hansíková, H; Saudek, V; Zeman, J; Martásek, P

    2017-01-01

    Menkes disease is a severe X-linked recessive disorder caused by a defect in the ATP7A gene, which encodes a membrane copper-transporting ATPase. Deficient activity of the ATP7A protein results in decreased intestinal absorption of copper, low copper level in serum and defective distribution of copper in tissues. The clinical symptoms are caused by decreased activities of copper-dependent enzymes and include neurodegeneration, connective tissue disorders, arterial changes and hair abnormalities. Without therapy, the disease is fatal in early infancy. Rapid diagnosis of Menkes disease and early start of copper therapy is critical for the effectiveness of treatment. We report a molecular biology-based strategy that allows early diagnosis of copper transport defects and implementation of individual therapies before the full development of pathological symptoms. Low serum copper and decreased activity of copperdependent mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in isolated platelets found in three patients indicated a possibility of functional defects in copper-transporting proteins, especially in the ATPA7 protein, a copper- transporting P-type ATPase. Rapid mutational screening of the ATP7A gene using high-resolution melting analysis of DNA indicated presence of mutations in the patients. Molecular investigation for mutations in the ATP7A gene revealed three nonsense mutations: c.2170C>T (p.Gln724Ter); c.3745G>T (p.Glu1249Ter); and c.3862C>T (p.Gln1288Ter). The mutation c.3745G>T (p.Glu1249Ter) has not been identified previously. Molecular analysis of the ATOX1 gene as a possible modulating factor of Menkes disease did not reveal presence of pathogenic mutations. Molecular diagnostics allowed early onset of individual therapies, adequate genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis in the affected families.

  2. Electric control of antiferromagnets

    OpenAIRE

    Fina, I.; Marti, X.

    2016-01-01

    In the past five years, most of the paradigmatic concepts employed in spintronics have been replicated substituting ferromagnets by antiferromagnets in critical parts of the devices. The numerous research efforts directed to manipulate and probe the magnetic moments in antiferromagnets have been gradually established a new and independent field known as antiferromagnetic spintronics. In this paper, we focus on the electrical control and detection of antiferromagnetic moments at a constant tem...

  3. Perspectives of antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Zhang, Wei; Hoffmann, Axel

    2018-04-01

    Antiferromagnets are promising for future spintronic applications owing to their advantageous properties: They are magnetically ordered, but neighboring magnetic moments point in opposite directions, which results in zero net magnetization. This means antiferromagnets produce no stray fields and are insensitive to external magnetic field perturbations. Furthermore, they show intrinsic high frequency dynamics, exhibit considerable spin-orbit and magneto-transport effects. Over the past decade, it has been realized that antiferromagnets have more to offer than just being utilized as passive components in exchange bias applications. This development resulted in a paradigm shift, which opens the pathway to novel concepts using antiferromagnets for spin-based technologies and applications. This article gives a broad perspective on antiferromagnetic spintronics. In particular, the manipulation and detection of antiferromagnetic states by spintronics effects, as well as spin transport and dynamics in antiferromagnetic materials will be discussed. We will also outline current challenges and future research directions in this emerging field.

  4. Perspectives of antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Zhang, Wei; Hoffmann, Axel

    2018-04-01

    Antiferromagnets are promising for future spintronics applications owing to their interesting properties: They are magnetically ordered, but neighboring magnetic moments point in opposite directions which results in zero net magneti- zation. This means antiferromagnets produce no stray fields and are insensitive to external magnetic field perturbations. Furthermore, they show intrinsic high frequency dynamics, exhibit considerable spin-orbit and magneto-transport effects. Over the past decade, it has been realized that antiferromagnets have more to offer than just being utilized as passive components in exchange bias applications. This development resulted in a paradigm shift, which opens the pathway to novel concepts using antiferromagnets for spin-based technologies and applications. This article gives a broad per- spective on antiferromagnetic spintronics. In particular, the manipulation and detection of anitferromagnetic states by spintronics effects, as well as spin transport and dynamics in antiferromagnetic materials will be discussed. We will also outline current challenges and future research directions in this emerging field.

  5. Binary molecular layers of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine on Au(111) : Self-organized nanostructuring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöhr, Meike; Wagner, Thorsten; Gabriel, Markus; Weyers, Bastian; Möller, Rolf

    The binary molecular system of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine(CuPc) molecules has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature and at 50 K. As substrate Au(111) was chosen. When C-60 and CuPc molecules are sequentially deposited, it is found that well-ordered domains

  6. Investigation of the Hydroxylation Mechanism of Noncoupled Copper Oxygenases by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meliá, C.; Ferrer, S.; Řezáč, Jan; Parisel, O.; Reinaud, O.; Moliner, V.; de la Lande, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 51 (2013), s. 17328-17337 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio calculations * copper * electron transfer * enzymes * molecular dynamics * reaction mechanisms Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.696, year: 2013

  7. Preparation of 103Pd seeds. Part 2. 'Molecular Plating' of 103Pd onto copper rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunfu Zhang; Yongxian Wang; Haibin Tian; Duanzhi Yin

    2002-01-01

    A method for 103 Pd 'molecular plating' onto the surface of the copper rod is reported. The optimal composition of the plating bath was: palladium chloride 2 g/l, ammonium hydroxide (28%) 150 ml/l, sodium hypophosphite 12 g/l, and ammonium chloride 37 g/l. The whole procedure of 103 Pd 'molecular plating' will last 50 minutes at 40 deg C. Valuable experience for the preparation of 103 Pd seeds is provided. (author)

  8. Speciation of copper diffused in a bi-porous molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-H.; Paul Wang, H.; Wei, Y.-L.; Chang, J.-E.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand diffusion of copper in the micro- and mesopores, speciation of copper in a bi-porous molecular sieve (BPMS) possessing inter-connecting 3-D micropores (0.50-0.55 nm) and 2-D mesopores (4.1 nm) has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. It is found that about 77% (16% of CuO nanoparticles and 61% of CuO clusters) and 23% (CuO ads ) of copper can be diffused into the meso- and micropores, respectively, in the BPMS. At least two diffusion steps in the BPMS may be involved: (i) free diffusion of copper in the mesopores and (ii) diffusion-controlled copper migrating into the micropores of the BPMS. The XANES data also indicate that diffusion rate of copper in the BPMS (4.68x10 -5 g/s) is greater than that in the ZSM-5 (1.11x10 -6 g/s) or MCM-41 (1.17x10 -5 g/s).

  9. Speciation of copper diffused in a bi-porous molecular sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.-H.; Paul Wang, H.; Wei, Y.-L.; Chang, J.-E.

    2010-07-01

    To better understand diffusion of copper in the micro- and mesopores, speciation of copper in a bi-porous molecular sieve (BPMS) possessing inter-connecting 3-D micropores (0.50-0.55 nm) and 2-D mesopores (4.1 nm) has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. It is found that about 77% (16% of CuO nanoparticles and 61% of CuO clusters) and 23% (CuO ads) of copper can be diffused into the meso- and micropores, respectively, in the BPMS. At least two diffusion steps in the BPMS may be involved: (i) free diffusion of copper in the mesopores and (ii) diffusion-controlled copper migrating into the micropores of the BPMS. The XANES data also indicate that diffusion rate of copper in the BPMS (4.68×10 -5 g/s) is greater than that in the ZSM-5 (1.11×10 -6 g/s) or MCM-41 (1.17×10 -5 g/s).

  10. Molecular recognition by gold, silver and copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauran, Yannick; Brioude, Arnaud; Coleman, Anthony W; Rhimi, Moez; Kim, Beonjoom

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic physical properties of the noble metal nanoparticles, which are highly sensitive to the nature of their local molecular environment, make such systems ideal for the detection of molecular recognition events. The current review describes the state of the art concerning molecular recognition of Noble metal nanoparticles. In the first part the preparation of such nanoparticles is discussed along with methods of capping and stabilization. A brief discussion of the three common methods of functionalization: Electrostatic adsorption; Chemisorption; Affinity-based coordination is given. In the second section a discussion of the optical and electrical properties of nanoparticles is given to aid the reader in understanding the use of such properties in molecular recognition. In the main section the various types of capping agents for molecular recognition; nucleic acid coatings, protein coatings and molecules from the family of supramolecular chemistry are described along with their numerous applications. Emphasis for the nucleic acids is on complementary oligonucleotide and aptamer recognition. For the proteins the recognition properties of antibodies form the core of the section. With respect to the supramolecular systems the cyclodextrins, calix[n]arenes, dendrimers, crown ethers and the cucurbitales are treated in depth. Finally a short section deals with the possible toxicity of the nanoparticles, a concern in public health. PMID:23977421

  11. Spintronics of antiferromagnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonaj, E.V.; Loktev, V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Spintronics of antiferromagnetics is a new field that has developed in a fascinating research topic in physics of magnetism. Antiferromagnetics, like ferromagnetic materials experience the influence of spin-polarized current, even though they show no macroscopic magnetization. The mechanism of this phenomenon is related to spin-dependent interaction between free and localized electrons-sd-exchange. Due to the peculiarities of antiferromagnetic materials (complicated magnetic structure, essential role of the exchange interactions, lack of macroscopic magnetization) spintronics of antiferromagnets appeals to new theoretical and experimental approaches. The purpose of this review is to systemize and summarize the recent progress in this field. We start with a short introduction into the structure and dynamics of antiferromagnets and proceed with discussion of different microscopic and phenomenological theories for description of current-induced phenomena in ferro-/antiferromagnetic heterostructures. We also consider the problems of the reverse influence of antiferromagnetic ordering on current, and effectiveness of the fully antiferromagnetic spin valve. In addition, we shortly review and interpret the available experimental results.

  12. Remote stabilization of copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks in metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Wenyang

    2015-03-24

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu2(O2C-)4], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu3O(N4-x(CH)xC-)3] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  13. Remote stabilization of copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks in metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Wenyang; Cai, Rong; Pham, Tony T.; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; Nugent, Patrick S.; Williams, Kia R.; Wojtas, Łukasz; Luebke, Ryan; Weselinski, Lukasz Jan; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Space, Brian; Chen, Yusheng; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shi, Xiaodong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-01-01

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu2(O2C-)4], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu3O(N4-x(CH)xC-)3] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. Copper-coated laser-fusion targets using molecular-beam levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocke, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of diagnostic experiments at the Shiva laser fusion facility required targets of glass microspheres coated with 1.5 to 3.0 μm of copper. Previous batch coating efforts using vibration techniques gave poor results due to microsphere sticking and vacuum welding. Molecular Beam Levitation (MBL) represented a noncontact method to produce a sputtered copper coating on a single glassmicrosphere. The coating specifications that were achieved resulted in a copper layer up to 3 μm thick with the allowance of a maximum variation of 10 nm in surface finish and thickness. These techniques developed with the MBL may be applied to sputter coat many soft metals for fusion target applications

  15. Deformation mechanisms in nanotwinned copper by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xing [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lu, Cheng, E-mail: chenglu@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tieu, Anh Kiet; Pei, Linqing; Zhang, Liang; Su, Lihong [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Zhan, Lihua [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2017-02-27

    Nanotwinned materials exhibit simultaneous ultrahigh strength and high ductility which is attributed to the interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries but the specific deformation mechanisms are rarely seen in experiments at the atomic level. Here we use large scale molecular dynamics simulations to explore this intricate interplay during the plastic deformation of nanotwinned Cu. We demonstrate that the dominant deformation mechanism transits dynamically from slip transfer to twin boundary migration to slip-twin interactions as the twin boundary orientation changes from horizontal to slant, and then to a vertical direction. Building on the fundamental physics of dislocation processes from computer simulations and combining the available experimental investigations, we unravel the underlying deformation mechanisms for nanotwinned Cu, incorporating all three distinct dislocation processes. Our results give insights into systematically engineering the nanoscale twins to fabricate nanotwinned metals or alloys that have high strength and considerable ductility.

  16. Molecular Features of the Copper Binding Sites in the Octarepeat Domain of the Prion Protein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Colin S.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Dunham, Christine M.; Lario, Paula; Avdievich, Nikolai I.; Antholine, William E.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Vrielink, Alice; Gerfen, Gary J.; Peisach, Jack; Scott, William G.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the prion protein (PrP) is a copper binding protein. The N-terminal region of human PrP contains four sequential copies of the highly conserved octarepeat sequence PHGGGWGQ spanning residues 60–91. This region selectively binds Cu2+ in vivo. In a previous study using peptide design, EPR, and CD spectroscopy, we showed that the HGGGW segment within each octarepeat comprises the fundamental Cu2+ binding unit [Aronoff-Spencer et al. (2000) Biochemistry 40, 13760–13771]. Here we present the first atomic resolution view of the copper binding site within an octarepeat. The crystal structure of HGGGW in a complex with Cu2+ reveals equatorial coordination by the histidine imidazole, two deprotonated glycine amides, and a glycine carbonyl, along with an axial water bridging to the Trp indole. Companion S-band EPR, X-band ESEEM, and HYSCORE experiments performed on a library of 15N-labeled peptides indicate that the structure of the copper binding site in HGGGW and PHGGGWGQ in solution is consistent with that of the crystal structure. Moreover, EPR performed on PrP(23–28, 57–91) and an 15N-labeled analogue demonstrates that the identified structure is maintained in the full PrP octarepeat domain. It has been shown that copper stimulates PrP endocytosis. The identified Gly–Cu linkage is unstable below pH ≈6.5 and thus suggests a pH-dependent molecular mechanism by which PrP detects Cu2+ in the extracellular matrix or releases PrP-bound Cu2+ within the endosome. The structure also reveals an unusual complementary interaction between copper-structured HGGGW units that may facilitate molecular recognition between prion proteins, thereby suggesting a mechanism for transmembrane signaling and perhaps conversion to the pathogenic form. PMID:11900542

  17. Theoretical Study of Copper Complexes: Molecular Structure, Properties, and Its Application to Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Baldenebro-Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical investigation of copper complexes with potential applications as sensitizers for solar cells. The density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT were utilized, using the M06 hybrid meta-GGA functional with the LANL2DZ (D95V on first row and DZVP basis sets. This level of calculation was used to find the optimized molecular structure, the absorption spectra, the molecular orbitals energies, and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from conceptual DFT. Solvent effects have been taken into account by an implicit approach, namely, the polarizable continuum model (PCM, using the nonequilibrium version of the IEF-PCM model.

  18. Molecular dynamic simulations of the high-speed copper nanoparticles collision with the aluminum surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, V. V.; Mayer, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    With the use of the molecular dynamic simulations, we investigated the effect of the high-speed (500 m/s, 1000 m/s) copper nanoparticle impact on the mechanical properties of an aluminum surface. Dislocation analysis shows that a large number of dislocations are formed in the impact area; the total length of dislocations is determined not only by the speed and size of the incoming copper nanoparticle (kinetic energy of the nanoparticle), but by a temperature of the system as well. The dislocations occupy the whole area of the aluminum single crystal at high kinetic energy of the nanoparticle. With the decrease of the nanoparticle kinetic energy, the dislocation structures are formed in the near-surface layer; formation of the dislocation loops takes place. Temperature rise of the system (aluminum substrate + nanoparticle) reduces the total dislocation length in the single crystal of aluminum; there is deeper penetration of the copper atoms in the aluminum at high temperatures. Average energy of the nanoparticles and room temperature of the system are optimal for production of high-quality layers of copper on the aluminum surface.

  19. Temperature sensitivity of void nucleation and growth parameters for single crystal copper: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, S; Chavan, V M; Warrier, M; Chaturvedi, S

    2011-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the void nucleation and growth is studied using the molecular dynamics (MD) code LAMMPS (Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). Single crystal copper is triaxially expanded at 5 × 10 9  s −1 strain rate keeping the temperature constant. It is shown that the nucleation and growth of voids at these atomistic scales follows a macroscopic nucleation and growth (NAG) model. As the temperature increases there is a steady decrease in the nucleation and growth thresholds. As the melting point of copper is approached, a double-dip in the pressure–time profile is observed. Analysis of this double-dip shows that the first minimum corresponds to the disappearance of the long-range order due to the creation of stacking faults and the system no longer has a FCC structure. There is no nucleation of voids at this juncture. The second minimum corresponds to the nucleation and incipient growth of voids. We present the sensitivity of NAG parameters to temperature and the analysis of double-dip in the pressure–time profile for single crystal copper at 1250 K

  20. Quantum chemical molecular dynamical investigation of alkyl nitrite photo-dissociated on copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaojing; Wang Wei; Han Peilin; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    An accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' was used to investigate the photolysis of alkyl nitrites series, RONO (R=CH 3 and C(CH 3 ) 3 ) on copper surfaces. Our calculations showed that the photo-dissociated processes are associated with the alkyl substituents of RONO when adsorbed on copper surfaces. For R=CH 3 , a two-step photolysis reaction occurred, yielding diverse intermediate products including RO radical, NO, and HNO, consistent with those reported in gas phase. While for R=C(CH 3 ) 3 , only one-step photolysis reaction occurred and gave intermediate products of RO radical and NO. Consequently, pure RO species were achieved to adsorb on metal surfaces by removing the NO species in photolysis reaction. The detailed photo-dissociated behaviors of RONO on copper surfaces with different alkyl substituents which are uncovered by the present simulation can be extended to explain the diverse dissociative mechanism experimentally observed. The quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' is proved to be highly applicable to the photo-dissociations on metal surfaces

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation on the elastoplastic properties of copper nanowire under torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Li, Ying; Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Guowei; Wang, Xizhi; Liu, Jin

    2018-02-01

    Influences of different factors on the torsion properties of single crystal copper nanowire are studied by molecular dynamics method. The length, torsional rate, and temperature of the nanowire are discussed at the elastic-plastic critical point. According to the average potential energy curve and shear stress curve, the elastic-plastic critical angle is determined. Also, the dislocation at elastoplastic critical points is analyzed. The simulation results show that the single crystal copper nanowire can be strengthened by lengthening the model, decreasing the torsional rate, and lowering the temperature. Moreover, atoms move violently and dislocation is more likely to occur with a higher temperature. This work mainly describes the mechanical behavior of the model under different states.

  2. Molecular dynamic simulation of Copper and Platinum nanoparticles Poiseuille flow in a nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toghraie, Davood; Mokhtari, Majid; Afrand, Masoud

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, simulation of Poiseuille flow within nanochannel containing Copper and Platinum particles has been performed using molecular dynamic (MD). In this simulation LAMMPS code is used to simulate three-dimensional Poiseuille flow. The atomic interaction is governed by the modified Lennard-Jones potential. To study the wall effects on the surface tension and density profile, we placed two solid walls, one at the bottom boundary and the other at the top boundary. For solid-liquid interactions, the modified Lennard-Jones potential function was used. Velocity profiles and distribution of temperature and density have been obtained, and agglutination of nanoparticles has been discussed. It has also shown that with more particles, less time is required for the particles to fuse or agglutinate. Also, we can conclude that the agglutination time in nanochannel with Copper particles is faster that in Platinum nanoparticles. Finally, it is demonstrated that using nanoparticles raises thermal conduction in the channel.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock-wave loading of copper and titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolesta, A. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    At extreme pressures and temperatures common materials form new dense phases with compacted atomic arrangements. By classical molecular dynamics simulation we observe that FCC copper undergo phase transformation to BCC structure. The transition occurs under shock wave loading at the pressures above 80 GPa and corresponding temperatures above 2000 K. We calculate phase diagram, show that at these pressures and low temperature FCC phase of copper is still stable and discuss the thermodynamic reason for phase transformation at high temperature shock wave regime. Titanium forms new hexagonal phase at high pressure as well. We calculate the structure of shock wave in titanium and observe that shock front splits in three parts: elastic, plastic and phase transformation. The possibility of using a phase transition behind a shock wave with further unloading for designing nanocrystalline materials with a reduced grain size is also shown.

  4. High-speed collision of copper nanoparticle with aluminum surface: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, Victor V.; Mayer, Alexander E.; Krasnikov, Vasiliy S.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of the high-speed collision of copper nanoparticles with aluminum surface by means of molecular dynamic simulations. Studied diameter of nanoparticles is varied within the range 7.2-22 nm and the velocity of impact is equal to 500 or 1000 m/s. Dislocation analysis shows that a large quantity of dislocations is formed within the impact area. Overall length of dislocations is determined, first of all, by the impact velocity and by the size of incident copper nanoparticle, in other words, by the kinetic energy of the nanoparticle. Dislocations occupy the total volume of the impacted aluminum single crystal layer (40.5 nm in thickness) in the form of intertwined structure in the case of large kinetic energy of the incident nanoparticle. Decrease in the initial kinetic energy or increase in the layer thickness lead to restriction of the penetration depth of the dislocation net; formation of separate dislocation loops is observed in this case. Increase in the initial system temperature slightly raises the dislocation density inside the bombarded layer and considerably decreases the dislocation density inside the nanoparticle. The temperature increase also leads to a deeper penetration of the copper atoms inside the aluminum. Additional molecular dynamic simulations show that the deposited particles demonstrate a very good adhesion even in the case of the considered relatively large nanoparticles. Medium energy of the nanoparticles corresponding to velocity of about 500 m/s and elevated temperature of the system about 700-900 K are optimal parameters for production of high-quality layers of copper on the aluminum surface. These conditions provide both a good adhesion and a less degree of the plastic deformation. At the same time, higher impact velocities can be used for combined treatment consisting of both the plastic deformation and the coating.

  5. Theoretical modeling of diluted antiferromagnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozo, J; Elgueta, R; Acevedo, R

    2000-01-01

    Some magnetic properties of a Diluted Antiferromagnetic System (DAFS) are studied. The model of the two sub-networks for antiferromagnetism is used and a Heisenberg Hamiltonian type is proposed, where the square operators are expressed in terms of boson operators with the approach of spin waves. The behavior of the diluted system's fundamental state depends basically on the competition effect between the anisotropy field and the Weiss molecular field. The approach used allows the diluted system to be worked for strong anisotropies as well as when these are very weak

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of apocupredoxins: insights into the formation and stabilization of copper sites under entatic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Vila, Alejandro J; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2014-06-01

    Cupredoxins perform copper-mediated long-range electron transfer (ET) in biological systems. Their copper-binding sites have evolved to force copper ions into ET-competent systems with decreased reorganization energy, increased reduction potential, and a distinct electronic structure compared with those of non-ET-competent copper complexes. The entatic or rack-induced state hypothesis explains these special properties in terms of the strain that the protein matrix exerts on the metal ions. This idea is supported by X-ray structures of apocupredoxins displaying "closed" arrangements of the copper ligands like those observed in the holoproteins; however, it implies completely buried copper-binding atoms, conflicting with the notion that they must be exposed for copper loading. On the other hand, a recent work based on NMR showed that the copper-binding regions of apocupredoxins are flexible in solution. We have explored five cupredoxins in their "closed" apo forms through molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that prearranged ligand conformations are not stable as the X-ray data suggest, although they do form part of the dynamic landscape of the apoproteins. This translates into variable flexibility of the copper-binding regions within a rigid fold, accompanied by fluctuations of the hydrogen bonds around the copper ligands. Major conformations with solvent-exposed copper-binding atoms could allow initial binding of the copper ions. An eventual subsequent incursion to the closed state would result in binding of the remaining ligands, trapping the closed conformation thanks to the additional binding energy and the fastening of noncovalent interactions that make up the rack.

  7. Ambipolar carrier transport properties and molecular packing structure of octahexyl-substituted copper phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Watanabe, Koichi; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Itani, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Yo; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2018-04-01

    The charge carrier mobility of a solution-processable low-molecular-weight organic semiconductor material, i.e., 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine copper complex (C6PcCu), was investigated by the time-of-flight technique. The anomalous ambipolar carrier mobility was discussed from the viewpoint of the molecular packing structure, which was clarified by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. In the comparison between the molecular packing structures of C6PcCu and its metal-free-type homologue, it was found that the difference in carrier mobility originates from the rotation of the molecule, which is caused by the steric hindrance due to the introduction of a center metal and the interpenetration of the nonperipheral alkyl chains.

  8. Computational Molecular Nanoscience Study of the Properties of Copper Complexes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldenebro-López, Jesús; Castorena-González, José; Flores-Holguín, Norma; Almaral-Sánchez, Jorge; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we studied a copper complex-based dye, which is proposed for potential photovoltaic applications and is named Cu (I) biquinoline dye. Results of electron affinities and ionization potentials have been used for the correlation between different levels of calculation used in this study, which are based on The Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT. Further, the maximum absorption wavelengths of our theoretical calculations were compared with the experimental data. It was found that the M06/LANL2DZ + DZVP level of calculation provides the best approximation. This level of calculation was used to find the optimized molecular structure and to predict the main molecular vibrations, the molecular orbitals energies, dipole moment, isotropic polarizability and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from Conceptual DFT. PMID:23443107

  9. Plasticity-mediated collapse and recrystallization in hollow copper nanowires: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Dutta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the thermal stability of hollow copper nanowires using molecular dynamics simulation. We find that the plasticity-mediated structural evolution leads to transformation of the initial hollow structure to a solid wire. The process involves three distinct stages, namely, collapse, recrystallization and slow recovery. We calculate the time scales associated with different stages of the evolution process. Our findings suggest a plasticity-mediated mechanism of collapse and recrystallization. This contradicts the prevailing notion of diffusion driven transport of vacancies from the interior to outer surface being responsible for collapse, which would involve much longer time scales as compared to the plasticity-based mechanism.

  10. Antiferromagnetic spin-orbitronics

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien; Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed; Ghosh, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Antiferromagnets have long remained an intriguing and exotic state of matter, whose application has been restricted to enabling interfacial exchange bias in metallic and tunneling spin-valves [1]. Their role in the expanding field of applied spintronics has been mostly passive and the in-depth investigation of their basic properties mostly considered from a fundamental perspective.

  11. Nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel Esmarch

    2008-01-01

    I denne Ph.D. afhandling studeres forskellige egenskaber ved antiferromagnetiske nanopartikler. I en ideel antiferromagnet er spinnene orienteret således at der ikke er et resulterende magnetisk moment. I nanopartikler af antiferromagnetiske materialer er denne kompensation på grund af forskellig...

  12. Antiferromagnetic spin-orbitronics

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-05-01

    Antiferromagnets have long remained an intriguing and exotic state of matter, whose application has been restricted to enabling interfacial exchange bias in metallic and tunneling spin-valves [1]. Their role in the expanding field of applied spintronics has been mostly passive and the in-depth investigation of their basic properties mostly considered from a fundamental perspective.

  13. Prospect for antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martí, Xavier; Fina, I.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2015), s. 2900104 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.277, year: 2015

  14. Pinning of fullerene lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge at the interface with standing up copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chenggong; Irfan, Irfan; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure evolution of interfaces of fullerene (C 60 ) with copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and on native silicon oxide has been investigated with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C 60 was found to be pinned at the interface with CuPc on SiO 2 . A substantial difference in the electron affinity of CuPc on the two substrates was observed as the orientation of CuPc is lying flat on HOPG and standing up on SiO 2 . The ionization potential and electron affinity of C 60 were not affected by the orientation of CuPc due to the spherical symmetry of C 60 molecules. We observed band bending in C 60 on the standing-up orientation of CuPc molecules, while the energy levels of C 60 on the flat lying orientation of CuPc molecules were observed to be flat. - Highlights: ► Orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on ordered graphite and silicon oxide. ► Pinning of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C60 to the Fermi level on CuPc. ► No C60 pinning or band bending was observed on flat laying CuPc. ► Results are useful for organic photovoltaic and organic light emitting diode research.

  15. High-speed collision of copper nanoparticle with aluminum surface: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelko, Victor V., E-mail: vik_ko83@mail.ru [Chelyabinsk State University, Bratiev Kashirinykh 129, 454001 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), Lenin Prospect 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Mayer, Alexander E., E-mail: mayer@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University, Bratiev Kashirinykh 129, 454001 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), Lenin Prospect 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Krasnikov, Vasiliy S., E-mail: vas.krasnikov@gmail.com [Chelyabinsk State University, Bratiev Kashirinykh 129, 454001 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), Lenin Prospect 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • High-speed nanoparticle impact induces shock waves and intensive plastic deformation. • Lattice orientation strongly influences on the deformation degree. • Plastic deformation goes through nucleation, growth and separation of semi-loops. • Medium impact energy and elevated temperature are optimal for high-quality coating. • High impact velocity and room temperature lead to plastic deformation and coating. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of the high-speed collision of copper nanoparticles with aluminum surface by means of molecular dynamic simulations. Studied diameter of nanoparticles is varied within the range 7.2–22 nm and the velocity of impact is equal to 500 or 1000 m/s. Dislocation analysis shows that a large quantity of dislocations is formed within the impact area. Overall length of dislocations is determined, first of all, by the impact velocity and by the size of incident copper nanoparticle, in other words, by the kinetic energy of the nanoparticle. Dislocations occupy the total volume of the impacted aluminum single crystal layer (40.5 nm in thickness) in the form of intertwined structure in the case of large kinetic energy of the incident nanoparticle. Decrease in the initial kinetic energy or increase in the layer thickness lead to restriction of the penetration depth of the dislocation net; formation of separate dislocation loops is observed in this case. Increase in the initial system temperature slightly raises the dislocation density inside the bombarded layer and considerably decreases the dislocation density inside the nanoparticle. The temperature increase also leads to a deeper penetration of the copper atoms inside the aluminum. Additional molecular dynamic simulations show that the deposited particles demonstrate a very good adhesion even in the case of the considered relatively large nanoparticles. Medium energy of the nanoparticles corresponding to velocity of about 500 m/s and elevated temperature of the

  16. High-speed collision of copper nanoparticle with aluminum surface: Molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelko, Victor V.; Mayer, Alexander E.; Krasnikov, Vasiliy S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • High-speed nanoparticle impact induces shock waves and intensive plastic deformation. • Lattice orientation strongly influences on the deformation degree. • Plastic deformation goes through nucleation, growth and separation of semi-loops. • Medium impact energy and elevated temperature are optimal for high-quality coating. • High impact velocity and room temperature lead to plastic deformation and coating. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of the high-speed collision of copper nanoparticles with aluminum surface by means of molecular dynamic simulations. Studied diameter of nanoparticles is varied within the range 7.2–22 nm and the velocity of impact is equal to 500 or 1000 m/s. Dislocation analysis shows that a large quantity of dislocations is formed within the impact area. Overall length of dislocations is determined, first of all, by the impact velocity and by the size of incident copper nanoparticle, in other words, by the kinetic energy of the nanoparticle. Dislocations occupy the total volume of the impacted aluminum single crystal layer (40.5 nm in thickness) in the form of intertwined structure in the case of large kinetic energy of the incident nanoparticle. Decrease in the initial kinetic energy or increase in the layer thickness lead to restriction of the penetration depth of the dislocation net; formation of separate dislocation loops is observed in this case. Increase in the initial system temperature slightly raises the dislocation density inside the bombarded layer and considerably decreases the dislocation density inside the nanoparticle. The temperature increase also leads to a deeper penetration of the copper atoms inside the aluminum. Additional molecular dynamic simulations show that the deposited particles demonstrate a very good adhesion even in the case of the considered relatively large nanoparticles. Medium energy of the nanoparticles corresponding to velocity of about 500 m/s and elevated temperature of the

  17. Superconductivity in doped antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, M.

    1990-09-01

    The antiferromagnetic S = 1/2 Heisenberg model is extended to account for the presence of holes. The holes move along a sublattice whose sites are located in between the spin sites. The spin-hole coupling arises from the modification of the exchange interaction between two neighbouring spins when the site between them is occupied by a hole. this physical picture leads to a generalized version of the so called t-J model Hamiltonian. The use of a recently developed method that introduces spin-O excitations for dealing with the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model allows us to map the model Hamiltonian onto a Froelich one, with the spin-O magnetic excitations substituting phonons. The case of electrons moving along the spin sites is discussed as well. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of tension–compression asymmetry in nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kai, E-mail: kaizhou@aliyun.com; Liu, Bin; Shao, Shaofeng; Yao, Yijun

    2017-04-04

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate uniaxial tension and compression of nanocrystalline copper with mean grain sizes of 3.8–11.9 nm. The simulation results show an apparent asymmetry in the flow stress, with nanocrystalline copper stronger in compression than in tension. The asymmetry exhibits a maximum at the mean grain size of about 10 nm. The dominant mechanism of the asymmetry depends on the mean grain size. At small grain sizes, grain-boundary based plasticity dominates the asymmetry, while for large grain sizes the asymmetry mainly arises from the pressure dependent dislocation emission from grain boundaries. - Highlights: • The tension–compression asymmetry in strength exhibits a maximum at the mean grain size of about 10 nm. • The main mechanisms govern the asymmetry are grain-boundary mediated plasticity and dislocation based plasticity. • The above-mentioned mechanisms are both grain size and pressure dependent. • The transition of the asymmetry with the mean grain size is not influenced by strain rate.

  19. Concepts of antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gomonay, O.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Sinova, Jairo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 1700022. ISSN 1862-6254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.032, year: 2016

  20. Brittle versus ductile behaviour of nanotwinned copper: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Linqing; Lu, Cheng; Zhao, Xing; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Kuiyu; Michal, Guillaume; Tieu, Kiet

    2015-01-01

    Nanotwinned copper (Cu) exhibits an unusual combination of ultra-high yield strength and high ductility. A brittle-to-ductile transition was previously experimentally observed in nanotwinned Cu despite Cu being an intrinsically ductile metal. However, the atomic mechanisms responsible for brittle fracture and ductile fracture in nanotwinned Cu are still not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures have been performed to investigate the fracture behaviour of a nanotwinned Cu specimen with a single-edge-notched crack whose surface coincides with a twin boundary. Three temperature ranges are identified, indicative of distinct fracture regimes, under tensile straining perpendicular to the twin boundary. Below 1.1 K, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. Between 2 K and 30 K a dynamic brittle-to-ductile transition is observed. Above 40 K the crack propagates in a ductile mode. A detailed analysis has been carried out to understand the atomic fracture mechanism in each fracture regime

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of aggregation of copper nanoparticles with different heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qibin; Wang, Meng; Liang, Yunpei; Lin, Liyang; Fu, Tao; Wei, Peitang; Peng, Tiefeng

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the heating rates' effect on aggregation of two copper nanoparticles. The aggregation can be distinguished into three distinct regimes by the contacting and melting of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles contacting at a lower temperature during the sintering with lower heating rate, meanwhile, some temporary stacking fault exists at the contacting neck. The aggregation properties of the system, i.e. neck diameter, shrinkage ratio, potential energy, mean square displacement (MSD) and relative gyration radius, experience drastic changes due to the free surface annihilation. After the nanoparticles coalesced for a stable period, the shrinkage ratio, MSD, relative gyration radius and neck diameter of the system are dramatically changed during the melting process. It is shown that the shrinkage ratio and MSD have relative larger increasing ratio for a lower heating rate. While the evolution of the relative gyration radius and neck diameter is only sensitive to the temperature.

  2. Ab initio electronic structure and correlations in pristine and potassium-doped molecular crystals of copper phthalocyanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giovannetti, G.; Brocks, G.; van den Brink, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect that potassium intercalation has on the electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecular crystals by means of ab initio density functional calculations. Pristine CuPc (in its alpha and beta structures) is found to be an insulator containing local magnetic

  3. Influence of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on Transport of Cadmium and Copper Ions across Model Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parisová, Martina; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Mareček, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), s. 27-44 ISSN 1452-3981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : cadmium * copper * low molecular weight organic acid Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013

  4. Molecular control of copper homeostasis in filamentous fungi: increased expression of a metallothionein gene during aging of Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, N B; Borghouts, C; Hamann, A; Specke, V; Osiewacz, H D

    2001-01-01

    The lifespan of the ascomycete Podospora anserina was previously demonstrated to be significantly increased in a copper-uptake mutant, suggesting that copper is a potential stressor involved in degenerative processes. In order to determine whether changes in copper stress occur in the cells during normal aging of cultures, we cloned and characterized a gene coding for a component of the molecular machinery involved in the control of copper homeostasis. This gene, PaMt1, is a single-copy gene that encodes a metallothionein of 26 amino acids. The coding sequence of PaMt1 is interrupted by a single intron. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of sequence identity to metallothioneins of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa and the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus, and to the N-terminal portion of mammalian metallothioneins. Levels of PaMt1 transcript increase in response to elevated amounts of copper in the growth medium and during aging of wild-type cultures. In contrast, in the long-lived mutant grisea, transcript levels first increase but then decrease again. The ability of wild-type cultures to respond to exogenous copper stress via the induction of PaMt1 transcription is not affected as they grow older.

  5. Spin reorientation via antiferromagnetic coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar, M., E-mail: mojtaba.ranjbar@physics.gu.se [Data Storage Institute, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 5, Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sbiaa, R. [Data Storage Institute, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 5, Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, PC 123, Muscat (Oman); Dumas, R. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Piramanayagam, S. N. [Data Storage Institute, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 5, Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    Spin reorientation in antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) Co/Pd multilayers, wherein the thickness of the constituent Co layers was varied, was studied. AFC-Co/Pd multilayers were observed to have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for a Co sublayer thickness of 1 nm, much larger than what is usually observed in systems without antiferromagnetic coupling. When similar multilayer structures were prepared without antiferromagnetic coupling, this effect was not observed. The results indicate that the additional anisotropy energy contribution arising from the antiferromagnetic coupling, which is estimated to be around 6 × 10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, induces the spin-reorientation.

  6. Diamond lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oitmaa, J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate ground-state and high-temperature properties of the nearest-neighbour Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the three-dimensional diamond lattice, using series expansion methods. The ground-state energy and magnetization, as well as the magnon spectrum, are calculated and found to be in good agreement with first-order spin-wave theory, with a quantum renormalization factor of about 1.13. High-temperature series are derived for the free energy, and physical and staggered susceptibilities for spin S  =  1/2, 1 and 3/2, and analysed to obtain the corresponding Curie and Néel temperatures.

  7. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Bhargab; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Naskar, Jnan Prakash

    2017-02-01

    Two osazone based ligands, butane-2,3-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (BDBPH) and hexane-3,4-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (HDBPH), were synthesized out of the 2:1 M Schiff base condensation of 2-hydrazino pyridine respectively with 2,3-butanedione and 3,4-hexanedione. The X-ray crystal structures of both the ligands have been determined. The copper(II) complex of HDBPH has also been synthesized and structurally characterized. HDBPH and its copper(II) complex have thoroughly been characterized through various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of the copper complex of HDBPH shows that it is a monomeric Cu(II) complex having 'N4O2' co-ordination chromophore. Interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with these ligands and their monomeric copper(II) complexes have been studied by various spectroscopic means. The experimental findings show that the ligands as well as their copper complexes are good HSA binders. Molecular docking investigations have also been done to unravel the mode of binding of the species with HSA.

  8. Understanding the Formation of the Self-Assembly of Colloidal Copper Nanoparticles by Surfactant: A Molecular Velcro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Kely Bortoleto-Bugs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly procedure is employed to synthesize colloidal copper nanoparticles (ccNPs with cationic surfactant in an environmentally friendly method. Scanning electron microscopy images provide a clear view of the ccNPs formed having an approximate size of 15 nm. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the ccNPs have the two types of copper oxide as well as the metallic copper. The new procedure shows that the cationic surfactant CTAB plays an important role in the understanding and development of self-assembly. There is a strong relationship between the ccNPs formation with the critical micelle concentration of the CTAB which influences both shape and size. The outcomes allowed the development of a molecular model for the ccNPs synthesis showing that the CTAB monomer on the surface has the function of a molecular velcro making the linkage of ccNPs to form an agglomerate with size around 600 nm. Finally, with the emerging new technologies, the synthesis of copper oxide takes a new perspective for their applicability in diverse integrated areas such as the flexible electronics and energy.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study on Lubrication Mechanism in Crystalline Structure between Copper and Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Saitoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the nanosized mechanism of good lubrication in copper disulfide (Cu2S crystal which is used as a sliding material, atomistic modeling of Cu2S is conducted and molecular dynamics (MD simulations are performed in this paper. The interatomic interaction between atoms and crystalline structure in the phase of hexagonal crystal of Cu2S are carefully estimated by first-principle calculations. Then, approximating these interactions, we originally construct a conventional interatomic potential function of Cu2S crystal in its hexagonal phase. By using this potential function, we perform MD simulation of Cu2S crystal which is subjected to shear loading parallel to the basal plane. We compare results obtained by different conditions of sliding directions. Unlike ordinary hexagonal metallic crystals, it is found that the easy-glide direction does not always show small shear stress for Cu2S crystal. Besides, it is found that shearing velocity affects largely the magnitude of averaged shear stress. Generally speaking, higher velocity results in higher resistance against shear deformation. As a result, it is understood that Cu2S crystal exhibits somewhat liquid-like (amorphous behavior in sliding condition and shear resistance increases with increase of sliding speed.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of cross-slip and the intersection of dislocations in copper

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Maozhen; Gao, K W; Qiao, L J

    2003-01-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to simulate cross-slip by thermal activation at 30 K and the intersection of dislocations in copper containing 1.6 x 10 sup 6 atoms using the embedded atom method potential. The results show that an extended screw dislocation can recombine through thermal activation at 30 K into a constriction on the surface because of stress imbalance and the constriction will split again in the other slip plane. Removing the constriction along the extended dislocation results in a cross-slip of the screw dislocation at low temperature. After the intersection between a moving right-hand screw dislocation DC and a perpendicular left-hand dislocation BA, whose ends are fixed on the surfaces, an extended jog corresponding to a row of one-third vacancies forms in BA and a trail of vacancies behind DC. If the intersected dislocation is a right-hand screw dislocation AB, the jog formed in AB corresponds to a row of one-third interstitials and the point defects behind DC are interstitials. Afte...

  11. Molecular characterization of copper in soils using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strawn, Daniel G.; Baker, Leslie L.

    2009-01-01

    Bioavailability of Cu in the soil is a function of its speciation. In this paper we investigated Cu speciation in six soils using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF). The XANES and EXAFS spectra in all of the soils were the same. μ-XRF results indicated that the majority of the Cu particles in the soils were not associated with calcium carbonates, Fe oxides, or Cu sulfates. Principal component analysis and target transform of the XANES and EXAFS spectra suggested that Cu adsorbed on humic acid (HA) was an acceptable match. Thus it appears that Cu in all of the soils is primarily associated with soil organic matter (SOM). Theoretical fitting of the molecular structure in the soil EXAFS spectra revealed that the Cu in the soils existed as Cu atoms bound in a bidentate complex to O or N functional groups. - Copper speciation in six soils was investigated using XANES, EXAFS, and μ-XRF.

  12. Evolution of elastic precursor and plastic shock wave in copper via molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriot, Romain; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Oleynik, Ivan I; Inogamov, Nail A

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate shock propagation in single crystal copper. It is shown that the P-V plastic Hugoniot is unique regardless of the sample's orientation, its microstructure, or its length. However, the P-V pathway to the final state is not, and depends on many factors. Specifically, it is shown that the pressure in the elastic precursor (the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL)) decreases as the shock wave propagates in a micron-sized sample. The attenuation of the HEL in sufficiently-long samples is the main source of disagreement between previous MD simulations and experiment: while single crystal experiments showed that the plastic shock speed is orientation-independent, the simulated plastic shock speed was observed to be orientation-dependent in relatively short single-crystal samples. Such orientation dependence gradually disappears for relatively long, micrometer-sized, samples for all three low-index crystallographic directions (100), (110), and (111), and the plastic shock velocities for all three directions approach the one measured in experiment. The MD simulations also demonstrate the existence of subsonic plastic shock waves generated by relatively weak supporting pressures.

  13. Forms of adsorption and transition states of oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen and dissociation of nitrogen monooxide, catalyzed by monovalent copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A. I.; Mashutin, V. Y.; Vishnjakov, A. V.

    With the help of the results of semiempirical (parametric method 3) and ab initio (second-order Møller-Plesset [MP2] unrestricted Hartree-Fock [UHF] 6-31G**, unrestricted density functional theory [UDFT] 6-31G** Becke's three-parameter exchange functional and the gradient-corrected functional of Lee, Yang, and Paar [B3LYP] and UDFT LANL2DZ B3LYP) quantum-chemical calculations has been studied the complexation CO and NO with molecular hydroxide of copper(I). The influence of charge defects has been simulated by the calculations of anionic, neutral, and cationic systems. It is shown that CO and NO are mainly coordinated by nonoxygen atom on an atom of copper(I) hydroxide as one- and two-center forms. These forms are suitable for appearance of prereactionary complexes of catalytic oxidation CO by molecular oxygen and decomposition NO into atoms of nitrogen and oxygen. The corresponding prereactionary complexes for systems with participation of copper(II) hydroxide and copper(III) hydroxide are not revealed. The calculations predict inhibiting impact of copper(II) and copper(III) of the observed reactions. Computed stability of complexes CO and NO with copper(I) hydroxide and activation energy of catalytic conversion of monooxides essentially depend on an excessive charge of the system. Introduction of electron-donating additives into copper(I) hydroxide promotes rise of catalytic activity of copper(I) compound.

  14. Controlling molecular condensation/diffusion of copper phthalocyanine by local electric field induced with scanning tunneling microscope tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Katsumi; Yaginuma, Shin; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered the condensation/diffusion phenomena of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules controlled with a pulsed electric field induced by the scanning tunneling microscope tip. This behavior is not explained by the conventional induced dipole model. In order to understand the mechanism, we have measured the electronic structure of the molecule by tunneling spectroscopy and also performed theoretical calculations on molecular orbitals. These data clearly indicate that the molecule is positively charged owing to charge transfer to the substrate, and that hydrogen bonding exists between CuPc molecules, which makes the molecular island stable.

  15. Quantum Number Fractionalization in Antiferromagnets

    OpenAIRE

    Laughlin, R. B.; Giuliano, D.; Caracciolo, R.; White, O.

    1998-01-01

    This is a pedagogical introduction to the mathematics of 1-dimensional spin-1/2 antiferromagnets. Topics covered include the Haldane-Shastry Hamiltonian, vector ``supercharges'', conserved spin currents, spinons, the supersymmetric Kuramoto-Yokoyama Hamiltonian, and holons.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Triboulet

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide, increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of dislocation cores in copper: structure and diffusion at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jin

    1989-01-01

    The variation of the core structure of an easy glide dislocation with temperature and its influence on the stacking fault energy (γ) have been investigated for the first time by molecular-dynamics simulation in copper. The calculations have been performed at various temperatures, using an ab-initio pseudo-potential. Our results show that the core of the Shockley partials, into which the perfect edge dislocation dissociates, becomes increasingly extended as temperature increases. However their separation remains constant. The calculated energy values of the infinite extension stacking fault and the ribbon fault between the partials are quite different, but the evolution of the core structure does not affect the temperature dependence of the latter. We have found that a high disorder appears in the core region when temperature increases due to important anharmonicity effects of the atomic vibrations. The core structure remains solid-like for T m (T m : melting point of bulk) in spite of the high disorder. Above T m , the liquid nucleus germinates in the core region, and then propagates into the bulk. In addition we studied the mobility of vacancies and interstitials trapped on the partials. Although fast diffusion is thought to occur exclusively in a pipe surrounding the dislocation core, in the present study a quasi two-dimensional diffusion is observed for both defects not only in the cores but also in the stacking fault ribbon. On the opposite of current assumptions, the activation energy for diffusion is found to be identical for both defects, which may therefore comparably contribute to mass transport along the dislocations. (author) [fr

  19. Influence of grain size on the mechanical properties of nano-crystalline copper; insights from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rida, A.; Makke, A.; Rouhaud, E.; Micoulaut, M.

    2017-10-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanical properties of a columnar nanocrystalline copper with a mean grain size between 8.91 nm and 24 nm. The used samples were generated by using a melting cooling method. These samples were submitted to uniaxial tensile test. The results reveal the presence of a critical mean grain size between 16 and 20 nm, where there is an inversion in the conventional Hall-Petch tendency. This inversion is illustrated by the increase of flow stress with the increase of the mean grain size. This transition is caused by shifting of the deformation mechanism from dislocations to a combination of grain boundaries sliding and dislocations. Moreover, the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline copper has been investigated. The results show a decrease of the flow stress and Young's modulus when the temperature increases.

  20. Corrosion of copper in distilled water without molecular oxygen and the detection of produced hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultquist, G.; Graham, M.J.; Kodra, O.; Moisa, S.; Liu, R.; Bexell, U.; Smialek, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on hydrogen pressures measured during the longterm immersion (∼19 000 hours) of copper in oxygen-free distilled water. Hydrogen gas evolution is from copper corrosion and similar pressures (in the mbar range) are measured for copper contained in either a 316 stainless steel or titanium system. Copper corrosion products have been examined ex-situ by SEM and characterized by Xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). XPS strongly indicates a corrosion product containing both hydroxide and oxide. SIMS shows that oxygen is mainly present in the outer 0.3 μm surface region and that hydrogen penetrates to depths in the substrate well below the corrosion product

  1. Molecular Characterization of CTR-type Copper Transporters in an Oceanic Diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica 1005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Price, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth because of its role as a redox cofactor in electron transfer proteins in photosynthesis and respiration, and a potentially limiting resource in parts of the open sea. Thalassiosira oceanica 1005 can grow at inorganic copper concentrations varying from 10 fmol/L to 10 nmol/L by regulating copper uptake across plasma membrane. Four putative CTR-type copper transporter genes (ToCTR1, ToCTR2, ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2) were identified by BLASTP search against the T. oceanica genome. Predicted gene models were revised by assembled mRNA sequencing transcripts and updated gene models contained all conserved features of characterized CTR-type copper transporters. ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 may arise from one another by gene duplication as they shared a sequence similarity of 97.6% with a peptide insertion of 5 amino acids at N-terminus of ToCTR3.1. The expression of ToCTR1, ToCTR2 and ToCTR3.1/3.2 was upregulated in low copper concentrations, but only ToCTR3.1/3.2 showed a significant increase (2.5 fold) in copper-starved cells. Both ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 restored growth of a yeast double mutant, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ctr1Δctr3Δ, in copper deficient medium. GFP-fused ToCTR expression showed that some ToCTR3.1 localized to the plasma membrane but a large portion was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Inefficient targeting of ToCTR3.1 to the yeast outer membrane may explain poorer growth compared to the Saccharomyces native ScCTR1 transformant. Thus, diatom CTR genes encoding CTR-type copper transporters show high-affinity copper uptake and their regulation may enable diatoms to survive in ocean environments containing a wide range of copper concentrations.

  2. ROS dependent copper toxicity in Hydra-biochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Mohammed; Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Rajendran, Ramasamy Babu; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-01-01

    Copper, an essential microelement, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at concentrations higher than that could be tolerated. Copper-induced oxidative stress has been documented in vitro, yet the in vivo effects of metal-induced oxidative stress have not been extensively studied in the lower invertebrates. The objective of the present study has been to find the effect of ROS-mediated toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of copper at organismal and cellular levels in Hydra magnipapillata. Exposure to copper at sublethal concentrations (0.06 and 0.1mg/L) for 24 or 48h resulted in generation of significant levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We infer that the free radicals here originate predominantly at the lysosomes but partly at the mitochondria also as visualized by H2-DHCFDA staining. Quantitative real-time PCR of RNA extracted from copper-exposed polyps revealed dose-dependent up-regulation of all antioxidant response genes (CAT, SOD, GPx, GST, GR, G6PD). Concurrent increase of Hsp70 and FoxO genes suggests the ability of polyps to respond to stress, which at 48h was not the same as at 24h. Interestingly, the transcript levels of all genes were down-regulated at 48h as compared to 24h incubation period. Comet assay indicated copper as a powerful genotoxicant, and the DNA damage was dose- as well as duration-dependent. Western blotting of proteins (Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3) confirmed ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death in copper-exposed animals. These changes correlated well with changes in morphology, regeneration and aspects of reproduction. Taken together, the results indicate increased production of intracellular ROS in Hydra on copper exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy for the fabrication of copper nanowires: Atomic contacts with quantized conductance, and molecular adsorption effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, Marion; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electrochemistry and SECM to generate copper nanowires with quantized conductance. ► Stable atomic contacts lasting for several hundreds of seconds have been obtained. ► The quantized conductances are independent of the tip and gap size. ► The method allows contacts to be generated in the presence of chosen molecules. ► Four-electrode configuration opens the route to redox gated atomic contact. - Abstract: Scanning electrochemical microscopy, SECM, is proposed as a tool for the fabrication of copper nanowires. In a first step, configuration based on two electrodes, a platinum UME (cathode) and a copper substrate (anode), operating in the SECM configuration was employed. For nanowires generated in water the conductance changes stepwise and varies by integer values of the conductance quantum G 0 . The formation of atomic contacts is supported by the ohmic behavior of the I–V curve. It depends neither on the UME tip radius nor on the initial gap size between tip and substrate. Atomic contacts generated in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) have conductances below 1G 0 attributed to molecular adsorption on the contact. In some cases, the nanowires have low conductance, 0.01G 0 . The corresponding I–V curve shows tunneling rather than ohmic behavior, suggesting that molecular junctions are formed with a few surfactant molecules trapped between the two electrodes. Finally, copper nanowires with quantized conductance have been generated using the SECM operating in a four-electrode setup. Thanks to the reference electrode, this configuration leads to better control of the potential of each working electrode; this setup will make it possible to evaluate the conductance variation and/or modulation upon electrochemical stimuli.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Separation Behavior at the Interface between PVDF Binder and Copper Current Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Li-ion batteries, the mechanical strengths at the interfaces of binder/particle and binder/current collector play an important role in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the composite electrode. In this work, the separation behaviors between polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF binders and copper current collectors are studied in the opening and sliding modes using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The simulation shows that the separation occurs inside the PVDF rather than at the interface due to the strong adhesion between PVDF and copper. This fracture behavior is different from the behavior of the PVDF/graphite basal plane that shows a clear separation at the interface. The results suggest that the adhesion strength of the PVDF/copper is stronger than that of the PVDF/graphite basal plane. The methodology used in MD simulation can directly evaluate the adhesion strength at the interfaces of various materials between binders, substrates, and particles at the atomic scales. The proposed method can therefore provide a guideline for the design of the electrode in order to enhance the mechanical integrity for better battery performance.

  5. Extended quantum critical phase in a magnetized spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, M.B.; Reich, D.H.; Broholm, C.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the magnetic field dependence of excitations in the quantum critical state of the spin S=1/2 linear chain Heisenberg antiferromagnet copper pyrazine dinitrate (CuPzN). The complete spectrum was measured at k(B)T/Jless than or equal to0.025 for H=0 and H=8.7 T, where...

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of strontium lanthanum copper oxide thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, John Wallace

    Among the multitude of known cuprate material families and associated structures, the archetype is "infinite-layer" ACuO2, where perfectly square and flat CuO2 planes are separated by layers of alkaline earth atoms. The infinite-layer structure is free of magnetic rare earth ions, oxygen chains, orthorhombic distortions, incommensurate superstructures, ordered vacancies, and other complications that abound among the other material families. Furthermore, it is the only cuprate that can be made superconducting by both electron and hole doping, making it a potential platform for decoding the complex many-body interactions responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. Research on the infinite-layer compound has been severely hindered by the inability to synthesize bulk single crystals, but recent progress has led to high-quality superconducting thin film samples. Here we report in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of epitaxially-stabilized Sr1-chiLa chiCuO2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. At low doping, the material exhibits a dispersive lower Hubbard band typical of other cuprate parent compounds. As carriers are added to the system, a continuous evolution from Mott insulator to superconducting metal is observed as a coherent low-energy band develops on top of a concomitant remnant lower Hubbard band, gradually filling in the Mott gap. For chi = 0.10, our results reveal a strong coupling between electrons and (pi,pi) anti-ferromagnetism, inducing a Fermi surface reconstruction that pushes the nodal states below the Fermi level and realizing nodeless superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurements indicate the presence of a surface reconstruction that is consistent with the polar nature of Sr1-chiLachiCuO2. Most knowledge about the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram has been deduced by generalizing from a single material family, Re2-chi CechiCuO4, where robust antiferromagnetism has been observed past chi

  7. Synthesis, molecular structures and ESI-mass studies of copper(I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 127, No. 10, October 2015, pp. 1859–1869. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... MS received 11 June 2015; revised 19 August 2015; accepted 24 August 2015. Abstract. Equimolar reaction of copper(I) bromide with ...... Homsy N K, Noltemeyer M, Roesky H W, Schmidt H-G and Sheldrick G M 1984 Inorg. Chim. Acta 90 L59.

  8. Hindered rotation of a copper phthalocyanine molecule on C60 : Experiments and molecular mechanics calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fendrich, M.; Wagner, Th.; Stöhr, M.; Möller, R.

    2006-01-01

    If copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules are deposited on a Au(111) surface covered with a monolayer of C60, the molecules are found to adsorb individually onto the close-packed layer of C60. As the adsorption site of the CuPc is not symmetric with respect to the underlying C60 layer, the CuPc

  9. Excellent Tribological Properties of Lower Reduced Graphene Oxide Content Copper Composite by Using a One-Step Reduction Molecular-Level Mixing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Nie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduced graphene oxide (RGO composite copper matrix powders were fabricated successfully by using a modified molecular-level mixing (MLM method. Divalent copper ions (Cu2+ were adsorbed in oxygen functional groups of graphene oxide (GO as a precursor, then were reduced simultaneously by one step chemical reduction. RGO showed a distribution converting from a random to a three-dimensional network in the copper matrix when its content increased to above 1.0 wt.% The tribological tests indicated that the friction coefficient of the composite with 1.0 wt.% RGO decreased markedly from 0.6 to 0.07 at an applied load of 10 N, and the wear rate was about one-third of pure copper. The excellent tribological properties were attributed to a three-dimensional and uniform distribution, which contributes to improving toughness and adhesion strength.

  10. How to manipulate magnetic states of antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cheng; You, Yunfeng; Chen, Xianzhe; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuyan; Pan, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials, which have drawn considerable attention recently, have fascinating features: they are robust against perturbation, produce no stray fields, and exhibit ultrafast dynamics. Discerning how to efficiently manipulate the magnetic state of an antiferromagnet is key to the development of antiferromagnetic spintronics. In this review, we introduce four main methods (magnetic, strain, electrical, and optical) to mediate the magnetic states and elaborate on intrinsic origins of different antiferromagnetic materials. Magnetic control includes a strong magnetic field, exchange bias, and field cooling, which are traditional and basic. Strain control involves the magnetic anisotropy effect or metamagnetic transition. Electrical control can be divided into two parts, electric field and electric current, both of which are convenient for practical applications. Optical control includes thermal and electronic excitation, an inertia-driven mechanism, and terahertz laser control, with the potential for ultrafast antiferromagnetic manipulation. This review sheds light on effective usage of antiferromagnets and provides a new perspective on antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  11. Exchange bias in diluted-antiferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Zhongquan; Zhan, Xiaozhi; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The hysteresis-loop properties of a diluted-antiferromagnetic (DAF) layer exchange coupling to an antiferromagnetic (AF) layer are investigated by means of numerical simulations. Remarkable loop shift and coercivity enhancement are observed in such DAF/AF bilayers, while they are absent in the uncoupled DAF single layer. The influences of pinned domains, dilution, cooling field and DAF layer thickness on the loop shift are investigated systematically. The result unambiguously confirms an exchange bias (EB) effect in the DAF/AF bilayers. It also reveals that the EB effect originates from the pinned AF domains within the DAF layer. In contrast to conventional EB systems, frozen uncompensated spins are not found at the interface of the AF pinning layer. (paper)

  12. Focused issue on antiferromagnetic spintronics: An overview (Part of a collection of reviews on antiferromagnetic spintronics)

    KAUST Repository

    Jungwirth, T.

    2017-05-30

    This focused issue attempts to provide a comprehensive introduction into the field of antiferromagnetic spintronics. Apart from the brief overview below, it features five review articles. The intention is to cover in a coherent and complementary way key physical aspects of the antiferromagnetic spintronics research. These range from microelectronic memory devices and optical manipulation and detection of antiferromagnetic spins, to the fundamentals of antiferromagnetic dynamics in uniform or spin-textured systems, and to the interplay of antiferromagnetic spintronics with topological phenomena. The antiferromagnetic ordering can take a number of forms including fully compensated collinear, non-collinear, and non-coplanar magnetic lattices, compensated and uncompensated ferrimagnets, or metamagnetic materials hosting an antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition. Apart from the variety of distinct magnetic crystal structures, the focused issue also encompasses spintronic phenomena and devices studied in antiferromagnet/ferromagnet heterostructures and in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  13. Focused issue on antiferromagnetic spintronics: An overview (Part of a collection of reviews on antiferromagnetic spintronics)

    KAUST Repository

    Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, J.; Manchon, Aurelien; Marti, X.; Wunderlich, J.; Felser, C.

    2017-01-01

    This focused issue attempts to provide a comprehensive introduction into the field of antiferromagnetic spintronics. Apart from the brief overview below, it features five review articles. The intention is to cover in a coherent and complementary way key physical aspects of the antiferromagnetic spintronics research. These range from microelectronic memory devices and optical manipulation and detection of antiferromagnetic spins, to the fundamentals of antiferromagnetic dynamics in uniform or spin-textured systems, and to the interplay of antiferromagnetic spintronics with topological phenomena. The antiferromagnetic ordering can take a number of forms including fully compensated collinear, non-collinear, and non-coplanar magnetic lattices, compensated and uncompensated ferrimagnets, or metamagnetic materials hosting an antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition. Apart from the variety of distinct magnetic crystal structures, the focused issue also encompasses spintronic phenomena and devices studied in antiferromagnet/ferromagnet heterostructures and in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  14. Void initiation from interfacial debonding of spherical silicon particles inside a silicon-copper nanocomposite: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2017-02-01

    Silicon particles with diameters from 1.9 nm to 30 nm are embedded in a face-centered-cubic copper matrix to form nanocomposite specimens for simulation. The interfacial debonding of silicon particles from the copper matrix and the subsequent growth of nucleated voids are studied via molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results are examined from several different perspectives. The overall mechanical performance is monitored by the average stress-strain response and the accumulated porosity. The ‘relatively farthest-traveled’ atoms are identified to characterize the onset of interfacial debonding. The relative displacement field is plotted to illustrate both subsequent interfacial debonding and the growth of a nucleated void facilitated by a dislocation network. Our results indicate that the initiation of interfacial debonding is due to the accumulated surface stress if the matrix is initially dislocation-free. However, pre-existing dislocations can make a considerable difference. In either case, the dislocation emission also contributes to the subsequent debonding process. As for the size effect, the debonding of relatively larger particles causes a drop in the stress-strain curve. The volume fraction of second-phase particles is found to be more influential than the size of the simulation box on the onset of interfacial debonding. The volume fraction of second-phase particles also affects the shape of the nucleated void and, therefore, influences the stress response of the composite.

  15. 60 YEARS OF POMC: From POMC and α-MSH to PAM, molecular oxygen, copper, and vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhivya; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2016-05-01

    A critical role for peptide C-terminal amidation was apparent when the first bioactive peptides were identified. The conversion of POMC into adrenocorticotropic hormone and then into α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an amidated peptide, provided a model system for identifying the amidating enzyme. Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), the only enzyme that catalyzes this modification, is essential; mice lacking PAM survive only until mid-gestation. Purification and cloning led to the discovery that the amidation of peptidylglycine substrates proceeds in two steps: peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase catalyzes the copper- and ascorbate-dependent α-hydroxylation of the peptidylglycine substrate; peptidyl-α-hydroxyglycine α-amidating lyase cleaves the N-C bond, producing amidated product and glyoxylate. Both enzymes are contained in the luminal domain of PAM, a type 1 integral membrane protein. The structures of both catalytic cores have been determined, revealing how they interact with metals, molecular oxygen, and substrate to catalyze both reactions. Although not essential for activity, the intrinsically disordered cytosolic domain is essential for PAM trafficking. A phylogenetic survey led to the identification of bifunctional membrane PAM in Chlamydomonas, a unicellular eukaryote. Accumulating evidence points to a role for PAM in copper homeostasis and in retrograde signaling from the lumen of the secretory pathway to the nucleus. The discovery of PAM in cilia, cellular antennae that sense and respond to environmental stimuli, suggests that much remains to be learned about this ancient protein. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarlinski, Michael D., E-mail: michael.skarlinski@rochester.edu [Materials Science Program, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Quesnel, David J. [Materials Science Program, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the

  17. Molecular dynamic simulation of interaction of low-energy Ar and Xe ions with copper clusters at graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornich, G.V.; Lozovskaya, L.I.; Betts, G.; Zaporozhchenko, V.I.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    One conducted molecular and dynamic simulation of sputtering of isolated clusters consisting of 13, 27 and 195 Cu atoms from the (0001) graphite surface by 200 eV energy Ar and Xe ions. It is shown that the factors of reflection of Ar and Xe ions from copper clusters differ from one another insignificantly, though the energy of the reflected Xe ions is essentially lower than that of Ar ions. The values of the factor of cluster sputtering by Xe ions are higher in contrast to sputtering by Ar ions. One identified two mechanisms of cluster sputtering resulting in the maximum of sputtering intensity at the polar angles near the normal one, and in periodicity of maximums within the azimuth distributions of sputtering intensity with 60 deg period [ru

  18. Spin Structure Analyses of Antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Ho; Song, Young Sang; Lee, Hak Bong

    2010-05-01

    We have synthesized series of powder sample of incommensurate antiferromagnetic multiferroics, (Mn, Co)WO 4 and Al doped Ba 0.5 Sr 1.5 Zn 2 Fe 12 O 22 , incommensurate antiferromagnetic multiferroics. Their spin structure was studied by using the HRPD. In addition, we have synthesized series of crystalline samples of incommensurate multiferroics, (Mn, Co)WO 4 and olivines. Their spin structure was investigated using neutron diffraction under high magnetic field. As a result, we were able to draw the phase diagram of (Mn, Co)WO 4 as a function of composition and temperature. We learned the how the spin structure changes with increased ionic substitution. Finally we have drawn the phase diagram of the multicritical olivine Mn2SiS4/Mn2GeS4 as a function of filed and temperature through the spin structure studies

  19. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative.

  20. Analogies between antiferromagnets and antiferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enz, C.P.; Matthias, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    Ferro- and antiferromagnetism in the Laves phase TiBesub(2-x) Cusub(x) occurs for 0.1 4 H 2 PO 4 and its solid solutions with TlH 2 PO 4 and with the ferroelectric KH 2 PO 4 are discussed as function of deuteration and of pressure. Another analogy as function of pressure is established with the antiferroelectric perovskite PbZrO 3 . (author)

  1. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  2. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  3. Suppression of antiferromagnetic interactions through Cu vacancies in Mn-substituted CuInSe2 chalcopyrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Jinlei; Brunetta, Carl D; Aitken, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    Stoichiometric and Cu-poor Cu 0.95-x Mn 0.05 InSe 2 (x = 0-0.20) compounds were synthesized by high-temperature, solid-state reactions. The presence of copper vacancies is revealed by Rietveld refinements of combined neutron and x-ray powder diffraction data. The antiferromagnetic interaction is depressed by the copper deficiency, which may be explained as the competition between the antiferromagnetic Mn-Se-eMn superexchange interaction and the hole-mediated ferromagnetic exchange induced by the copper vacancy. The introduction of copper vacancies is proposed to be a viable route to impart carrier-mediated ferromagnetic exchange in the chalcopyrite-based dilute magnetic semiconductors. (paper)

  4. Improvement of Electrochemical Water Oxidation by Fine-Tuning the Structure of Tetradentate N4 Ligands of Molecular Copper Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junyu; Wang, Mei; Gao, Jinsuo; Han, Hongxian; Liu, Hong; Sun, Licheng

    2017-11-23

    Two copper complexes, [(L1)Cu(OH 2 )](BF 4 ) 2 [1; L1=N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane] and [(L2)Cu(OH 2 )](BF 4 ) 2 [2, L2=2,7-bis(2-pyridyl)-3,6-diaza-2,6-octadiene], were prepared as molecular water oxidation catalysts. Complex 1 displayed an overpotential (η) of 1.07 V at 1 mA cm -2 and an observed rate constant (k obs ) of 13.5 s -1 at η 1.0 V in pH 9.0 phosphate buffer solution, whereas 2 exhibited a significantly smaller η (0.70 V) to reach 1 mA cm -2 and a higher k obs (50.4 s -1 ) than 1 under identical test conditions. Additionally, 2 displayed better stability than 1 in controlled potential electrolysis experiments with a faradaic efficiency of 94 % for O 2 evolution at 1.58 V, when a casing tube was used for the Pt cathode. A possible mechanism for 1- and 2-catalyzed O 2 evolution reactions is discussed based on the experimental evidence. These comparative results indicate that fine-tuning the structures of tetradentate N 4 ligands can bring about significant change in the performance of copper complexes for electrochemical water oxidation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Spiral phases of doped antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shraiman, B.I.; Siggia, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The dipole density field describing the holls in a doped antiferromagnet is considered for law hole density in the semiclassical limit. This yields a phase in which the order parameter is planar and spirals round a fixed direction. The single spiral state breaks the continuous spin rotational symmetry and exhibits long-range order at zero temperature. In it there is a global spin direction as rotation axis. The double spiral state, in which there are two perpendicular directions, is isotropic in both spin and real space. Several results of microscopic calculations, carried out to understand the electronic states, quantum fluctuations, lattice effects and normal mode dynamics, are recapitulated. 8 refs

  6. The shear response of copper bicrystals with Σ11 symmetric and asymmetric tilt grain boundaries by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Kiet; Zhao, Xing; Pei, Linqing

    2015-04-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) are important microstructure features and can significantly affect the properties of nanocrystalline materials. Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the shear response and deformation mechanisms of symmetric and asymmetric Σ11 tilt GBs in copper bicrystals. Different deformation mechanisms were reported, depending on GB inclination angles and equilibrium GB structures, including GB migration coupled to shear deformation, GB sliding caused by local atomic shuffling, and dislocation nucleation from GB. The simulation showed that migrating Σ11(1 1 3) GB under shear can be regarded as sliding of GB dislocations and their combination along the boundary plane. A non-planar structure with dissociated intrinsic stacking faults was prevalent in Σ11 asymmetric GBs of Cu. This type of structure can significantly increase the ductility of bicrystal models under shear deformation. A grain boundary can be a source of dislocation and migrate itself at different stress levels. The intrinsic free volume involved in the grain boundary area was correlated with dislocation nucleation and GB sliding, while the dislocation nucleation mechanism can be different for a grain boundary due to its different equilibrium structures.Grain boundaries (GBs) are important microstructure features and can significantly affect the properties of nanocrystalline materials. Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the shear response and deformation mechanisms of symmetric and asymmetric Σ11 tilt GBs in copper bicrystals. Different deformation mechanisms were reported, depending on GB inclination angles and equilibrium GB structures, including GB migration coupled to shear deformation, GB sliding caused by local atomic shuffling, and dislocation nucleation from GB. The simulation showed that migrating Σ11(1 1 3) GB under shear can be regarded as sliding of GB dislocations and their combination along the

  7. Enhanced mechanical properties of graphene/copper nanocomposites using a molecular-level mixing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jaewon; Yoon, Taeshik; Jin, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jinsup; Kim, Taek-Soo; Hong, Soon Hyung; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2013-12-10

    RGO flakes are homogeneously dispersed in a Cu matrix through a molecular-level mixing process. This novel fabrication process prevents the agglomeration of the RGO and enhances adhesion between the RGO and the Cu. The yield strength of the 2.5 vol% RGO/Cu nanocomposite is 1.8 times higher than that of pure Cu. The strengthening mechanism of the RGO is investigated by a double cantilever beam test using the graphene/Cu model structure. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Reinforcing copper matrix composites through molecular-level mixing of functionalized nanodiamond by co-deposition route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jie; Zhao Naiqin; Shi Chunsheng; Du Xiwen; Li Jiajun; Nash, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This work reports a chemical method called 'co-deposition route' for fabricating ND (nanodiamond)/Cu composite at a molecular-level mixing. The main procedure of 'co-deposition route' includes four steps. ND particles have been functionalized by HF acid before co-deposition. SEM, HRTEM (high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffraction), EDS (energy-dispersive spectrum analysis) and optical microscope were carried out to characterize the as-prepared composite powders and bulk composites. Results indicated that copper matrix composite with a homogeneous dispersion of functionalized ND particles can be prepared. The modification of ND particles was performed by HF (30 vol%) acid at 70 deg. C, and C-F bond was successfully detected by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectrum) and IR (Infrared spectroscopy). The properties of relative density, microhardness and electric conductivity of ND/Cu composites have been measured. With the comparison of conventional methods, it showed that the as-prepared ND/Cu composites with good combined performances have a promising future for industry application

  9. Reinforcing copper matrix composites through molecular-level mixing of functionalized nanodiamond by co-deposition route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 30072 (China); Zhao Naiqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 30072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials (China)], E-mail: nqzhao@tju.edu.cn; Shi Chunsheng; Du Xiwen; Li Jiajun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 30072 (China); Nash, Philip [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2008-08-25

    This work reports a chemical method called 'co-deposition route' for fabricating ND (nanodiamond)/Cu composite at a molecular-level mixing. The main procedure of 'co-deposition route' includes four steps. ND particles have been functionalized by HF acid before co-deposition. SEM, HRTEM (high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffraction), EDS (energy-dispersive spectrum analysis) and optical microscope were carried out to characterize the as-prepared composite powders and bulk composites. Results indicated that copper matrix composite with a homogeneous dispersion of functionalized ND particles can be prepared. The modification of ND particles was performed by HF (30 vol%) acid at 70 deg. C, and C-F bond was successfully detected by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectrum) and IR (Infrared spectroscopy). The properties of relative density, microhardness and electric conductivity of ND/Cu composites have been measured. With the comparison of conventional methods, it showed that the as-prepared ND/Cu composites with good combined performances have a promising future for industry application.

  10. Cellular and molecular responses of adult zebrafish after exposure to CuO nanoparticles or ionic copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario-Parés, Unai; Lacave, Jose M; Reip, Paul; Cajaraville, Miren P; Orbea, Amaia

    2018-01-01

    Due to their antimicrobial, electrical and magnetic properties, copper nanoparticles (NPs) are suitable for a vast array of applications. Copper can be toxic to biota, making it necessary to assess the potential hazard of copper nanomaterials. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 10 µg Cu/L of CuO NPs of ≈100 nm (CuO-poly) or ionic copper to compare the effects provoked after 3 and 21 days of exposure and at 6 months post-exposure (mpe). At 21 days, significant copper accumulation was only detected in fish exposed to ionic copper. Exposure to both copper forms caused histopathological alterations that could reduce gill functionality, more markedly in the case of ionic copper. Nevertheless, at 6 mpe higher prevalences of gill lesions were detected in fish previously exposed to CuO-poly NPs. No relevant histological alterations were detected in liver, but the lysosomal membrane stability test showed significantly impaired general health status after exposure to both metal forms that lasted up to 6 mpe. 69 transcripts appeared regulated after 3 days of exposure to CuO-poly NPs, suggesting that NPs could produce oxidative stress and reduce metabolism and transport processes. Thirty transcripts were regulated after 21 days of exposure to ionic copper, indicating possible DNA damage. Genes of the circadian clock were identified as the key genes involved in time-dependent differences between the two copper forms. In conclusion, each copper form showed a distinct pattern of liver transcriptome regulation, but both caused gill histopathological alterations and long lasting impaired health status in adult zebrafish.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of structural changes during the collision of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, Justo; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Copa, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with embedded-atom potential (EAM) have been performed to study the energetic and structural changes during the collision and coalescence of two Cu n nanoparticles. We simulated collision of nanoparticles at several temperatures below the melting point and with different impact energy. Analyzing the potential energy change during the collision we identify three clearly defined stages. The pair correlation function and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural changes in the collision process. The variation in the time of the population of different pairs has been quantified, being observed diverse structural transformations. During the collision of two equal icosahedral nanoparticles ( Cu 55 ) has been observed different behavior of 1551 pairs depending on the impact velocity. (author).

  12. Singlet Ground State Magnetism: III Magnetic Excitons in Antiferromagnetic TbP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, K.; Loidl, A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1981-01-01

    The dispersion of the lowest magnetic excitations of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied in the antiferromagnetic phase by inelastic neutron scattering. The magnetic exchange interaction and the magnetic and the rhombohedral molecular fields have been determined.......The dispersion of the lowest magnetic excitations of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied in the antiferromagnetic phase by inelastic neutron scattering. The magnetic exchange interaction and the magnetic and the rhombohedral molecular fields have been determined....

  13. Novel insights in the molecular pathogenesis of human copper homeostasis disorders through studies of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, P. de

    2007-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for living organisms, yet it is very toxic when present in amounts exceeding cellular needs. Delicate mechanisms have evolved to ensure proper copper homeostasis is maintained for the organism, as well as at a cellular level, and perturbations in these mechanisms give

  14. Effect of Molecular Structure on Modulation of Passivation Films on Copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarski, Amy

    In order to optimize the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, there is a need to further understand the synergistic relationship between chemical and mechanical parameters to enhance the polishing process. CMP chemistry is very complex, as it contains complexing agents, oxidizing agents, passivating agents, and abrasive particles. This variety of components ensues chaos within the system, which complicates the understanding of the direct impact each component has on the CMP process. In order for there to be efficiency in the polishing process, specifically for copper (Cu) polishing, the chemistry must create a softened passivation layer on the Cu surface that is able to be readily removed by applied mechanical abrasion. Focusing on Cu CMP, the oxidation of Cu to Cu2+ needs to be thoroughly understood in order to probe the formation of creating this ideal passivated layer, which protects recessed Cu regions. The type of film that is formed, the strength of the film, and even the efficiency of film removal will be altered depending on the chemistry of interaction at the Cu surface. This thesis focuses on understanding the working mechanism of the film formation on Cu, depending on the passivating agent added to the system. The different passivating agents used, more specifically benzotriazole (BTA), triazole (TAZ), salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA), and benzimidazole (BIA), have all been known to create a light coat of protection on the recessed metal, providing corrosion resistance. In order to study the differences in these films, many different techniques can be utilized to characterize the films, such as electrochemical scans, referred to as Tafel plots, which will be performed to compare the differences of the films. By altering the temperature within the system, the activation energy for each system can also be determined as another way to characterize the density of the passive film formed. Furthermore, the generation of *OH will be monitored since the

  15. Antiferromagnetism and d-wave superconductivity in the Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahl, H.C.

    2007-07-25

    The two-dimensional Hubbard model is a promising effective model for the electronic degrees of freedom in the copper-oxide planes of high temperature superconductors. We present a functional renormalization group approach to this model with focus on antiferromagnetism and d-wave superconductivity. In order to make the relevant degrees of freedom more explicitly accessible on all length scales, we introduce composite bosonic fields mediating the interaction between the fermions. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is reflected in a non-vanishing expectation value of a bosonic field. The emergence of a coupling in the d-wave pairing channel triggered by spin wave fluctuations is demonstrated. Furthermore, the highest temperature at which the interaction strength for the electrons diverges in the renormalization flow is calculated for both antiferromagnetism and d-wave superconductivity over a wide range of doping. This ''pseudo-critical'' temperature signals the onset of local ordering. Moreover, the temperature dependence of d-wave superconducting order is studied within a simplified model characterized by a single coupling in the d-wave pairing channel. The phase transition within this model is found to be of the Kosterlitz-Thouless type. (orig.)

  16. Effects of vibration frequency on vibration-assisted nano-scratch process of mono-crystalline copper via molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has always been a critical issue to understand the material removal behavior of Vibration-Assisted Machining (VAM, especially on atomic level. To find out the effects of vibration frequency on material removal response, a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD model has been established in this research to investigate the effects of scratched groove, crystal defects on the surface quality, comparing with the Von Mises shear strain and tangential force in simulations during nano-scratching process. Comparisons are made among the results of simulations from different vibration frequency with the same scratching feed, depth, amplitude and crystal orientation. Copper potential in this simulation is Embedded-Atom Method (EAM potential. Interaction between copper and carbon atoms is Morse potential. Simulational results show that higher frequency can make groove smoother. Simulation with high frequency creates more dislocations to improve the machinability of copper specimen. The changing frequency does not have evident effects on Von Mises shear strain. Higher frequency can decrease the tangential force to reduce the consumption of cutting energy and tool wear. In conclusion, higher vibration frequency in VAM on mono-crystalline copper has positive effects on surface finish, machinablility and tool wear reduction.

  17. Effects of vibration frequency on vibration-assisted nano-scratch process of mono-crystalline copper via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Bo; Zhao, Hongwei, E-mail: hwzhao@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: khl69@163.com; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yihan; Han, Lei [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China); Kui, Hailin, E-mail: hwzhao@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: khl69@163.com [School of Transportation, Jilin University, 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China)

    2016-03-15

    It has always been a critical issue to understand the material removal behavior of Vibration-Assisted Machining (VAM), especially on atomic level. To find out the effects of vibration frequency on material removal response, a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) model has been established in this research to investigate the effects of scratched groove, crystal defects on the surface quality, comparing with the Von Mises shear strain and tangential force in simulations during nano-scratching process. Comparisons are made among the results of simulations from different vibration frequency with the same scratching feed, depth, amplitude and crystal orientation. Copper potential in this simulation is Embedded-Atom Method (EAM) potential. Interaction between copper and carbon atoms is Morse potential. Simulational results show that higher frequency can make groove smoother. Simulation with high frequency creates more dislocations to improve the machinability of copper specimen. The changing frequency does not have evident effects on Von Mises shear strain. Higher frequency can decrease the tangential force to reduce the consumption of cutting energy and tool wear. In conclusion, higher vibration frequency in VAM on mono-crystalline copper has positive effects on surface finish, machinablility and tool wear reduction.

  18. Dynamic rotor mode in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, Kim; Jacobsen, H.; Garde, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental, numerical, and theoretical evidence for an unusual mode of antiferromagnetic dynamics in nanoparticles. Elastic neutron scattering experiments on 8-nm particles of hematite display a loss of diffraction intensity with temperature, the intensity vanishing around 150 K...

  19. Antiferromagnetic resonance excited by oscillating electric currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Volker

    2017-12-01

    In antiferromagnetic materials the order parameter exhibits resonant modes at frequencies that can be in the terahertz range, making them interesting components for spintronic devices. Here, it is shown that antiferromagnetic resonance can be excited using the inverse spin-Hall effect in a system consisting of an antiferromagnetic insulator coupled to a normal-metal waveguide. The time-dependent interplay between spin torque, ac spin accumulation, and magnetic degrees of freedom is studied. It is found that the dynamics of the antiferromagnet affects the frequency-dependent conductivity of the normal metal. Further, a comparison is made between spin-current-induced and Oersted-field-induced excitation under the condition of constant power injection.

  20. Magnon Spin Nernst Effect in Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir A.; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2016-11-01

    We predict that a temperature gradient can induce a magnon-mediated spin Hall response in an antiferromagnet with nontrivial magnon Berry curvature. We develop a linear response theory which gives a general condition for a Hall current to be well defined, even when the thermal Hall response is forbidden by symmetry. We apply our theory to a honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet and discuss a role of magnon edge states in a finite geometry.

  1. Magnon Spin Nernst Effect in Antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir A; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2016-11-18

    We predict that a temperature gradient can induce a magnon-mediated spin Hall response in an antiferromagnet with nontrivial magnon Berry curvature. We develop a linear response theory which gives a general condition for a Hall current to be well defined, even when the thermal Hall response is forbidden by symmetry. We apply our theory to a honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet and discuss a role of magnon edge states in a finite geometry.

  2. Sputtering of copper atoms by keV atomic and molecular ions A comparison of experiment with analytical and computer based models

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, D R; Goelich,

    2002-01-01

    Non-resonant multiphoton ionisation combined with quadrupole and time-of-flight analysis has been used to measure energy distributions of sputtered copper atoms. The sputtering of a polycrystalline copper target by 3.6 keV Ar sup + , N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + and 1.8 keV N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + ion bombardment at 45 deg. has been investigated. The linear collision model in the isotropic limit fails to describe the high energy tail of the energy distributions. However the TRIM.SP computer simulation has been shown to provide a good description. The results indicate that an accurate description of sputtering by low energy, molecular ions requires the use of computer simulation rather than analytical approaches. This is particularly important when considering plasma-surface interactions in plasma etching and deposition systems.

  3. Understanding the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel and copper in sulphuric acid medium by amino acids using electrochemical techniques allied to molecular modelling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, Glaydson L.F.; Costa, Stefane N.; Freire, Valder N.; Casciano, Paulo N.S.; Correia, Adriana N.; Lima-Neto, Pedro de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel and of copper by the amino acids was studied. • Inhibition efficiencies were experimentally achieved by electrochemical impedance. • DFT and Monte Carlo methods allowed correlating molecular properties with inhibition efficiency. • The corrosion inhibition followed the electron donation the electron-back donations process. - Abstract: Six amino acids were evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel and copper in 0.5 mol L"−"1 H_2SO_4 solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance techniques allied to Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo computations The corrosion inhibitor rankings were: Arg > Gln > Asn > Met > Cys > Ser, for copper, and Met > Cys > Ser > Arg > Gln > Asn, for carbon steel. The DFT approach failed to explain the corrosion inhibition rating based on the HOMO and LUMO energies of the isolated amino acid molecules, while the simpler classical Monte Carlo approach, performed considering the interaction energies between the corrosion inhibitor and the metallic substrate, was successful.

  4. A molecular dynamics investigation into the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper subjected to nanoscale high speed grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen; Zhang, Liangchi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper when it is under a nanoscale high speed grinding of a diamond tip. The analysis was carried out with the aid of three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations. The key factors that would influence the deformation of the material were carefully explored by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and workpiece deformation, which include grinding speed, depth of cut, grid tip radius, crystal orientation and machining angle of copper. An analytical model was also established to predict the emission of partial dislocations during the nanoscale high speed grinding. The investigation showed that a higher grinding velocity, a larger tip radius or a larger depth of cut would result in a larger chipping volume and a greater temperature rise in the copper workpiece. A lower grinding velocity would produce more intrinsic stacking faults. It was also found that the transition of deformation mechanisms depends on the competition between the dislocations and deformation twinning. There is a critical machining angle, at which a higher velocity, a smaller tip radius, or a smaller depth of cut will reduce the subsurface damage and improve the smoothness of a ground surface. The established analytical model showed that the Shockley dislocation emission is most likely to occur with the crystal orientations of (0 0 1)[1 0 0] at 45° angle.

  5. Molecular structure, spectroscopic studies, and coppersbnd oxygen bond strength of α-methyl and α-ethyl derivatives of copper (II) acetylacetonate; Experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedkatouli, Seyedabdollah; Vakili, Mohammad; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz; Afzali, Raheleh

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the Cusbnd O bond strength of copper (II) α-methylacetylacetonate, Cu(3-Meacac)2, and copper (II) α-ethylacetylacetonate, Cu(3-Etacac)2, complexes in comparison to that in copper (II) acetylacetonate, Cu(acac)2. For this purpose, the molecular structure, UV spectra, and complete vibrational assignment of target molecules were investigated by DFT, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) theory, and Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) analysis at the B3LYP/6-311G* level of theory. The mentioned results are compared with those in Cu(acac)2. Fourier transform-Raman, IR, and UV spectra of these complexes have been also recorded. A complete assignment of the observed band frequencies has been done. All theoretical and experimental spectroscopic results are consisting with a stronger metal-oxygen bond in Cu(3-Meacac)2 and Cu(3-Etacac)2 complexes compared with Cu(acac)2. In addition, these results confirm that there is no significant difference between the Cusbnd O bond strength of the Cu(3-Meacac)2 and Cu(3-Etacac)2 complexes.

  6. Robust spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed; Waintal, Xavier; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the current-induced spin torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions, composed of two semi-infinite antiferromagnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier, in both clean and disordered regimes. We find that the torque

  7. Determination of fluorine in copper concentrate via high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis - Comparison of three target molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadorim, Heloisa R; de Gois, Jefferson S; Borges, Aline R; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Gleisner, Heike; Ott, Christina

    2018-01-01

    The chemical composition of complex inorganic materials, such as copper concentrate, may influence the economics of their further processing because most smelters, and particularly the producers of high-purity electrolyte copper, have strict limitations for the permissible concentration of impurities. These components might be harmful to the quality of the products, impair the production process and be hazardous to the environment. The goal of the present work is the development of a method for the determination of fluorine in copper concentrate using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The molecular absorption of the diatomic molecule CaF was measured at 606.440nm. The molecule CaF was generated by the addition of 200µg Ca as the molecule-forming reagent; the optimized pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 900°C and 2400°C, respectively. The characteristic mass and limit of detection were 0.5ng and 3ng, respectively. Calibration curves were established using aqueous standard solutions containing the major components Cu, Fe, S and the minor component Ag in optimized concentrations. The accuracy of the method was verified using certified reference materials. Fourteen copper concentrate samples from Chile and Australia were analyzed to confirm the applicability of the method to real samples; the concentration of fluorine ranged from 34 to 5676mgkg -1 . The samples were also analyzed independently at Analytik Jena by different operators, using the same equipment, but different target molecules, InF and GaF, and different operating conditions; but with a few exceptions, the results agreed quite well. The results obtained at Analytik Jena using the GaF molecule and our results obtained with CaF, with one exception, were also in agreement with the values informed by the supplier of the samples, which were obtained using ion selective electrode potentiometry after alkaline fusion. A comparison will

  8. Hole pairing induced by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Z.B.; Yu Lu; Dong, J.M.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-08-01

    The effective interaction induced by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations is considered in the random phase approximation in the context of the recently discovered high T c oxide superconductors. This effective attraction favours a triplet pairing of holes. The implications of such pairing mechanism are discussed in connection with the current experimental observations. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs

  9. Antiferromagnetism in chromium alloy single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Trego, A.L.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1965-01-01

    The antiferromagnetism of single crystals of dilute alloys of V, Mn and Re in Cr has been studied at 95°K and 300°K by neutron diffraction. The addition of V causes the diffraction peaks to decrease in intensity and move away from (100), while Mn and Re cause them to increase and approach (100) s...

  10. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  11. Metallic and antiferromagnetic fixed points from gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Chandrima

    2018-06-01

    We consider SU(2) × U(1) gauge theory coupled to matter field in adjoints and study RG group flow. We constructed Callan-Symanzik equation and subsequent β functions and study the fixed points. We find there are two fixed points, showing metallic and antiferromagnetic behavior. We have shown that metallic phase develops an instability if certain parametric conditions are satisfied.

  12. Shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonay, O.; Kondovych, S.; Loktev, V.

    2014-01-01

    High fraction of the surface atoms considerably enhances the influence of size and shape on the magnetic and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Shape effects in ferromagnetic nanoparticles are well understood and allow us to set and control the parameters of a sample that affect its magnetic anisotropy during production. In the present paper we study the shape effects in the other widely used magnetic materials – antiferromagnets, – which possess vanishingly small or zero macroscopic magnetization. We take into account the difference between the surface and bulk magnetic anisotropy of a nanoparticle and show that the effective magnetic anisotropy depends on the particle shape and crystallographic orientation of its faces. The corresponding shape-induced contribution to the magnetic anisotropy energy is proportional to the particle volume, depends on magnetostriction, and can cause formation of equilibrium domain structure. Crystallographic orientation of the nanoparticle surface determines the type of domain structure. The proposed model allows us to predict the magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles depending on their shape and treatment. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that the shape effects in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles stem from the difference of surface and bulk magnetic properties combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. • We predict shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic particles with large aspect ratio. • We predict different types of domain structures depending on the orientation of the particle faces

  13. Thermoinduced magnetization in nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2004-01-01

    We show that there is a thermoinduced contribution to the magnetic moment of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials. It arises from thermal excitations of the uniform spin-precession mode, and it has the unusual property that its magnitude increases with increasing temperature. This has...

  14. Structural and magnetic studies on copper succinate dihydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The four bis-bidendate succinate anions form syn–syn bridges among two copper atomsto form a polymeric two-dimensional chain. From room temperature vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) studies themagnetic moment of the material is calculated as 1.35 Bohr magneton (BM), indicating antiferromagnetic interaction ...

  15. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  16. Antiferromagnetic ordering in GdRhIn{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latka, K.; Rams, M. [Marian Smoluchowski Inst. of Physics, Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Kmiec, R.; Pacyna, A.W. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Zaremba, V.I. [Inorganic Chemistry Dept., Ivan Franko National Univ. of Lviv, Lviv (Ukraine); Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, R. [Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    A polycrystalline sample of tetragonal GdRhIn{sub 5} (HoCoGa{sub 5} type, space group P4/mmm) was obtained by induction melting of the elements in a glassy carbon crucible in a water-cooled sample chamber and subsequent annealing at 670 K. X-ray powder data yielded the cell parameters a = 460.65(7), c = 743.52(12) pm. The magnetic and electronic properties of GdRhIn{sub 5} have been studied by magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and {sup 155}Gd Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements. Antiferromagnetic ordering is detected at 41.0(2) K. The results are discussed using a simple molecular field approximation. (orig.)

  17. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nanowire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsiao, Chun-I.; Hsu, Wen-Dung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nanowires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nanowires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nanowires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress–strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nanowire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nanowire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  18. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nanowire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei-Ting [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chun-I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wen-Dung, E-mail: wendung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nanowires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nanowires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nanowires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress–strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nanowire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nanowire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  19. Theory of antiferromagnetic pairing in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    A review of the antiferromagnetic exchange and spin-fluctuation pairing theory in the cuprate superconductors is given. We briefly discuss a phenomenological approach and a theory in the limit of weak Coulomb correlations. A microscopic theory in the strong correlation limit is presented in more detail. In particular, results of our recently developed theory for the effective p-d Hubbard model and the reduced t-J model are given. We have proved that retardation effects for the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction are unimportant that results in pairing of all charge carriers in the conduction band and high Tc proportional to the Fermi energy. The spin-fluctuation interaction caused by kinematic interaction gives an additional contribution to the d-wave pairing. Dependence of Tc on the hole concentration and the lattice constant (or pressure) and an oxygen isotope shift are discussed

  20. Magnetic behaviour of interacting antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovich, V; Jung, G; Gorodetsky, G; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Skourski, Y; Mogilyanski, D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic properties of interacting La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 nanoparticles have been investigated. The field-induced transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) state in the La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 bulk has been observed at exceptionally high magnetic fields. For large particles, the field-induced transition widens while magnetization progressively decreases. In small particles the transition is almost fully suppressed. The thermoremanence and isothermoremanence curves constitute fingerprints of irreversible magnetization originating from nanoparticle shells. We have ascribed the magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles to a core-shell scenario with two main magnetic contributions; one attributed to the formation of a collective state formed by FM clusters in frustrated coordination at the surfaces of interacting AFM nanoparticles and the other associated with inner core behaviour as a two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet. (paper)

  1. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems. PMID:27650053

  2. Antiferromagnetic transition in graphene functionalized with nitroaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlev, Anton A.; Makarova, Tatiana L.; Lahderanta, Erkki; Semenikhin, Petr Valeryevich; Veinger, Anatoly I.; Kochman, Igor V.; Magnani, Giacomo; Bertoni, Giovanni; Pontiroli, Daniele; Ricco, Mauro

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic properties of graphene nanostructures functionalized with aromatic radicals were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) techniques. Three types of functionalized graphene samples were investigated (functionalization was performed by 4-bromoaniline, 4-nitroaniline, or 4-chloroaniline). According to SQUID measurements, in case of functionalization by nitroaniline, sharp change in temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility was observed near 120 K. Such behavior was explained as antiferromagnetic ordering. The same but more extended effect was observed in ESR measurements below 160 K. In the ESR measurements, only one resonance line with g-factor equal to 2.003 was observed. Based on the temperature dependencies of spin concentration and resonance position and intensity, the effect was explained as antiferromagnetic ordering along the extended defects on the basal planes of the graphene.

  3. Heat-driven spin torques in antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Marcin; Bréchet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Heat-driven magnetization damping, which is a linear function of a temperature gradient, is predicted in antiferromagnets by considering the sublattice dynamics subjected to a heat-driven spin torque. This points to the possibility of achieving spin torque oscillator behavior. The model is based on the magnetic Seebeck effect acting on sublattices which are exchange coupled. The heat-driven spin torque is estimated and the feasibility of detecting this effect is discussed.

  4. Spin Transport in Ferromagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Textures

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins A.

    2016-12-07

    In this dissertation, we provide an accurate description of spin transport in magnetic textures and in particular, we investigate in detail, the nature of spin torque and magnetic damping in such systems. Indeed, as will be further discussed in this thesis, the current-driven velocity of magnetic textures is related to the ratio between the so-called non-adiabatic torque and magnetic damping. Uncovering the physics underlying these phenomena can lead to the optimal design of magnetic systems with improved efficiency. We identified three interesting classes of systems which have attracted enormous research interest (i) Magnetic textures in systems with broken inversion symmetry: We investigate the nature of magnetic damping in non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets. Based on phenomenological and microscopic derivations, we show that the magnetic damping becomes chiral, i.e. depends on the chirality of the magnetic texture. (ii) Ferromagnetic domain walls, skyrmions and vortices: We address the physics of spin transport in sharp disordered magnetic domain walls and vortex cores. We demonstrate that upon spin-independent scattering, the non-adiabatic torque can be significantly enhanced. Such an enhancement is large for vortex cores compared to transverse domain walls. We also show that the topological spin currents owing in these structures dramatically enhances the non-adiabaticity, an effect unique to non-trivial topological textures (iii) Antiferromagnetic skyrmions: We extend this study to antiferromagnetic skyrmions and show that such an enhanced topological torque also exist in these systems. Even more interestingly, while such a non-adiabatic torque inuences the undesirable transverse velocity of ferromagnetic skyrmions, in antiferromagnetic skyrmions, the topological non-adiabatic torque directly determines the longitudinal velocity. As a consequence, scaling down the antiferromagnetic skyrmion results in a much more efficient spin torque.

  5. Entanglement in a Dimerized Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Xiang; Zhu, Shiqun

    2008-01-01

    The entanglement properties in an antiferromagnetic dimerized Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain are investigated. The entanglement gap, which is the difference between the ground-state energy and the minimal energy that any separable state can attain, is calculated to detect the entanglement. It is found that the entanglement gap can be increased by varying the alternation parameter. Through thermal energy, the witness of the entanglement can determine a characteristic temperature below that an entan...

  6. Enhanced antiferromagnetic coupling in dual-synthetic antiferromagnet with Co2FeAl electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.L.; Xu, X.G.; Wu, Y.; Li, X.Q.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We study dual-synthetic antiferromagnets (DSyAFs) using Co 2 FeAl (CFA) Heusler electrodes with a stack structure of Ta/CFA/Ru/CFA/Ru/CFA/Ta. When the thicknesses of the two Ru layers are 0.45 nm, 0.65 nm or 0.45 nm, 1.00 nm, the CFA-based DSyAF has a strong antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent CFA layers at room temperature with a saturation magnetic field of ∼11,000 Oe, a saturation magnetization of ∼710 emu/cm 3 and a coercivity of ∼2.0 Oe. Moreover, the DSyAF has a good thermal stability up to 400 °C, at which CFA films show B2-ordered structure. Therefore, the CFA-based DSyAFs are favorable for applications in future spintronic devices. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Co 2 FeAl can be applied in room temperature dual-synthetic antiferromagnets. ► Co 2 FeAl dual-synthetic antiferromagnets have a good thermal stability up to 400 °C. ► The Co 2 FeAl has B2-ordered structure in annealed dual-synthetic antiferromagnets.

  7. Noncollinear antiferromagnetic Mn3Sn films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, A.; Taylor, J. M.; Kalache, A.; Werner, P.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Felser, C.

    2018-05-01

    Noncollinear hexagonal antiferromagnets with almost zero net magnetization were recently shown to demonstrate giant anomalous Hall effect. Here, we present the structural and magnetic properties of noncollinear antiferromagnetic Mn3Sn thin films heteroepitaxially grown on Y:ZrO2 (111) substrates with a Ru underlayer. The Mn3Sn films were crystallized in the hexagonal D 019 structure with c -axis preferred (0001) crystal orientation. The Mn3Sn films are discontinuous, forming large islands of approximately 400 nm in width, but are chemical homogeneous and characterized by near perfect heteroepitaxy. Furthermore, the thin films show weak ferromagnetism with an in-plane uncompensated magnetization of M =34 kA/m and coercivity of μ0Hc=4.0 mT at room temperature. Additionally, the exchange bias effect was studied in Mn3Sn /Py bilayers. Exchange bias fields up to μ0HEB=12.6 mT can be achieved at 5 K. These results show Mn3Sn films to be an attractive material for applications in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  8. Model calculation of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, I.F.I., E-mail: ifi_mikhail@hotmail.com; Ismail, I.M.M.; Ameen, M.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is given of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnetic materials. The study has the advantage that the three-phonon interactions as well as the magnon phonon interactions have been represented by model operators that preserve the important properties of the exact collision operators. A new expression for thermal conductivity has been derived that involves the same terms obtained in our previous work in addition to two new terms. These two terms represent the conservation and quasi-conservation of wavevector that occur in the three-phonon Normal and Umklapp processes respectively. They gave appreciable contributions to the thermal conductivity and have led to an excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements of the antiferromagnet FeCl{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The Boltzmann equations of phonons and magnons in antiferromagnets have been studied. • Model operators have been used to represent the magnon–phonon and three-phonon interactions. • The models possess the same important properties as the exact operators. • A new expression for the thermal conductivity has been derived. • The results showed a good quantitative agreement with the experimental data of FeCl{sub 2}.

  9. Robust spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed

    2017-04-18

    We theoretically study the current-induced spin torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions, composed of two semi-infinite antiferromagnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier, in both clean and disordered regimes. We find that the torque enabling electrical manipulation of the Néel antiferromagnetic order parameter is out of plane, ∼n×p, while the torque competing with the antiferromagnetic exchange is in plane, ∼n×(p×n). Here, p and n are the Néel order parameter direction of the reference and free layers, respectively. Their bias dependence shows behavior similar to that in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions, the in-plane torque being mostly linear in bias, while the out-of-plane torque is quadratic. Most importantly, we find that the spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions is much more robust against disorder than that in antiferromagnetic metallic spin valves due to the tunneling nature of spin transport.

  10. Neutron-diffraction studies of the nuclear magnetic phase diagram of copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annila, A.J.; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Oja, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the spontaneous antiferromagnetic (AF) order in the nuclear spin system of copper by use of neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures. Copper is an ideal model system as a nearest-neighbor-dominated spin-3/2 fcc antiferromagnet. The phase diagram has been investig......We have studied the spontaneous antiferromagnetic (AF) order in the nuclear spin system of copper by use of neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures. Copper is an ideal model system as a nearest-neighbor-dominated spin-3/2 fcc antiferromagnet. The phase diagram has been...... investigated by measuring the magnetic-field dependence of the (100) reflection, characteristic of a type-I AF structure, and of a Bragg peak at (0 2/3 2/3). The results suggest the presence of high-field (100) phases at 0.12 less-than-or-equal-to B less-than-or-equal-to B(c) almost-equal-to 0.26 mT, for B...... compared with results of earlier susceptibility measurements in order to identify the translational periods of the three previously found antiferromagnetic phases for B parallel-to [100]. Recent theoretical work has yielded results in agreement with our experimental data....

  11. Voltage Control of Antiferromagnetic Phases at Near-Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Anthony; Domann, John; Kim, Ki Wook; Carman, Greg

    2018-03-01

    A method to control antiferromagnetism using voltage-induced strain is proposed and theoretically examined. Voltage-induced magnetoelastic anisotropy is shown to provide sufficient torque to switch an antiferromagnetic domain 90° either from out of plane to in plane or between in-plane axes. Numerical results indicate that strain-mediated antiferromagnetic switching can occur in an 80-nm nanopatterned disk at frequencies approaching 1 THz but that the switching speed heavily depends on the system's mechanical design. Furthermore, the energy cost to induce magnetic switching is only 450 aJ, indicating that magnetoelastic control of antiferromagnetism is substantially more energy efficient than other approaches.

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Marquardt, Iris; Donsante, Anthony; Yi, Ling; Hicks, Julia D; Steinbach, Peter J; Wilson, Callum; Elpeleg, Orly; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Christodoulou, John; Kaler, Stephen G; Gärtner, Jutta

    2012-08-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace metal that readily gains and donates electrons, a property that renders it desirable as an enzyme cofactor but dangerous as a source of free radicals. To regulate cellular Cu metabolism, an elaborate system of chaperones and transporters has evolved, although no human Cu chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution of a highly conserved arginine residue at position 163, with tryptophan in domain II of CCS, which interacts directly with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Biochemical analyses of the patient's fibroblasts, mammalian cell transfections, immunoprecipitation assays, and Lys7Δ (CCS homolog) yeast complementation support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation in a gene coding for a Cu chaperone. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Molecular self assembly and chiral recognition of copper octacyanophthalocyanine on Au(111): Interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Rejaul; Dhara, Barun; Miller, Joel; Deshpande, Aparna

    Submolecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of copper octacyanophthalocyanine, CuPc(CN)8, at 77 K demonstrates that these achiral molecules form a two dimensional (2D) tetramer-based self-assembly upon evaporation onto an atomically flat Au(111) substrate. They assemble in two different structurally chiral configurations upon adsorption on Au(111). Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS),acquired at 77 K, unveils the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of this self-assembly. Voltage dependent STM images show that each molecule in both the structurally chiral configurations individually becomes chiral by breaking the mirror symmetry due to the enhanced intermolecular dipolar coupling interaction at the LUMO energy while the individual molecules remain achiral at the HOMO energy and within the HOMO-LUMO gap. At the LUMO energy, the handedness of the each chiral molecule is decided by the direction of the dipolar coupling interaction in the tetramer unit cell. This preference for LUMO energy indicates that this chirality is purely electronic in nature and it manifests on top of the organizational chirality that is present in the self-assembly independent of the orbital energy. Supported by IISER Pune and DAE-BRNS, India (Project No. 2011/20/37C/17/BRNS).

  14. Reparatory adaptation to copper-induced injury and occurrence of a copper-binding protein in the polycheate, Eudistylia vancouveri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.S.; Roesijadi, G.

    1983-01-01

    Chemically injured branchial pinnae of copper-treated polychaetes, Eudistylia vancouveri, regenerated while still exposed to copper. The first observations of pinna regeneration coincided with the apparent induction of a low molecular weight (approx.5000 daltons) copper-binding protein. This protein may play a role in the detoxification of copper and subsequent tissue regeneration. 7 references, 5 figures.

  15. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fina, I.; Martí, Xavier; Yi, D.; Liu, J.; Chu, J.-H.; Rayan-Serrao, C.; Suresha, S.; Shick, Alexander; Železný, Jakub; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Fontcuberta, J.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, SEP (2014), "4671-1"-"4671-7" ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G; GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/10/0330 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnets * semiconductors * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 11.470, year: 2014

  16. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martí, Xavier; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, J.; Wadley, P.; He, P.; Paull, R.J.; Clarkson, J.D.; Kudrnovský, Josef; Turek, Ilja; Kuneš, Jan; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C.T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ramesh, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2014), s. 367-374 ISSN 1476-1122 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1228 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : spintronics * antiferromagnets * memories Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 36.503, year: 2014

  17. Solitons in one-dimensional antiferromagnetic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, A.S.T.; Talim, S.L.; Costa, B.V.

    1989-01-01

    We study the quantum-statistical mechanics, at low temperatures, of a one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with two anisotropies. In the weak-coupling limit we determine the temperature dependences of the soliton energy and the soliton density. We have found that the leading correction to the sine-Gordon (SG) expression for the soliton density and the quantum soliton energy comes from the out-of-plane magnon mode, not present in the pure SG model. We also show that when an external magnetic field is applied, the chain supports a new type of kink, where the sublattices rotate in opposite directions

  18. Dirac Fermions in an Antiferromagnetic Semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peizhe; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Shou-Cheng Zhang's Group Team, Prof.

    Analogues of the elementary particles have been extensively searched for in condensed matter systems for both scientific interest and technological applications. Recently, massless Dirac fermions were found to emerge as low energy excitations in materials now known as Dirac semimetals. All the currently known Dirac semimetals are nonmagnetic with both time-reversal symmetry  and inversion symmetry "". Here we show that Dirac fermions can exist in one type of antiferromagnetic systems, where both  and "" are broken but their combination "" is respected. We propose orthorhombic antiferromagnet CuMnAs as a candidate, analyze the robustness of the Dirac points under symmetry protections, and demonstrate its distinctive bulk dispersions as well as the corresponding surface states by ab initio calculations. Our results provide a possible platform to study the interplay of Dirac fermion physics and magnetism. We acknowledge the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515, NSF under Grant No.DMR-1305677 and FAME, one of six centers of STARnet.

  19. Antiferromagnetic domains in rare earth metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S B [Hull Univ. (UK). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1975-12-01

    Anomalies in the c-axis elastic properties of antiferromagnetic Dy, 50% Tb-Ho and 60% Gd-Y are reported. The anomalies are only present when the sample is cycled from the ferromagnetic to the antiferromagnetic state and are attributed to domains in the helical regime.

  20. Spin transport and spin torque in antiferromagnetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Železný, J.; Wadley, P.; Olejník, K.; Hoffmann, A.; Ohno, H.

    2018-03-01

    Ferromagnets are key materials for sensing and memory applications. In contrast, antiferromagnets, which represent the more common form of magnetically ordered materials, have found less practical application beyond their use for establishing reference magnetic orientations via exchange bias. This might change in the future due to the recent progress in materials research and discoveries of antiferromagnetic spintronic phenomena suitable for device applications. Experimental demonstration of the electrical switching and detection of the Néel order open a route towards memory devices based on antiferromagnets. Apart from the radiation and magnetic-field hardness, memory cells fabricated from antiferromagnets can be inherently multilevel, which could be used for neuromorphic computing. Switching speeds attainable in antiferromagnets far exceed those of ferromagnetic and semiconductor memory technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in electronic spin-transport and spin-torque phenomena in antiferromagnets that are dominantly of the relativistic quantum-mechanical origin. We discuss their utility in pure antiferromagnetic or hybrid ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic memory devices.

  1. Scattering of neutrons and critical phenomena in antiferromagnetic fermi liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, I.A.; Barannik, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of slow neutrons in an antiferromagnetic with collectivized magnetic electrons is considered and it is shown to significantly differ from the neutron scattering in an antiferromagnetic with localized magnetic electrons. The behaviour of scattering cross sections and fluctuation correlators near the Neel point is studied. These magnitudes are shown to increase with the critical index r=-1 [ru

  2. Possible coexistence of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zhaobin; Dong Jinming; Yu Lu; Shen Juelian

    1988-01-01

    The Hubbard model in the nearly half-filled case was studied in the mean field approximation using the effective Hamiltonian approach. Both antiferromagnetic order parameter and condensation of singlet pairs were considered. In certain parameter ranges the coexistence of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity is energetically favourable. Relevance to the high temperature superconductivity and other theoretical approaches is also discussed. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials are reviewed. The magnetic structure is often similar to the bulk structure, but there are several examples of size-dependent magnetic structures. Owing to the small magnetic moments of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles, the co...

  4. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  5. Shape-Selective Syntheses of Gold and Copper Nanostructures: Insights From Density-Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsien

    Density-functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) were used to resolve the origins of shape-selective syntheses of {111}-faceted Au nanostructures mediated by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as well as {100}-faceted Cu nanostructures mediated by hex- adecylamine(HDA) seen in experiment. For the work in PVP on Au surfaces, the hexagonal reconstruction of Au(100) was considered. DFT results indicate that the Au(111) surface covered by the PVP segment, 2-pyrrolidone (2P), has a lower surface energy than the 2P- covered (5 x 1) Au(100)-hex surface, and that PVP may exhibit a binding affinity for Au(111) comparable to or greater than (5 x 1) Au(100)-hex. With MD, it is shown that the PVP-covered Au(111) surface has a lower surface energy than the PVP-covered (5 x 1) Au(100)-hex surface, and that the atactic PVP isosamer chains have a binding affinity for Au(111) comparable to (5 x 1) Au(100)-hex. Also, the (5 x 1) Au(100)-hex surface may have a higher flux of Au atoms than the Au(111) surface. Therefore, the Au(111) surface would be thermodynamically and kinetically favored in PVP-mediated syntheses, leading to {111}-faceted Au nanostructures. For the work in HDA on Cu surfaces, DFT results show that the HDA-covered Cu(100) surface has a slightly higher surface energy than the HDA- covered Cu(111) surface. However, HDA has a significant binding preference on Cu(100) over Cu(111). Therefore, the Cu(100) surface would be kinetically favored in HDA-mediated syn- theses, leading to {100}-faceted Cu nanostructures. Further, a metal-organic many-body (MOMB) force field for HDA-Cu interactions was developed based on the DFT work, and the force field was used to resolve the HDA binding patterns on Cu(100) at molecular level. With MD, it is found that decylamine (DA) may be used as an effective capping agent in the synthesis of {100}-faceted Cu nanostructures since DA as well as HDA are organized on Cu surfaces and have the same binding preference on Cu(100) over Cu(111

  6. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  7. Antiferromagnetic spinor condensates in a bichromatic superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Zhao, Lichao; Chen, Zihe; Liu, Yingmei

    2017-04-01

    A spinor Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical supelattice has been considered as a good quantum simulator for understanding mesoscopic magnetism. We report an experimental study on an antiferromagnetic spinor condensate in a bichromatic superlattice constructed by a cubic red-detuned optical lattice and a one-dimensional blue-detuned optical lattice. Our data demonstrate a few advantages of this bichromatic superlattice over a monochromatic lattice. One distinct advantage is that the bichromatic superlattice enables realizing the first-order superfluid to Mott-insulator phase transitions within a much wider range of magnetic fields. In addition, we discuss an apparent discrepancy between our data and the mean-field theory. We thank the National Science Foundation and the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology for financial support.

  8. Magnetostriction and magnetoelastic domains in antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonay, Helen; Loktev, Vadim M.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of the observable equilibrium domain structure (DS) in pure antiferromagnets is investigated with the use of continuous elasticity theory. It is shown that the difference between the bulk and surface magnetoelastic strains causes imaginary 'incompatibility elastic charges' analogous to the surface 'magnetic' charges in ferromagnets. The corresponding long-range field is shown to contribute to the 'stray' energy of the sample that governs the appearance of the DS, the contribution from the 'elastic charges' being proportional to the sample volume. Competition between the elastic 'stray' field, which favours inhomogeneous strain distribution, and an external field, which tends to make the sample homogeneous, provides a reversible reconstruction of the DS under the action of the external magnetic field. (author)

  9. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the arm and/or a 24-hour urine sample is collected. Sometimes a health practitioner performs a liver ... disease , a rare inherited disorder that can lead to excess storage of copper in the liver, brain, and other ...

  10. Interplay of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in cuprates with impurity effect and d-wave pairing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, Rasmita, E-mail: rmrmmohapatra@gmail.com [P.G. Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore, Odisha 756019 (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Physics Enclave, Plot no-664/4825, Lane-4A, Shree Vihar, Patia, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751024 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We considered here the interplay of antiferromagnetism (AFM) and Superconductivity (SC) with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of impurity effect. • The tunneling conductance explains the multiple peaks and dip-hump structure. • It is observed that AFM coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature. • The low temperature specific heat anomaly due to impurity atoms. - Abstract: We present here a model Hamiltonian to study the interplay between staggered magnetic field and the superconductivity with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of hybridization between impurity f-electrons of rare-earth ions and 3d-electrons of copper ions. The staggered field and superconducting (SC) gaps are calculated by Green’s function technique and solved self-consistently. The coupling constants are compared using s-wave and d-wave pairings. The strength of hybridization suppresses the magnitude of the gaps; while antiferromagnetic coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature, but suppresses the Neel temperature. The density of states (DOS) representing tunneling conductance shows complex character with impurity level lying at the Fermi level. The electronic specific heat explains prototype heavy fermion behavior in cuprate systems at low temperatures.

  11. Interplay of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in cuprates with impurity effect and d-wave pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Rasmita; Rout, G.C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We considered here the interplay of antiferromagnetism (AFM) and Superconductivity (SC) with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of impurity effect. • The tunneling conductance explains the multiple peaks and dip-hump structure. • It is observed that AFM coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature. • The low temperature specific heat anomaly due to impurity atoms. - Abstract: We present here a model Hamiltonian to study the interplay between staggered magnetic field and the superconductivity with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of hybridization between impurity f-electrons of rare-earth ions and 3d-electrons of copper ions. The staggered field and superconducting (SC) gaps are calculated by Green’s function technique and solved self-consistently. The coupling constants are compared using s-wave and d-wave pairings. The strength of hybridization suppresses the magnitude of the gaps; while antiferromagnetic coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature, but suppresses the Neel temperature. The density of states (DOS) representing tunneling conductance shows complex character with impurity level lying at the Fermi level. The electronic specific heat explains prototype heavy fermion behavior in cuprate systems at low temperatures

  12. Molecular Cloning, Characterization and Predicted Structure of a Putative Copper-Zinc SOD from the Camel, Camelus dromedarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajamaluddin Malik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD is the first line of defense against oxidative stress induced by endogenous and/or exogenous factors and thus helps in maintaining the cellular integrity. Its activity is related to many diseases; so, it is of importance to study the structure and expression of SOD gene in an animal naturally exposed most of its life to the direct sunlight as a cause of oxidative stress. Arabian camel (one humped camel, Camelus dromedarius is adapted to the widely varying desert climatic conditions that extremely changes during daily life in the Arabian Gulf. Studying the cSOD1 in C. dromedarius could help understand the impact of exposure to direct sunlight and desert life on the health status of such mammal. The full coding region of a putative CuZnSOD gene of C. dromedarius (cSOD1 was amplified by reverse transcription PCR and cloned for the first time (gene bank accession number for nucleotides and amino acids are JF758876 and AEF32527, respectively. The cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 459 nucleotides encoding a protein of 153 amino acids which is equal to the coding region of SOD1 gene and protein from many organisms. The calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of cSOD1 was 15.7 kDa and 6.2, respectively. The level of expression of cSOD1 in different camel tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, lung and testis was examined using Real Time-PCR. The highest level of cSOD1 transcript was found in the camel liver (represented as 100% followed by testis (45%, kidney (13%, lung (11% and spleen (10%, using 18S ribosomal subunit as endogenous control. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high similarity with Cebus apella (90%, Sus scrofa (88%, Cavia porcellus (88%, Mus musculus (88%, Macaca mulatta (87%, Pan troglodytes (87%, Homo sapiens (87%, Canis familiaris (86%, Bos taurus (86%, Pongo abelii (85% and Equus caballus (82%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cSOD1 is grouped together with S. scrofa. The

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and predicted structure of a putative copper-zinc SOD from the camel, Camelus dromedarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataya, Farid S; Fouad, Dalia; Al-Olayan, Ebtsam; Malik, Ajamaluddin

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the first line of defense against oxidative stress induced by endogenous and/or exogenous factors and thus helps in maintaining the cellular integrity. Its activity is related to many diseases; so, it is of importance to study the structure and expression of SOD gene in an animal naturally exposed most of its life to the direct sunlight as a cause of oxidative stress. Arabian camel (one humped camel, Camelus dromedarius) is adapted to the widely varying desert climatic conditions that extremely changes during daily life in the Arabian Gulf. Studying the cSOD1 in C. dromedarius could help understand the impact of exposure to direct sunlight and desert life on the health status of such mammal. The full coding region of a putative CuZnSOD gene of C. dromedarius (cSOD1) was amplified by reverse transcription PCR and cloned for the first time (gene bank accession number for nucleotides and amino acids are JF758876 and AEF32527, respectively). The cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 459 nucleotides encoding a protein of 153 amino acids which is equal to the coding region of SOD1 gene and protein from many organisms. The calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of cSOD1 was 15.7 kDa and 6.2, respectively. The level of expression of cSOD1 in different camel tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, lung and testis) was examined using Real Time-PCR. The highest level of cSOD1 transcript was found in the camel liver (represented as 100%) followed by testis (45%), kidney (13%), lung (11%) and spleen (10%), using 18S ribosomal subunit as endogenous control. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high similarity with Cebus apella (90%), Sus scrofa (88%), Cavia porcellus (88%), Mus musculus (88%), Macaca mulatta (87%), Pan troglodytes (87%), Homo sapiens (87%), Canis familiaris (86%), Bos taurus (86%), Pongo abelii (85%) and Equus caballus (82%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cSOD1 is grouped together with S. scrofa. The

  14. Reciprocal propagation of surface modes in an antiferromagnetic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.A.; Amato, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    Linear response theory is used to evaluate the Green's functions describing the fluctuations in an antiferromagnetic film at zero applied field. It is shown the similarities between the dielectric and magnetic excitations. (Author) [pt

  15. Long-range interactions in antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, B.; Cabra, D. C.; Gómez Albarracín, F. A.; Rossini, G. L.

    2017-08-01

    We study the role of long-range dipolar interactions on antiferromagnetic spin chains, from the classical S →∞ limit to the deep quantum case S =1 /2 , including a transverse magnetic field. To this end, we combine different techniques such as classical energy minima, classical Monte Carlo, linear spin waves, bosonization, and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). We find a phase transition from the already reported dipolar ferromagnetic region to an antiferromagnetic region for high enough antiferromagnetic exchange. Thermal and quantum fluctuations destabilize the classical order before reaching magnetic saturation in both phases, and also close to zero field in the antiferromagnetic phase. In the extreme quantum limit S =1 /2 , extensive DMRG computations show that the main phases remain present with transition lines to saturation significatively shifted to lower fields, in agreement with the bosonization analysis. The overall picture maintains a close analogy with the phase diagram of the anisotropic XXZ spin chain in a transverse field.

  16. Nuclear order in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annila, A.J.; Clausen, K.N.; Lindgård, P.-A.

    1990-01-01

    The new antiferromagnetic reflection (02/32/3) has been found by neutron diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear spin system of a 65CU single crystal. The corresponding three-sublattice structure has not been observed previously in any fcc antiferromagnet.......The new antiferromagnetic reflection (02/32/3) has been found by neutron diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear spin system of a 65CU single crystal. The corresponding three-sublattice structure has not been observed previously in any fcc antiferromagnet....

  17. Theory of the upper critical field in antiferromagnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, C.; Levin, K.

    1984-01-01

    We compute the temperature T dependence of the upper critical field H/sub c/2(T) in antiferromagnetic (AF) superconductors. Using a strong-coupling formalism we explicitly treat the effects of the molecular field H/sub Q/, inelastic and elastic spin-fluctuation scattering and magnetic as well as nonmagnetic impurities. A sum rule is used to relate the T dependence of H/sub Q/ to that of the spin-fluctuation scattering. The decreased pair breaking observed below the Neel temperature in SmRh 4 B 4 and the increased pair breaking seen in the AF Chevrel compounds will both occur in our theory for a reasonable choice of parameters. For larger values of the dimensionless spin-exchange coupling constant N(0)J/sup c/f, spin-fluctuation-scattering effects dominate over those of H/sub Q/ and decreased pair breaking is observed below T/sub N/. For smaller values of the coupling constant, the converse is true. Impurity scattering is treated in a self-consistent fashion. As a consequence, the molecular field H/sub Q/ is altered by nonmagnetic impurities. This leads to important pair-breaking effects in H/sub c/2. A physical manifestation of this pair breaking is a qualitative change in the shape of the H/sub c/2 versus T curve, as nonmagnetic impurities are added. We give detailed predictions for the expected effects of these impurities on H/sub c/2 which can be tested experimentally

  18. Electronic energy spectra in antiferromagnetic media with broken reciprocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitebsky, I.; Edelkind, J.; Bogachek, E.N.; Scherbakov, A.G.; Landman, U.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic energy spectra var-epsilon(q) of antiferromagnetically ordered media may display nonreciprocity; that is, the energies corresponding to Bloch states with wave numbers q and -q may be different. In this paper a simple Kronig-Penney model, which includes a staggered microscopic magnetic and electric fields of the proper symmetry, is employed to estimate the magnitude of nonreciprocity effects in systems such as antiferromagnetically ordered crystals as well as periodical layered structures. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Reversal of exchange bias in nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prados, C; Pina, E; Hernando, A; Montone, A

    2002-01-01

    The sign of the exchange bias in field cooled nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers (Co-O and Ni-O/permalloy) is reversed at temperatures approaching the antiferromagnetic (AFM) blocking temperature. A similar phenomenon is observed after magnetic training processes at similar temperatures. These effects can be explained assuming that the boundaries of nanocrystalline grains in AFM layers exhibit lower transition temperatures than grain cores

  20. Isostructural magnetic phase transition and magnetocaloric effect in Ising antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavanov, G.Yu; Kalita, V.M.; Loktev, V.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the external magnetic field induced isostructural I st order magnetic phase transition between antiferromagnetic phases with different antiferromagnetic vector values is associated with entropy. It is found, that depending on temperature the entropy jump and the related heat release change their sign at this transition point. In the low-temperature region of metamagnetic I st order phase tensition the entropy jump is positive, and in the triple point region this jump for isostructural magnetic transition is negative

  1. Proposal for quantum gates in permanently coupled antiferromagnetic spin rings without need of local fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Filippo; Affronte, Marco; Carretta, Stefano; Santini, Paolo; Amoretti, Giuseppe

    2005-05-20

    We propose a scheme for the implementation of quantum gates which is based on the qubit encoding in antiferromagnetic molecular rings. We show that a proper engineering of the intercluster link would result in an effective coupling that vanishes as far as the system is kept in the computational space, while it is turned on by a selective excitation of specific auxiliary states. These are also shown to allow the performing of single-qubit and two-qubit gates without an individual addressing of the rings by means of local magnetic fields.

  2. Magnetic properties of the strongly correlated chain antiferromagnet KTb(WO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsko, E.; Loginov, A.; Cherny, A.; Rykova, A.

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility and magnetization of a single crystal of KTb(WO 4 ) 2 has been measured in the temperature range 0.5-80 K in magnetic fields up to 6 T. It is shown that KTb(WO 4 ) 2 is an Ising magnet with only one component of the magnetic moment. The three-dimensional phase transition to the antiferromagnetically ordered state has been found below 0.7 K. This transition can be described in the molecular field two-level approximation. The principal exchange constant has been estimated. By using experimental data the magnetic structure of KTb(WO 4 ) 2 is proposed

  3. Tunable Noncollinear Antiferromagnetic Resistive Memory through Oxide Superlattice Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jason D.; Wu, Stephen M.; Kirby, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2018-04-01

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) have recently gathered a large amount of attention as a potential replacement for ferromagnets (FMs) in spintronic devices due to their lack of stray magnetic fields, invisibility to external magnetic probes, and faster magnetization dynamics. Their development into a practical technology, however, has been hampered by the small number of materials where the antiferromagnetic state can be both controlled and read out. We show that by relaxing the strict criterion on pure antiferromagnetism, we can engineer an alternative class of magnetic materials that overcome these limitations. This is accomplished by stabilizing a noncollinear magnetic phase in LaNiO3 /La2 /3Sr1 /3MnO3 superlattices. This state can be continuously tuned between AFM and FM coupling through varying the superlattice spacing, strain, applied magnetic field, or temperature. By using this alternative "knob" to tune magnetic ordering, we take a nanoscale materials-by-design approach to engineering ferromagneticlike controllability into antiferromagnetic synthetic magnetic structures. This approach can be used to trade-off between the favorable and unfavorable properties of FMs and AFMs when designing realistic resistive antiferromagnetic memories. We demonstrate a memory device in one such superlattice, where the magnetic state of the noncollinear antiferromagnet is reversibly switched between different orientations using a small magnetic field and read out in real time with anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements.

  4. Thermodynamic and critical properties of an antiferromagnetically stacked triangular Ising antiferromagnet in a field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, M.; Borovský, M.; Bobák, A.

    2018-05-01

    We study a stacked triangular lattice Ising model with both intra- and inter-plane antiferromagnetic interactions in a field, by Monte Carlo simulation. We find only one phase transition from a paramagnetic to a partially disordered phase, which is of second order and 3D XY universality class. At low temperatures we identify two highly degenerate phases: at smaller (larger) fields the system shows long-range ordering in the stacking direction (within planes) but not in the planes (stacking direction). Nevertheless, crossovers to these phases do not have a character of conventional phase transitions but rather linear-chain-like excitations.

  5. Helical waves in easy-plane antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Yuriy G.; Li, Xi-Lai; Xu, Xinyi; Kim, Ki Wook

    2017-12-01

    Effective spin torques can generate the Néel vector oscillations in antiferromagnets (AFMs). Here, it is theoretically shown that these torques applied at one end of a normal AFM strip can excite a helical type of spin wave in the strip whose properties are drastically different from characteristic spin waves. An analysis based on both a Néel vector dynamical equation and the micromagnetic simulation identifies the direction of magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor as the two key parameters determining the dynamics. Helical wave propagation requires the hard axis of the easy-plane AFM to be aligned with the traveling direction, while the damping limits its spatial extent. If the damping is neglected, the calculation leads to a uniform periodic domain wall structure. On the other hand, finite damping decelerates the helical wave rotation around the hard axis, ultimately causing stoppage of its propagation along the strip. With the group velocity staying close to spin-wave velocity at the wave front, the wavelength becomes correspondingly longer away from the excitation point. In a sufficiently short strip, a steady-state oscillation can be established whose frequency is controlled by the waveguide length as well as the excitation energy or torque.

  6. Antiferromagnetism and magnetoleasticity of UNiAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechovsky, V.; Honda, F.; Svoboda, P.; Prokes, K.; Chernyavsky, O.; Doerr, M.; Rotter, M.; Loewenhaupt, M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a thermal-expansion (TE) and magnetostriction (MS) study of the antiferromagnet UNiAl at temperatures 2-90 K and in magnetic fields up to 16.5 T applied along the c-axis. The TE along the c-axis (in 0 T) exhibits a broad valley centered around 35 K. This anomaly is nearly removed in 16.5 T. For T≤7 K a sharp metamagnetic transition (MT) observed in UNiAl at 11.4 T and it is accompanied by abrupt MS effects of +1.3x10 -4 and -1.8x10 -4 along the a- and c-axis, respectively. In fields above the MT a negligible additional negative MS is induced along c-axis whereas the a-axis and consequently the volume expand considerably, which indicates a field-induced enhancement of the U magnetic moment. T>7 K, the MT becomes gradually smeared out but a non-negligible MS is observed even for T>T N . In the light of these results the TE anomaly measured in zero field may be attributed to AF that survives at temperatures far above T N

  7. Weyl magnons in noncoplanar stacked kagome antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    Weyl nodes have been experimentally realized in photonic, electronic, and phononic crystals. However, magnonic Weyl nodes are yet to be seen experimentally. In this paper, we propose Weyl magnon nodes in noncoplanar stacked frustrated kagome antiferromagnets, naturally available in various real materials. Most crucially, the Weyl nodes in the current system occur at the lowest excitation and possess a topological thermal Hall effect, therefore they are experimentally accessible at low temperatures due to the population effect of bosonic quasiparticles. In stark contrast to other magnetic systems, the current Weyl nodes do not rely on time-reversal symmetry breaking by the magnetic order. Rather, they result from explicit macroscopically broken time reversal symmetry by the scalar spin chirality of noncoplanar spin textures and can be generalized to chiral spin liquid states. Moreover, the scalar spin chirality gives a real space Berry curvature which is not available in previously studied magnetic Weyl systems. We show the existence of magnon arc surface states connecting projected Weyl magnon nodes on the surface Brillouin zone. We also uncover the first realization of triply-degenerate nodal magnon point in the noncollinear regime with zero scalar spin chirality.

  8. Antiferromagnetic Skyrmion: Stability, Creation and Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations in ferromagnets, which have the topo-logical number Q = ± 1, and hence show the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE) due to the Magnus force effect originating from the topology. Here, we propose the counterpart of the magnetic skyrmion in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) system, that is, the AFM skyrmion, which is topologically protected but without showing the SkHE. Two approaches for creating the AFM skyrmion have been described based on micromagnetic lattice simulations: (i) by injecting a vertical spin-polarized current to a nanodisk with the AFM ground state; (ii) by converting an AFM domain-wall pair in a nanowire junction. It is demonstrated that the AFM skyrmion, driven by the spin-polarized current, can move straightly over long distance, benefiting from the absence of the SkHE. Our results will open a new strategy on designing the novel spintronic devices based on AFM materials.

  9. Dilute antiferromagnetism in magnetically doped phosphorene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Allerdt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the competition between Kondo physics and indirect exchange on monolayer black phos-phorous using a realistic description of the band structure in combination with the density matrixrenormalization group (DMRG method. The Hamiltonian is reduced to a one-dimensional problemvia an exact canonical transformation that makes it amenable to DMRG calculations, yielding exactresults that fully incorporate the many-body physics. We find that a perturbative description of theproblem is not appropriate and cannot account for the slow decay of the correlations and the completelack of ferromagnetism. In addition, at some particular distances, the impurities decouple formingtheir own independent Kondo states. This can be predicted from the nodes of the Lindhard function.Our results indicate a possible route toward realizing dilute anti-ferromagnetism in phosphorene. Received: 19 September 2017, Accepted: 12 October 2017; Edited by: K. Hallberg; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.090008 Cite as: A Allerdt, A E Feiguin, Papers in Physics 9, 090008 (2017

  10. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  11. Quantum disordered phase in a doped antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuebert, C.; Muramatsu, A.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative description of the transition to a quantum disordered phase in a doped antiferromagnet is obtained for the long-wavelength limit of the spin-fermion model, which is given by the O(3) non-linear σ model, a free fermionic part and current-current interactions. By choosing local spin quantization axes for the fermionic spinor we show that the low-energy limit of the model is equivalent to a U(1) gauge theory, where both the bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom are minimally coupled to a vector gauge field. Within a large-N expansion, the strength of the gauge fields is found to be determined by the gap in the spin-wave spectrum, which is dynamically generated. The explicit doping dependence of the spin-gap is determined as a function of the parameters of the original model. As a consequence of the above, the gauge-fields mediate a long-range interaction among dopant holes and S-1/2 magnetic excitations only in the quantum disordered phase. The possible bound-states in this regime correspond to charge-spin separation and pairing

  12. Identifying Two-Dimensional Z 2 Antiferromagnetic Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bègue, F.; Pujol, P.; Ramazashvili, R.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the question of whether a two-dimensional topological insulator may arise in a commensurate Néel antiferromagnet, where staggered magnetization breaks the symmetry with respect to both elementary translation and time reversal, but retains their product as a symmetry. In contrast to the so-called Z 2 topological insulators, an exhaustive characterization of antiferromagnetic topological phases with the help of topological invariants has been missing. We analyze a simple model of an antiferromagnetic topological insulator and chart its phase diagram, using a recently proposed criterion for centrosymmetric systems [13]. We then adapt two methods, originally designed for paramagnetic systems, and make antiferromagnetic topological phases manifest. The proposed methods apply far beyond the particular examples treated in this work, and admit straightforward generalization. We illustrate this by two examples of non-centrosymmetric systems, where no simple criteria have been known to identify topological phases. We also present, for some cases, an explicit construction of edge states in an antiferromagnetic topological insulator.

  13. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galceran, R; Fina, I; Cisneros-Fernández, J; Bozzo, B; Frontera, C; López-Mir, L; Deniz, H; Park, K-W; Park, B-G; Balcells, Ll; Martí, X; Jungwirth, T; Martínez, B

    2016-10-20

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature.

  14. “Pulling the plug” on cellular copper: The role of mitochondria in copper export

    OpenAIRE

    Leary, Scot C.; Winge, Dennis R.; Cobine, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria contain two enzymes, Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), that require copper as a cofactor for their biological activity. The copper used for their metallation originates from a conserved, bioactive pool contained within the mitochondrial matrix, the size of which changes in response to either genetic or pharmacological manipulation of cellular copper status. Its dynamic nature implies molecular mechanisms exist that functionally couple mitochondria...

  15. SBA-15 mesoporous silica free-standing thin films containing copper ions bounded via propyl phosphonate units - preparation and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskowski, Lukasz, E-mail: lukasz.laskowski@kik.pcz.pl [Czestochowa University of Technology, Institute of Computational Intelligence, Unit of Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, Al. Armii Krajowej 36, 42–201 Czestochowa (Poland); Laskowska, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.laskowska@onet.pl [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow, ul. Radzikowskiego 152 (Poland); Jelonkiewicz, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.jelonkiewicz@kik.pcz.pl [Czestochowa University of Technology, Institute of Computational Intelligence, Unit of Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, Al. Armii Krajowej 36, 42–201 Czestochowa (Poland); Dulski, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.dulski@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Materials Science, Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, ul. 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41–500 Chorzów (Poland); Wojtyniak, Marcin, E-mail: marcin.wojtyniak@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, ul. 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41–500 Chorzów (Poland); Fitta, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.fitta@ifj.edu.pl [H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31–342 Krakow, ul. Radzikowskiego 152 (Poland); Balanda, Maria, E-mail: Maria.Balanda@ifj.edu.pl [H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31–342 Krakow, ul. Radzikowskiego 152 (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    The SBA-15 silica thin films containing copper ions anchored inside channels via propyl phosphonate groups are investigated. Such materials were prepared in the form of thin films, with hexagonally arranged pores, laying rectilinear to the substrate surface. However, in the case of our thin films, their free standing form allowed for additional research possibilities, that are not obtainable for typical thin films on a substrate. The structural properties of the samples were investigated by X-ray reflectometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The molecular structure was examined by Raman spectroscopy supported by numerical simulations. Magnetic measurements (SQUID magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy) showed weak antiferromagnetic interactions between active units inside silica channels. Consequently, the pores arrangement was determined and the process of copper ions anchoring by propyl phosphonate groups was verified in unambiguous way. Moreover, the type of interactions between magnetic atoms was determined. - Highlights: • Functionalized free-standing SBA-15 thin films were synthesized for a first time. • Thin films synthesis procedure was described in details. • Structural properties of the films were thoroughly investigated and presented. • Magnetic properties of the novel material was investigated and presented.

  16. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Ivan K. [Center for Advanced Nanoscience and Physics Department, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Morales, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.morales@ehu.es [Department of Chemical-Physics & BCMaterials, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Batlle, Xavier [Departament Física Fonamental and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nowak, Ulrich [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78464 Konstanz (Germany); Güntherodt, Gernot [Physics Institute (IIA), RWTH Aachen University, Campus RWTH-Melaten, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    This “Critical Focused Issue” presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice. - Highlights: • We address the role of bulk antiferromagnetic spins in the exchange bias phenomenon. • Significant experiments on how bulk AFM spins determine exchange bias are highlighted. • We explain the model that accounts for experimental results.

  17. Vertex functions at finite momentum: Application to antiferromagnetic quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfle, Peter; Abrahams, Elihu

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the three-point vertex function that describes the coupling of fermionic particle-hole pairs in a metal to spin or charge fluctuations at nonzero momentum. We consider Ward identities, which connect two-particle vertex functions to the self-energy, in the framework of a Hubbard model. These are derived using conservation laws following from local symmetries. The generators considered are the spin density and particle density. It is shown that at certain antiferromagnetic critical points, where the quasiparticle effective mass is diverging, the vertex function describing the coupling of particle-hole pairs to the spin density Fourier component at the antiferromagnetic wave vector is also divergent. Then we give an explicit calculation of the irreducible vertex function for the case of three-dimensional antiferromagnetic fluctuations, and show that it is proportional to the diverging quasiparticle effective mass.

  18. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Morales, Rafael; Batlle, Xavier; Nowak, Ulrich; Güntherodt, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    This “Critical Focused Issue” presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice. - Highlights: • We address the role of bulk antiferromagnetic spins in the exchange bias phenomenon. • Significant experiments on how bulk AFM spins determine exchange bias are highlighted. • We explain the model that accounts for experimental results.

  19. Antiferromagnetic phase of the gapless semiconductor V3Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamer, M. E.; Assaf, B. A.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Arena, D.; Lewis, L. H.; Saúl, A. A.; Radtke, G.; Heiman, D.

    2015-03-01

    Discovering new antiferromagnetic (AF) compounds is at the forefront of developing future spintronic devices without fringing magnetic fields. The AF gapless semiconducting D 03 phase of V3Al was successfully synthesized via arc-melting and annealing. The AF properties were established through synchrotron measurements of the atom-specific magnetic moments, where the magnetic dichroism reveals large and oppositely oriented moments on individual V atoms. Density functional theory calculations confirmed the stability of a type G antiferromagnetism involving only two-thirds of the V atoms, while the remaining V atoms are nonmagnetic. Magnetization, x-ray diffraction, and transport measurements also support the antiferromagnetism. This archetypal gapless semiconductor may be considered as a cornerstone for future spintronic devices containing AF elements.

  20. Anti-ferromagnetic Heisenberg model on bilayer honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoja, M.; Shahbazi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiment on spin-3/2 bilayer honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Bi 3 Mn 4 O 12 (NO 3 ) shows a spin liquid behavior down to very low temperatures. This behavior can be ascribed to the frustration effect due to competitions between first and second nearest neighbour's antiferromagnet interaction. Motivated by the experiment, we study J 1 -J 2 Antiferromagnet Heisenberg model, using Mean field Theory. This calculation shows highly degenerate ground state. We also calculate the effect of second nearest neighbor through z direction and show these neighbors also increase frustration in these systems. Because of these degenerate ground state in these systems, spins can't find any ground state to be freeze in low temperatures. This behavior shows a novel spin liquid state down to very low temperatures.

  1. COPPER AND COPPER-CONTAINING PESTICIDES: METABOLISM, TOXICITY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Husak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of the current knowledge regarding metabolism and toxicity of copper and copper-based pesticides in living organisms. Copper is an essential trace element in all living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, because it participates in different metabolic processes and maintain functions of organisms. The transport and metabolism of copper in living organisms is currently the subject of many studies. Copper is absorbed, transported, distributed, stored, and excreted in the body via the complex of homeostatic processes, which provide organisms with a needed constant level of this micronutrient and avoid excessive amounts. Many aspects of copper homeostasis were studied at the molecular level. Copper based-pesticides, in particularly fungicides, bacteriocides and herbicides, are widely used in agricultural practice throughout the world. Copper is an integral part of antioxidant enzymes, particularly copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, and plays prominent roles in iron homeostasis. On the other hand, excess of copper in organism has deleterious effect, because it stimulates free radical production in the cell, induces lipid peroxidation, and disturbs the total antioxidant capacity of the body. The mechanisms of copper toxicity are discussed in this review also.

  2. Spin waves in antiferromagnetic FeF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, M T; Rainford, B.D.; Guggenheim, H J

    1970-01-01

    Spin-wave dispersion in antiferromagnetic FeF2 has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering using a chopper time-of-flight spectrometer. The single mode observed has a relatively flat dispersion curve rising from 53 cm-1 at the zone centre to 79 cm-1 at the zone boundary. A spin Hamilton......Spin-wave dispersion in antiferromagnetic FeF2 has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering using a chopper time-of-flight spectrometer. The single mode observed has a relatively flat dispersion curve rising from 53 cm-1 at the zone centre to 79 cm-1 at the zone boundary. A spin...

  3. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in antiferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in a magnetic bilayer composed of a normal metal adjacent to an antiferromagnet. Based on a recently derived drift diffusion equation, we show that the resistance of the bilayer depends on the relative angle between the direction transverse to the current flow and the Néel order parameter. While this effect presents striking similarities with the spin Hall magnetoresistance recently reported in ferromagnetic bilayers, its physical origin is attributed to the anisotropic spin relaxation of itinerant spins in the antiferromagnet.

  4. Magnetoresistive properties of non-uniform state of antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchko, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model of magnetoresistive properties of magneto-non-single-phase state of alloyed magnetic semiconductors is considered using the concept derived for a description of magnetoresistive effects in layered and granular magnetic metals. By assuming that there exists a magneto-non-single state in the manganites having the perovskite structure, it is possible to describe, in the framework of above approach, large magnetoresistive effects of manganite phases with antiferromagnetic order and semiconductor-type conductivity as well as those with antiferromagnetic properties and metallic-type conductivity

  5. A new copper(II) chelate complex with tridentate ligand: Synthesis, crystal and molecular electronic structure of aqua-(diethylenetriamine-N, N‧, N‧‧)-copper(II) sulfate monohydrate and its fire retardant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrenyuk, H.; Mykhalichko, O.; Zarychta, B.; Olijnyk, V.; Mykhalichko, B.

    2015-09-01

    The crystals of a new aqua-(diethylenetriamine-N, N‧, N‧‧)-copper(II) sulfate monohydrate have been synthesized by direct interaction of solid copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate with diethylenetriamine (deta). The crystal structure of [Cu(deta)H2O]SO4ṡH2O (1) has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods at 100 K and characterized using X-ray powder diffraction pattern: space group P 1 bar, a = 7.2819(4), b = 8.4669(4), c = 8.7020(3) Å, α = 83.590(3), β = 89.620(4), γ = 84.946(4)°, Z = 2. The environment of the Cu(II) atom is a distorted, elongated square pyramid which consists of three nitrogen atoms of the deta molecule and oxygen atom of the water molecule in the basal plane of the square pyramid (the average lengths of the in-plane Cu-N and Cu-O bonds are 2.00 Å). The apical position of the coordination polyhedron is occupied by complementary oxygen atom of the sulfate anion (the length of the axial Cu-O bond is 2.421(1) Å). The crystal packing is governed by strong hydrogen bonds of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O types. The ab initio quantum-chemical calculations have been performed by the restricted Hartree-Fock method with a basis set 6-31∗G using the structural data of [Cu(deta)H2O]SO4ṡH2O. It has been ascertained that the degenerate d-orbitals of the Cu2+ ion split under the co-action of both the square-pyramidal coordination and the chelation. It is significant that visually observed crystals color (blue-violet) of the [Cu(deta)H2O]SO4ṡH2O complex is in good agreement with the calculated value of wavelength of visible light (λ = 5735 Å) which is closely related to the energy of the absorbed photon (Δ = 2.161 eV). Furthermore, the stereo-chemical aspect of influence of the CuSO4 upon combustibility of modified epoxy-amine polymers has been scrutinized.

  6. Excitations in a Two-Dimensional Random Antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R. J.; Walker, L. R.; Guggenheim, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering studies of the magnetic excitations in the planar Heisenberg random antiferromagnet Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 at 7K are reported. Two well-defined bands of excitations are observed. A simple mean crystal model is found to predict accurately the measured dispersion relations using...

  7. Observation of Antiferromagnetic Resonance in an Organic Superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrance, J. B.; Pedersen, H. J.; Bechgaard, K.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous microwave absorption has been observed in the organic superconductor TMTSF2AsF6 (TMTSF: tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene) below its metal-nonmetal transition near 12 K. This absorption is unambiguously identified as antiferromagnetic resonance by the excellent agreement between a spin...

  8. Static and dynamic behaviour of antiferromagnetic linear chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkens, L.S.J.M.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis deals with an experimental study of the static and dynamic behaviour of s=1/2 heisenberg antiferromagnetic linear chains in the temperature range of 0,05K 4 , CuSeO 4 .5H 2 O, and CuBeF 4 .5H 2 O, all of which are isomorphic salts

  9. Antiferromagnetic ground state in NpCoGe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.C.; Eloirdi, R.; Gaczyński, P.; Khmelevskyi, S.; Shick, Alexander; Caciuffo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 11 (2014), "115135-1"-"115135-11" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/10/0330 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neptunium * anti-ferromagnetism * quantum critical phenomena Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  10. On the magnetism of Heisenberg double-layer antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uijen, C.M.J. van.

    1980-01-01

    The author investigates the sublattice magnetization and the susceptibility of the double-layer Heisenberg antiferromagnet K 3 M 2 F 7 by employing the techniques of elastic and quasi-elastic critical magnetic scattering of neutrons. (G.T.H.)

  11. 235U NMR study of the itinerant antiferromagnet USb2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Harukazu; Sakai, Hironori; Ikushima, Kenji; Kambe, Shinsaku; Tokunaga, Yo; Aoki, Dai; Haga, Yoshinori; O-bar nuki, Yoshichika; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Walstedt, Russell E.

    2005-01-01

    We have succeeded in resolving a 235 U antiferromagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (AFNMR) signal using 235 U-enriched samples of USb 2 . The uranium hyperfine field and coupling constant estimated for this compound are consistent with those from other experiments. This is the first reported observation of 235 U NMR in conducting host material

  12. NdRhSn: A ferromagnet with an antiferromagnetic precursor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihalik, M.; Prokleška, J.; Kamarád, Jiří; Prokeš, K.; Isnard, O.; McIntyre, G. J.; Dönni, A.; Yoshii, S.; Kitazawa, H.; Sechovský, V.; de Boer, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 10 (2011), "104403-1"-"104403-10" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : NdRhSn * ferromagnet * antiferromagnetic precursor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  13. Dynamics of an inhomogeneous anisotropic antiferromagnetic spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, M.; Amuda, R.

    1994-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear spin excitations in the two sublattice model of a one dimensional classical continuum Heisenberg inhomogeneous antiferromagnetic spin chain. The dynamics of the inhomogeneous chain reduces to that of its homogeneous counterpart when the inhomogeneity assumes a particular form. Apart from the usual twists and pulses, we obtain some planar configurations representing the nonlinear dynamics of spins. (author). 12 refs

  14. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimczuk, T.; Shick, Alexander; Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Griveau, J.C.; Colineau, E.; Falmbigl, M.; Wastin, F.; Rogl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 4 (2015), "041803-1"-"041803-9" ISSN 2166-532X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-07172S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ferromagetism * antiferromagnetism * magnetic anisotropy * strong electron correlations * spin-orbit coupling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.323, year: 2015

  15. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes.......In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  16. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  17. Separation of copper-64 from copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglin, R.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of copper-64 from irradiated copper phthalocyanine by Szilard-Chalmers effect is studied. Two methods of separation are used: one of them is based on the dissolution of the irradiated dry compound in concentrated sulfuric acid following its precipitation in water. In the other one the compound is irradiated with water in paste form following treatment with water and hydrochloric acid. The influence of the crystal form of the copper phthalocyanine on the separation yield of copper-64 is shown. Preliminary tests using the ionic exchange technique for purification and changing of copper-64 sulfate to chloride form are carried out. The specific activity using the spectrophotometric technique, after the determination of the copper concentration in solution of copper-64, is calculated. (Author) [pt

  18. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nano-wire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsiao, Chun-I.; Hsu, Wen-Dung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nano-wires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nano-wires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nano-wires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress-strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nano-wire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nano-wire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  19. Understanding the superconductivity in copper oxides

    CERN Document Server

    2019-01-01

    The aim of this book is to clarify the situation by adopting a very different approach from the above electronic/magnetic models, where explicitly local dynamical distortions are considered. These are distinctly different from conventional phonons which are a property of the infinite translational invariant symmetric lattice. The local dynamical distortions are shown to account for bulk properties and provide consistent and quantitative agreement with experimental data together with explicit predictions. Selected published experimental and theoretical papers are presented which support the above arguments, but have been ignored on purpose by the originators of the RVB/t-J bubble. To summarize the scope of this book, comprising nine chapters, it is shown, that the phenomenon of HTS in copper oxides is much better understood than publically claimed by RVB/t-J followers. Using the words of B. Laughlin, the presence of the antiferromagnetism in HTS masks the underlying physics where vibronic bipolarons with spin...

  20. Iridates and RuCl3 - from Heisenberg antiferromagnets to potential Kitaev spin-liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    The observed richness of topological states on the single-electron level prompts the question what kind of topological phases can develop in more strongly correlated, many-body electron systems. Correlation effects, in particular intra- and inter-orbital electron-electron interactions, are very substantial in 3 d transition-metal compounds such as the copper oxides, but the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is weak. In 5 d transition-metal compounds such as iridates, the interesting situation arises that the SOC and Coulomb interactions meet on the same energy scale. The electronic structure of iridates thus depends on a strong competition between the electronic hopping amplitudes, local energy-level splittings, electron-electron interaction strengths, and the SOC of the Ir 5d electrons. The interplay of these ingredients offers the potential to stabilise relatively well-understood states such as a 2D Heisenberg-like antiferromagnet in Sr2IrO4, but in principle also far more exotic ones, such a topological Kitaev quantum spin liquid, in (hyper)honeycomb iridates. I will discuss the microscopic electronic structures of these iridates, their proximity to idealized Heisenberg and Kitaev models and our contributions to establishing the physical factors that appear to have preempted the realization of quantum spin liquid phases so far and include a discussion on the 4d transition metal chloride RuCl3. Supported by SFB 1143 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  1. A novel dumbbell-like polyoxometalate assembled of copper(II)-disubstituted monovacant keggin polyoxoanions with a tetranuclear copper cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hao; Xu, Xiao; Ju, Wei-Wei; Wan, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Dun-Ru; Xu, Yan

    2014-03-17

    A dimeric Keggin polyoxometalate, [Cu(bpy)(μ2-OH)]4[(H2O)(bpy)2HPW11Cu2O39]2·2CH3CH2OH·10H2O (1), constructed from two dicopper(II)-substituted monovacant Keggin polyoxoanions bridged by a Cu4 cluster, has been hydrothermally synthesized. Magnetic analysis indicates predominantly an antiferromagnetic interaction between copper(II) centers. Compound 1 also shows very high catalytic activity for the esterification of phosphoric acid with equimolar lauryl alcohol to monoalkyl phosphate ester.

  2. Antiferromagnetic exchange coupling measurements on single Co clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Leroy, D.; Portemont, C.; Brenac, A.; Morel, R.; Notin, L.; Mailly, D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on single-cluster measurements of the angular dependence of the low-temperature ferromagnetic core magnetization switching field in exchange-coupled Co/CoO core-shell clusters (4 nm) using a micro-bridge DC superconducting quantum interference device (μ-SQUID). It is observed that the coupling with the antiferromagnetic shell induces modification in the switching field for clusters with intrinsic uniaxial anisotropy depending on the direction of the magnetic field applied during the cooling. Using a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth model, it is shown that the core interacts with two weakly coupled and asymmetrical antiferromagnetic sublattices. Ref.: C. Portemont, R. Morel, W. Wernsdorfer, D. Mailly, A. Brenac, and L. Notin, Phys. Rev. B 78, 144415 (2008)

  3. Soft modes in the easy plane pyrochlore antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, J D M; Holdsworth, P C W

    2004-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations lift the high ground state degeneracy of the classical nearest neighbour pyrochlore antiferromagnet, with easy plane anisotropy, giving a first-order phase transition to a long range ordered state. We show, from spin wave analysis and numerical simulation, that even below this transition a continuous manifold of states, of dimension N 2/3 , exist (N is the number of degrees of freedom). As the temperature goes to zero a further 'order by disorder' selection is made from this manifold. The pyrochlore antiferromagnet Er 2 Ti 2 O 7 is believed to have an easy plane anisotropy and is reported to have the same magnetic structure. This is perhaps surprising, given that the dipole interaction lifts the degeneracy of the classical model in favour of a different structure. We interpret our results in the light of these facts

  4. Synthesis, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of phthalimide-based copper(II) complex: In vitro antibacterial, hemolytic and antioxidant assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rizwan; Nayab, Pattan Sirajuddin; Ansari, Istikhar A.; Shahid, M.; Irfan, Mohammad; Alam, Shadab; Abid, Mohammad; Rahisuddin

    2018-05-01

    In the present research work, we prepared N-substituted phthalimide, 2-(-(2-(2-(2-(1,3-dioxoisoindoline-2-yl-ethylamino)ethylamino)ethyl)isoindoline-1,3-dione (DEEI) and its copper(II) complex. The ligand (DEEI) and its Cu(II) complex were structurally identified using absorption, FTIR, NMR, electron spin resonance, X-ray diffraction spectral studies, thermogravimetric and elemental analyses. The electronic spectrum and magnetic moment value proposed that Cu(II) complex has square planar geometry. The DNA interaction ability of the ligand (DEEI) and Cu(II) complex was studied by means of absorption and fluorescence spectrophotometer, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetery, and circular dichroism methods. The extent of DNA binding (Kb) with Calf thymus (Ct-DNA) follows the order of Cu(II) complex (1.11 × 106 M-1) > DEEI (1.0 × 105 M-1), indicating that Cu(II) complex interact with Ct-DNA through groove binding mode and more sturdily than ligand (DEEI). Interestingly, in silico predictions were corroborated with in vitro DNA binding studies. The antibacterial evaluation of these compounds was screened against a panel of bacterial strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 2453), Salmonella enterica (MTCC 3224), Streptococcus pneumoniae (MTCC 655), Enterococcus faecalis (MTCC 439), Klebsiella pneumonia and Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922). The results showed that the copper(II) complex has significant antibacterial potential (IC50 = 0.0019 μg/mL) against Salmonella enteric comparable with ligand (DEEI) and standard drug ciprofloxacin. Growth curve study of Cu(II) complex against only three bacterial strains S. enterica, E. faecalis and S. pneumoniae showed its bactericidal nature. Cu(II) complex showed less than 2% hemolysis on human RBCs indicating its non toxic nature. The results of antioxidant assay demonstrated that scavenging activity of Cu(II) complex is higher as compared to ligand and ascorbic acid as standard.

  5. Molecular cloning, expression, and functional analysis of the copper amine oxidase gene in the endophytic fungus Shiraia sp. Slf14 from Huperzia serrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huilin; Peng, Silu; Zhang, Zhibin; Yan, Riming; Wang, Ya; Zhan, Jixun; Zhu, Du

    2016-12-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a drug used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, the biosynthesis of this medicinally important compound is not well understood. The HupA biosynthetic pathway is thought to be initiated by the decarboxylation of lysine to form cadaverine, which is then converted to 5-aminopentanal by copper amine oxidase (CAO). In this study, we cloned and expressed an SsCAO gene from a HupA-producing endophytic fungus, Shiraia sp. Slf14. Analysis of the deduced protein amino acid sequence showed that it contained the Asp catalytic base, conserved motif Asn-Tyr-Asp/Glu, and three copper-binding histidines. The cDNA of SsCAO was amplified and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), from which a 76 kDa protein was obtained. The activity of this enzyme was tested, which provided more information about the SsCAO gene in the endophytic fungus. Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that this SsCAO could accept cadaverine as a substrate to produce 5-aminopentanal, the precursor of HupA. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the SsCAO from Shiraia sp. Slf14 was closely related to Stemphylium lycopersici CAO. This is the first report on the cloning and expression of a CAO gene from HupA-producing endophytic fungi. Functional characterization of this enzyme provides new insights into the biosynthesis of the HupA an anti-Alzheimer's drug. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  7. Antiferromagnetic ordering of Er2NiSi3 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Ternary intermetallics of the stoichiometric composition R 2 TX 3 , where, R = rare earth element, T = d-electron transition metal and X= p-electron element, crystallizes in hexagonal A1B 2 type crystal structure with space group P6/mmm. We report here the synthesis and basic magnetic properties of the compound Er 2 NiSi 3 . Paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic phase change occurs below 5.4 K for this compound. (author)

  8. Magnetization behavior of nanocrystalline systems combining ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, J.; Wagner, W.; Svygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Meier, J.; Doudin, B.; Ansermet, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The magnetic properties of nanostructured materials on the basis of Fe and Ni have been investigated with a SQUID magnetometer, complementary to the small-angle neutron scattering study reported in the same volume. Measurements of the coercive field in a temperature range from 5 to 300 K confirm the validity of the random anisotropy model for our nanostructured systems. Furthermore, we obtain information about the presence and distribution of the antiferromagnetic oxides, joining the ferromagnetic grains. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  9. Spintronic materials and devices based on antiferromagnetic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.Y.; Song, C.; Zhang, J.Y.; Pan, F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent experimental developments on antiferromagnet (AFM) spintronics mainly comprising Mn-based noncollinear AFM metals. IrMn-based tunnel junctions and Hall devices have been investigated to explore the manipulation of AFM moments by magnetic fields, ferromagnetic materials and electric fields. Room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance based on IrMn as well as FeMn has been successfully achieved, and electrical control of the AFM exchange spring i...

  10. Highly tunable perpendicularly magnetized synthetic antiferromagnets for biotechnology applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vemulkar, T; Mansell, Rhodri; Petit, Dorothee Celine; Cowburn, Russell Paul; Lesniak, MS

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic micro and nanoparticles are increasingly used in biotechnological applications due to the ability to control their behavior through an externally applied field. We demonstrate the fabrication of particles made from ultrathin perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/Pt layers with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling. The particles are characterized by zero moment at remanence, low susceptibility at low fields, and a large saturated moment created by the stacking of the basic coupled bilayer...

  11. Magnetization behavior of nanocrystalline systems combining ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, J.; Wagner, W.; Svygenhoven, H. van; Meier, J.; Doudin, B.; Ansermet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanostructured materials on the basis of Fe and Ni have been investigated with a SQUID magnetometer, complementary to the small-angle neutron scattering study reported in the same volume. Measurements of the coercive field in a temperature range from 5 to 300 K confirm the validity of the random anisotropy model for our nanostructured systems. Furthermore, we obtain information about the presence and distribution of the antiferromagnetic oxides, joining the ferromagnetic grains. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs

  12. Polarized Neutron Reflectivity Simulation of Ferromagnet/ Antiferromagnet Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Jeong Soo

    2008-02-15

    This report investigates the current simulating and fitting programs capable of calculating the polarized neutron reflectivity of the exchange-biased ferromagnet/antiferromagnet magnetic thin films. The adequate programs are selected depending on whether nonspin flip and spin flip reflectivities of magnetic thin films and good user interface are available or not. The exchange-biased systems such as Fe/Cr, Co/CoO, CoFe/IrMn/Py thin films have been simulated successfully with selected programs.

  13. High-field spin dynamics of antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enderle, M.; Regnault, L.P.; Broholm, C.

    2000-01-01

    present recent work on the high-field spin dynamics of the S = I antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains NENP (Haldane ground state) and CsNiCl3 (quasi-1D HAF close to the quantum critical point), the uniform S = 1/2 chain CTS, and the spin-Peierls system CuGeO3. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights...

  14. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piazza, B. Dalla; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, Niels Bech

    2015-01-01

    -projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially extended pairs of fractional S=1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wavevector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Our results establish...... the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration....

  15. Long range anti-ferromagnetic spin model for prebiotic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokura, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    I propose and discuss a fitness function for one-dimensional binary monomer sequences of macromolecules for prebiotic evolution. The fitness function is defined by the free energy of polymers in the high temperature random coil phase. With repulsive interactions among the same kind of monomers, the free energy in the high temperature limit becomes the energy function of the one-dimensional long range anti-ferromagnetic spin model, which is shown to have a dynamical phase transition and glassy states

  16. Superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in heavy-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, R.; Ueda, K.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in heavy-electron systems are investigated from a general point of view. First we classify superconducting states in a simple cubic lattice, a body-centered tetragonal lattice, and a hexagonal close-packed lattice, having URu 2 Si 2 and UPt 3 in mind. For that purpose we take an approach to treat the effective couplings in real space. The approach is convenient to discuss the relation between the nature of fluctuations in the system and the superconducting states. When we assume that the antiferromagnetic fluctuations reported by neutron experiments are dominant, the most promising are some of the anisotropic singlet states and there remains the possibility for some triplet states too. Then we discuss the coupling between the two order parameters based on a Ginzburg-Landau theory. We derive a general expression of the coupling term. It is pointed out that the coupling constant can be large in heavy-electron systems. The general trend of the coexistence of the superconductivity and antiferromagnetism is discussed, and it is shown that the anisotropic states are generally more favorable to the coexistence than the conventional isotropic singlet. Experimental data of URu 2 Si 2 and UPt 3 are analyzed by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. According to the analysis URu 2 Si 2 has a small coupling constant and a large condensation energy of the antiferromagnetism. On the other hand, UPt 3 has a large coupling constant and a small condensation energy. It means that the specific-heat anomaly at T N should be small in UPt 3 and its superconductivity is easily destroyed when a large moment is formed

  17. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernandez, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; Lopez-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.W.; Park, B.G.; Balcells, J.; Martí, Xavier; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Oct (2016), 1-6, č. článku 35471. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnets * spintronics * magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  18. Antiferromagnetism in reduced YBa2Cu3O6+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalta, H.; Schleger, P.; Montfrooij, W.; Andersen, N.H.; Lebech, B.; Liang Ruixing; Hardy, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic ordering was investigated by neutron scattering in an YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x single crystal. We observed antiferromagnetic ordering (AFI) (T N =410 K for x=0.1 and T N =368 K for x=0.18), but found no evidence for a reordering down to 2 K (AFII). The magnetic structure factors are presented to emphasize the anisotropic character of the form factor. ((orig.))

  19. Interface states in stressed semiconductor heterojunction with antiferromagnetic ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantser, V.G.

    1995-08-01

    The stressed heterojunctions with antiferromagnetic ordering in which the constituents have opposite band edge symmetry and their gaps have opposite signs have been investigated. The interface states have been shown to appear in these heterojunctions and they are spin-split. As a result if the Fermi level gets into one of the interface bands then it leads to magnetic ordering in the interface plane. That is if the interface magnetization effect can be observed. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs

  20. Spin Wave Theory in Two-Dimensional Coupled Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimahara, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    We apply spin wave theory to two-dimensional coupled antiferromagnets. In particular, we primarily examine a system that consists of small spins coupled by a strong exchange interaction J1, large spins coupled by a weak exchange interaction J2, and an anisotropic exchange interaction J12 between the small and large spins. This system is an effective model of the organic antiferromagnet λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 in its insulating phase, in which intriguing magnetic phenomena have been observed, where the small and large spins correspond to π electrons and 3d spins, respectively. BETS stands for bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene. We obtain the antiferromagnetic transition temperature TN and the sublattice magnetizations m(T) and M(T) of the small and large spins, respectively, as functions of the temperature T. When T increases, m(T) is constant with a slight decrease below TN, even where M(T) decreases significantly. When J1 ≫ J12 and J2 = 0, an analytical expression for TN is derived. The estimated value of TN and the behaviors of m(T) and M(T) agree with the observations of λ-(BETS)2FeCl4.

  1. Magnetic Transport in Spin Antiferromagnets for Spintronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Azzouz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Had magnetic monopoles been ubiquitous as electrons are, we would probably have had a different form of matter, and power plants based on currents of these magnetic charges would have been a familiar scene of modern technology. Magnetic dipoles do exist, however, and in principle one could wonder if we can use them to generate magnetic currents. In the present work, we address the issue of generating magnetic currents and magnetic thermal currents in electrically-insulating low-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets by invoking the (broken electricity-magnetism duality symmetry. The ground state of these materials is a spin-liquid state that can be described well via the Jordan–Wigner fermions, which permit an easy definition of the magnetic particle and thermal currents. The magnetic and magnetic thermal conductivities are calculated in the present work using the bond–mean field theory. The spin-liquid states in these antiferromagnets are either gapless or gapped liquids of spinless fermions whose flow defines a current just as the one defined for electrons in a Fermi liquid. The driving force for the magnetic current is a magnetic field with a gradient along the magnetic conductor. We predict the generation of a magneto-motive force and realization of magnetic circuits using low-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets. The present work is also about claiming that what the experiments in spintronics attempt to do is trying to treat the magnetic degrees of freedoms on the same footing as the electronic ones.

  2. Metallic magnets without inversion symmetry and antiferromagnetic quantum critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, I.A.

    2006-07-01

    This thesis focusses on two classes of systems that exhibit non-Fermi liquid behaviour in experiments: we investigated aspects of chiral ferromagnets and of antiferromagnetic metals close to a quantum critical point. In chiral ferromagnets, the absence of inversion symmetry makes spin-orbit coupling possible, which leads to a helical modulation of the ferromagnetically ordered state. We studied the motion of electrons in the magnetically ordered state of a metal without inversion symmetry by calculating their generic band-structure. We found that spin-orbit coupling, although weak, has a profound effect on the shape of the Fermi surface: On a large portion of the Fermi surface the electron motion parallel to the helix practically stops. Signatures of this effect can be expected to show up in measurements of the anomalous Hall effect. Recent neutron scattering experiments uncovered the existence of a peculiar kind of partial order in a region of the phase diagram adjacent to the ordered state of the chiral ferromagnet MnSi. Starting from the premise that this partially ordered state is a thermodynamically distinct phase, we investigated an extended Ginzburg-Landau theory for chiral ferromagnets. In a certain parameter regime of the Ginzburg-Landau theory we identified crystalline phases that are reminiscent of the so-called blue phases in liquid crystals. Many antiferromagnetic heavy-fermion systems can be tuned into a regime where they exhibit non-Fermi liquid exponents in the temperature dependence of thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat capacity; this behaviour could be due to a quantum critical point. If the quantum critical behaviour is field-induced, the external field does not only suppress antiferromagnetism but also induces spin precession and thereby influences the dynamics of the order parameter. We investigated the quantum critical behavior of clean antiferromagnetic metals subject to a static, spatially uniform external magnetic field. We

  3. Spin canting in a Dy-based single-chain magnet with dominant next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, K.; Luzon, J.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Sessoli, R.; Bogani, L.; Vindigni, A.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the static magnetic properties of single crystals of the molecular-based single-chain magnet of formula [Dy(hfac)3NIT(C6H4OPh)]∞ comprising alternating Dy3+ and organic radicals. The magnetic molar susceptibility χM displays a strong angular variation for sample rotations around two directions perpendicular to the chain axis. A peculiar inversion between maxima and minima in the angular dependence of χM occurs on increasing temperature. Using information regarding the monomeric building block as well as an ab initio estimation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Dy3+ ion, this “anisotropy-inversion” phenomenon can be assigned to weak one-dimensional ferromagnetism along the chain axis. This indicates that antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor interactions between Dy3+ ions dominate, despite the large Dy-Dy separation, over the nearest-neighbor interactions between the radicals and the Dy3+ ions. Measurements of the field dependence of the magnetization, both along and perpendicularly to the chain, and of the angular dependence of χM in a strong magnetic field confirm such an interpretation. Transfer-matrix simulations of the experimental measurements are performed using a classical one-dimensional spin model with antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange interaction and noncollinear uniaxial single-ion anisotropies favoring a canted antiferromagnetic spin arrangement, with a net magnetic moment along the chain axis. The fine agreement obtained with experimental data provides estimates of the Hamiltonian parameters, essential for further study of the dynamics of rare-earth-based molecular chains.

  4. Nuclear order in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annila, A.J.; Clausen, K.N.; Lindgård, P-A.

    1990-01-01

    A new ordering vector k=(2π/a)(0, 2/3, 2/3) for fcc antiferromagnets has been found by neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear-spin system of a 65Cu single crystal. The corresponding reflection together with the previously observed (100) Bragg peak show the prese......A new ordering vector k=(2π/a)(0, 2/3, 2/3) for fcc antiferromagnets has been found by neutron-diffraction experiments at nanokelvin temperatures in the nuclear-spin system of a 65Cu single crystal. The corresponding reflection together with the previously observed (100) Bragg peak show...

  5. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  6. Research for molecular magnetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Xiaoyu; Zhou Kangwei; Gou Qingquan

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the authors have established a DSF theoretical method suitable for researching molecular magnetism of the compounds consisting of transition group elements. By this method, the authors have revealed that the ferromagnetism of molecules is due to the cross-interaction between d orbitals of adjacent transition-metal ions, and that the antiferromagnetism is due to the parallel interactions. Further more, the authors have also established a magnetism theory for hetero-dinuclear molecular systems and covalent molecular systems, respectively. With these theoretical methods, a systematical studies are performed for the magnetism origin and the magnetism variation rule of transition metal complex molecules in various inorganic compounds, organic compounds and biologic proteins, and a reasonable explanation is presented for the strong antiferromagnetic coupling phenomenon in the catalysis active center of ribonucleotide reductase. This indicates that the main physical mechanisms are the combined effect of the direct-exchange, kinetic exchange and the molecular covalent property

  7. Nuclear spin relaxation in a spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain at high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyo, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The proton spin relaxation rate is calculated in the one-dimensional spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet α-bis (N-methylsalicylaldiminato)-copper (II), α-CuNSal by using a fermion representation for magnons above the critical field where the magnon spectrum develops a gap. The one-magnon process which is dominant below the critical field is shown to be absent in the presence of a gap in contrast to a previous theory. Instead, we find that the three-magnon rate is large enough to explain the data at low fields. The two-magnon off-resonance damping which enters the expression for the three-magnon rate is calculated by solving the two-magnon scattering exactly, leading to a much smaller value of the rate than that predicted by the Born approximation. Also, in an unsuccessful attempt to resolve the discrepancy between the recently calculated two-magnon rate (dominant at high fields) and the data of α-CuNSal reported by Azevedo et al., we carry out the vertex correction for the spin-density correlation function by summing the RPA series as well as the exchange ladders for the polarization part. We find that, although the exchange enhancement is significantly large, it is nearly canceled out by the RPA correction, and the net effect of the vertex correction is small. This result agrees with the recent data of the similar spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain system CuSO 4 x5H 2 O reported by Groen et al. On the other hand, it disagrees with a recent calculation of the two-magnon rate based on a boson representation of spins. To resolve this discrepancy we examine the effect of the boson self-energy correction on the two-magnon rate. The boson spectral shift is found to be quite large in the region where the cited two-boson rate deviates from the two-fermion rate. As a result the two-boson rate is significantly reduced, leading to reasonable agreement with the two-fermion rate

  8. Copper Bioleaching in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Gentina; Fernando Acevedo

    2016-01-01

    Chile has a great tradition of producing and exporting copper. Over the last several decades, it has become the first producer on an international level. Its copper reserves are also the most important on the planet. However, after years of mineral exploitation, the ease of extracting copper oxides and ore copper content has diminished. To keep the production level high, the introduction of new technologies has become necessary. One that has been successful is bioleaching. Chile had the first...

  9. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  10. The spatially anisotropic triangular lattice antiferromagnet: Popov-Fedotov method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, Pham Thi Thanh; Trang, Phan Thu; Thang, Nguyen Toan

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on an triangular lattice with spatially anisotropic J 1 - J 2 exchange interactions. We apply the Popov-Fedotov method based on introducing an imaginary valued chemical potential to enforce the auxiliary fermion constraint exactly. The staggered magnetization, magnon spectra, free energy are computed in one loop approximation and compared using two different constraints: exact and on average. In the limit of zero temperature the results are identical, whereas at higher temperature significant differences are found. The comparisons with the results obtained by other methods are discussed. (paper)

  11. Antiferromagnetism in EuPdGe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albedah, Mohammed A. [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Al-Qadi, Khalid [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Stadnik, Zbigniew M., E-mail: stadnik@uottawa.ca [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Przewoźnik, Janusz [Solid State Physics Department, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We show that EuPdGe{sub 3} crystallizes in the BaNiSn{sub 3}-type structure with the lattice constants a = 4.4457(1) Å and c = 10.1703(2). • We demonstrate that EuPdGe{sub 3} is an antiferromagnet with the Néel temperature T{sub N} = 12.16(1) K. • The temperature dependence of the hyperfine magnetic field follows a S = 7/2 Brillouin function. • We find that the Debye temperature of the studied compound is 199(2) K. - Abstract: The results of X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization, and {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of polycrystalline EuPdGe{sub 3} are reported. EuPdGe{sub 3} crystallizes in the BaNiSn{sub 3}-type tetragonal structure (space group I4mm) with the lattice constants a=4.4457(1)Å and c=10.1703(2)Å. The results are consistent with EuPdGe{sub 3} being an antiferromagnet with the Néel temperature T{sub N}=12.16(1)K and with the Eu spins S=7/2 in the ab plane. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility above T{sub N} follows the modified Curie-Weiss law with the effective magnetic moment of 7.82(1) μ{sub B} per Eu atom and the paramagnetic Curie temperature of -5.3(1)K indicative of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions. The M(H) isotherms for temperatures approaching T{sub N} from above are indicative of dynamical short-range antiferromagnetic ordering in the sample. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine magnetic field follows a S=7/2 Brillouin function. The principal component of the electric field gradient tensor is shown to increase with decreasing temperature and is well described by a T{sup 3/2} power-law relation. The Debye temperature of EuPdGe{sub 3} determined from the Mössbauer data is 199(2) K.

  12. Critical Behaviour of a Two-Dimensional Random Antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Birgeneau, R. J.; Guggenheim, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron scattering study of the order parameter, correlation length and staggered susceptibility of the two-dimensional random antiferromagnet Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 is reported. The system is found to exhibit a well-defined phase transition with critical exponents identical to those of the isomorphou...... pure materials K2NiF4 and K2MnF4. Thus, in these systems, which have the asymptotic critical behaviour of the two-dimensional Ising model, randomness has no measurable effect on the phase-transition behaviour....

  13. Competing interactions in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Y.; Biegalski, M.B.; Christen, H.M.

    2009-10-22

    Soft x-ray magnetic dichroism, magnetization, and magnetotransport measurements demonstrate that the competition between different magnetic interactions (exchange coupling, electronic reconstruction, and long-range interactions) in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3}(LSFO)/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}(LSMO) perovskite oxide superlattices leads to unexpected functional properties. The antiferromagnetic order parameter in LSFO and ferromagnetic order parameter in LSMO show a dissimilar dependence on sublayer thickness and temperature, illustrating the high degree of tunability in these artificially layered materials.

  14. Quantum phase transitions of a disordered antiferromagnetic topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baireuther, P.; Edge, J. M.; Fulga, I. C.; Beenakker, C. W. J.; Tworzydło, J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of electrostatic disorder on the conductivity of a three-dimensional antiferromagnetic insulator (a stack of quantum anomalous Hall layers with staggered magnetization). The phase diagram contains regions where the increase of disorder first causes the appearance of surface conduction (via a topological phase transition), followed by the appearance of bulk conduction (via a metal-insulator transition). The conducting surface states are stabilized by an effective time-reversal symmetry that is broken locally by the disorder but restored on long length scales. A simple self-consistent Born approximation reliably locates the boundaries of this so-called "statistical" topological phase.

  15. Microscopic theory of coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkenazi, J.; Kuper, C.G.; Ron, A.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism is presented. We study the role of the ''diagonal'' exchange coupling between magnetic ions and conduction electrons, using Eliashberg's formalism. This coupling generates a spatial displacement of the Cooper-paired states, and thus reduces the pairing strength. The reduction is linear in the exchange integral and the staggered magnetization. The theory agrees well with experiment for Dy/sub 1.2/Mo 6 S 8 and Tb/sub 1.2/Mo 6 S 8

  16. Analytical results for a hole in an antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; d'Ambrumenil, N.; Su, Z.B.

    1996-04-01

    The Green's function for a hole moving in an antiferromagnet is derived analytically in the long-wavelength limit. We find that the infrared divergence is eliminated in two and higher dimensions so that the quasiparticle weight is finite. Our results also suggest that the hole motion is polaronic in nature with a bandwidth proportional to t 2 /J exp[-c(t/J) 2 ] (c is a constant) for J/t >or approx 0.5. The connection of the long-wavelength approximation to the first-order approximation in the cumulant expansion is also clarified. (author). 23 refs, 2 figs

  17. Collective impurity effects in the Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryasin, V S; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice doped with nonmagnetic impurities. Two nontrivial effects resulting from collective impurity behavior are predicted. The first one is related to presence of uncompensated magnetic moments localized near vacancies as revealed by the low-temperature Curie tail in the magnetic susceptibility. These moments exhibit an anomalous growth with the impurity concentration, which we attribute to the clustering mechanism. In an external magnetic field, impurities lead to an even more peculiar phenomenon lifting the classical ground-state degeneracy in favor of the conical state. We analytically demonstrate that vacancies spontaneously generate a positive biquadratic exchange, which is responsible for the above degeneracy lifting

  18. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  19. Analysis of copper contamination in transformer insulating material with nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, N.; Vasa, N. J.; Sarathi, R.

    2018-06-01

    This work examines the oil-impregnated pressboard insulation of high-voltage power transformers, for the determination of copper contamination. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy revealed atomic copper lines and molecular copper monoxide bands due to copper sulphide diffusion. X-ray diffraction studies also indicated the presence of CuO emission. Elemental and molecular mapping compared transformer insulating material ageing in different media—air, N2, He and vacuum.

  20. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Antiferromagnetic Sr_{2}IrO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report point-contact measurements of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR in a single crystal of antiferromagnetic Mott insulator Sr_{2}IrO_{4}. The point-contact technique is used here as a local probe of magnetotransport properties on the nanoscale. The measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature reveal negative magnetoresistances (up to 28% for modest magnetic fields (250 mT applied within the IrO_{2} a-b plane and electric currents flowing perpendicular to the plane. The angular dependence of magnetoresistance shows a crossover from fourfold to twofold symmetry in response to an increasing magnetic field with angular variations in resistance from 1% to 14%. We tentatively attribute the fourfold symmetry to the crystalline component of AMR and the field-induced transition to the effects of applied field on the canting of antiferromagnetic-coupled moments in Sr_{2}IrO_{4}. The observed AMR is very large compared to the crystalline AMRs in 3d transition metal alloys or oxides (0.1%–0.5% and can be associated with the large spin-orbit interactions in this 5d oxide while the transition provides evidence of correlations between electronic transport, magnetic order, and orbital states. The finding of this work opens an entirely new avenue to not only gain a new insight into physics associated with spin-orbit coupling but also to better harness the power of spintronics in a more technically favorable fashion.

  1. Stability of the antiferromagnetic state in the electron doped iridates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowal, Sayantika; Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid; Satpathy, Sashi

    2018-06-01

    Iridates such as Sr2IrO4 are of considerable interest owing to the formation of the Mott insulating state driven by a large spin–orbit coupling. However, in contrast to the expectation from the Nagaoka theorem that a single doped hole or electron destroys the anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) state of the half-filled Hubbard model in the large U limit, the anti-ferromagnetism persists in the doped Iridates for a large dopant concentration beyond half-filling. With a tight-binding description of the relevant states by the third-neighbor (t 1, t 2, t 3, U) Hubbard model on the square lattice, we examine the stability of the AFM state to the formation of a spin spiral state in the strong coupling limit. The third-neighbor interaction t 3 is important for the description of the Fermi surface of the electron doped system. A phase diagram in the parameter space is obtained for the regions of stability of the AFM state. Our results qualitatively explain the robustness of the AFM state in the electron doped iridate (such as Sr2‑x La x IrO4), observed in many experiments, where the AFM state continues to be stable until a critical dopant concentration.

  2. Small-scale phase separation in doped anisotropic antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, M Yu; Kugel, K I; Rakhmanov, A L; Pazhitnykh, K S

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the possibility of nanoscale phase separation manifesting itself in the formation of ferromagnetic (FM) polarons (FM droplets) in the general situation of doped anisotropic three- and two-dimensional antiferromagnets. In these cases, we calculate the shape of the most energetically favourable droplets. We show that the binding energy and the volume of a FM droplet in the three-dimensional (3D) case depend upon only two universal parameters J-bar=(J x +J y +J z )S 2 and t eff (t x t y t z ) 1/3 , where J-bar and t eff are effective antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange and hopping integrals, respectively. In the two-dimensional (2D) case these parameters have the form J-bar=(J x +J y )S 2 and t eff (t x t y ) 1/2 . The most favourable shape of a ferromagnetic droplet corresponds to an ellipse in the 2D case and to an ellipsoid in the 3D case

  3. Electrical control of antiferromagnetic metal up to 15 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, PengXiang; Yin, GuFan; Wang, YuYan; Cui, Bin; Pan, Feng; Song, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Manipulation of antiferromagnetic (AFM) spins by electrical means is on great demand to develop the AFM spintronics with low power consumption. Here we report a reversible electrical control of antiferromagnetic moments of FeMn up to 15 nm, using an ionic liquid to exert a substantial electric-field effect. The manipulation is demonstrated by the modulation of exchange spring in [Co/Pt]/FeMn system, where AFM moments in FeMn pin the magnetization rotation of Co/Pt. By carrier injection or extraction, the magnetic anisotropy of the top layer in FeMn is modulated to influence the whole exchange spring and then passes its influence to the [Co/Pt]/FeMn interface, through a distance up to the length of exchange spring that fully screens electric field. Comparing FeMn to IrMn, despite the opposite dependence of exchange bias on gate voltages, the same correlation between carrier density and exchange spring stiffness is demonstrated. Besides the fundamental significance of modulating the spin structures in metallic AFM via all-electrical fashion, the present finding would advance the development of low-power-consumption AFM spintronics.

  4. Low Field Magnetic and Thermal Hysteresis in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Liubimova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and thermal hysteresis (difference in magnetic properties on cooling and heating have been studied in polycrystalline Dy (dysprosium between 80 and 250 K using measurements of the reversible Villari effect and alternating current (AC susceptibility. We argue that measurement of the reversible Villari effect in the antiferromagnetic phase is a more sensitive method to detect magnetic hysteresis than the registration of conventional B(H loops. We found that the Villari point, recently reported in the antiferromagnetic phase of Dy at 166 K, controls the essential features of magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibility on heating from the ferromagnetic state: (i thermal hysteresis in AC susceptibility and in the reversible Villari effect disappears abruptly at the temperature of the Villari point; (ii the imaginary part of AC susceptibility is strongly frequency dependent, but only up to the temperature of the Villari point; (iii the imaginary part of the susceptibility drops sharply also at the Villari point. We attribute these effects observed at the Villari point to the disappearance of the residual ferromagnetic phase. The strong influence of the Villari point on several magnetic properties allows this temperature to be ranked almost as important as the Curie and Néel temperatures in Dy and likely also for other rare earth elements and their alloys.

  5. The Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square-kagomé lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Richter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the ground state, the low-lying excitations as well as high-field thermodynamics of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the two-dimensional square-kagomé lattice. This magnetic system belongs to the class of highly frustrated spin systems with an infinite non-trivial degeneracy of the classical ground state as it is also known for the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagomé and on the star lattice. The quantum ground state of the spin-half system is a quantum paramagnet with a finite spin gap and with a large number of non-magnetic excitations within this gap. We also discuss the magnetization versus field curve that shows a plateaux as well as a macroscopic magnetization jump to saturation due to independent localized magnon states. These localized states are highly degenerate and lead to interesting features in the low-temperature thermodynamics at high magnetic fields such as an additional low-temperature peak in the specific heat and an enhanced magnetocaloric effect.

  6. Effects of interfacial frustration in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urazhdin, Sergei; Ma, Tianyu

    While the ferromagnet (F)/antiferromagnet (AF) bilayers have been extensively studied in the context of exchange bias, and more recently in the context of antiferromagnetic spintronics, the fundamental understanding of the nature of the magnetic state in this system is still a subject a debate. We will present measurements of magnetization aging in several F/AF systems based on AF=FeMn, CoO, and NiO, universally observed in all of these systems when AF layers are sufficiently thin. Quite generally, the aging curves are well-described by the power law with a small exponent. We show that the aging characteristics such as the dependence on temperature and the magnetic history are inconsistent with the Arrhenius activation, disproving the granular models of exchange bias. Furthermore, we show that the aging characteristics qualitatively change across the exchange bias blocking temperature, demonstrating that the latter is similar to the glass transition temperature, and is not simply of a characteristic activation temperature of the AF domains. We discuss the our findings in the context of frustration due to the random effective exchange field at the F/AF interface. supported by NSF DMR.

  7. {mu}SR study of organic systems: ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, the spin-crossover effect, and fluctuations in magnetic nanodiscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blundell, S.J.; Pratt, F.L.; Lancaster, T.; Marshall, I.M.; Steer, C.A.; Hayes, W.; Sugano, T.; Letard, J.-F.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Heath, S.L

    2003-02-01

    We present the results of recent {mu}SR experiments on a variety of novel organic and molecular magnetic systems. Muons are sensitive to local static fields and magnetic fluctuations, but can probe much more than just the onset of long-range magnetic order. We review our work on nitronyl nitroxide organic ferromagnets and antiferromagnets. We describe a muon study of the spin-crossover phenomenon which has been studied in Fe(PM-PEA){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}, and which shows Gaussian and root-exponential muon relaxation in the high-spin and low-spin phases, respectively. Experiments on a disc-shaped molecular complex containing Fe{sub 19} (with spin ((31)/(2))) reveal the effects of quantum tunneling of magnetization and allow an estimate of the quantum tunneling rate.

  8. μSR study of organic systems: ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, the spin-crossover effect, and fluctuations in magnetic nanodiscs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, S.J.; Pratt, F.L.; Lancaster, T.; Marshall, I.M.; Steer, C.A.; Hayes, W.; Sugano, T.; Letard, J.-F.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Heath, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of recent μSR experiments on a variety of novel organic and molecular magnetic systems. Muons are sensitive to local static fields and magnetic fluctuations, but can probe much more than just the onset of long-range magnetic order. We review our work on nitronyl nitroxide organic ferromagnets and antiferromagnets. We describe a muon study of the spin-crossover phenomenon which has been studied in Fe(PM-PEA) 2 (NCS) 2 , and which shows Gaussian and root-exponential muon relaxation in the high-spin and low-spin phases, respectively. Experiments on a disc-shaped molecular complex containing Fe 19 (with spin ((31)/(2))) reveal the effects of quantum tunneling of magnetization and allow an estimate of the quantum tunneling rate

  9. Spin wave spectrum and zero spin fluctuation of antiferromagnetic solid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, M.; Delrieu, J.M.

    1981-08-01

    The spin wave spectrum and eigenvectors of the uudd antiferromagnetic phase of solid 3 He are calculated; an optical mode is predicted around 150 - 180 Mc and a zero point spin deviation of 0.74 is obtained in agreement with the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency measured by Osheroff

  10. Long range order in the ground state of two-dimensional antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, E.J.; Perez, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of long range order is shown in the ground state of the two-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet for S >= 3/2. The method yields also long range order for the ground state of a larger class of anisotropic quantum antiferromagnetic spin systems with or without transverse magnetic fields. (Author) [pt

  11. A new crystal form of Aspergillus oryzae catechol oxidase and evaluation of copper site structures in coupled binuclear copper enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Leena; Rutanen, Chiara; Saloheimo, Markku; Kruus, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Coupled binuclear copper (CBC) enzymes have a conserved type 3 copper site that binds molecular oxygen to oxidize various mono- and diphenolic compounds. In this study, we found a new crystal form of catechol oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoCO4) and solved two new structures from two different crystals at 1.8-Å and at 2.5-Å resolutions. These structures showed different copper site forms (met/deoxy and deoxy) and also differed from the copper site observed in the previously solved structure of AoCO4. We also analysed the electron density maps of all of the 56 CBC enzyme structures available in the protein data bank (PDB) and found that many of the published structures have vague copper sites. Some of the copper sites were then re-refined to find a better fit to the observed electron density. General problems in the refinement of metalloproteins and metal centres are discussed.

  12. A new crystal form of Aspergillus oryzae catechol oxidase and evaluation of copper site structures in coupled binuclear copper enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Penttinen

    Full Text Available Coupled binuclear copper (CBC enzymes have a conserved type 3 copper site that binds molecular oxygen to oxidize various mono- and diphenolic compounds. In this study, we found a new crystal form of catechol oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoCO4 and solved two new structures from two different crystals at 1.8-Å and at 2.5-Å resolutions. These structures showed different copper site forms (met/deoxy and deoxy and also differed from the copper site observed in the previously solved structure of AoCO4. We also analysed the electron density maps of all of the 56 CBC enzyme structures available in the protein data bank (PDB and found that many of the published structures have vague copper sites. Some of the copper sites were then re-refined to find a better fit to the observed electron density. General problems in the refinement of metalloproteins and metal centres are discussed.

  13. Copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), an antioxidant gene from seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis); molecular cloning, sequence characterization, antioxidant activity and potential peroxidation function of its recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, N C N; Godahewa, G I; Lee, Jehee

    2016-10-01

    Copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) from Hippocampus abdominalis (HaCuZnSOD) is a metalloenzyme which belongs to the ubiquitous family of SODs. Here, we determined the characteristic structural features of HaCuZnSOD, analyzed its evolutionary relationships, and identified its potential immune responses and biological functions in relation to antioxidant defense mechanisms in the seahorse. The gene had a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 67 bp, a coding sequence of 465 bp and a 3' UTR of 313 bp. The putative peptide consists of 154 amino acids. HaCuZnSOD had a predicted molecular mass of 15.94 kDa and a theoretical pI value of 5.73, which is favorable for copper binding activity. In silico analysis revealed that HaCuZnSOD had a prominent Cu-Zn_superoxide_dismutase domain, two Cu/Zn signature sequences, a putative N-glycosylation site, and several active sites including Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) binding sites. The three dimensional structure indicated a β-sheet barrel with 8 β-sheets and two short α-helical regions. Multiple alignment analyses revealed many conserved regions and active sites among its orthologs. The highest amino acid identity to HaCuZnSOD was found in Siniperca chuatsi (87.4%), while Maylandia zebra shared a close relationship in the phylogenetic analysis. Functional assays were performed to assess the antioxidant, biophysical and biochemical properties of overexpressed recombinant (r) HaCuZnSOD. A xanthine/XOD assay gave optimum results at pH 9 and 25 °C indicating these may be the best conditions for its antioxidant action in the seahorse. An MTT assay and flow cytometry confirmed that rHaCuZnSOD showed peroxidase activity in the presence of HCO3(-). In all the functional assays, the level of antioxidant activity of rHaCuZnSOD was concentration dependent; metal ion supplementation also increased its activity. The highest mRNA expressional level of HaCuZnSOD was found in blood. Temporal assessment under pathological stress showed a delay

  14. Spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves: From clean to disordered regimes

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed

    2014-05-28

    Current-driven spin torques in metallic spin valves composed of antiferromagnets are theoretically studied using the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method implemented on a tight-binding model. We focus our attention on G-type and L-type antiferromagnets in both clean and disordered regimes. In such structures, spin torques can either rotate the magnetic order parameter coherently (coherent torque) or compete with the internal antiferromagnetic exchange (exchange torque). We show that, depending on the symmetry of the spin valve, the coherent and exchange torques can either be in the plane, ∝n×(q×n) or out of the plane ∝n×q, where q and n are the directions of the order parameter of the polarizer and the free antiferromagnetic layers, respectively. Although disorder conserves the symmetry of the torques, it strongly reduces the torque magnitude, pointing out the need for momentum conservation to ensure strong spin torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves.

  15. Spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves: From clean to disordered regimes

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed; Manchon, Aurelien; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Current-driven spin torques in metallic spin valves composed of antiferromagnets are theoretically studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function method implemented on a tight-binding model. We focus our attention on G-type and L-type antiferromagnets in both clean and disordered regimes. In such structures, spin torques can either rotate the magnetic order parameter coherently (coherent torque) or compete with the internal antiferromagnetic exchange (exchange torque). We show that, depending on the symmetry of the spin valve, the coherent and exchange torques can either be in the plane, ∝n×(q×n) or out of the plane ∝n×q, where q and n are the directions of the order parameter of the polarizer and the free antiferromagnetic layers, respectively. Although disorder conserves the symmetry of the torques, it strongly reduces the torque magnitude, pointing out the need for momentum conservation to ensure strong spin torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves.

  16. Bonding and structure of copper nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundari, Thomas R; Dinescu, Adriana; Kazi, Abul B

    2008-11-03

    Copper nitrenes are of interest as intermediates in the catalytic aziridination of olefins and the amination of C-H bonds. However, despite advances in the isolation and study of late-transition-metal multiply bonded complexes, a bona fide structurally characterized example of a terminal copper nitrene has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In anticipation of such a report, terminal copper nitrenes are studied from a computational perspective. The nitrene complexes studied here are of the form (beta-diketiminate)Cu(NPh). Density functional theory (DFT), complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure techniques, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are employed to study such species. While DFT methods indicate that a triplet (S = 1) is the ground state, CASSCF calculations indicate that a singlet (S = 0) is the ground state, with only a small energy gap between the singlet and triplet. Moreover, the ground-state (open-shell) singlet copper nitrene is found to be highly multiconfigurational (i.e., biradical) and to possess a bent geometry about the nitrene nitrogen, contrasting with the linear nitrene geometry of the triplet copper nitrenes. CASSCF calculations also reveal the existence of a closed-shell singlet state with some degree of multiple bonding character for the copper-nitrene bond.

  17. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about......, they may be inadequate in patients diagnosed so late that extensive body deposits of metal have been developed. The main research needs in this field are to further clarify molecular mechanisms of disease progression and to develop new chelators that are more effective and less toxic than those presently...

  18. Combined proteomic and molecular approaches for cloning and characterization of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD2) from garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadji Sfaxi, Imen; Ezzine, Aymen; Coquet, Laurent; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Marzouki, M Nejib

    2012-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; EC 1.15.1.1) are key enzymes in the cells protection against oxidant agents. Thus, SODs play a major role in the protection of aerobic organisms against oxygen-mediated damages. Three SOD isoforms were previously identified by zymogram staining from Allium sativum bulbs. The purified Cu, Zn-SOD2 shows an antagonist effect to an anticancer drug and alleviate cytotoxicity inside tumor cells lines B16F0 (mouse melanoma cells) and PAE (porcine aortic endothelial cells). To extend the characterization of Allium SODs and their corresponding genes, a proteomic approach was applied involving two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS analyses. From peptide sequence data obtained by mass spectrometry and sequences homologies, primers were defined and a cDNA fragment of 456 bp was amplified by RT-PCR. The cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame coding for 152 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high identity (82-87%) with sequences of Cu, Zn-SODs from other plant species. Molecular analysis was achieved by a protein 3D structural model.

  19. Metabolism of manganese, iron, copper, and selenium in calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen male Holstein calves were used to study manganese and iron metabolism. The calves were fed one of the following diets for 18 days: control, control + iron, control + manganese, and control + iron and manganese. All calves were dosed orally with manganese-54. Tissue concentrations of manganese, iron and manganese-54 were determined. Small intestinal iron was lower in calves fed the high manganese diet than in controls. Tissue manganese-54 was lower in calves fed a high manganese diet. Fecal manganese content increased in calves fed both high manganese and high manganese-high iron diets. Serum total iron was not affected by the dietary treatments. To study the effects of high dietary levels of copper and selenium on the intracellular distributions of these two elements in liver and kidney cytosol, calves were fed one of four diets for 15 days. These were 0 and 100 ppM supplemental copper and 0 and 1 ppM added selenium. The control diet containing 0.1 ppM of selenium and 15 ppM of copper. All calves were orally dosed 48 hrs prior to sacrifice with selenium-75. A high copper diet increased copper concentrations in all intracellular liver fractions and most kidney fractions. Only the effects in the liver were significant. Less copper was found in the mitochondria fractions in liver and kidney of calves fed a high selenium diet. Three major copper-binding protein peaks were separated from the soluble fractions of calf liver and kidney. Peak 1 appeared to be the major copper-binding protein in liver and kidney cytosol of copper-loaded animals. Added selenium alone or in combination with copper accentuated the copper accumulation in this peak. Most of selenium-75 was recovered in the same peak as the copper. The results of this experiment indicated that the large molecular proteins in liver and kidney cytosol of calves play an important role in copper and selenium-75 metabolism

  20. Charge dynamics of the antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xing-Jie; Li, Xin; Chen, Jing; Liao, Hai-Jun; Xiang, Tao; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Normand, B

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a slave-fermion formulation in which to study the charge dynamics of the half-filled Hubbard model on the square lattice. In this description, the charge degrees of freedom are represented by fermionic holons and doublons and the Mott-insulating characteristics of the ground state are the consequence of holon–doublon bound-state formation. The bosonic spin degrees of freedom are described by the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, yielding long-ranged (Néel) magnetic order at zero temperature. Within this framework and in the self-consistent Born approximation, we perform systematic calculations of the average double occupancy, the electronic density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. Qualitatively, our method reproduces the lower and upper Hubbard bands, the spectral-weight transfer into a coherent quasiparticle band at their lower edges and the renormalisation of the Mott gap, which is associated with holon–doublon binding, due to the interactions of both quasiparticle species with the magnons. The zeros of the Green function at the chemical potential give the Luttinger volume, the poles of the self-energy reflect the underlying quasiparticle dispersion with a spin-renormalised hopping parameter and the optical gap is directly related to the Mott gap. Quantitatively, the square-lattice Hubbard model is one of the best-characterised problems in correlated condensed matter and many numerical calculations, all with different strengths and weaknesses, exist with which to benchmark our approach. From the semi-quantitative accuracy of our results for all but the weakest interaction strengths, we conclude that a self-consistent treatment of the spin-fluctuation effects on the charge degrees of freedom captures all the essential physics of the antiferromagnetic Mott–Hubbard insulator. We remark in addition that an analytical approximation with these properties serves a vital function in developing a full understanding of

  1. Charge dynamics of the antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xing-Jie; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Xin; Chen, Jing; Liao, Hai-Jun; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Normand, B.; Xiang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a slave-fermion formulation in which to study the charge dynamics of the half-filled Hubbard model on the square lattice. In this description, the charge degrees of freedom are represented by fermionic holons and doublons and the Mott-insulating characteristics of the ground state are the consequence of holon-doublon bound-state formation. The bosonic spin degrees of freedom are described by the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, yielding long-ranged (Néel) magnetic order at zero temperature. Within this framework and in the self-consistent Born approximation, we perform systematic calculations of the average double occupancy, the electronic density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. Qualitatively, our method reproduces the lower and upper Hubbard bands, the spectral-weight transfer into a coherent quasiparticle band at their lower edges and the renormalisation of the Mott gap, which is associated with holon-doublon binding, due to the interactions of both quasiparticle species with the magnons. The zeros of the Green function at the chemical potential give the Luttinger volume, the poles of the self-energy reflect the underlying quasiparticle dispersion with a spin-renormalised hopping parameter and the optical gap is directly related to the Mott gap. Quantitatively, the square-lattice Hubbard model is one of the best-characterised problems in correlated condensed matter and many numerical calculations, all with different strengths and weaknesses, exist with which to benchmark our approach. From the semi-quantitative accuracy of our results for all but the weakest interaction strengths, we conclude that a self-consistent treatment of the spin-fluctuation effects on the charge degrees of freedom captures all the essential physics of the antiferromagnetic Mott-Hubbard insulator. We remark in addition that an analytical approximation with these properties serves a vital function in developing a full understanding of the

  2. Incorporation of copper ions into crystals of T2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, E. M.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Kittl, R.; Dorovatovskii, P.V.; Shleev, S. V.; Popov, V. O.; Ludwig, R.

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of the native form of laccase from B. aclada from the type 2 copper-depleted form of the enzyme was investigated. Copper ions were found to be incorporated into the active site after soaking the depleted enzyme in a Cu + -containing solution. Laccases belong to the class of multicopper oxidases catalyzing the oxidation of phenols accompanied by the reduction of molecular oxygen to water without the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The activity of laccases depends on the number of Cu atoms per enzyme molecule. The structure of type 2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada has been solved previously. With the aim of obtaining the structure of the native form of the enzyme, crystals of the depleted laccase were soaked in Cu + - and Cu 2+ -containing solutions. Copper ions were found to be incorporated into the active site only when Cu + was used. A comparative analysis of the native and depleted forms of the enzymes was performed

  3. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  4. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-01-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76 Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76 Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76 Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  5. Superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in cuprates and pnictides: Evidence of the role of Coulomb correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, J.D.; Malozovsky, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In a layered 2D cuprates the long-range order antiferromagnetism is driven mainly by the Van Hove singularity. • The long-range antiferromagnetism quickly disappear with doping away from the Van Hove singularity. • For pnictides the antiferromagnetism exists as a result of the nesting condition. • Since the doping steadily changes the nesting conditions, the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity may coexist. -- Abstract: We consider the Hubbard model in terms of the perturbative diagrammatic approach (UN F ⩽1) where the interaction between two electrons with antiparallel spins in the lowest order of perturbation is described by the short-range repulsive contact (on-site) interaction (U>0). We argue that in layered 2D cuprates the long-range order antiferromagnetism is driven mainly by the Van Hove singularity, whereas in the case of pnictides the antiferromagnetism exists as a result of the nesting condition. We show that when the interaction is quite strong (UN F ≈1) in the case of the Van Hove singularity the electron system undergoes the antiferromagnetic phase transition with the log-range order parameter and large insulating gap. The long-range antiferromagnetism quickly disappear, as shown, with the doping away from the Van Hove singularity, but the antiferromagnetic short-range correlation persists (UN F < 1) due to Coulomb repulsive interaction which is the mechanism for superconductivity in cuprates. We argue that in the case of pnictides the antiferromagnetism appears when the nesting conditions for the Fermi surface are met. Since the doping steadily changes the nesting conditions, the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity may coexist as has been observed in pnictides. We show that the proximity of the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity implies the repulsive interaction between electrons, which turns into attractive between quasiparticles as shown by the authors in the article published on the same issue as this one

  6. Structural templating in a nonplanar phthalocyanine using single crystal copper iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Rochford, L. A. (Luke A.); Ramadan, Alexandra J.; Keeble, Dean S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, T. S. (Tim S.)

    2015-01-01

    Solution-grown copper iodide crystals are used as substrates for the templated growth of the nonplanar vanadyl phthalocyanine using organic molecular beam deposition. Structural characterization reveals a single molecular orientation produced by the (111) Miller plane of the copper iodide crystals. These fundamental measurements show the importance of morphology and structure in templating interactions for organic electronics applications.

  7. Antiferromagnetic order in the Hubbard model on the Penrose lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Akihisa; Tsunetsugu, Hirokazu

    2017-12-01

    We study an antiferromagnetic order in the ground state of the half-filled Hubbard model on the Penrose lattice and investigate the effects of quasiperiodic lattice structure. In the limit of infinitesimal Coulomb repulsion U →+0 , the staggered magnetizations persist to be finite, and their values are determined by confined states, which are strictly localized with thermodynamics degeneracy. The magnetizations exhibit an exotic spatial pattern, and have the same sign in each of cluster regions, the size of which ranges from 31 sites to infinity. With increasing U , they continuously evolve to those of the corresponding spin model in the U =∞ limit. In both limits of U , local magnetizations exhibit a fairly intricate spatial pattern that reflects the quasiperiodic structure, but the pattern differs between the two limits. We have analyzed this pattern change by a mode analysis by the singular value decomposition method for the fractal-like magnetization pattern projected into the perpendicular space.

  8. NMR relaxation rate in quasi one-dimensional antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, Sylvain; Dupont, Maxime; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Sengupta, Pinaki; Shao, Hui; Sandvik, Anders W.

    We compare results of different numerical approaches to compute the NMR relaxation rate 1 /T1 in quasi one-dimensional (1d) antiferromagnets. In the purely 1d regime, recent numerical simulations using DMRG have provided the full crossover behavior from classical regime at high temperature to universal Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid at low-energy (in the gapless case) or activated behavior (in the gapped case). For quasi 1d models, we can use mean-field approaches to reduce the problem to a 1d one that can be studied using DMRG. But in some cases, we can also simulate the full microscopic model using quantum Monte-Carlo techniques. This allows to compute dynamical correlations in imaginary time and we will discuss recent advances to perform stochastic analytic continuation to get real frequency spectra. Finally, we connect our results to experiments on various quasi 1d materials.

  9. Magnetocaloric properties of a frustrated Blume-Capel antiferromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žukovič Milan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature magnetization processes and magnetocaloric properties of a geometrically frustrated spin-1 Blume-Capel model on a triangular lattice are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The model is found to display qualitatively different behavior depending on the sign of the single-ion anisotropy D. For positive values of D we observe two magnetization plateaus, similar to the spin-1/2 Ising antiferromagnet, and negative isothermal entropy changes for any field intensity. For a range of small negative values of D there are four magnetization plateaus and the entropy changes can be either negative or positive, depending on the field. If D is negative but large in absolute value then the entropy changes are solely positive.

  10. Control and manipulation of antiferromagnetic skyrmions in racetrack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiyan; Jin, Chendong; Song, Chengkun; Wang, Jinshuai; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2017-12-01

    Controllable manipulations of magnetic skyrmions are essential for next-generation spintronic devices. Here, the duplication and merging of skyrmions, as well as logical AND and OR functions, are designed in antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials with a cusp or smooth Y-junction structures. The operational time are in the dozens of picoseconds, enabling ultrafast information processing. A key factor for the successful operation is the relatively complex Y-junction structures, where domain walls propagate through in a controlled manner, without significant risks of pinning, vanishing or unwanted depinning of existing domain walls, as well as the nucleation of new domain walls. The motions of a multi-bit, namely the motion of an AFM skyrmion-chain in racetrack, are also investigated. Those micromagnetic simulations may contribute to future AFM skyrmion-based spintronic devices, such as nanotrack memory, logic gates and other information processes.

  11. Performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic racetrack memory: domain wall versus skyrmion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasello, R; Puliafito, V; Martinez, E; Manchon, A; Ricci, M; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G

    2017-01-01

    A storage scheme based on racetrack memory, where the information can be coded in a domain or a skyrmion, seems to be an alternative to conventional hard disk drive for high density storage. Here, we perform a full micromagnetic study of the performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) racetrack memory in terms of velocity and sensitivity to defects by using experimental parameters. We find that, to stabilize a SAF skyrmion, the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction in the top and the bottom ferromagnet should have an opposite sign. The velocity of SAF skyrmions and SAF Néel domain walls are of the same order and can reach values larger than 1200 m s −1 if a spin–orbit torque from the spin-Hall effect with opposite sign is applied to both ferromagnets. The presence of disordered anisotropy in the form of randomly distributed grains introduces a threshold current for both SAF skyrmions and SAF domain walls motions. (paper)

  12. Performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic racetrack memory: domain wall versus skyrmion

    KAUST Repository

    Tomasello, R

    2017-06-20

    A storage scheme based on racetrack memory, where the information can be coded in a domain or a skyrmion, seems to be an alternative to conventional hard disk drive for high density storage. Here, we perform a full micromagnetic study of the performance of synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) racetrack memory in terms of velocity and sensitivity to defects by using experimental parameters. We find that, to stabilize a SAF skyrmion, the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction in the top and the bottom ferromagnet should have an opposite sign. The velocity of SAF skyrmions and SAF Néel domain walls are of the same order and can reach values larger than 1200 m s−1 if a spin–orbit torque from the spin-Hall effect with opposite sign is applied to both ferromagnets. The presence of disordered anisotropy in the form of randomly distributed grains introduces a threshold current for both SAF skyrmions and SAF domain walls motions.

  13. Equivalence of the O( n) vector ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, J. Ricardo de

    The effective-field renormalization group (EFRG) approach is used to find the Néel temperature ( TN) of the O( n) vector model with antiferromagnetic (AF) interaction. The EFRG method is illustrated by employing approximations in which clusters with one ( N‧=1) and two ( N=2) spins are used. The critical temperature TN is obtained as a function of component ( n) and coordination ( z) numbers. For all values of n and z we show that TN= Tc, where Tc is the Curie temperature for the ferromagnetic (F) case. As a comparison, the results of the quantum Heisenberg model ( n=3) with F and AF interactions are also presented, and we find that TN> Tc, which is different from the classical result Tc= TN.

  14. Evolution of topological features in finite antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changfeng

    2003-01-01

    We examine the behavior of nonlocal topological order in finite antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains using the density matrix renormalization group techniques. We find that chains with even and odd site parity show very different behavior in the topological string order parameter, reflecting interesting interplay of the intrinsic magnetic correlation and the topological term in the chains. Analysis of the calculated string order parameter as a function of the chain length and the topological angle indicates that S=1/2 and S=1 chains show special behavior while all S>1 chains have similar topological structure. This result supports an earlier conjecture on the classification of quantum spin chains based on an analysis of their phase diagrams. Implications of the topological behavior in finite quantum spin chains are discussed

  15. Uranium nitride: a cubic antiferromagnet with anisotropic critical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyers, W.J.L.; Holden, T.M.; Svensson, E.C.; Lander, G.H.

    1977-11-01

    Highly anisotropic critical scattering associated with the transition at T/sub N/ = 49.5 K to the type-I antiferromagnetic structure has been observed in uranium nitride. The transverse susceptibility is found to be unobservably small. The longitudinal susceptibility diverges at T/sub N/ and its anisotropy shows that the spins within the (001) ferromagnetic sheets of the [001] domain are much more highly correlated than they are with the spins lying in adjacent (001) sheets. The correlation range within the sheets is much greater than that expected for a Heisenberg system with the same T/sub N/. The rod-like scattering extended along the spin and domain direction is reminiscent of two-dimensional behavior. The results are inconsistent with a simple localized model and may reflect the itinerant nature of the 5f electrons

  16. Magnetization reversal in weak ferrimagnets and canted antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, H.; Khomskii, D.I.; Levitin, R.Z.; Markina, M.M.; Okuyama, T.; Uchimoto, T.; Vasil'ev, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In some ferrimagnets the total magnetization vanishes at a certain compensation temperature T*. In weak magnetic fields, the magnetization can change sign at T* (the magnetization reversal). Much rarer is observation of ferrimagnetic-like response in canted antiferromagnets, where the weak ferromagnetic moment is due to the tilting of the sublattice magnetizations. The latter phenomenon was observed in nickel (II) formate dihydrate Ni(HCOO) 2 ·2H 2 O. The observed weak magnetic moment increases initially below T N =15.5 K, equals zero at T*=8.5 K and increases again at lowering temperature. The sign of the low-field magnetization at any given temperature is determined by the sample's magnetic prehistory and the signs are opposite to each other at T N

  17. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  18. Effect of antiferromagnetic layer thickness on exchange bias, training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic antidot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W. J.; Liu, W., E-mail: wliu@imr.ac.cn; Feng, J. N.; Zhang, Z. D. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Kim, D. S.; Choi, C. J. [Functional Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 531 Changwon- daero, Changwon 631-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-07

    The effect of antiferromagnetic (AFM) layer on exchange bias (EB), training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic (FM) /AFM nanoscale antidot arrays and sheet films Ag(10 nm)/Co(8 nm)/NiO(t{sub NiO})/Ag(5 nm) at 10 K is studied. The AFM layer thickness dependence of the EB field shows a peak at t{sub NiO} = 2 nm that is explained by using the random field model. The misalignment of magnetic moments in the three-dimensional antidot arrays causes smaller decrease of EB field compared with that in the sheet films for training effect. The anomalous magnetotransport properties, in particular positive magnetoresistance (MR) for antidot arrays but negative MR for sheet films are found. The training effect and magnetotransport properties are strongly affected by the three-dimensional spin-alignment effects in the antidot arrays.

  19. A neutron scattering study on the antiferromagnet in an exchange biased systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solina, Danica; Lott, Dieter; Fenske, Jochen; Schreyer, Andreas [Institute of Materials Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Schmidt, Wolfgang [Institut-Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Wu, Yu-Chang; Lai, Chih-Huang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, HsinChu (China)

    2008-07-01

    The magnetic structure of single crystal antiferromagnetic PtMn that biases CoFe has been studied using neutron scattering. Polarized neutron reflection (PNR) was used to determine the switching behaviour of the ferromagnetic layer and polarized neutron diffraction (PND) to probe the magnetic configuration of the anti-ferromagnetic layer. PNR suggests a combination of rotation and domain formation. Changes were observed in the PND patterns taken at points around the hysteresis loop. The diffraction data has been simulated with a 'twisting' of part of the anti-ferromagnetic layer as the ferromagnetic layer changes.

  20. Single-site approximation for the s-f model of antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masao; Nolting, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    For the s-f model of an antiferromagnetic semiconductor, the effect of the antiferromagnetic ordering of the localized spins on the conduction-electron state is investigated over a wide range of exchange strengths by combining the effective-medium approach with the Green's function in the 2x2 sublattice Bloch function representation. The band splitting due to the reduced magnetic Brillouin zone occurs below the Neel temperature. There is a marked effect of the thermal fluctuation of the antiferromagnetically ordered localized spins on the conduction electron at the energies near the top (bottom) of the lower- (higher-) energy subband

  1. S =1/2 ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic alternating Heisenberg chain in a zinc-verdazyl complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shinpuku, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Tokuro; Iwase, Kenji; Ono, Toshio; Kono, Yohei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-02-01

    We successfully synthesized the zinc-verdazyl complex [Zn(hfac)2].(o -Py -V ) [hfac = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate; o -Py-V = 3-(2-pyridyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl], which is an ideal model compound with an S = 1/2 ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic alternating Heisenberg chain (F-AF AHC). Ab initio molecular-orbital (MO) calculations indicate that two dominant interactions JF and JAF form the S = 1/2 F-AF AHC in this compound. The magnetic susceptibility and magnetic specific heat of the compound exhibit thermally activated behavior below approximately 1 K. Furthermore, its magnetization curve is observed up to the saturation field and directly indicates a zero-field excitation gap of 0.5 T. These experimental results provide evidence for the existence of a Haldane gap. We successfully explain the results in terms of the S = 1/2 F-AF AHC through quantum Monte Carlo calculations with | JAF/JF|=0.22 . The ab initio MO calculations also indicate a weak AF interchain interaction J' and that the coupled F-AF AHCs form a honeycomb lattice. The J' dependence of the Haldane gap is calculated, and the actual value of J' is determined to be less than 0.01 | JF| .

  2. Superfluid and antiferromagnetic phases in ultracold fermionic quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis several models are treated, which are relevant for ultracold fermionic quantum gases loaded onto optical lattices. In particular, imbalanced superfluid Fermi mixtures, which are considered as the best way to realize Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states experimentally, and antiferromagnetic states, whose experimental realization is one of the next major goals, are examined analytically and numerically with the use of appropriate versions of the Hubbard model. The usual Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor is known to break down in a magnetic field with a strength exceeding the size of the superfluid gap. A spatially inhomogeneous spin-imbalanced superconductor with a complex order parameter known as FFLO-state is predicted to occur in translationally invariant systems. Since in ultracold quantum gases the experimental setups have a limited size and a trapping potential, we analyze the realistic situation of a non-translationally invariant finite sized Hubbard model for this purpose. We first argue analytically, why the order parameter should be real in a system with continuous coordinates, and map our statements onto the Hubbard model with discrete coordinates defined on a lattice. The relevant Hubbard model is then treated numerically within mean field theory. We show that the numerical results agree with our analytically derived statements and we simulate various experimentally relevant systems in this thesis. Analogous calculations are presented for the situation at repulsive interaction strength where the N'eel state is expected to be realized experimentally in the near future. We map our analytical results obtained for the attractive model onto corresponding results for the repulsive model. We obtain a spatially invariant unit vector defining the direction of the order parameter as a consequence of the trapping potential, which is affirmed by our mean field numerical results for the repulsive case. Furthermore, we observe

  3. Superfluid and antiferromagnetic phases in ultracold fermionic quantum gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwald, Tobias

    2010-08-27

    In this thesis several models are treated, which are relevant for ultracold fermionic quantum gases loaded onto optical lattices. In particular, imbalanced superfluid Fermi mixtures, which are considered as the best way to realize Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states experimentally, and antiferromagnetic states, whose experimental realization is one of the next major goals, are examined analytically and numerically with the use of appropriate versions of the Hubbard model. The usual Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor is known to break down in a magnetic field with a strength exceeding the size of the superfluid gap. A spatially inhomogeneous spin-imbalanced superconductor with a complex order parameter known as FFLO-state is predicted to occur in translationally invariant systems. Since in ultracold quantum gases the experimental setups have a limited size and a trapping potential, we analyze the realistic situation of a non-translationally invariant finite sized Hubbard model for this purpose. We first argue analytically, why the order parameter should be real in a system with continuous coordinates, and map our statements onto the Hubbard model with discrete coordinates defined on a lattice. The relevant Hubbard model is then treated numerically within mean field theory. We show that the numerical results agree with our analytically derived statements and we simulate various experimentally relevant systems in this thesis. Analogous calculations are presented for the situation at repulsive interaction strength where the N'eel state is expected to be realized experimentally in the near future. We map our analytical results obtained for the attractive model onto corresponding results for the repulsive model. We obtain a spatially invariant unit vector defining the direction of the order parameter as a consequence of the trapping potential, which is affirmed by our mean field numerical results for the repulsive case. Furthermore, we observe

  4. Correlation functions of electronic and nuclear spins in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet semi-infinite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    Results are found for the dynamical correlation functions (or its corresponding Green's functions) among any combination including operator pairs of electronic and nuclear spins in an antiferromagnet semi-infinite medium, at low temperatures T [pt

  5. Topological term of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model in 2+1 dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ke; Yu Lu; Zhu Chuanjie

    1988-05-01

    It is shown in this note that the two different ways of introducing the topological term in the discussion of the spin 1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model are identical to each other. (author). 12 refs

  6. One- and Two- Magnon Excitations in a One-Dimensional Antiferromagnet in a Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, I.U.; Kjems, Jørgen; Endoh, Y.

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the inelastic scattering in the one-dimensional near-Heisenberg antiferromagnet (CD3)4NMnCl3 (TMMC) at low temperatures, 0.3...

  7. Non-resonant precession of the neutron magnetic moment in antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic moment of a neutron moving in an antiferromagnet with a spiral-order magnetic field slowly precesses. Precession pitch strongly depends on the value and direction of the neutron velocity. 4 refs

  8. Copper carrier protein in copper toxic sheep liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, A L; Dean, P D.G.

    1973-01-01

    The livers of copper-toxic sheep have been analyzed by gel electrophoresis followed by staining the gels for copper with diethyldithiocarbamate and for protein with amido schwartz. These gels were compared with similar gels obtained from the livers of normal and copper-deficient animals. The copper-toxic livers contained an extra protein band which possessed relatively weakly bound copper. Possible origins of this protein are discussed. 8 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D and D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D and D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D and D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness

  10. Canine Copper-Associated Hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, Karen; Fieten, Hille

    2017-01-01

    Copper-associated hepatitis is recognized with increasing frequency in dogs. The disease is characterized by centrolobular hepatic copper accumulation, leading to hepatitis and eventually cirrhosis. The only way to establish the diagnosis is by histologic assessment of copper distribution and copper

  11. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level.

  12. Ground state configurations in antiferromagnetic ultrathin films with dipolar anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, H.

    2013-01-01

    The formalism developed in a previous work to calculate the dipolar energy in quasi-two-dimensional crystals with ferromagnetic order is now extended to collinear antiferromagnetic order. Numerical calculations of the dipolar energy are carried out for systems with tetragonally distorted fcc [001] structures, the case of NiO and MnO ultrathin film grown in non-magnetic substrates, where the magnetic phase is a consequence of superexchange and dipolar interactions. The employed approximation allows to demonstrate that dipolar coupling between atomic layers is responsible for the orientation of the magnetization when it differs from the one in a single layer. The ground state energy of a given NiO or MnO film is found to depend not only on the strain, but also on how much the interlayer separation and the 2D lattice constant are changed with respect to the ideal values corresponding to the non-distorted cubic structure. Nevertheless, it is shown that the orientation of the magnetization in the magnetic phase of any of these films is determined by the strain exclusively. A striped phase with the magnetization along the [112 ¯ ] direction appears as the ground state configuration of NiO and MnO ultrathin films. In films with equally oriented stripes along the layers this magnetic phase is twofold degenerate, while in films with multidomain layers it is eightfold degenerate. These results are not in contradiction with experimentally observed out-of-plane or in-plane magnetization of striped phases in NiO and MnO ultrathin films. - Highlights: ► Dipolar energy in collinear antiferromagnetic ultrathin films is calculated. ► Numerical results are presented for distorted fcc [001] structures. ► The lowest energy of a system depends on how the tetragonal distortion is achieved. ► A striped phase with magnetization in the [112 ¯ ] direction is the ground state. ► In multidomain NiO and MnO films it is eightfold degenerate.

  13. New antiferromagnetic semiconductor CuCr1.5Sb0.5S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Koroleva, L.I.; Mikheev, M.G.; Odintsov, A.G.; Filimonov, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    New halcogenide compound with spinel-antiferromagnetic semiconductor CuCr 1.5 Sb 0.5 S 4 are obtained and studied for the first time. Magnetic properties of this compound, namely, magnetization linear dependence, maximum on PHI(T) curve in the low-temperature area and realization of the Curie-Weis law for paramagnetic susceptibility with negative paramagnetic temperature testiby to the fact that this compound is antiferromagnetic

  14. Nuclear spin-magnon relaxation in two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wal, A.J. van der.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are discussed of the dependence on temperature and magnetic field of the longitudinal relaxation time of single crystals of antiferromagnetically ordered insulators, i.e. in the temperature range below the Neel temperature and in fields up to the spin-flop transition. The experiments are done on 19 F nuclei in the Heisenberg antiferromagnets K 2 MnF 4 and K 2 NiF 4 , the magnetic structure of which is two-dimensional quadratic. (C.F.)

  15. External magnetic field induced anomalies of spin nuclear dynamics in thin antiferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that if the thickness of homogeneously magnetized plate of high-axial antiferromagnetic within H external magnetic field becomes lower the critical one, then the effect of dynamic magnetoelastic interaction on Soul-Nakamura exchange of nuclear spins results in formation of qualitatively new types of spreading nuclear spin waves no else compared neither within the model of unrestricted magnetic nor at H = 0 in case of thin plate of high-axial antiferromagnetic. 10 refs

  16. Spin Dynamics and Critical Fluctuations in a Two-Dimensional Random Antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Birgeneau, R. J.; Guggenheim, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive elastic- and inelastic-neutron-scattering study of the binary mixed antiferromagnet Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 has been carried out. The pure materials, Rb2MnF4 and Rb2NiF4 are [2d] near-Heisenberg antiferromagnets of the K2NiF4 type. Elastic-scattering experiments demonstrate that the Mn...

  17. Structural Distortion Stabilizing the Antiferromagnetic and Semiconducting Ground State of BaMn2As2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report evidence that the experimentally found antiferromagnetic structure as well as the semiconducting ground state of BaMn 2 As 2 are caused by optimally-localized Wannier states of special symmetry existing at the Fermi level of BaMn 2 As 2 . In addition, we find that a (small tetragonal distortion of the crystal is required to stabilize the antiferromagnetic semiconducting state. To our knowledge, this distortion has not yet been established experimentally.

  18. Frustrated Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on Cubic Lattices: Magnetic Structures, Exchange Gaps, and Non-Conventional Critical Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatenko, A. N.; Irkhin, V. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the Heisenberg antiferromagnets characterized by the magnetic structures with the periods being two times larger than the lattice period. We have considered all the types of the Bravais lattices (simple cubic, bcc and fcc) and divided all these antiferromagnets into 7 classes i.e. 3 plus 4 classes denoted with symbols A and B correspondingly. The order parameter characterizing the degeneracies of the magnetic structures is an ordinary Neel vector for A classes and so-called 4-...

  19. Two-magnon Raman scattering in a spin density wave antiferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, Friedhelm; Kampf, Arno P.; Mueller-Hartmann, Erwin

    1996-01-01

    We present the results for a model calculation of resonant two-magnon Raman scattering in a spin density wave (SDW) antiferromagnet. The resonant enhancement of the two-magnon intensity is obtained from a microscopic analysis of the photon-magnon coupling vertex. By combining magnon-magnon interactions with `triple resonance` phenomena in the vertex function the resulting intensity line shape is found to closely resemble the measured two-magnon Raman signal in antiferromagnetic cuprates. Both...

  20. Antiferromagnetism and d-wave superconductivity in (doped) Mott insulators: A wave function approach

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Z. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Muthukumar, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a class of wave functions that provide a unified description of antiferromagnetism and d-wave superconductivity in (doped) Mott insulators. The wave function has a Jastrow form and prohibits double occupancies. In the absence of holes, the wave function describes antiferromagnetism accurately. Off diagonal long range order develops at finite doping and the superconducting order parameter has d-wave symmetry. We also show how nodal quasiparticles and neutral spin excitations can be ...

  1. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  2. Copper Coordination in the Full-Length, Recombinant Prion Protein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Colin S.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Legname, Giuseppe; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Antholine, William E.; Gerfen, Gary J.; Peisach, Jack; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds divalent copper at physiologically relevant conditions and is believed to participate in copper regulation or act as a copper-dependent enzyme. Ongoing studies aim at determining the molecular features of the copper binding sites. The emerging consensus is that most copper binds in the octarepeat domain, which is composed of four or more copies of the fundamental sequence PHGGGWGQ. Previous work from our laboratory using PrP-derived peptides, in conjunction with EPR and X-ray crystallography, demonstrated that the HGGGW segment constitutes the fundamental binding unit in the octarepeat domain [Burns et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 3991–4001; Aronoff-Spencer et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 13760–13771]. Copper coordination arises from the His imidazole and sequential deprotonated glycine amides. In this present work, recombinant, full-length Syrian hamster PrP is investigated using EPR methodologies. Four copper ions are taken up in the octarepeat domain, which supports previous findings. However, quantification studies reveal a fifth binding site in the flexible region between the octarepeats and the PrP globular C-terminal domain. A series of PrP peptide constructs show that this site involves His96 in the PrP(92–96) segment GGGTH. Further examination by X-band EPR, S-band EPR, and electron spin–echo envelope spectroscopy, demonstrates coordination by the His96 imidazole and the glycine preceding the threonine. The copper affinity for this type of binding site is highly pH dependent, and EPR studies here show that recombinant PrP loses its affinity for copper below pH 6.0. These studies seem to provide a complete profile of the copper binding sites in PrP and support the hypothesis that PrP function is related to its ability to bind copper in a pH-dependent fashion. PMID:12779334

  3. Hole spectral functions in lightly doped quantum antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Satyaki; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2011-11-01

    We study the hole and magnon spectral functions as a function of hole doping in the two-dimensional t-J and t-t'-t''-J models working within the limits of spin-wave theory by linearizing the hole-spin-deviation interaction and by adapting the noncrossing approximation. We find that the staggered magnetization decreases rather rapidly with doping and it goes to zero at a few percent of hole concentration in both t-J and t-t'-t''-J models. Furthermore, our results show that the residue of the quasiparticle peak at G⃗=(±π/2,±π/2) decreases very rapidly with doping. We also find pockets centered at G⃗, (i) with an elliptical shape with large eccentricity along the antinodal direction in the case of the t-J model and (ii) with an almost circular shape in the case of the t-t'-t''-J model. Last, we show that the spectral intensity distribution in the doped antiferromagnet has a waterfall-like pattern along the nodal direction of the Brillouin zone, a feature that is also seen in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Magnetoelectric antiferromagnets as platforms for the manipulation of solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzuela, Ricardo; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2018-01-01

    We study the magnetic dynamics of magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic thin films, where an unconventional boundary ferromagnetism coexists with the bulk Néel phase below the Néel temperature. The spin exchange between the two order parameters yields an effective low-energy theory that is formally equivalent to that of a ferrimagnet. Dynamics of domain walls and skyrmions are analyzed within the collective-variable approach, from which we conclude that they behave as massive particles moving in a viscous medium subjected to a gyrotropic force. We find that the film thickness can be used as a control parameter for the motion of these solitons. In this regard, it is shown that an external magnetic field can drive the dynamics of domain walls, whose terminal velocity is tunable with the sample thickness. Furthermore, the classification of the skyrmion dynamics is sensitive to the spatial modulation of the sample thickness, which can be easily engineered with the present (thin-film) deposition techniques. Current-driven spin transfer can trigger drifting orbits of skyrmions, which can be utilized as racetracks for these magnetic textures.

  5. Generation of Elliptically Polarized Terahertz Waves from Antiferromagnetic Sandwiched Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Fu, Shu-Fang; Wang, Xuan-Zhang; Song, Yu-Ling; Wang, Xiang-Guang; Qu, Xiu-Rong

    2018-04-01

    The generation of elliptically polarized electromagnetic wave of an antiferromagnetic (AF)/dielectric sandwiched structure in the terahertz range is studied. The frequency and external magnetic field can change the AF optical response, resulting in the generation of elliptical polarization. An especially useful geometry with high levels of the generation of elliptical polarization is found in the case where an incident electromagnetic wave perpendicularly illuminates the sandwiched structure, the AF anisotropy axis is vertical to the wave-vector and the external magnetic field is pointed along the wave-vector. In numerical calculations, the AF layer is FeF2 and the dielectric layers are ZnF2. Although the effect originates from the AF layer, it can be also influenced by the sandwiched structure. We found that the ZnF2/FeF2/ZnF2 structure possesses optimal rotation of the principal axis and ellipticity, which can reach up to about thrice that of a single FeF2 layer.

  6. Monte Carlo study of one hole in a quantum antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorella, S.

    1992-01-01

    Using the standard Quantum Monte Carlo technique for the Hubbard model, I present here a numerical investigation of the hole propagation in a Quantum Antiferromagnet. The calculation is very well stabilized, using selected sized systems and special use of the trial wavefunction that satisfy the close shell condition in presence of an arbitrarily weak Zeeman magnetic field, vanishing in the thermodynamic limit. In this paper the author investigates the question of vanishing or nonvanishing quasiparticle weight, in order to clarify whether the Mott insulator should behave just as conventional insulator with an upper and lower Hubbard band. By comparing the present finite size scaling with several techniques predicting a finite quasiparticle weight the data seem more consistent with a vanishing quasiparticle weight, i.e., as recently suggested by P.W. Anderson the Hubbard-Mott insulator should be characterized by non-trivial excitations which cannot be interpreted in a simple quasi-particle picture. However it cannot be excluded, based only on numerical grounds, that a very small but non vanishing quasiparticle weight should survive in the thermodynamic limit

  7. High magnetic field magnetization of a new triangular lattice antiferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, H. D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Stritzinger, Laurel Elaine Winter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In CsV(MoO4)2, the magnetic V3+ ions with octahedral oxygen-coordination form a geometrically frustrated triangular lattice. So fare, there is no magnetic properties reported on it. Recently, we successfully grew single crystals of CsV(MoO4)2 by using flux method. The susceptibility shows a sharp drop around 24 K, representing a long range magnetic ordering. To understand the physical properties of this new triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLAF), we pursued high field magnetization measurements to answer two questions: (i) what is the saturation field, which will be very useful to calculate the exchange interaction of the system? (ii) Will it exhibit spin state transition, such as the up up down phase with 1/3-saturation moment as other TLAFs? Recently, we performed VSM measurements in Cell 8, Tallahassee, NHMFL, the results show that the magnetization reaches 0.38 MuB at 34 T, which is just 19% of the full moment of 2 MuB for V3+ (3d2) ions. Apparently we need higher field to reach 1/3 value or full moment.

  8. Zero Modes and Global Antiferromagnetism in Strained Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitan Roy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel magnetic ground state is reported for the Hubbard Hamiltonian in strained graphene. When the chemical potential lies close to the Dirac point, the ground state exhibits locally both the Néel and ferromagnetic orders, even for weak Hubbard interaction. Whereas the Néel order parameter remains of the same sign in the entire system, the magnetization at the boundary takes the opposite sign from the bulk. The total magnetization vanishes this way, and the magnetic ground state is globally only an antiferromagnet. This peculiar ordering stems from the nature of the strain-induced single-particle zero-energy states, which have support on one sublattice of the honeycomb lattice in the bulk, and on the other sublattice near the boundary of a finite system. We support our claim with the self-consistent numerical calculation of the order parameters, as well as by the Monte Carlo simulations of the Hubbard model in both uniformly and nonuniformly strained honeycomb lattice. The present result is contrasted with the magnetic ground state of the same Hubbard model in the presence of a true magnetic field (and for vanishing Zeeman coupling, which is exclusively Néel ordered, with zero local magnetization everywhere in the system.

  9. Pure spin current manipulation in antiferromagnetically exchange coupled heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Félix, L.; Butera, A.; González-Chávez, D. E.; Sommer, R. L.; Gómez, J. E.

    2018-03-01

    We present a model to describe the spin currents generated by ferromagnet/spacer/ferromagnet exchange coupled trilayer systems and heavy metal layers with strong spin-orbit coupling. By exploiting the magnitude of the exchange coupling (oscillatory RKKY-like coupling) and the spin-flop transition in the magnetization process, it has been possible to produce spin currents polarized in arbitrary directions. The spin-flop transition of the trilayer system originates pure spin currents whose polarization vector depends on the exchange field and the magnetization equilibrium angles. We also discuss a protocol to control the polarization sign of the pure spin current injected into the metallic layer by changing the initial conditions of magnetization of the ferromagnetic layers previously to the spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments. The small differences in the ferromagnetic layers lead to a change in the magnetization vector rotation that permits the control of the sign of the induced voltage components due to the inverse spin Hall effect. Our results can lead to important advances in hybrid spintronic devices with new functionalities, particularly, the ability to control microscopic parameters such as the polarization direction and the sign of the pure spin current through the variation of macroscopic parameters, such as the external magnetic field or the thickness of the spacer in antiferromagnetic exchange coupled systems.

  10. Spintronic materials and devices based on antiferromagnetic metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Y. Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review our recent experimental developments on antiferromagnet (AFM spintronics mainly comprising Mn-based noncollinear AFM metals. IrMn-based tunnel junctions and Hall devices have been investigated to explore the manipulation of AFM moments by magnetic fields, ferromagnetic materials and electric fields. Room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance based on IrMn as well as FeMn has been successfully achieved, and electrical control of the AFM exchange spring is realized by adopting ionic liquid. In addition, promising spin-orbit effects in AFM as well as spin transfer via AFM spin waves reported by different groups have also been reviewed, indicating that the AFM can serve as an efficient spin current source. To explore the crucial role of AFM acting as efficient generators, transmitters, and detectors of spin currents is an emerging topic in the field of magnetism today. AFM metals are now ready to join the rapidly developing fields of basic and applied spintronics, enriching this area of solid-state physics and microelectronics.

  11. Kinetically Inhibited Order in a Diamond-Lattice Antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, Gregory J.; Gout, Delphine J.; Zarestky, Jerel L.; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Mandrus, David; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Frustrated magnetic systems exhibit highly degenerate ground states and strong fluctuations, often leading to new physics. An intriguing example of current interest is the antiferromagnet on a diamond lattice, realized physically in the A-site spinel materials. This is a prototypical system in three dimensions where frustration arises from competing interactions rather than purely geometric constraints, and theory suggests the possibility of novel order at low temperature. Here we present a comprehensive single crystal neutron scattering study CoAl2O4, a highly frustrated A-site spinel. We observe strong diffuse scattering that peaks at wavevectors associated with Neel ordering. Below the temperature T*=6.5K, there is a dramatic change in elastic scattering lineshape accompanied by the emergence of well-defined spin-wave excitations. T* had previously been associated with the onset of glassy behavior. Our new results suggest instead that in fact T* signifies a first-order phase transition, but with true long-range order inhibited by the kinetic freezing of domain walls. This scenario might be expected to occur widely in frustrated systems containing first-order phase transitions and is a natural explanation for existing reports of anomalous glassy behavior in other materials.

  12. Antiferromagnetic ordering in the plumbide EuPdPb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heletta, Lukas; Klenner, Steffen; Block, Theresa; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    The plumbide EuPdPb was synthesized in polycrystalline form by reaction of the elements in a sealed niobium ampoule in a muffle furnace. The structure was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: TiNiSi type, Pnma, a = 752.4(2), b = 476.0(2), c = 826.8(2) pm, wR2 = 0.0485, 704 F{sup 2} values and 20 variables. The europium atoms are coordinated by two tilted and puckered Pd{sub 3}Pb{sub 3} hexagons (280-289 pm Pd-Pb) with pronounced Eu-Pd bonding (312-339 pm). Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements show Curie-Weiss behaviour and an experimental magnetic moment of 7.35(1) μB per Eu atom. EuPdPb orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N} = 13.8(5) K and shows a metamagnetic transition at a critical field of 15 kOe. {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectra confirm divalent europium (δ = -10.04(1) mm s{sup -1}) and show full magnetic hyperfine field splitting (B{sub hf} = 21.1(1) T) at 6 K.

  13. Micromachining with copper lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  14. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  15. copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptadionato)copper(II) ... Abstract. Equilibrium concentrations of various condensed and gaseous phases have been thermodyna- ... phere, over a wide range of substrate temperatures and total reactor pressures.

  16. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    OpenAIRE

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important fir...

  17. Neutron scattering study of two-magnon states in the quantum magnet copper nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennant, D.A.; Broholm, C.; Reich, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    We report measurements of the two-magnon states in a dimerized antiferromagnetic chain material, copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)(2).2.5D(2)O]. Using inelastic neutron scattering we have measured the one- and two-magnon excitation spectra in a large single crystal. The data are in excellent agreement...... with a perturbative expansion of the alternating Heisenberg Hamiltonian from the strongly dimerized limit. The expansion predicts a two-magnon bound state for qsimilar to(2n+1)pid which is consistent with the neutron scattering data....

  18. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  19. Copper intoxication in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazaryan, V.S.; Sogoyan, I.S.; Agabalov, G.A.; Mesropyan, V.V.

    1966-01-01

    Of 950 sheep fed hay from a vineyard sprayed regularly with copper sulfate, 143 developed clinical copper poisoning and 103 died. The Cu content of the hay was 10.23 mg%, of the liver of dead sheep 17-52 mg%, and of the blood serum of affected sheep 0.86 mg%. The symptoms and the histological findings in kidneys and liver are described.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nickel(II), cobalt(II), copper(II), manganese(II), zinc(II), zirconium(IV), dioxouranium(VI) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes of a new Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and 5-methylpyrazole-3-carbohydrazide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamal, A.; Maurya, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Synthesis of a new Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and 5-methylpyrazole-3-carbohydrazide, and its coordination compounds with nickel(II), cobalt(II), copper(II), manganese(II), zinc(II), zirconium(IV), dioxouranium(VI) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) are described. The ligand and the complexes have been characterized on the basis of analytical, conductance, molecular weight, i.r., electronic and n.m.r. spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The stoichiometries of the complexes are represented as NiL . 3H 2 O, CoL . 2H 2 O, CuL, MnL . 2H 2 O, ZnL . H 2 O, Zr(OH) 2 (LH) 2 , Zr(OH) 2 L . 2MeOH, UO 2 L . MeOH and MoO 2 L . MeOH (where LH 2 =Schiff base). The copper(II) complex shows a subnormal magnetic moment due to antiferromagnetic exchange interaction while the nickel(II), cobalt(II) and manganese(II) complexes show normal magnetic moments at room temperature. The i.r. and n.m.r. spectral studies show that the Schiff base behaves as a dibasic and tridentate ligand coordinating through the deprotonated phenolic oxygen, enolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. (orig.)

  1. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  2. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is activated through a sulfenic acid intermediate at a copper ion entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherolf, Morgan M; Boyd, Stefanie D; Taylor, Alexander B; Kim, Hee Jong; Wohlschlegel, James A; Blackburn, Ninian J; Hart, P John; Winge, Dennis R; Winkler, Duane D

    2017-07-21

    Metallochaperones are a diverse family of trafficking molecules that provide metal ions to protein targets for use as cofactors. The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (Ccs1) activates immature copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Sod1) by delivering copper and facilitating the oxidation of the Sod1 intramolecular disulfide bond. Here, we present structural, spectroscopic, and cell-based data supporting a novel copper-induced mechanism for Sod1 activation. Ccs1 binding exposes an electropositive cavity and proposed "entry site" for copper ion delivery on immature Sod1. Copper-mediated sulfenylation leads to a sulfenic acid intermediate that eventually resolves to form the Sod1 disulfide bond with concomitant release of copper into the Sod1 active site. Sod1 is the predominant disulfide bond-requiring enzyme in the cytoplasm, and this copper-induced mechanism of disulfide bond formation obviates the need for a thiol/disulfide oxidoreductase in that compartment. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Antiferromagnetic CsCrF{sub 5} and canted antiferromagnetism in RbCrF{sub 5} and KCrF{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagličić, Zvonko, E-mail: zvonko.jaglicic@imfm.si [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mazej, Zoran, E-mail: zoran.mazej@ijs.si [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Cr(IV) ions are antiferromagnetically coupled within chains in ACrF{sub 5} (A = Cs, Rb, K). • Small structural difference causes huge difference in magnetic properties below 10 K. • Canted antiferromagnetism has been observed in RbCrF{sub 5} and KCrF{sub 5} at low temperature. - Abstract: In ACrF{sub 5} (A = Cs, Rb, K), Cr(IV) ions are coordinated by six fluoride ligands where the resulting CrF{sub 6} octahedra share cis vertexes to form infinite chains of ([Cr{sup IV}F{sub 5}]{sup −}){sub n}. The geometry of the latter in Cs compound differs from that in K and Rb compounds. The results of investigations of the magnetic behaviour of these compounds have shown that an antiferromagnetic superexchange interaction is present within the chains with J{sub Cs} = −10.2 cm{sup −1}, J{sub Rb} = −13.3 cm{sup −1}, and J{sub K} = −13.1 cm{sup −1}. Additional ferromagnetic-like long-range ordering has been observed in KCrF{sub 5} and RbCrF{sub 5} below 6 K which can be explained, in a correlation with their crystal structures, as canted antiferromagnetism.

  4. Thermoelectric properties of layered antiferromagnetic CuCrSe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, Girish C.; Tripathi, T.S.; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit

    2014-01-01

    Here we study thermoelectric and magnetic properties of CuCrSe 2 samples sintered at various temperatures. Structural analysis with XRD shows an order-disorder transition for Cr atoms when the sintering temperature is increased above 1273 K. Metal-like electrical resistivity and anomalously large Seebeck coefficient are found about room temperature. Analysis of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the partially-disordered phase suggests hopping conduction of charge carriers. For both the ordered and disordered phases magnetic susceptibility follows Curie–Weiss temperature dependence at high temperatures above 150 K and shows an antiferromagnetic transition around 55 K. For the disordered phase, the effective magnetic moment is determined at 3.62 μ B ; this low value in comparison to the spin only value for Cr 3+ of 3.89 μ B indicates spin fluctuations in the paramagnetic state. The thermal conductivity in these phases is low and dominated by the lattice contribution. Values for the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at room temperature are estimated to be 0.17 and 0.05 for the ordered and disordered phases, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric and magnetic properties of CuCrSe 2 samples are investigated. • The properties strongly depend on the degree of order of chromium atoms. • The degree of order is controlled by the sintering temperature. • Room-temperature figure of merit is estimated at 0.17 for the ordered phase. • For the disordered phase the figure of merit is lower

  5. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A., E-mail: perumal@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039 (India)

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  6. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patta Ravikumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  7. Pairing-induced kinetic energy lowering in doped antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, P; Eder, R; Fulde, P

    2003-01-01

    We analyse lowering of the kinetic energy in doped antiferromagnets at the transition to the superconducting state. Measurements of optical conductivity indicate that such unconventional behaviour takes place in underdoped Bi-2212. We argue that the definition of the operator representing the kinetic energy is determined by experimental conditions. The thermodynamic average of that operator is related to the integrated spectral weight of the optical conductivity and thus depends on the cut-off frequency limiting that integral. If the upper limit of the integral lies below the charge transfer gap the spectral weight represents the average of the hopping term in the space restricted to the energy range below the gap. We show that the kinetic energy is indeed lowered at the superconducting transition in the t-J model (tJM), which is an effective model defined in the restricted space. That result is in agreement with experimental observations and may be attributed to the formation of spin polarons and the change of roles which are played by the kinetic and the potential energy in the tJM and in some effective model for spin polarons. The total spectral weight represents the kinetic energy in a model defined in a broader space if the upper limit in the integral of the optical conductivity is set above the gap. We demonstrate that the kinetic energy in the Hubbard model is also lowered in the superconducting state. That result does not agree with experimental observations, indicating that the spectral weight is conserved for all temperatures if the upper limit of the integral is set above the charge transfer gap. This discrepancy suggests that a single band model is not capable of describing in some respects the physics of excitations across the gap

  8. Magnetic and elastic properties of the antiferromagnet uranium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Doorn, C.F.

    1976-10-01

    The magnetic and elastic properties of antiferromagnetic uranium mononitride single crystals are studied in the thesis from the measurements of the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity and elastic constants. The elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 were determined in the temperature interval 4 to 300 K by ultrasonic measurements of the five possible wave velocities in the [100] and [110] directions. A test for internal consistency was also made. A dip of about 9 percent occurs in C 11 at a temperature of 5 to 6 K lower than the Neel temperature T(N) (equals about 53 K). Starting at T(N), a renormalization in C 44 is proportional to the square of the sublattice magnetization also occurs. Both these results agree with model calculations which include spin-phonon interactions. The investigation of this anomaly was extended by measuring the electrical resistivity of a sample cut from the same crystal as that on which the elasticity was measured. No anomalous behavior was observed at the temperature where C 11 displays its anomaly. However, a discontinuity in the temperature derivative of the resistance was found at T(N). The possible effect of a magnetic field on the resistivity, as well as on the elasticity, was investigated without any measurable effect. The magnetic susceptibility was measured with a Foner magnetometer between 4 and 1 000 K. It was found that above the Neel temperature the paramagnetic susceptibility followed a revised Curie-Weiss law. In an attempt to ascertain the ionic state of the 5f-uranium ion in UN, use was made of the experimentally determined Weiss constant, spin disorder resistivity and Knight shift. A calculation was made that gave a good representation of the ratio of the experimental susceptibilities along the [100] and [110] directions in the ordered region [af

  9. Copper : recession and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick-Ching, T.

    2002-01-01

    In 2002, the world output for copper will fall for the first time in nearly a decade because of financial pressure and voluntary constraints. Cutbacks at copper mines amount to 760,000 tonnes per year. These cutbacks have occurred mostly in the United States which holds the largest share of high cost mines. This paper discussed recent developments in both copper supply and demand. The United States is unique as both a large consumer and producer of copper. At 1.35 million tonnes, US mine output in 2001 was at its lowest since 1987. The cutbacks in mining in general were described in this paper with particular reference to the huge loss of mining and metallurgical activity in the United States during a prolonged period of low prices in the mid 1980s. The author noted that this period was followed by an exceptional decade when much of the industry rebounded. Only 8 mines closed outright in the United States and a handful in Canada since the recession of the 1980s, but that is partly because mines got bigger and there are fewer small mines in North America. There are only 4 electrolytic refineries and 3 smelters still active in the entire United States, of which 2 are operating at a fraction of capacity. It was noted that only the buoyancy of China prevented a much bigger decline in copper demand on a global scale

  10. Effect of antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling on spin-wave resonance frequency of multi-layer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Rong-ke, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • A quantum approach is developed to study the SWR of a bicomponent multi-layer films. • The comparison of the SWR in films with FM and AFM interfacial coupling has been made. • The present results show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of films. - Abstract: We investigate the spin-wave resonance (SWR) frequency in a bicomponent bilayer and triple-layer films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as function of interfacial coupling, surface anisotropy, interface anisotropy, thickness and external magnetic field, using the linear spin-wave approximation and Green’s function technique. The microwave properties for multi-layer magnetic film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling is different from those for multi-layer magnetic film with ferromagnetic interfacial coupling. For the bilayer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as the lower (upper) surface anisotropy increases, only the SWR frequencies of the odd (even) number modes increase. The lower (upper) surface anisotropy does not affect the SWR frequencies of the even (odd) number modes{sub .} For the multi-layer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling, the SWR frequency of modes m = 1, 3 and 4 decreases while that of mode m = 2 increases with increasing thickness of the film within a proper parameter region. The present results could be useful in enhancing our fundamental understanding and show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of bicomponent multi-layer magnetic films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial coupling.

  11. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  12. Electrical conduction in composites containing copper core-copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of nanometre-sized copper core-copper oxide shell with diameters in the range 6.1 to 7.3 nm dispersed in a silica gel were synthesised by a technique comprising reduction followed by oxidation of a suitably chosen precursor gel. The hot pressed gel powders mixed with nanometre-sized copper particles ...

  13. Study of copper fluorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillardeau, J.

    1967-02-01

    This report deals with the action of fluorine on copper. Comprehensive descriptions are given of the particular technological methods and of the preparation of the reactants. This fluorination reaction has been studied at medium and low fluorine pressures. A nucleation and growth phenomenon is described. The influence of a pollution of the gas phase on the fluorination process is described. The solid-state reaction between cupric fluoride and cooper has also been studied. A special study has been made of the growth of copper deposits by thermal decomposition of gaseous fluorides. (author) [fr

  14. Magnetic Properties of a Rare-Earth Antiferromagnetic Nanoparticle Investigated with a Quantum Simulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao-Sen, Liu; Vladimir, Sechovský; Martin, Diviš

    2011-01-01

    A Usov-type quantum model based on a mean-field approximation is utilized to simulate the magnetic structure of an assumed rare-earth nanoparticle consisting of an antiferromagnetic core and a paramagnetic outer shell. We study the magnetic properties in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. Our simulation results show that the magnetic moments in the core region orientate antiferromagnetically in zero external magnetic field; an applied magnetic field rotates all of the magnetic moments in the paramagnetic shell completely to the field direction, and turns those in the core (which tries to maintain its original antiferromagnetic structure) towards the orientation in some degree; and the paramagnetic shell does not have a strong influence on the magnetic configuration of the core. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Novel spin excitation in the high field phase of an S=1 antiferromagnetic chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, M.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kimura, S.; Honda, Z.; Kindo, K.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of high-field multi-frequency ESR experiment on the S=1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain Ni(C 5 H 14 N 2 ) 2 N 3 (PF 6 ) for the fields up to about 55T and the frequencies up to about 2THz. We have found that excitation branches above the critical field (H c ) where the energy gap closes change into one branch around 15T which becomes close to the paramagnetic line at high fields. The branch above 15T fits well the conventional antiferromagnetic resonance mode with easy planar anisotropy. We compare the results with those in a weakly coupled antiferromagnetic dimer compound KCuCl 3 and discuss the origin of the branches observed above H c

  16. Three-dimensional spin mapping of antiferromagnetic nanopyramids having spatially alternating surface anisotropy at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R

    2012-11-14

    Antiferromagnets play a key role in modern spintronic devices owing to their ability to modify the switching behavior of adjacent ferromagnets via the exchange bias effect. Consequently, detailed measurements of the spin structure at antiferromagnetic interfaces and surfaces are highly desirable, not only for advancing technologies but also for enabling new insights into the underlying physics. Here using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at room-temperature, we reveal in three-dimensions an orthogonal spin structure on antiferromagnetic compound nanopyramids. Contrary to expected uniaxial anisotropy based on bulk properties, the atomic terraces are found to have alternating in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies. The observed layer-wise alternation in anisotropy could have strong influences on future nanoscale spintronic applications.

  17. Relativistic Néel-Order Fields Induced by Electrical Current in Antiferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Železný, J.

    2014-10-06

    We predict that a lateral electrical current in antiferromagnets can induce nonequilibrium Néel-order fields, i.e., fields whose sign alternates between the spin sublattices, which can trigger ultrafast spin-axis reorientation. Based on microscopic transport theory calculations we identify staggered current-induced fields analogous to the intraband and to the intrinsic interband spin-orbit fields previously reported in ferromagnets with a broken inversion-symmetry crystal. To illustrate their rich physics and utility, we consider bulk Mn2Au with the two spin sublattices forming inversion partners, and a 2D square-lattice antiferromagnet with broken structural inversion symmetry modeled by a Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We propose an antiferromagnetic memory device with electrical writing and reading.

  18. Dynamic selective switching in antiferromagnetically-coupled bilayers close to the spin reorientation transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Lee, J. H.; Cowburn, R. P.; Ummelen, F. C.; Swagten, H. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a bilayer synthetic antiferromagnet where the order of layer reversal can be selected by varying the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. The system is formed by two ultra-thin ferromagnetic layers with different proximities to the spin reorientation transition, coupled antiferromagnetically using Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. The different dynamic magnetic reversal behavior of both layers produces a crossover in their switching fields for field rates in the kOe/s range. This effect is due to the different effective anisotropy of both layers, added to an appropriate asymmetric antiferromagnetic coupling between them. Field-rate controlled selective switching of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy layers as shown here can be exploited in sensing and memory applications.

  19. Antiferromagnetic spin phase transition in nuclear matter with effective Gogny interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A.A.; Yang, J.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase transitions in symmetric nuclear matter is analyzed within the framework of a Fermi liquid theory with the effective Gogny interaction. It is shown that at some critical density nuclear matter with the D1S effective force undergoes a phase transition to the antiferromagnetic spin state (opposite directions of neutron and proton spins). The self-consistent equations of spin polarized nuclear matter with the D1S force have no solutions corresponding to ferromagnetic spin ordering (the same direction of neutron and proton spins) and, hence, the ferromagnetic transition does not appear. The dependence of the antiferromagnetic spin polarization parameter as a function of density is found at zero temperature

  20. Quantum oscillations in antiferromagnetic CaFe2As2 on the brink of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Mielke, C H; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Thompson, J D

    2009-01-01

    We report quantum oscillation measurements on CaFe 2 As 2 under strong magnetic fields-recently reported to become superconducting under pressures of as little as a kilobar. The largest observed carrier pocket occupies less than 0.05% of the paramagnetic Brillouin zone volume-consistent with Fermi surface reconstruction caused by antiferromagnetism. On comparing several alkaline earth AFe 2 As 2 antiferromagnets (with A = Ca, Sr and Ba), the dependences of the Fermi surface cross-sectional area F α and the effective mass m α * of the primary observed pocket on the antiferromagnetic/structural transition temperature T s are both found to be consistent with the case for quasiparticles in a conventional spin-density wave model. These findings suggest that the recently proposed strain-enhanced superconductivity in these materials occurs within a broadly conventional spin-density wave phase. (fast track communication)

  1. Specific heat study of quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetic model for an organic polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shaohua; Zhu Lin

    2008-01-01

    The specific heat of an infinite one-dimensional polymer chain bearing periodically arranged side radicals connected to the even sites is studied by means of quantum transfer-matrix method based on a Ising-Heisenberg model. In the absence of the exchange interactions between side radicals and the main chain, the curves of specific heat show a round peak due to the antiferromagnetic excitations for the all antiferromagnetic interactions along the polymer chain. Considering the exchange interactions between the side radicals and the main chain, the curves of the specific heat show double-peak structure for ferromagnetic interactions between the radicals and main chain, indicating that a competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions and the possibility of the occurrence of the stable ferrimagnetic state along the polymer chain

  2. Relativistic Néel-Order Fields Induced by Electrical Current in Antiferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Železný , J.; Gao, H.; Vý borný , K.; Zemen, J.; Mašek, J.; Manchon, Aurelien; Wunderlich, J.; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, T.

    2014-01-01

    We predict that a lateral electrical current in antiferromagnets can induce nonequilibrium Néel-order fields, i.e., fields whose sign alternates between the spin sublattices, which can trigger ultrafast spin-axis reorientation. Based on microscopic transport theory calculations we identify staggered current-induced fields analogous to the intraband and to the intrinsic interband spin-orbit fields previously reported in ferromagnets with a broken inversion-symmetry crystal. To illustrate their rich physics and utility, we consider bulk Mn2Au with the two spin sublattices forming inversion partners, and a 2D square-lattice antiferromagnet with broken structural inversion symmetry modeled by a Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We propose an antiferromagnetic memory device with electrical writing and reading.

  3. Magnetic structure driven ferroelectricity and large magnetoelectric coupling in antiferromagnet Co4Nb2O9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Chaudhary, S.; Maurya, V.; Saha, J.; Kaushik, S. D.; Siruguri, V.; Patnaik, S.

    2018-05-01

    Synthesis and extensive structural, pyroelectric, magnetic, dielectric and magneto-electric characterizations are reported for polycrystalline Co4Nb2O9 towards unraveling the multiferroic ground state. Magnetic measurements confirm that Co4Nb2O9 becomes an anti-ferromagnet at around 28 K. Associated with the magnetic phase transition, a sharp peak in pyroelectric current indicates the appearance of strong magneto-electric coupling below Neel temperature (TN) along with large coupling constant upto 17.8 μC/m2T. Using temperature oscillation technique, we establish Co4Nb2O9 to be a genuine multiferroic with spontaneous electric polarization in the anti-ferromagnetic state in the absence of magnetic field poling. This is in agreement with our low temperature neutron diffraction studies that show the magnetic structure of Co4Nb2O9 to be that of a non-collinear anti-ferromagnet with ferroelectric ground state.

  4. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryding, David G.; Allen, Douglas; Lee, Richard H.

    1996-11-01

    The advanced photon source is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail than has ben possible to date. The beam is produced by using third- generation insertion devices in a 7-GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1,104 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high-power devices is very high, and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm$_2). Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop, a dispersion-strengthened copper, is the desired design material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Montes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson’s disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson’s disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson’s disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  6. Spin-orbit torque in two-dimensional antiferromagnetic topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We investigate spin transport in two-dimensional ferromagnetic (FTI) and antiferromagnetic (AFTI) topological insulators. In the presence of an in-plane magnetization AFTI supports zero energy modes, which enables topologically protected edge conduction at low energy. We address the nature of current-driven spin torque in these structures and study the impact of spin-independent disorder. Interestingly, upon strong disorder the spin torque develops an antidamping component (i.e., even upon magnetization reversal) along the edges, which could enable current-driven manipulation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter. This antidamping torque decreases when increasing the system size and when the system enters the trivial insulator regime.

  7. Controlling the switching field in nanomagnets by means of domain-engineered antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folven, E.; Linder, J.; Gomonay, O. V.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Young, A. T.; Retterer, S. T.; Malik, V. K.; Tybell, T.; Takamura, Y.; Grepstad, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    Using soft x-ray spectromicroscopy, we investigate the magnetic domain structure in embedded nanomagnets defined in L a0.7S r0.3Mn O3 thin films and LaFe O3/L a0.7S r0.3Mn O3 bilayers. We find that shape-controlled antiferromagnetic domain states give rise to a significant reduction of the switching field of the rectangular nanomagnets. This is discussed within the framework of competition between an intrinsic spin-flop coupling and shape anisotropy. The data demonstrates that shape effects in antiferromagnets may be used to control the magnetic properties in nanomagnets.

  8. Critical Behaviour of Pure and Site-Random Two Dimensional Antiferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgenau, R. J.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering studies of the static critical behavior in the two-dimensional antiferromagnets K2NiF4, K2MnF4, and Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 are reported. For T......Quasielastic neutron scattering studies of the static critical behavior in the two-dimensional antiferromagnets K2NiF4, K2MnF4, and Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 are reported. For T...

  9. Antiferromagnetism and its relation to the superconducting phases of UPt3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, E.D.; Zschack, P.; Broholm, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Using magnetic x-ray and neutron diffraction in UPt3, we find that a suppression of the antiferromagnetic scattering intensity in the superconducting phase is due to a reduction in the magnitude of the staggered moment with no change in symmetry. The existence of the suppression as well...... as the magnetic correlation lengths are not affected by the presence or absence of a visible splitting in the superconducting transition. The simplest models wherein antiferromagnetic order provides the symmetry-breaking field for the splitting do not provide a compete explanation of our results....

  10. Magnonic quantum spin Hall state in the zigzag and stripe phases of the antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Hoon; Chung, Suk Bum; Park, Kisoo; Park, Je-Geun

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the topological property of magnon bands in the collinear magnetic orders of zigzag and stripe phases for the antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice and identified Berry curvature and symmetry constraints on the magnon band structure. Different symmetries of both zigzag and stripe phases lead to different topological properties, in particular, the magnon bands of the stripe phase being disentangled with a finite Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) term with nonzero spin Chern number. This is corroborated by calculating the spin Nernst effect. Our study establishes the existence of a nontrivial magnon band topology for all observed collinear antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattices in the presence of the DM term.

  11. ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} antiferromagnetic structure redetermination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremenović, Aleksandar, E-mail: akremenovic@rgf.bg.ac.rs [Laboratory for Crystallography, Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Đušina 7, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); Antić, Bratislav [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Vulić, Predrag [Laboratory for Crystallography, Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Đušina 7, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); Blanuša, Jovan [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Tomic, Aleksandra [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča”, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10027 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Magnetic structure of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} normal spinel is re-examined. Antiferromagnetic structure non-collinear model is established within C{sub a}2 space group having four different crystallographic/magnetic sites for 32 Fe{sup 3+} spins within magnetic unit cell. - Highlights: • Magnetic structure of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} normal spinel is re-examined. • Antiferromagnetic non-collinear structure model is established within C{sub a}2 space group. • Four different crystallographic/magnetic sites contain 32 Fe{sup 3+} spins within magnetic unit cell.

  12. A mean field study of the quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetic anisotropic Heisenberg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of the chain and the dimer anisotropies on the ground state energy and the energy gap of the spin-1/2 quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model is investigated using a mean field theory. The dependence of the magnetization and the effective hopping parameters on the anisotropy α xy (=J xy perpendicular /J xy parallel ) are presented for several values of the chain anisotropy. However, such a system exhibits a transition from antiferromagnetic ordered to disordered phases for arbitrary chain anisotropy and dimer anisotropy. (author). 22 refs, 11 figs

  13. Effective Hamiltonian and low-lying eigenenergy clustering patterns of four-sublattice antiferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, N.G.; Henley, C.L.; Rischel, C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the low-lying eigenenergy clustering patterns of quantum antiferromagnets with p sublattices (in particular p = 4). We treat each sublattice as a large spin, and using second-order degenerate perturbation theory, we derive the effective (biquadratic) Hamiltonian coupling the p large spins....... In order to compare with exact diagonalizations, the Hamiltonian is explicitly written for a finite-size lattice, and it contains information on energies of excited states as well as the ground state. The result is applied to the face-centered-cubic Type-I antiferromagnet of spin 1/2, including second...

  14. Spin-orbit torque in two-dimensional antiferromagnetic topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2017-01-24

    We investigate spin transport in two-dimensional ferromagnetic (FTI) and antiferromagnetic (AFTI) topological insulators. In the presence of an in-plane magnetization AFTI supports zero energy modes, which enables topologically protected edge conduction at low energy. We address the nature of current-driven spin torque in these structures and study the impact of spin-independent disorder. Interestingly, upon strong disorder the spin torque develops an antidamping component (i.e., even upon magnetization reversal) along the edges, which could enable current-driven manipulation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter. This antidamping torque decreases when increasing the system size and when the system enters the trivial insulator regime.

  15. Strain-Induced Ferromagnetism in Antiferromagnetic LuMnO3 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. S.; Bator, M.; Hu, Y.; Luetkens, H.; Stahn, J.; Capelli, S.; Das, S.; Döbeli, M.; Lippert, Th.; Malik, V. K.; Martynczuk, J.; Wokaun, A.; Kenzelmann, M.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Schneider, C. W.

    2013-07-01

    Single phase and strained LuMnO3 thin films are discovered to display coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orders. A large moment ferromagnetism (≈1μB), which is absent in bulk samples, is shown to display a magnetic moment distribution that is peaked at the highly strained substrate-film interface. We further show that the strain-induced ferromagnetism and the antiferromagnetic order are coupled via an exchange field, therefore demonstrating strained rare-earth manganite thin films as promising candidate systems for new multifunctional devices.

  16. Polarized neutron powder diffraction studies of antiferromagnetic order in bulk and nanoparticle NiO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.

    2015-01-01

    surface contribution to the magnetic anisotropy. Here we explore the potential use of polarized neutron diffraction to reveal the magnetic structure in NiO bulk and nanoparticle powders by applying the XYZ-polarization analysis method. Our investigations address in particular the spin orientation in bulk....... The results show that polarization analyzed neutron powder diffraction is a viable method to investigate magnetic order in powders of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles.......In many materials it remains a challenge to reveal the nature of magnetic correlations, including antiferromagnetism and spin disorder. Revealing the spin structure in magnetic nanoparticles is further complicated by the large incoherent neutron scattering cross section from water adsorbed...

  17. Ground-state candidate for the classical dipolar kagome Ising antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioar, I. A.; Rougemaille, N.; Canals, B.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the low-temperature thermodynamic properties of the classical dipolar kagome Ising antiferromagnet using Monte Carlo simulations, in the quest for the ground-state manifold. In spite of the limitations of a single-spin-flip approach, we managed to identify certain ordering patterns in the low-temperature regime and we propose a candidate for this unknown state. This configuration presents some intriguing features and is fully compatible with the extrapolations of the at-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior sampled so far, making it a very likely choice for the dipolar long-range ordered state of the classical kagome Ising antiferromagnet.

  18. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Xiaole [Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Xianfeng [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L., E-mail: clgao@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Luo, Weidong, E-mail: wdluo@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China)

    2016-02-08

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  19. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R.; Zhang, Xiaole; Chen, Xianfeng; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L.; Jia, Jin-Feng; Luo, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations

  20. Creative Copper Crests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  1. and copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (II) and copper(II)–zinc(II) complexes. SUBODH KUMAR1, R N PATEL1*, P V KHADIKAR1 and. K B PANDEYA2. 1 Department of Chemistry, APS University, Rewa 486 003, India. 2 CSJM University, Kanpur 208 016, India e-mail: (R N Patel) ...

  2. Reagent conditions of the flotation of copper, copper - molybdenum and copper -zinc ores in foreing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevaeva, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Reagents-collectors and frothers, used abroad in reagent regimes of flotation of copper, copper-molybdenum and copper zinc ores, have been considered. Xanthogenates, aerofloats, xanthogenformiates, thionocarbamates are mainly used as reagents-collectors. Methylizobutylcarbinol and Daufros are used as reagents-frothers

  3. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearling, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ( 64 Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64 Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64 Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  4. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  5. Spin Currents and Spin Orbit Torques in Ferromagnets and Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ming

    This thesis focuses on the interactions of spin currents and materials with magnetic order, e.g., ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic thin films. The spin current is generated in two ways. First by spin-polarized conduction-electrons associated with the spin Hall effect in heavy metals (HMs) and, second, by exciting spin-waves in ferrimagnetic insulators using a microwave frequency magnetic field. A conduction-electron spin current can be generated by spin-orbit coupling in a heavy non-magnetic metal and transfer its spin angular momentum to a ferromagnet, providing a means of reversing the magnetization of perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin films with currents that flow in the plane of the layers. The torques on the magnetization are known as spin-orbit torques (SOT). In the first part of my thesis project I investigated and contrasted the quasistatic (slowly swept current) and pulsed current-induced switching characteristics of micrometer scale Hall crosses consisting of very thin (magnetized CoFeB layers on beta-Ta. While complete magnetization reversal occurs at a threshold current density in the quasistatic case, pulses with short duration (≤10 ns) and larger amplitude (≃10 times the quasistatic threshold current) lead to only partial magnetization reversal and domain formation. The partial reversal is associated with the limited time for reversed domain expansion during the pulse. The second part of my thesis project studies and considers applications of SOT-driven domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin ferromagnet sandwiched between a heavy metal and an oxide. My experiment results demonstrate that the DW motion can be explained by a combination of the spin Hall effect, which generates a SOT, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which stabilizes chiral Neel-type DW. Based on SOT-driven DW motion and magnetic coupling between electrically isolated ferromagnetic elements, I proposed a new type of spin logic devices. I then

  6. Primary biochemical defect in copper metabolism in mice with a recessive X-linked mutation analogous to Menkes' disease in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prins, H.W.; Hamer, C.J.A. van den.

    1979-01-01

    The defect in Menkes' disease in man is identical to that in Brindled mice. The defect manifests itself in a accumulation of copper in some tissues, such as renal, intestinal (mucosa and muscle), pancreatic, osseous, muscular, and dermal. Hence a fatal copper deficiency results in other tissues (e.g., hepatic). The copper transport through the intestine is impaired and copper, which circumvents the block in the copper resorption, is irreversibly trapped in the above-mentioned, copper accumulating tissues where it is bound to a cytoplasmatic protein with molecular weight 10,000 daltons, probably the primary cytoplasmatic copper transporting protein. This protein shows a Cu-S absorption band at 250 nm, and the copper:protein ratio is increased. Such copper rich protein was found neither in the kidneys of the unaffected mica nor in the liver of the mice that do have the defect. Three models of the primary defect in Menkes' disease are proposed

  7. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  8. Magnetization process in antiferromagnetic EuPdIn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, T.; Nishigori, S.; Hiromitsu, I.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been m[e on EuPdIn single crystals. Isothermal magnetization curves measured along the a-, b- and c-axis exhibit three anomalies at the maximum. The phase diagrams determined by the critical fields are explained by the molecular field theory in weak magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (orig.)

  9. Construction and study of exact ground states for a class of quantum antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fannes, M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of quantum probability are used to construct the exact ground states for a class of quantum spin systems in one dimension. This class in particular contains the antiferromagnetic models introduced by various authors under the name of VBS-models. The construction permits a detailed study of these ground states. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  10. Electronic structure of the antiferromagnetic phase of Sr2Co2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, V.; Botta, P.M.; Baldomir, D.; Rivas, J.; Pineiro, A.; Calle, C. de la; Alonso, J.A.; Arias, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Ab initio calculations analyze the properties of the G-type antiferromagnetic Sr 2 Co 2 O 5 as a high-spin system. The description of the electronic structure is given; all the Co atoms are in a high-spin state with a small unquenched orbital angular momentum. Thermal analysis on a polycrystalline sample shows a magnetic phase transition at high temperatures

  11. Magnetic correlations in the intermetallic antiferromagnet Nd3Co4Sn13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. W.; Lin, J. W.; Lue, C. S.; Liu, H. F.; Kuo, C. N.; Mole, R. A.; Gardner, J. S.

    2017-11-01

    Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and neutron scattering have been used to investigate the nature of the spin system in the antiferromagnet Nd3Co4Sn13. At room temperature Nd3Co4Sn13 has a cubic, Pm-3n structure similar to Yb3Rh4Sn13. Antiferromagnetic interactions between, Nd3+ ions dominate the magnetic character of this sample and at 2.4 K the Nd spins enter a long range order state with a magnetic propagation vector q  =  (0 0 0) with an ordered moment of 1.78(2) µ B at 1.5 K. The magnetic Bragg intensity grows very slowly below 1 K, reaching ~2.4 µ B at 350 mK. The average magnetic Nd3+ configuration corresponds to the 3D irreducible representation Γ7. This magnetic structure can be viewed as three sublattices of antiferromagnetic spin chains coupled with each other in the 120°-configuration. A well-defined magnetic excitation was measured around the 1 1 1 zone centre and the resulting dispersion curve is appropriate for an antiferromagnet with a gap of 0.20(1) meV.

  12. Real-space imaging of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order with a single-spin magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, I.; Akhtar, W.; Garcia, V.; Martínez, L. J.; Chouaieb, S.; Garcia, K.; Carrétéro, C.; Barthélémy, A.; Appel, P.; Maletinsky, P.; Kim, J.-V.; Chauleau, J. Y.; Jaouen, N.; Viret, M.; Bibes, M.; Fusil, S.; Jacques, V.

    2017-09-01

    Although ferromagnets have many applications, their large magnetization and the resulting energy cost for switching magnetic moments bring into question their suitability for reliable low-power spintronic devices. Non-collinear antiferromagnetic systems do not suffer from this problem, and often have extra functionalities: non-collinear spin order may break space-inversion symmetry and thus allow electric-field control of magnetism, or may produce emergent spin-orbit effects that enable efficient spin-charge interconversion. To harness these traits for next-generation spintronics, the nanoscale control and imaging capabilities that are now routine for ferromagnets must be developed for antiferromagnetic systems. Here, using a non-invasive, scanning single-spin magnetometer based on a nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-space visualization of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order in a magnetic thin film at room temperature. We image the spin cycloid of a multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) thin film and extract a period of about 70 nanometres, consistent with values determined by macroscopic diffraction. In addition, we take advantage of the magnetoelectric coupling present in BiFeO3 to manipulate the cycloid propagation direction by an electric field. Besides highlighting the potential of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry for imaging complex antiferromagnetic orders at the nanoscale, these results demonstrate how BiFeO3 can be used in the design of reconfigurable nanoscale spin textures.

  13. Spin-orbit torques in locally and globally noncentrosymmetric crystals: Antiferromagnets and ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Železný, J.

    2017-01-10

    One of the main obstacles that prevents practical applications of antiferromagnets is the difficulty of manipulating the magnetic order parameter. Recently, following the theoretical prediction [J. Železný, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 157201 (2014)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.157201, the electrical switching of magnetic moments in an antiferromagnet was demonstrated [P. Wadley, Science 351, 587 (2016)]SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.aab1031. The switching is due to the so-called spin-orbit torque, which has been extensively studied in ferromagnets. In this phenomena a nonequilibrium spin-polarization exchange coupled to the ordered local moments is induced by current, hence exerting a torque on the order parameter. Here we give a general systematic analysis of the symmetry of the spin-orbit torque in locally and globally noncentrosymmetric crystals. We study when the symmetry allows for a nonzero torque, when is the torque effective, and its dependence on the applied current direction and orientation of magnetic moments. For comparison, we consider both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic orders. In two representative model crystals we perform microscopic calculations of the spin-orbit torque to illustrate its symmetry properties and to highlight conditions under which the spin-orbit torque can be efficient for manipulating antiferromagnetic moments.

  14. Antiferromagnetic MnN layer on the MnGa(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J., E-mail: guerrero@cnyn.unam.mx; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A ferromagnetic Gallium terminated surface is stable before N incorporation. • After N incorporation, an antiferromagnetic MnN layer becomes stable in a wide range of chemical potential. • Spin density distribution shows an antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (MnN/MnGa) arrangement at the surface. - Abstract: Spin polarized first principles total energy calculations have been applied to study the stability and magnetic properties of the MnGa(001) surface and the formation of a topmost MnN layer with the deposit of nitrogen. Before nitrogen adsorption, surface formation energies show a stable gallium terminated ferromagnetic surface. After incorporation of nitrogen atoms, the antiferromagnetic manganese terminated surface becomes stable due to the formation of a MnN layer (Mn-N bonding at the surface). Spin density distribution shows a ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic arrangement in the first surface layers. This thermodynamically stable structure may be exploited to growth MnGa/MnN magnetic heterostructures as well as to look for exchange biased systems.

  15. The finite temperature density matrix and two-point correlations in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhmann, Frank; Hasenclever, Nils P.; Seel, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    We derive finite temperature versions of integral formulae for the two-point correlation functions in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain. The derivation is based on the summation of density matrix elements characterizing a finite chain segment of length m. On this occasion we also supply a proof of the basic integral formula for the density matrix presented in an earlier publication.

  16. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the

  17. Odd number of coupled antiferromagnetic anisotropic Heisenberg chains: Spin wave theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of the chain and perpendicular anisotropies on the energy gap for odd number of coupled quantum spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic anisotropic Heisenberg chains is investigated using a spin wave theory. The energy gap opens above a critical anisotropic value. The known results of the isotropic case have been obtained. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs

  18. Magnon Spin-Momentum Locking: Various Spin Vortices and Dirac magnons in Noncollinear Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We generalize the concept of the spin-momentum locking to magnonic systems and derive the formula to calculate the spin expectation value for one-magnon states of general two-body spin Hamiltonians. We give no-go conditions for magnon spin to be independent of momentum. As examples of the magnon spin-momentum locking, we analyze a one-dimensional antiferromagnet with the Néel order and two-dimensional kagome lattice antiferromagnets with the 120° structure. We find that the magnon spin depends on its momentum even when the Hamiltonian has the z -axis spin rotational symmetry, which can be explained in the context of a singular band point or a U (1 ) symmetry breaking. A spin vortex in momentum space generated in a kagome lattice antiferromagnet has the winding number Q =-2 , while the typical one observed in topological insulator surface states is characterized by Q =+1 . A magnonic analogue of the surface states, the Dirac magnon with Q =+1 , is found in another kagome lattice antiferromagnet. We also derive the sum rule for Q by using the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem.

  19. Spin-orbit torques in locally and globally noncentrosymmetric crystals: Antiferromagnets and ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Železný , J.; Gao, H.; Manchon, Aurelien; Freimuth, Frank; Mokrousov, Yuriy; Zemen, J.; Mašek, J.; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, T.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main obstacles that prevents practical applications of antiferromagnets is the difficulty of manipulating the magnetic order parameter. Recently, following the theoretical prediction [J. Železný, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 157201 (2014)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.157201, the electrical switching of magnetic moments in an antiferromagnet was demonstrated [P. Wadley, Science 351, 587 (2016)]SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.aab1031. The switching is due to the so-called spin-orbit torque, which has been extensively studied in ferromagnets. In this phenomena a nonequilibrium spin-polarization exchange coupled to the ordered local moments is induced by current, hence exerting a torque on the order parameter. Here we give a general systematic analysis of the symmetry of the spin-orbit torque in locally and globally noncentrosymmetric crystals. We study when the symmetry allows for a nonzero torque, when is the torque effective, and its dependence on the applied current direction and orientation of magnetic moments. For comparison, we consider both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic orders. In two representative model crystals we perform microscopic calculations of the spin-orbit torque to illustrate its symmetry properties and to highlight conditions under which the spin-orbit torque can be efficient for manipulating antiferromagnetic moments.

  20. Anomalous Z2 antiferromagnetic topological phase in pressurized SmB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Chen, Peng-Jen

    2018-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials, whose time-reversal symmetry is broken, can be classified into the Z2 topology if they respect some specific symmetry. Since the theoretical proposal, however, no materials have been found to host such Z2 antiferromagnetic topological (Z2-AFT ) phase to date. Here we demonstrate that the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 can be a Z2-AFT system when pressurized to undergo an antiferromagnetic phase transition. In addition to proposing the possible candidate for a Z2-AFT material, in this work we also illustrate the anomalous topological surface states of the Z2-AFT phase which have not been discussed before. Originating from the interplay between the topological properties and the antiferromagnetic surface magnetization, the topological surface states of the Z2-AFT phase behave differently as compared with those of a topological insulator. Besides, the Z2-AFT insulators are also found promising in the generation of tunable spin currents, which is an important application in spintronics.

  1. Quantum crystal growing: adiabatic preparation of a bosonic antiferromagnet in the presence of a parabolic inhomogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Eckardt, André

    2013-01-01

    felt by the two species. Using numerical simulations we predict that a finite parabolic potential can assist the adiabatic preparation of the antiferromagnet. The optimal strength of the parabolic inhomogeneity depends sensitively on the number imbalance between the two species. We also find...

  2. Exchange anisotropy as a probe of antiferromagnetism in expanded face-centered-tetragonal Mn(001) layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlhepp, J.T.; Wieldraaijer, H.; Jonge, de W.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) grows coherent and with an expanded metastable face-centered-tetragonal (e-fct) structure on ultrathin fct Co(001)/Cu(001) template layers. From the temp. dependence of the obsd. unidirectional Mn/Co interface exchange anisotropy, an antiferromagnetic state with a blocking temp.

  3. Magnon Spin-Momentum Locking: Various Spin Vortices and Dirac magnons in Noncollinear Antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-08

    We generalize the concept of the spin-momentum locking to magnonic systems and derive the formula to calculate the spin expectation value for one-magnon states of general two-body spin Hamiltonians. We give no-go conditions for magnon spin to be independent of momentum. As examples of the magnon spin-momentum locking, we analyze a one-dimensional antiferromagnet with the Néel order and two-dimensional kagome lattice antiferromagnets with the 120° structure. We find that the magnon spin depends on its momentum even when the Hamiltonian has the z-axis spin rotational symmetry, which can be explained in the context of a singular band point or a U(1) symmetry breaking. A spin vortex in momentum space generated in a kagome lattice antiferromagnet has the winding number Q=-2, while the typical one observed in topological insulator surface states is characterized by Q=+1. A magnonic analogue of the surface states, the Dirac magnon with Q=+1, is found in another kagome lattice antiferromagnet. We also derive the sum rule for Q by using the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem.

  4. Spin-transfer torques in antiferromagnetic textures: efficiency and quantification method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamane, Y.; Ieda, J.; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 054409. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spin-transfer torques * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  5. GPU-Accelerated Population Annealing Algorithm: Frustrated Ising Antiferromagnet on the Stacked Triangular Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borovský Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The population annealing algorithm is a novel approach to study systems with rough free-energy landscapes, such as spin glasses. It combines the power of simulated annealing, Boltzmann weighted differential reproduction and sequential Monte Carlo process to bring the population of replicas to the equilibrium even in the low-temperature region. Moreover, it provides a very good estimate of the free energy. The fact that population annealing algorithm is performed over a large number of replicas with many spin updates, makes it a good candidate for massive parallelism. We chose the GPU programming using a CUDA implementation to create a highly optimized simulation. It has been previously shown for the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the stacked triangular lattice with a ferromagnetic interlayer coupling, that standard Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations fail to equilibrate at low temperatures due to the effect of kinetic freezing of the ferromagnetically ordered chains. We applied the population annealing to study the case with the isotropic intra- and interlayer antiferromagnetic coupling (J2/|J1| = −1. The reached ground states correspond to non-magnetic degenerate states, where chains are antiferromagnetically ordered, but there is no long-range ordering between them, which is analogical with Wannier phase of the 2D triangular Ising antiferromagnet.

  6. Quasi-one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model for an organic polymeric chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, F; Wang, W Z

    2006-01-01

    Using the exact diagonalization technique, we study the properties of the ground state of a spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model for a zigzag polymer chain with side radicals connected to the even sites. We consider the nearest-neighbour exchange J and the next-nearest-neighbour exchange αJ along the main chain, and J 1 between the even site on the main chain and the radical site. For small α the ground state is ferrimagnetic. For α>α c1 , the ground state is a spiral phase, which is characterized by a peak of the static structure factor S(q) locating at an incommensurate value q max . For α>α c2 , the ground state is antiferromagnetic. With increasing J 1 , α c1 decreases while α c2 has a maximum at about J 1 = 0.5. For very small J 1 and α = 0.5, the spin configuration on the main chain is a product of nearest-neighbour singlets. In the antiferromagnetic phase, if J 1 is large enough the even site and the radical site form a singlet with exchange-decoupling from the odd site while the odd sites approximately form an antiferromagnetic chain

  7. Precessional switching of antiferromagnets by electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. H.; Grünberg, P.; Han, S. H.; Cho, B. K.

    2018-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic insulators (AFIs) have attracted much interest from many researchers as promising candidates for use in ultrafast, ultralow-dissipation spintronic devices. As a fast method of reversing magnetization, precessional switching is realized when antiferromagnetic Néel orders l =(s1+s2 )/2 surmount the magnetic anisotropy or potential barrier in a given magnetic system, which is described well by the antiferromagnetic plane pendulum (APP) model. Here, we report that, as an alternative switching scenario, the direct coupling of an electric field with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction, which stems from spin-orbit coupling, is exploited for optimal switching. We derive the pendulum equation of motion of antiferromagnets, where DM torque is induced by a pulsed electric field. The temporal DM interaction is found to not only be in the form of magnetic torques (e.g., spin-orbit torque or magnetic field) but also modifies the magnetic potential that limits l 's activity; as a result, appropriate controls (e.g., direction, magnitude, and pulse shape) of the induced DM vector realize deterministic reversal in APP. The results present an approach for the control of a magnetic storage device by means of an electric field.

  8. Breakdown of antiferromagnet order in polycrystalline NiFe/NiO bilayers probed with acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebyodkin, M. A.; Lebedkina, T. A.; Shashkov, I. V.; Gornakov, V. S.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetization reversal of polycrystalline NiFe/NiO bilayers was investigated using magneto-optical indicator film imaging and acoustic emission techniques. Sporadic acoustic signals were detected in a constant magnetic field after the magnetization reversal. It is suggested that they are related to elastic waves excited by sharp shocks in the NiO layer with strong magnetostriction. Their probability depends on the history and number of repetitions of the field cycling, thus testifying the thermal-activation nature of the long-time relaxation of an antiferromagnetic order. These results provide evidence of spontaneous thermally activated switching of the antiferromagnetic order in NiO grains during magnetization reversal in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet (FM/AFM) heterostructures. The respective deformation modes are discussed in terms of the thermal fluctuation aftereffect in the Fulcomer and Charap model which predicts that irreversible breakdown of the original spin orientation can take place in some antiferromagnetic grains with disordered anisotropy axes during magnetization reversal of exchange-coupled FM/AFM structures. The spin reorientation in the saturated state may induce abrupt distortion of isolated metastable grains because of the NiO magnetostriction, leading to excitation of shock waves and formation of plate (or Lamb) waves.

  9. Detection of a single synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticle with an AMR nanostructure: Comparison between simulations and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, M.; Gobbi, M.; Cantoni, M.

    2010-01-01

    magnetoresistance effect and hence an electrical signal. In this paper we use micromagnetic simulations to calculate the output signal of a particularly shaped device in the presence of a single synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticle. The calculated magnetoresistive signal is in good agreement with corresponding...

  10. (Anti)-ferromagnetic coupling in Fe/Si multilayers from polarized neutron reflectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrikze, H.; Graaf, van der A; Valkier, M.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Broeder, den F.J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry data on Fe/Si multilayers are interpreted using strongly depth-dependent magnetization in the Fe layers. This behaviour is ascribed to a depth-dependent mixture of ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic coupled regions in the sample.

  11. High-frequency effects in antiferromagnetic Sr3Ir2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Morgan; Seinige, Heidi; Shen, Shida; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John; Tsoi, Maxim

    Antiferromagnetic (AFM) spintronics is one of many promising routes for `beyond the CMOS' technologies where unique properties of AFM materials are exploited to achieve new and improved functionalities. AFMs are especially interesting for high-speed memory applications thanks to their high natural frequencies. Here we report the effects of high-frequency (microwave) currents on transport properties of antiferromagnetic Mott insulator Sr3Ir2O7. The microwaves at 3-7 GHz were found to affect the material's current-voltage characteristic and produce resonance-like features that we tentatively associate with the dissipationless magnonics recently predicted to occur in antiferromagnetic insulators subject to ac electric fields. Our observations support the potential of antiferromagnetic materials for high-speed/high-frequency spintronic applications. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162, DMR-1600057, and DMR-1122603, and by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) under Award No. OSR-2015-CRG4-2626.

  12. An Investigation of Low Biofouling Copper-charged Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asapu, Sunitha

    with increased biofouling resistance. The goal of this project was to develop low-biofouling nanofiltration cellulose acetate (CA) membranes through functionalization with metal chelating ligands charged with biocidal metal ions, i.e. copper ions. To this end, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), an epoxy, was used to attach a chelating agent, iminodiacetic acid (IDA) to facilitate the charging of copper to the membrane surface. Both CA and CA-GMA membranes were cast using the phase-inversion method. The CA-GMA membranes were then charged with copper ions to make them low biofouling. Pore size distribution analysis of CA and copper charged membranes were conducted using various molecular weights of polyethylene glycol (PEG). CA and copper-charged membranes were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), contact angle to measure hydrophilicity changes, and using scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy EDS to monitor copper leaching. Permeation experiments were conducted with distilled (DI) water, protein solutions, and synthetic brackish water containing microorganisms. The DI water permeation of the copper-charged membranes was initially lower than the CA membranes. The membranes were then subjected to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipase filtration. The copper-charged membranes showed higher pure water flux values for both proteins as compared to CA membranes. The rejection of BSA and lipase was the same for both the copper charged and CA membranes. The filtration with the synthetic brackish water showed that copper-charged membranes had higher flux values as compared to CA membranes, and biofouling analysis showed more bacteria on the CA membranes as compared to copper-charged membranes. Therefore, the copper-charged membranes made here have shown a potential to be used as low-biofouling membranes in the future.

  13. The role of insufficient copper in lipid synthesis and fatty-liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Austin; Tallino, Savannah; Yu, Lei; Burkhead, Jason L

    2017-04-01

    The essential transition metal copper is important in lipid metabolism, redox balance, iron mobilization, and many other critical processes in eukaryotic organisms. Genetic diseases where copper homeostasis is disrupted, including Menkes disease and Wilson disease, indicate the importance of copper balance to human health. The severe consequences of insufficient copper supply are illustrated by Menkes disease, caused by mutation in the X-linked ATP7A gene encoding a protein that transports copper from intestinal epithelia into the bloodstream and across the blood-brain barrier. Inadequate copper supply to the body due to poor diet quality or malabsorption can disrupt several molecular level pathways and processes. Though much of the copper distribution machinery has been described and consequences of disrupted copper handling have been characterized in human disease as well as animal models, physiological consequences of sub-optimal copper due to poor nutrition or malabsorption have not been extensively studied. Recent work indicates that insufficient copper may be important in a number of common diseases including obesity, ischemic heart disease, and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, marginal copper deficiency (CuD) has been reported as a potential etiologic factor in diseases characterized by disrupted lipid metabolism such as non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). In this review, we discuss the available data suggesting that a significant portion of the North American population may consume insufficient copper, the potential mechanisms by which CuD may promote lipid biosynthesis, and the interaction between CuD and dietary fructose in the etiology of NAFLD. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):263-270, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  15. The Effect of Copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment, where fishes are found, stuns them ... of earthen ponds are springing up near cocoa ... farm, which posses toxicological risk to farmed ... Veg. oil. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. Copper sulphate 0. 1.0. 2.5. 5.0. 7.5. Total ..... Cellulase Production by Wild Strains of Aspergillus Niger, ... Mangrove Area of Lagos, Nigeria.

  16. Copper Pyrimidine based MOFs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesized hydrothermally in a 23-mL Teflon lined stainless steel bomb by heating copper(II) 2-pyrazinecarboxylate (31 mg, 0.1 mmol) and tin(II) iodide (75 mg, 0.2 mmol) in 4 mL water at 150±C for 24 h. The reaction vessel was subsequently cooled to 70±C at 1±C/min and held at that temperature for 6 h before returning ...

  17. Supersonic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.E.; Hansen, S.G.; Geusic, M.E.; Michalopoulos, D.L.; Smalley, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Copper clusters ranging in size from 1 to 29 atoms have been prepared in a supersonic beam by laser vaporization of a rotating copper target rod within the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle using helium for the carrier gas. The clusters were cooled extensively in the supersonic expansion [T(translational) 1 to 4 K, T(rotational) = 4 K, T(vibrational) = 20 to 70 K]. These clusters were detected in the supersonic beam by laser photoionization with time-of-flight mass analysis. Using a number of fixed frequency outputs of an exciplex laser, the threshold behavior of the photoionization cross section was monitored as a function of cluster size.nce two-photon ionization (R2PI) with mass selective detection allowed the detection of five new electronic band systems in the region between 2690 and 3200 A, for each of the three naturally occurring isotopic forms of Cu 2 . In the process of scanning the R2PI spectrum of these new electronic states, the ionization potential of the copper dimer was determined to be 7.894 +- 0.015 eV

  18. Native copper as a natural analogue for copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the occurrence of native copper as found in geological formations as a stability analogue of copper canisters that are planned to be used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock. A summary of several publications on native copper occurrences is presented. The present geochemical and geohydrological conditions in which copper is met with in its metallic state show that metallic copper is stable in a wide range of temperatures. At low temperatures native copper is found to be stable where groundwater has moderate pH (about 7), low Eh (< +100 mV), and low total dissolved solids, especially chloride. Microscopical and microanalytical studies were carried out on a dozen of rock samples containing native copper. The results reveal that the metal shows no significant alteration. Only the surface of copper grains is locally coated. In the oldest samples there exist small corrosion cracks; the age of the oldest samples is over 1,000 million years. A review of several Finnish groundwater studies suggests that there are places in Finland where the geohydrological conditions are favourable for native copper stability. (orig.)

  19. Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Stereoselective Oxygen Atom Transfer Mediated by a Copper Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafentzi, Maria-Chrysanthi; Papadakis, Raffaello; Gennarini, Federica; Kochem, Amélie; Iranzo, Olga; Le Mest, Yves; Le Poul, Nicolas; Tron, Thierry; Faure, Bruno; Simaan, A Jalila; Réglier, Marius

    2018-04-06

    Water oxidation by copper-based complexes to form dioxygen has attracted attention in recent years, with the aim of developing efficient and cheap catalysts for chemical energy storage. In addition, high-valent metal-oxo species produced by the oxidation of metal complexes in the presence of water can be used to achieve substrate oxygenation with the use of H 2 O as an oxygen source. To date, this strategy has not been reported for copper complexes. Herein, a copper(II) complex, [(RPY2)Cu(OTf) 2 ] (RPY2=N-substituted bis[2-pyridyl(ethylamine)] ligands; R=indane; OTf=triflate), is used. This complex, which contains an oxidizable substrate moiety (indane), is used as a tool to monitor an intramolecular oxygen atom transfer reaction. Electrochemical properties were investigated and, upon electrolysis at 1.30 V versus a normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), both dioxygen production and oxygenation of the indane moiety were observed. The ligand was oxidized in a highly diastereoselective manner, which indicated that the observed reactivity was mediated by metal-centered reactive species. The pH dependence of the reactivity was monitored and correlated with speciation deduced from different techniques, ranging from potentiometric titrations to spectroscopic studies and DFT calculations. Water oxidation for dioxygen production occurs at neutral pH and is probably mediated by the oxidation of a mononuclear copper(II) precursor. It is achieved with a rather low overpotential (280 mV at pH 7), although with limited efficiency. On the other hand, oxygenation is maximum at pH 8-8.5 and is probably mediated by the electrochemical oxidation of an antiferromagnetically coupled dinuclear bis(μ-hydroxo) copper(II) precursor. This constitutes the first example of copper-centered oxidative water activation for a selective oxygenation reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  1. Copper tolerance in Becium homblei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, C; Stone, J

    1971-04-09

    Analyses show that Becium homblei has apparently no mechanism for limiting copper uptake. As growth proceeds, the concentration of metal increases in leaves and stems. Much of the copper is bound to structural material of the cells. There is a significant difference between the amount of extractable material in root and leaf tissues. These differences, in conjunction with the extrinsic factor of regular bush fires, were important factors in the evolution of this copper-resistant species of Becium. 9 references.

  2. Copper toxicity in housed lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, A H; Valks, D A; Appleton, M A; Shaw, W B

    1969-09-27

    Copper toxicity among 170 lambs artificially reared indoors at High Mowthorpe NAAS Experimental Husbandry Farm is reported. Although only three lambs were lost it is not unreasonable to suggest that the liver copper levels of the lambs which were slaughtered would have been high and losses could have been much heavier had there been any further copper supplementation. Even a copper level of 20 ppm in lamb concentrates given to lambs reared artificially indoors is dangerous, and intakes of much less than 38 mg per lamb per day can be fatal if given of a prolonged period. 5 references, 1 table.

  3. Copper and copper-nickel-alloys - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassert, Anton; Tikana, Ladji [Deutsches Kupferinstitut e.V. Am Bonneshof 5, 40474 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    With the increasing level of industrialization the demand for and the number of copper alloys rose in an uninterrupted way. Today, the copper alloys take an important position amongst metallic materials due to the large variety of their technological properties and applications. Nowadays there exist over 3.000 standardized alloys. Copper takes the third place of all metals with a worldwide consumption of over 15 millions tons per year, following only to steel and aluminum. In a modern industrial society we meet copper in all ranges of the life (electro-technology, building and construction industry, mechanical engineering, automotive, chemistry, offshore, marine engineering, medical applications and others.). Copper is the first metal customized by humanity. Its name is attributed to the island Cyprus, which supplied in the antiquity copper to Greece, Rome and the other Mediterranean countries. The Romans called it 'ore from Cyprus' (aes cyprium), later cuprum. Copper deposited occasionally also dapper and could be processed in the recent stone age simply by hammering. Already in early historical time copper alloys with 20 to 50 percent tin was used for the production of mirrors because of their high reflecting power. Although the elementary nickel is an element discovered only recently from a historical perspective, its application in alloys - without any knowledge of the alloy composition - occurred at least throughout the last 2.000 years. The oldest copper-nickel coin originates from the time around 235 B.C.. Only around 1800 AD nickel was isolated as a metallic element. In particular in the sea and offshore technology copper nickel alloys found a broad field of applications in piping systems and for valves and armatures. The excellent combination of characteristics like corrosion resistance, erosion stability and bio-fouling resistance with excellent mechanical strength are at the basis of this success. An experience of many decades supports the use

  4. Effective S =2 antiferromagnetic spin chain in the salt (o -MePy-V)FeCl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Y.; Kida, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Kawakami, T.; Hosokoshi, Y.; Tamekuni, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2018-02-01

    We present a model compound for the S =2 antiferromagnetic (AF) spin chain composed of the salt (o -MePy-V ) FeCl4 . Ab initio molecular-orbital calculations indicate the formation of a partially stacked two-dimensional (2D) spin model comprising five types of exchange interactions between S =1 /2 and S =5 /2 spins, which locate on verdazyl radical and Fe ion, respectively. The magnetic properties of the synthesized crystals indicate that the dominant interaction between the S =1 /2 and S =5 /2 spins stabilizes an S =2 spin in the low-temperature region, and an effective S =2 AF chain is formed for T ≪10 K and H chain. At higher fields above quantitatively 4 T, the magnetization curve assumes two-thirds of the full saturation value for fields between 4 and 20 T, and approaches saturation at ˜40 T. The spin model in the high-field region can be considered as a quasi-2D S =1 /2 honeycomb lattice under an effective internal field caused by the fully polarized S =5 /2 spin.

  5. Single reference Coupled Cluster treatment of nearly degenerate problems: Cohesive energy of antiferromagnetic lattices of spin 1 centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lattices of antiferromagnetically coupled spins, ruled by Heisenberg Hamiltonians, are intrinsically highly degenerate systems. The present work tries to estimate the ground state energy of regular bipartite spin lattices of S = 1 sites from a single reference Coupled Cluster expansion starting from a Néel function, taken as reference. The simultaneous changes of spin momentum on adjacent sites play the role of the double excitations in molecular electronic problems. Propagation of the spin changes plays the same role as the triple excitations. The treatment takes care of the deviation of multiple excitation energies from additivity. Specific difficulties appear for 1D chains, which are not due to a near degeneracy between the reference and the vectors which directly interact with it but to the complexity of the processes which lead to the low energy configurations where a consistent reversed-Néel domain is created inside the Néel starting spin wave. Despite these difficulties a reasonable value of the cohesive energy is obtained.

  6. Single reference Coupled Cluster treatment of nearly degenerate problems: Cohesive energy of antiferromagnetic lattices of spin 1 centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Lattices of antiferromagnetically coupled spins, ruled by Heisenberg Hamiltonians, are intrinsically highly degenerate systems. The present work tries to estimate the ground state energy of regular bipartite spin lattices of S = 1 sites from a single reference Coupled Cluster expansion starting from a Néel function, taken as reference. The simultaneous changes of spin momentum on adjacent sites play the role of the double excitations in molecular electronic problems. Propagation of the spin changes plays the same role as the triple excitations. The treatment takes care of the deviation of multiple excitation energies from additivity. Specific difficulties appear for 1D chains, which are not due to a near degeneracy between the reference and the vectors which directly interact with it but to the complexity of the processes which lead to the low energy configurations where a consistent reversed-Néel domain is created inside the Néel starting spin wave. Despite these difficulties a reasonable value of the cohesive energy is obtained.

  7. Spectrographic determination of impurities in copper and copper oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-11-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the determination of Al, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ge, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn and Zn in copper and copper oxide is described. Two mixtures (Graphite and ZnO: graphite and GeO sub(2)) were used as buffers. The standard deviation lies around 10%. (author)

  8. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  9. A spin-frustrated trinuclear copper complex based on triaminoguanidine with an energetically well-separated degenerate ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Eike T; Gilb, Aksana; Plaul, Daniel; Geibig, Daniel; Hornig, David; Schuch, Dirk; Buchholz, Axel; Ardavan, Arzhang; Plass, Winfried

    2015-04-06

    We present the synthesis and crystal structure of the trinuclear copper complex [Cu3(saltag)(bpy)3]ClO4·3DMF [H5saltag = tris(2-hydroxybenzylidene)triaminoguanidine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine]. The complex crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3̅, with all copper ions being crystallographically equivalent. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility shows that the triaminoguanidine ligand mediates very strong antiferromagnetic interactions (JCuCu = -324 cm(-1)). Detailed analysis of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data as well as X-band electron spin resonance spectra, all recorded on both powdered samples and single crystals, show indications of neither antisymmetric exchange nor symmetry lowering, thus indicating only a very small splitting of the degenerate S = (1)/2 ground state. These findings are corroborated by density functional theory calculations, which explain both the strong isotropic and negligible antisymmetric exchange interactions.

  10. The synthesis, spectroscopy and X-ray single crystal structure of catena-[(μ-anacardato)-copper(II)bipyridine][Cu2{(μ-O2CC6H3(o-OH)(o-C15H31)}4(NC5H5)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad Azad; O'Brien, Paul; Tuna, Floriana; Pritchard, Robin; Buchweishaija, Joseph; Kimambo, Elianaso; Mubofu, Egid B

    2013-10-28

    Hydrogenation of crude anacardic acid gave a transparent crystalline product on recrystallization. When reacted with copper nitrate in the presence of pyridine it produced green crystals of a pyridine adduct of a dimeric copper(II) anacardate with the copper acetate structure. The X-ray single crystal structures of both anacardic acid and the copper complex were determined. Magnetic studies have confirmed strong antiferromagnetic coupling between copper(II) centre in the dimer. The exchange coupling constant was determined to be J = -324 cm(-1). The EPR spectra of the polycrystalline product are consistent with spin S = 1. The zero-field splitting parameter and g tensor values are |D| = 0.36 cm(-1), g(||) = 2.36 and g(⊥) = 2.06.

  11. A new manganese-based single-molecule magnet with a record-high antiferromagnetic phase transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yan; Li Yan-Rong; Li Rui-Yuan; Wang Yun-Ping

    2014-01-01

    We perform both dc and ac magnetic measurements on the single crystal of Mn 3 O(Et-sao) 3 (ClO 4 )(MeOH) 3 single-molecule magnet (SMM) when the sample is preserved in air for different durations. We find that, during the oxidation process, the sample develops into another SMM with a smaller anisotropy energy barrier and a stronger antiferromagnetic intermolecular exchange interaction. The antiferromagnetic transition temperature observed at 6.65 K in the new SMM is record-high for the antiferromagnetic phase transition in all the known SMMs. Compared to the original SMM, the only apparent change for the new SMM is that each molecule has lost three methyl groups as revealed by four-circle x-ray diffraction (XRD), which is thought to be the origin of the stronger antiferromagnetic intermolecular exchange interaction

  12. Crystal Structure and Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Quasi-2D [Cu(HF2)(pyz)2]TaF6 (pyz=pyrazine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF2- ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains TaF6- anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  13. Culture-Dependent and Independent Studies of Microbial Diversity in Highly Copper-Contaminated Chilean Marine Sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besaury, L.; Marty, F.; Buquet, S.; Mesnage, V.; Muijzer, G.; Quillet, L.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation and molecular-based approaches were used to study microbial diversity in two Chilean marine sediments contaminated with high (835 ppm) and very high concentrations of copper (1,533 ppm). The diversity of cultivable bacteria resistant to copper was studied at oxic and anoxic conditions,

  14. Antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce2PdIn8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, V. H.; Hillier, A. D.; Adroja, D. T.; Kaczorowski, D.

    2012-09-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering and muon spin relaxation/rotation (μSR) measurements were performed on the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce2PdIn8. The observed scaling of the imaginary part of the dynamical susceptibility χ''Tα∝f(ℏω/kBT) with α=3/2 revealed a non-Fermi liquid character of the normal state, being due to critical antiferromagnetic fluctuations near a T=0 quantum phase transition. The longitudinal-field μSR measurements indicated that superconductivity and antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations coexist in Ce2PdIn8 on a microscopic scale. The observed power-law temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth λ∝T3/2, deduced from the transverse-field μSR data, strongly confirms an unconventional superconductivity in this compound.

  15. Magnetic Anisotropy by Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling in Antiferromagnetic Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Jun'ichi; Barnes, Stewart E.; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic anisotropy in an antiferromagnet (AFM) with inversion symmetry breaking (ISB) is investigated. The magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) resulting from the Rashba spin-orbit and s-d type exchange interactions is determined for two different models of AFMs. The global ISB model, representing the effect of a surface, an interface, or a gating electric field, results in an easy-plane magnetic anisotropy. In contrast, for a local ISB model, i.e., for a noncentrosymmetric AFM, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) arises. Both results differ from the ferromagnetic case, in which the result for PMA depends on the band structure and dimensionality. These MAE contributions play a key role in determining the direction of the Néel order parameter in antiferromagnetic nanostructures, and reflect the possibility of electrical-field control of the Néel vector.

  16. Electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic iron doped NiO - A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John E.; Twagirayezu, Fidele; Scolfaro, Luisa M.; Borges, Pablo D.; Geerts, Wilhelmus J.

    2017-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic NiO is a candidate for next generation high-speed and scaled RRAM devices. Here, electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic NiO: Fe 25% in the rock salt structure are studied and compared to intrinsic NiO. From density of states and complex dielectric function analysis, the first optical transition is found to be at lower frequency than intrinsic NiO due to an Fe impurity level being the valence band maximum. The resulting effects on refractive index, reflectivity, absorption, optical conductivity and loss function for Fe-doped NiO are compared to those of intrinsic NiO, and notable differences are analyzed. The electronic component of the static dielectric constant of NiO: Fe 25% is calculated to be about 2% less than that of intrinsic NiO.

  17. Surface antiferromagnetism and incipient metal-insulator transition in strained manganite films

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio; Colizzi, G.; Filippetti, A.; Fiorentini, Vincenzo; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we show that the (001) surface of the ferromagnet La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 under an epitaxial compressive strain favors antiferromagnetic (AF) order in the surface layers, coexisting with ferromagnetic (FM) bulk order. Surface antiferromagnetism is accompanied by a very marked surface-related spectral pseudogap, signaling an incomplete metal-insulator transition at the surface. The different relaxation and rumpling of the MnO2 and LaO surface planes in the two competing magnetic phases cause distinct work-function changes, which are of potential diagnostic use. The AF phase is recognized as an extreme surface-assisted case of the combination of in-plane AF super-exchange and vertical FM double-exchange couplings that rules magnetism in manganites under in-plane compression.

  18. Quantum fluctuations in the competition among spin glass, antiferromagnetism and local pairing superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, S.G.; Zimmer, F.M.; Kipper, C.J.; Calegari, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    The competition among spin glass (SG), antiferromagnetism (AF) and local pairing superconductivity (PAIR) is studied in a two-sublattice fermionic Ising SG model with a local BCS pairing interaction in the presence of a transverse magnetic field Γ. The spins in different sublattices interact with Gaussian random couplings with an antiferromagnetic mean. The problem is formulated in a Grassmann path integral formalism. The static ansatz and the replica symmetry are used to obtain the half-filling thermodynamic potential. The results are shown in phase diagrams that exhibit a complex transition line separating the PAIR phase from the others. This line is second order at high temperature which ends in a tricritical point. The presence of Γ affects deeply the transition lines

  19. Theory of the Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction in Rashba Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Ado, Ivan A.; Duine, Rembert A.; Titov, Mikhail; Brataas, Arne

    2018-05-01

    In antiferromagnetic (AFM) thin films, broken inversion symmetry or coupling to adjacent heavy metals can induce Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions. Knowledge of the DM parameters is essential for understanding and designing exotic spin structures, such as hedgehog Skyrmions and chiral Néel walls, which are attractive for use in novel information storage technologies. We introduce a framework for computing the DM interaction in two-dimensional Rashba antiferromagnets. Unlike in Rashba ferromagnets, the DM interaction is not suppressed even at low temperatures. The material parameters control both the strength and the sign of the interfacial DM interaction. Our results suggest a route toward controlling the DM interaction in AFM materials by means of doping and electric fields.

  20. Thermal conductivity of the vortex lattice state involving the antiferromagnetism around the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Mitsuaki; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity κ xx is the difference between higher and lower temperature regions, because the spatially-resolved thermal conductivity κ xx (r) is localized around the vortex core at lower temperature and delocalized at higher temperature. On one hand, much attention is focused on the spin and charge ordering around the vortex. When the antiferromagnetism appears around the core, the energy gap suppresses the density of states on the Fermi energy, and the zero-energy peak at the vortex core splits or vanishes. The κ xx under the Neel temperature is suppressed by the antiferromagnetism. We solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation self-consistently by two-dimensional extended Hubbard model including the repulsive interaction U, and calculate the κ xx on the basis of the linear response theory. The picture of the spatial variation of the thermal conductivity κ(r) through the spin resolved local DOS well explains recent experiments

  1. Surface antiferromagnetism and incipient metal-insulator transition in strained manganite films

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2013-06-21

    Using first-principles calculations, we show that the (001) surface of the ferromagnet La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 under an epitaxial compressive strain favors antiferromagnetic (AF) order in the surface layers, coexisting with ferromagnetic (FM) bulk order. Surface antiferromagnetism is accompanied by a very marked surface-related spectral pseudogap, signaling an incomplete metal-insulator transition at the surface. The different relaxation and rumpling of the MnO2 and LaO surface planes in the two competing magnetic phases cause distinct work-function changes, which are of potential diagnostic use. The AF phase is recognized as an extreme surface-assisted case of the combination of in-plane AF super-exchange and vertical FM double-exchange couplings that rules magnetism in manganites under in-plane compression.

  2. Fe-induced enhancement of antiferromagnetic spin correlations in Mn2-xFexBO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, N. V.; Platunov, M. S.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Moshkina, E. M.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Bayukov, O. A.; Gorev, M. V.; Pogoreltsev, E. I.; Zeer, G. M.; Zharkov, S. M.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    Fe substitution effect on the magnetic behavior of Mn2-xFexBO4 (x = 0.3, 0.5, 0.7) warwickites has been investigated combining Mössbauer spectroscopy, dc magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Fe3+ ions distribution over two crystallographic nonequivalent sites is studied. The Fe introduction breaks a long-range antiferromagnetic order and leads to onset of spin-glass ground state. The antiferromagnetic short-range-order spin correlations persist up to temperatures well above TSG reflecting in increasing deviations from the Curie-Weiss law, the reduced effective magnetic moment and "missing" entropy. The results are interpreted in the terms of the progressive increase of the frustration effect and the formation of spin-correlated regions.

  3. Two-magnon Raman scattering in a Mott-Hubbard antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.; Singh, A.

    1996-01-01

    A perturbation-theoretic diagrammatic scheme is developed for systematically studying the two-magnon Raman scattering in a Mott-Hubbard antiferromagnet. The fermionic structure of the magnon interaction vertex is obtained at order-1/N level in an inverse-degeneracy expansion, and the relevant two-magnon propagator is obtained by incorporating magnon interactions at a ladder-sum level. Evaluation of the magnon interaction vertex in the large-U limit yields a nearest-neighbor instantaneous interaction with interaction energy -J. Application of this approach to the intermediate-U regime, which is of relevance for cuprate antiferromagnets, is also discussed. Incorporating the zero-temperature magnon damping, which is estimated in terms of quantum spin fluctuations, the two-magnon Raman scattering intensity is evaluated and compared with experiments on La 2 CuO 4 . copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Dipolar Antiferromagnetism and Quantum Criticality in LiErF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, Conradin; Nikseresht, Neda; Piatek, Julian; Tsyrulin, Nikolay; Piazza, Bastien; Kiefer, Klaus; Klemke, Bastian; Rosenbaum, Thomas; Aeppli, Gabriel; Gannarelli, Che; Prokes, Karel; Straessle, Thierry; Keller, Lukas; Zaharko, Oksana; Kraemer, Karl; Ronnow, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Magnetism has been predicted to occur in systems in which dipolar interactions dominate exchange. We present neutron scattering, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility data for LiErF 4 , establishing it as a model dipolar-coupled antiferromagnet with planar spin-anisotropy and a quantum phase transition in applied field H c# parallel# = 4.0 ± 0.1 kilo-oersteds. We discovered non-mean-field critical scaling for the classical phase transition at the antiferromagnetic transition temperature that is consistent with the two-dimensional XY/h 4 universality class; in accord with this, the quantum phase transition at H c exhibits three-dimensional classical behavior. The effective dimensional reduction may be a consequence of the intrinsic frustrated nature of the dipolar interaction, which strengthens the role of fluctuations.

  5. All-oxide-based synthetic antiferromagnets exhibiting layer-resolved magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Xu, Haoran; Ma, Chao; Mattauch, Stefan; Lan, Da; Jin, Feng; Guo, Zhuang; Wan, Siyuan; Chen, Pingfan; Gao, Guanyin; Chen, Feng; Su, Yixi; Wu, Wenbin

    2017-07-01

    Synthesizing antiferromagnets with correlated oxides has been challenging, owing partly to the markedly degraded ferromagnetism of the magnetic layer at nanoscale thicknesses. Here we report on the engineering of an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling (AF-IEC) between ultrathin but ferromagnetic La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 layers across an insulating CaRu1/2Ti1/2O3 spacer. The layer-resolved magnetic switching leads to sharp steplike hysteresis loops with magnetization plateaus depending on the repetition number of the stacking bilayers. The magnetization configurations can be switched at moderate fields of hundreds of oersted. Moreover, the AF-IEC can also be realized with an alternative magnetic layer of La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 that possesses a Curie temperature near room temperature. The findings will add functionalities to devices with correlated-oxide interfaces.

  6. Breatherlike electromagnetic wave propagation in an antiferromagnetic medium with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavitha, L.; Saravanan, M.; Srividya, B.; Gopi, D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the nature of propagation of electromagnetic waves (EMWs) in an antiferromagnetic medium with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction environment. The interplay of bilinear and DM exchange spin coupling with the magnetic field component of the EMW has been studied by solving Maxwell's equations coupled with a nonlinear spin equation for the magnetization of the medium. We made a nonuniform expansion of the magnetization and magnetic field along the direction of propagation of EMW, in the framework of reductive perturbation method, and the dynamics of the system is found to be governed by a generalized derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. We employ the Jacobi-elliptic function method to solve the DNLS equation, and the electromagnetic wave propagation in an antiferromagnetic medium is governed by the breatherlike spatially and temporally coherent localized modes under the influence of DM interaction parameter.

  7. Frustrated ground state in the metallic Ising antiferromagnet Nd2Ni2In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, G.; Mašková, S.; Stone, M. B.

    2017-10-01

    We used inelastic neutron scattering measurements to examine the intermetallic Ising antiferromagnet Nd2Ni2In . The dynamical structure factor displays a spectrum with multiple crystal field excitations. These crystal field excitations consist of a set of four transitions covering a range of energies between 4 and 80 meV. The spectrum is very sensitive to the temperature, and we observed a softening and a shift in the energies above the transition temperature of the system. The analysis of the crystalline electric field scheme confirms the Ising nature of the spins and their orientation as proposed by previous studies. We characterized Nd2Ni2In as a large moment intermetallic antiferromagnet with the potential to support a geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice.

  8. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Sanderink, J. G. M.; Bolhuis, T.; van der Wiel, W. G.; de Jong, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the rotation of antiferromagnetic moments of an insulating CoO layer, incorporated into a tunnel junction consisting of sapphire(substrate)/fcc-Co/CoO/AlOx/Al. The ferromagnetic Co layer is exchange coupled to the AFM CoO layer and drives rotation of the AFM moments in an external magnetic field. The results may help pave the way towards the development of spintronic devices based on AFM insulators. PMID:26486931

  9. Dynamic magnetic behavior of the mixed spin (2, 5/2) Ising system with antiferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interactions on a bilayer square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertaş Mehmet; Keskin Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Using the mean-field theory and Glauber-type stochastic dynamics, we study the dynamic magnetic properties of the mixed spin (2, 5/2) Ising system for the antiferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (AFM/AFM) interactions on the bilayer square lattice under a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field. The time dependence of average magnetizations and the thermal variation of the dynamic magnetizations are examined to calculate the dynamic phase diagrams. The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the reduced temperature and magnetic field amplitude plane and the effects of interlayer coupling interaction on the critical behavior of the system are investigated. We also investigate the influence of the frequency and find that the system displays richer dynamic critical behavior for higher values of frequency than that of the lower values of it. We perform a comparison with the ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (FM/FM) and AFM/FM interactions in order to see the effects of AFM/AFM interaction and observe that the system displays richer and more interesting dynamic critical behaviors for the AFM/AFM interaction than those for the FM/FM and AFM/FM interactions. (general)

  10. On the equivalence of dilute antiferromagnets and ferromagnets in random external fields: Curie-Weiss models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.F.; Pontin, L.F.; Segundo, J.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Using a method proposed by van Hemmen the free energy of the Curie-Weiss version of the site-dilute antiferromagnetic Ising model is computed, in the presence of an uniform magnetic field. The solution displays an exact correspondence between this model and the Curie-Weiss version of the Ising model in the presence of a random magnetic field. The phase diagrams are discussed and a tricritical point is shown to exist. (Author) [pt

  11. Two-dimensional Potts antiferromagnets with a phase transition at arbitrarily large q

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, Y.; Chen, K.; Deng, Y.; Jacobsen, J. L.; Kotecký, R.; Salas, J.; Sokal, Alan D.; Swart, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, Č. 1 (2013), 12136-1-12136-5 ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/12/2613 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Monte Carlo simulation * two-dimensional lattices * q-state Potts Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.326, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/swart-two-dimensional potts antiferromagnets with a phase transition at arbitrarily large q.pdf

  12. Adiabatic demagnetization of the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg hexagonal cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Moumita; Ghosh, Asim Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Exact analytic expressions of eigenvalues of the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg hexagon in the presence of uniform magnetic field have been obtained. Magnetization process, nature of isentrops and properties of magneto caloric effect in terms of adiabatic demagnetization have been investigated. Theoretical results have been used to study the magneto caloric effect of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg hexagonal compound Cu_3WO_6.

  13. Antiferromagnetic Ising model decorated with D-vector spins: Transversal and longitudinal local fields effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Dos Santos, R.J.; Coutinho, S.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a local field acting on decorating classical D-vector bond spins of an antiferromagnetic Ising model on the square lattice is studied for both the annealed isotropic and the axial decorated cases. In both models the effect on the phase diagrams of the transversal and the longitudinal components of the local field acting on the decorating spins are fully analyzed and discussed

  14. Magnetic hysteresis and domain wall dynamics in single chain magnets with antiferromagnetic interchain coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukharov, A A; Ovchinnikov, A S; Baranov, N V [Department of Physics, Ural State University, Ekaterinburg, 620083 (Russian Federation); Inoue, K [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2010-11-03

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate magnetic hysteresis in two- and three-dimensional systems of weakly antiferromagnetically coupled spin chains based on a scenario of domain wall (kink) motion within the chains. By adapting the model of walkers to simulate the domain wall dynamics and using the Ising-like dipole-dipole model, we study the effects of interchain coupling, temperature and anisotropy axis direction on hysteresis curves.

  15. Control of antiferromagnetic spin axis orientation in bilayer Fe/CuMnAs films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wadley, P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Shahedkhah, M.R.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Železný, Jakub; Kuneš, Jan; Novák, Vít; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Saidl, Vít; Němec, P.; Maccherozzi, F.; Dhesi, S.S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Sep (2017), 1-6, č. článku 11147. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnetic spintronics * exchange coupling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  16. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kriegner, D.; Výborný, Karel; Olejník, Kamil; Reichlová, Helena; Novák, Vít; Martí, Xavier; Gazquez, J.; Saidl, V.; Němec, P.; Volobuev, V.V.; Springholz, G.; Holý, V.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jun (2016), 1-7, č. článku 11623. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13436S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnets * spintronics * anisotropic magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  17. Cluster-Bethe-Lattice study of a planar antiferromagnet: Rb2NiF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.A.C. de la; Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the Cluster-Bethe-Lattice method is presented for a planar antiferromagnet for which the hamiltonian parameters are known and the one-magnon density of states may be computed exactly. All the square clusters of 1 to 121 atoms are studied both connected to and isolated from the Bethe lattices. It is shown that, even for the largest cluster treated, the approximation is still far from the exact result. It is discussed the limitations of the method [pt

  18. High antiferromagnetic domain wall velocity induced by Néel spin-orbit torques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gomonay, O.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 1 (2016), 1-5, č. článku 017202. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * domain walls * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 8.462, year: 2016

  19. Antiferromagnetism of nuclear matter in the model with effective Gogny interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A.A.; Yang, J.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of ferromagnetic (FM) antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transitions in symmetric nuclear matter is analyzed within the framework of a Fermi-liquid theory with the effective Gogny interaction. It is shown that at some critical density nuclear matter undergoes a phase transition to the AFM spin state. The self-consistent equations of spin-polarized nuclear matter have no solutions corresponding to FM spin ordering and, hence, the FM transition does not appear. The AFM spin state properties are investigated [ru

  20. Pressure induced superconductivity in the antiferromagnetic Dirac material BaMnBi2

    OpenAIRE

    Huimin Chen; Lin Li; Qinqing Zhu; Jinhu Yang; Bin Chen; Qianhui Mao; Jianhua Du; Hangdong Wang; Minghu Fang

    2017-01-01

    The so-called Dirac materials such as graphene and topological insulators are a new class of matter different from conventional metals and (doped) semiconductors. Superconductivity induced by doing or applying pressure in these systems may be unconventional, or host mysterious Majorana fermions. Here, we report a successfully observation of pressure-induced superconductivity in an antiferromagnetic Dirac material BaMnBi2 with T c of ~4?K at 2.6?GPa. Both the higher upper critical field, ? 0 H...

  1. Photo-induced antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling in Fe superlattices with iron silicide spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, J.E.; Fullerton, E.E.; Kumar, S.; Lee, S.R.; Sowers, C.H.; Grimsditch, M.; Bader, S.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parker, F.T. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Center for Magnetic Recording Research

    1993-09-01

    Sputtered Fe/FeSi films possessing antiferromagnetic (AF) interlayer coupling at room temperature develop ferromagnetic remanence when cooled below 100K, but the AF coupling can be restored at low temperature by exposure to visible light of sufficient intensity (>10 mW/mm{sup 2}). We attribute these effects to charge carriers in the FeSi spacer layer which, when thermally or photo-generated, are capable of communicating spin information between the Fe layers.

  2. su(1,2) Algebraic Structure of XYZ Antiferromagnetic Model in Linear Spin-Wave Frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shuo; Xie Binghao; Yu Zhaoxian; Hou Jingmin

    2008-01-01

    The XYZ antiferromagnetic model in linear spin-wave frame is shown explicitly to have an su(1,2) algebraic structure: the Hamiltonian can be written as a linear function of the su(1,2) algebra generators. Based on it, the energy eigenvalues are obtained by making use of the similar transformations, and the algebraic diagonalization method is investigated. Some numerical solutions are given, and the results indicate that only one group solution could be accepted in physics

  3. Critical phase for the antiferromagnetic Z(5) model on a square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltar, V.L.; Carneiro, G.M.; Pol, M.E.; Zagury, N.

    1983-04-01

    The existence of a critical phase for the antiferromagnetic Z(5) model on a square lattice is suggested based on results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and of Migdal Kadanoff Renormalization Group calculations (MKRG). The MKRG simulates a line of fixed points which it is interpreted as the locus of attraction of a critical phase. The MC simulations are compatible with this interpretation. (Author) [pt

  4. Susceptibility and specific heat of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the Kagome lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, B.H.; Canals, B.; Lacroix, C.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamic susceptibility of the S=((1)/(2)) Heisenberg antiferromagnet is calculated on the Kagome lattice by means of a Green's function decoupling scheme. The spin-spin correlation functions decrease exponentially with distance. The specific heat exhibits a single-peak structure with a T 2 dependence at low temperature and the correct high-temperature behaviour. The calculated total change in entropy indicates a ground-state entropy of 0.46 ln 2

  5. A critical scattering study of the helical antiferromagnets Ho and Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaulin, B.D.; Hagen, M.; Child, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have measured the frequency integrated magnetic critical scattering of neutrons from paramagnetic Dy and Ho. Analysis of these data show the paramagnetic to helical antiferromagnetic phase transitions are characterized by the critical exponents ν = 0.57 +- 0.05 and γ = 1.05 = +- .07 for Dy and ν = 0.57 +- .04 and γ = 1.14 = +- .10 for Ho. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Wave function, spectrum and effective mass of holes in 2 D quantum antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhao-bin; Ll, Yan-min; Lai, Wu-yan; Yu, Lu

    1989-12-01

    A new quantum Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdeG) formalism is developed to study the self-consistent motion of holes on an quantum antiferromagnetic (QAFM) background within the generalized t- J model. The local distortion of spin configurations and the renormalization of the hole motion due to virtual excitations of the distorted spin background are treated on an equal footing. The hole wave function and its spectrum, as well as the effective mass for a propagating hole are calculated explicitly.

  7. Skyrmion dynamics in single-hole Neel ordered doped two-dimensional antiferromagnets with arbitrary spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, A.R.; Pereira, A.R.; Moura-Melo, W.A.; Pires, A.S.T.

    2008-01-01

    We develop an effective theory to study the skyrmion dynamics in the presence of a hole (removed spins from the lattice) in Neel ordered two-dimensional antiferromagnets with arbitrary spin value S. The general equation of motion for the 'mass center' of this structure is obtained. The frequency of small amplitude oscillations of pinned skyrmions around the defect center is calculated. It is proportional to the hole size and inversely proportional to the square of the skyrmion size

  8. Phase transition induced for external field in tree-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Minos A.; Viana, J. Roberto; Salmon, Octavio D. R.; Filho, E. Bublitz; de Sousa, J. Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report mean-field and effective-field renormalization group calculations on the isotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model under a longitudinal magnetic field. As is already known, these methods, denoted by MFRG and EFRG, are based on the comparison of two clusters of different sizes, each of them trying to mimic certain Bravais lattice. Our attention has been on the obtantion of the critical frontier in the plane of temperature versus magnetic field, for the simple cubic ...

  9. Energy of the amplitude mode in the bicubic antiferromagnet: Series expansion results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oitmaa, J.

    2018-05-01

    Series expansion methods are used to study the quantum critical behavior of the bicubic spin-1/2 antiferromagnet. Excitation energies are computed throughout the Brillouin zone, for both the Néel and dimer phases. We compute the energy of the amplitude/Higgs mode and show that it becomes degenerate with the magnon modes at the quantum critical point, as expected on general symmetry grounds.

  10. Entropy-driven phase transition in low-temperature antiferromagnetic Potts models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotecký, R.; Sokal, A.D.; Swart, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 3 (2014), s. 1339-1394 ISSN 0010-3616 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/1931; GA ČR GAP201/12/2613 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Antiferromagnetic Potts model * proper coloring * plane quadrangulation * phase transition * diced lattice Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.086, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/SI/swart-0429507.pdf

  11. Antiferromagnetic CuMnAs multi-level memory cell with microelectronic compatibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejník, Kamil; Schuler, V.; Martí, Xavier; Novák, Vít; Kašpar, Zdeněk; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Garces, J.; Baumgartner, M.; Gambardella, P.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, May (2017), 1-7, č. článku 15434. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  12. Optical determination of the Neel vector in a CuMnAs thin-film antiferromagnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saidl, Vít; Němec, P.; Wadley, P.; Hills, V.; Campion, R. P.; Novák, Vít; Edmonds, K. W.; Maccherozzi, F.; Dhesi, S.S.; Gallagher, B. L.; Trojánek, F.; Kuneš, Jan; Železný, Jakub; Malý, P.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2017), s. 91-96 ISSN 1749-4885 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magneto-optics * spintronics * antiferromagnets Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 37.852, year: 2016

  13. Low-temperature spin transport in a S = 1 one-dimensional antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, A S T; Lima, L S

    2009-01-01

    We study spin transport in the insulating antiferromagnet with S = 1 in one dimension. The spin conductivity is calculated, at zero temperature, using a modified spin wave theory and the Kubo formalism, within the ladder approximation. Two-magnon processes provide the dominant contribution to the spin conductivity. At finite temperature, free magnons are activated, and turn the system into a perfect spin conductor, i.e., the spin conductivity has a Drude form with infinite scattering time.

  14. Electrical measurement of antiferromagnetic moments in exchange-coupled IrMn/NiFe stacks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martí, X.; Park, B.G.; Wunderlich, Joerg; Reichlová, Helena; Kurosaki, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nishide, A.; Hayakawa, J.; Takahashi, H.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2012), , , "017201-1"-"017201-4" ISSN 0031-9007 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : tunneling magnetoresistance * antiferromagnetic spintronics * exchange bias Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.943, year: 2012

  15. Enhanced exchange bias fields for CoO/Co bilayers: influence of antiferromagnetic grains and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Chang, Shin-Chen [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Tsay, Jyh-Shen, E-mail: jstsay@phy.ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yao, Yeong-Der [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • An antiferromagnetic grain model on exchange bias phenomena is proposed. • Grain size and grain density are considered. • For smaller grain size, the dependence of t{sub CoO} on T{sub B} showed a less pronounced variation. • An increased grain density is responsible for the enhancement in the exchange bias fields. - Abstract: The emergence and optimization of devices that can be applied to spintronics have attracted considerable interest, and both experimental and theoretical approaches have been used in studies of exchange bias phenomena. A survey of the literature indicates that great efforts have been devoted to improving exchange bias fields, while only limited attempts have been made to control the temperature dependence of exchange bias. In this study, the influence of antiferromagnetic grains on exchange bias phenomena in CoO/Co bilayers on a semiconductor surface was investigated. Based on an antiferromagnetic grain model, a correlation between grain size, grain density, blocking temperature, and the exchange bias field was established. For crystallites with a smaller median diameter, the dependence of the thickness of the CoO layer on blocking temperature showed a less pronounced variation. This is due to the larger thermal agitation of the atomic spin moments in the grain, which causes a weaker exchange coupling between atomic spin moments. The enhanced density of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic pinning sites resulting from an increased grain density is responsible for the enhancement in the exchange bias fields. The results reported herein provide insights into our knowledge related to controlling the temperature dependence of exchange bias and related mechanisms.

  16. Relativistic Néel-order fields induced by electrical current in antiferromagnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Železný, Jakub; Gao, H.; Výborný, Karel; Zemen, Jan; Mašek, Jan; Manchon, A.; Wunderlich, Joerg; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 15 (2014), , "157201-1"-"157201-5" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * antiferromagnets * current induced switching Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.512, year: 2014

  17. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  18. Antimicrobial electrospun silver-, copper- and zinc-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirós, Jennifer; Borges, João P.; Boltes, Karina; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Rosal, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc. • Antimicrobial effect for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. • Silver strongly reduced colony forming units and bacterial viability. • Silver, copper, and zinc led to a significant increase of non-viable cells on mats. - Abstract: The use of electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc nanoparticles was studied to prepare antimicrobial mats using silver and copper nitrates and zinc acetate as precursors. Silver became reduced during electrospinning and formed nanoparticles of several tens of nanometers. Silver nanoparticles and the insoluble forms of copper and zinc were dispersed using low molecular weight PVP as capping agent. High molecular weight PVP formed uniform fibers with a narrow distribution of diameters around 500 nm. The fibers were converted into an insoluble network using ultraviolet irradiation crosslinking. The efficiency of metal-loaded mats against the bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was tested for different metal loadings by measuring the inhibition of colony forming units and the staining with fluorescent probes for metabolic viability and compromised membranes. The assays included the culture in contact with mats and the direct staining of surface attached microorganisms. The results indicated a strong inhibition for silver-loaded fibers and the absence of significant amounts of viable but non-culturable microorganisms. Copper and zinc-loaded mats also decreased the metabolic activity and cell viability, although in a lesser extent. Metal-loaded fibers allowed the slow release of the soluble forms of the three metals.

  19. Antimicrobial electrospun silver-, copper- and zinc-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirós, Jennifer [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Borges, João P. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Boltes, Karina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Rodea-Palomares, Ismael [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rosal, Roberto [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc. • Antimicrobial effect for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. • Silver strongly reduced colony forming units and bacterial viability. • Silver, copper, and zinc led to a significant increase of non-viable cells on mats. - Abstract: The use of electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc nanoparticles was studied to prepare antimicrobial mats using silver and copper nitrates and zinc acetate as precursors. Silver became reduced during electrospinning and formed nanoparticles of several tens of nanometers. Silver nanoparticles and the insoluble forms of copper and zinc were dispersed using low molecular weight PVP as capping agent. High molecular weight PVP formed uniform fibers with a narrow distribution of diameters around 500 nm. The fibers were converted into an insoluble network using ultraviolet irradiation crosslinking. The efficiency of metal-loaded mats against the bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was tested for different metal loadings by measuring the inhibition of colony forming units and the staining with fluorescent probes for metabolic viability and compromised membranes. The assays included the culture in contact with mats and the direct staining of surface attached microorganisms. The results indicated a strong inhibition for silver-loaded fibers and the absence of significant amounts of viable but non-culturable microorganisms. Copper and zinc-loaded mats also decreased the metabolic activity and cell viability, although in a lesser extent. Metal-loaded fibers allowed the slow release of the soluble forms of the three metals.

  20. Canted antiferromagnetic and optical properties of nanostructures of Mn2O3 prepared by hydrothermal synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, Qurat-ul-ain; Feng-Ping Wang; Rafique, M. Yasir; Toufiq, Arbab Mohammad; Iqbal, M. Zubair

    2012-01-01

    We have reported new magnetic and optical properties of Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures. The nanostructures have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method combined with the adjustment of pH values in the reaction system. The particular characteristics of the nanostructures have been analyzed by employing X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS), UV—visible spectroscopy, and the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Structural investigation manifests that the synthesized Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures are orthorhombic crystal. Magnetic investigation indicates that the Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures are antiferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic transition temperature is at T N = 83 K. Furthermore, the Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures possess canted antiferromagnetic order below the Neel temperature due to spin frustration, resulting in hysteresis with large coercivity (1580 Oe) and remnant magnetization (1.52 emu/g). The UV—visible spectrophotometry was used to determine the transmittance behaviour of Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures. A direct optical band gap of 1.2 eV was acquired by using the Davis—Mott model. The UV—visible spectrum indicates that the absorption is prominent in the visible region, and transparency is more than 80% in the UV region

  1. Nonlocally sensing the magnetic states of nanoscale antiferromagnets with an atomic spin sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Malavolti, Luigi; Burgess, Jacob A J; Droghetti, Andrea; Rubio, Angel; Loth, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The ability to sense the magnetic state of individual magnetic nano-objects is a key capability for powerful applications ranging from readout of ultradense magnetic memory to the measurement of spins in complex structures with nanometer precision. Magnetic nano-objects require extremely sensitive sensors and detection methods. We create an atomic spin sensor consisting of three Fe atoms and show that it can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets through minute, surface-mediated magnetic interaction. Coupling, even to an object with no net spin and having vanishing dipolar stray field, modifies the transition matrix element between two spin states of the Fe atom-based spin sensor that changes the sensor's spin relaxation time. The sensor can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets at up to a 3-nm distance and achieves an energy resolution of 10 μeV, surpassing the thermal limit of conventional scanning probe spectroscopy. This scheme permits simultaneous sensing of multiple antiferromagnets with a single-spin sensor integrated onto the surface.

  2. Antiferromagnetism and its origin in iron-based superconductors (Review Article)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Ming-Cui; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In iron-based superconductors, unravelling the origin of the antiferromagnetism is a crucial step towards understanding the high-T c superconductivity as it is widely believed that the magnetic fluctuations play important roles in the formation of the Cooper pairs. Therefore, in this paper, we will briefly review experimental results related to the antiferromagnetic state in iron-based superconductors and focus on a review of the theoretical investigations which show applicability of the itinerant scenario to the observed antiferromagnetism and corresponding phase transitions in various families of the iron-based superconductors. A proposal of coupling between frustrated and un frustrated bands for understanding the reduced magnetic moment typically observed in iron pnictides is also reviewed. While all the above theoretical investigations do not rule out a possible existence of localized electrons in iron-based superconductors, these results strongly indicate a close relation between itinerant electrons and the magnetically ordered state and point out the importance of taking into account the orbital degrees of freedom.

  3. Large exchange bias induced by polycrystalline Mn3Ga antiferromagnetic films with controlled layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haokaifeng; Sudoh, Iori; Xu, Ruihan; Si, Wenshuo; Vaz, C. A. F.; Kim, Jun-young; Vallejo-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline Mn3Ga layers with thickness in the range from 6–20 nm were deposited at room temperature by a high target utilisation sputtering. To investigate the onset of exchange-bias, a ferromagnetic Co0.6Fe0.4 layer (3.3–9 nm thick) capped with 5 nm Ta, were subsequently deposited. X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the presence of Mn3Ga (0 0 0 2) and (0 0 0 4) peaks characteristic of the D019 antiferromagnetic structure. The 6 nm thick Mn3Ga film shows the largest exchange bias of 430 Oe at 120 K with a blocking temperature of 225 K. The blocking temperature is found to decrease with increasing Mn3Ga thickness. These results in combination with x-ray reflectivity measurements confirm that the quality of the Mn3Ga/Co0.6Fe0.4 interface controls the exchange bias, with the sharp interface with the 6-nm-thick Mn3Ga inducing the largest exchange bias. The magneto-crystalline anisotropy for 6 nm thick Mn3Ga thin film sample is calculated to be . Such a binary antiferromagnetic Heusler alloy is compatible with the current memory fabrication process and hence has a great potential for antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  4. Magnon-induced superconductivity in a topological insulator coupled to ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugdal, Henning G.; Rex, Stefan; Nogueira, Flavio S.; Sudbø, Asle

    2018-05-01

    We study the effective interactions between Dirac fermions on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator due to the proximity coupling to the magnetic fluctuations in a ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic insulator. Our results show that the magnetic fluctuations can mediate attractive interactions between Dirac fermions of both Amperean and BCS types. In the ferromagnetic case, we find pairing between fermions with parallel momenta, so-called Amperean pairing, whenever the effective Lagrangian for the magnetic fluctuations does not contain a quadratic term. The pairing interaction also increases with increasing Fermi momentum and is in agreement with previous studies in the limit of high chemical potential. If a quadratic term is present, the pairing is instead of BCS type above a certain chemical potential. In the antiferromagnetic case, BCS pairing occurs when the ferromagnetic coupling between magnons on the same sublattice exceeds the antiferromagnetic coupling between magnons on different sublattices. Outside this region in parameter space, we again find that Amperean pairing is realized.

  5. Circular dichroism and Raman optical activity in antiferromagnetic transition metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, K.R.; Lockwood, D.J.; Yen, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Raman optical activity (ROA) of magnons in rutile-structure antiferromagnetic FeF 2 (T N = 78 K) has been studied as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. For exciting light incident along the c axis, ROA is observed for magnons but not for phonons. In zero field, a small splitting (0.09 cm -1 ) of the two acoustic-magnon branches is observed for the first time by inelastic light scattering. The splitting in applied magnetic field is found to reduce with increasing temperature in accordance with theory. No ROA was detected for two-magnon excitations. In optical absorption measurements performed over thirty years ago, a very small circular dichroism (CD) was observed in the magnon sidebands of other simple rutile antiferromagnetic fluorides (MnF 2 and CoF 2 ). The origin of this CD was not understood at the time. The Raman studies of the one-magnon Raman scattering in FeF 2 have demonstrated that in zero field the degeneracy of the antiferromagnetic magnon branches is lifted by a weak magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, as predicted by Pincus and Loudon and by White four decades ago. The source of the observed CD in the magnon sidebands can now be traced to this same magnetic-dipole induced splitting

  6. Frustrated antiferromagnets at high fields: Bose-Einstein condensation in degenerate spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackeli, G.; Zhitomirsky, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum phase transition at the saturation field is studied for a class of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets. The considered models include (i) the J 1 -J 2 frustrated square-lattice antiferromagnet with J 2 =(1/2)J 1 and (ii) the nearest-neighbor Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a face centered cubic lattice. In the fully saturated phase the magnon spectra for the two models have lines of degenerate minima. Transition into a partially magnetized state is treated via a mapping to a dilute gas of hard-core bosons and by complementary spin-wave calculations. Momentum dependence of the exact four-point boson vertex removes the degeneracy of the single-particle excitation spectra and selects the ordering wave vectors at (π,π) and (π,0,0) for the two models. We predict a unique form for the magnetization curve ΔM=S-M≅μ (d-1)/2 (logμ) (d-1) , where μ is a distance from the quantum critical point

  7. Nonlocally sensing the magnetic states of nanoscale antiferromagnets with an atomic spin sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Malavolti, Luigi; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Droghetti, Andrea; Rubio, Angel; Loth, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The ability to sense the magnetic state of individual magnetic nano-objects is a key capability for powerful applications ranging from readout of ultradense magnetic memory to the measurement of spins in complex structures with nanometer precision. Magnetic nano-objects require extremely sensitive sensors and detection methods. We create an atomic spin sensor consisting of three Fe atoms and show that it can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets through minute, surface-mediated magnetic interaction. Coupling, even to an object with no net spin and having vanishing dipolar stray field, modifies the transition matrix element between two spin states of the Fe atom–based spin sensor that changes the sensor’s spin relaxation time. The sensor can detect nanoscale antiferromagnets at up to a 3-nm distance and achieves an energy resolution of 10 μeV, surpassing the thermal limit of conventional scanning probe spectroscopy. This scheme permits simultaneous sensing of multiple antiferromagnets with a single-spin sensor integrated onto the surface. PMID:28560346

  8. Advanced Copper Composites Against Copper-Tolerant Xanthomonas perforans and Tomato Bacterial Spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer-Scherer, A; Liao, Y Y; Young, M; Ritchie, L; Vallad, G E; Santra, S; Freeman, J H; Clark, D; Jones, J B; Paret, M L

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a widespread and damaging bacterial disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). For disease management, growers rely on copper bactericides, which are often ineffective due to the presence of copper-tolerant Xanthomonas strains. This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of the new copper composites core-shell copper (CS-Cu), multivalent copper (MV-Cu), and fixed quaternary ammonium copper (FQ-Cu) as potential alternatives to commercially available micron-sized copper bactericides for controlling copper-tolerant Xanthomonas perforans. In vitro, metallic copper from CS-Cu and FQ-Cu at 100 μg/ml killed the copper-tolerant X. perforans strain within 1 h of exposure. In contrast, none of the micron-sized copper rates (100 to 1,000 μg/ml) from Kocide 3000 significantly reduced copper-tolerant X. perforans populations after 48 h of exposure compared with the water control (P copper-based treatments killed the copper-sensitive X. perforans strain within 1 h. Greenhouse studies demonstrated that all copper composites significantly reduced bacterial spot disease severity when compared with copper-mancozeb and water controls (P copper composites significantly reduced disease severity when compared with water controls, using 80% less metallic copper in comparison with copper-mancozeb in field studies (P copper composites have the potential to manage copper-tolerant X. perforans and tomato bacterial spot.

  9. Template Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of a Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex with Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shin Geol; Nam, Kwang Hee; Min, Kil Sik; Lee, Uk

    2011-01-01

    The dinuclear complex with cooperative hydrogen bonds can be prepared by the metal-directed reaction of Eq. This work shows that the coordinated hydroxyl group trans to the secondary amino group is deprotonated more readily than that trans to the tertiary amino group and acts as the hydrogen-bond accepter. The lattice water molecules in act as bridges between the two mononuclear units through hydrogen bonds. The complex is quite stable as the dimeric form even in various polar solvents. The complex exhibits a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the metal ions in spite of relatively long Cu···Cu distance. This strongly supports the suggestion that the antiferromagnetic behavior is closely related to the cooperative hydrogen bonds. The design and synthesis of polynuclear transition metal complexes have received much attention because of their potential applications in various fields, such as catalysis, supramolecular chemistry, and materials chemistry. Until now, various types of dinuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and investigated. Some dinuclear copper(II) complexes resulting from cooperative hydrogen bonding, such as containing two N_2O_2 donor sets, are also reported

  10. Ag2CuMnO4: A new silver copper oxide with delafossite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Rojas, David; Subias, Gloria; Oro-Sole, Judith; Fraxedas, Jordi; Martinez, Benjamin; Casas-Cabanas, Montse; Canales-Vazquez, Jesus; Gonzalez-Calbet, Jose; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ester; Walton, Richard I.; Casan-Pastor, Nieves

    2006-01-01

    The use of hydrothermal methods has allowed the synthesis of a new silver copper mixed oxide, Ag 2 CuMnO 4 , the first example of a quaternary oxide containing both elements. It crystallizes with the delafossite 3R structure, thus being the first delafossite to contain both Ag and Cu. Synthesis conditions affect the final particle size (30-500nm). Powder X-ray diffraction Rietveld refinement indicates a trigonal structure (R3-bar m) and cell parameters a=2.99991A and c=18.428A, where Cu and Mn are disordered within the octahedral B positions in the plane and linearly coordinated Ag occupies de A position between layers. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) for copper and manganese, and XPS for silver evidence +2, +4, and +1 oxidation states. The microstructure consists of layered particles that may form large twins showing 5nm nanodomains. Finally, magnetic measurements reveal the existence of ferromagnetic coupling yielding in-plane moments that align antiferromagnetically at lower temperatures. The singularity of the new phase resides on the fact that is an example of a bidimensional arrangement of silver and copper in an oxide that also shows clear bidimensionality in its physical properties. That is of special relevance to the field of high T c superconducting oxides, while the ferromagnetic coupling in a bidimensional system deserves itself special attention

  11. Copper Powder and Chemicals: edited proceedings of a seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Various papers are presented covering the following topics: Status of Copper Chemical Industry in India, Copper Powder from Industrial Wastes, Manufacture of Copper Hydroxide and High Grade Cement Copper from Low Grade Copper Ore, Manufacture of Copper Sulphate as a By-Product, Hydrometallurgical Treatments of Copper Converter and Smelter Slage for Recovering Copper and other Non-Ferrous Metals, Recovery of Copper from Dilute Solutions, Use of Copper Compounds as Fungicides in India, Copper in Animal Husbandry, and Use of Copper Powder and Chemicals for Marine Applications. The keynote paper given at the Seminar was on Conservation of Copper for Better Use.

  12. Mottness in high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Philip; Choy, T.-P.; Leigh, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    The standard theory of metals, Fermi liquid theory, hinges on the key assumption that although the electrons interact, the low-energy excitation spectrum stands in a one-to-one correspondence with that of a non-interacting system. In the normal state of the copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors, drastic deviations from the Fermi liquid picture are obtained, highlighted by a pseudogap, broad spectral features and T-linear resistivity. A successful theory in this context must confront the highly constraining scaling argument which establishes that all 4-Fermi interactions are irrelevant (except for pairing) at a Fermi surface. This argument lays plain that new low-energy degrees of freedom are necessary. This paper focuses on the series of experiments on copper-oxide superconductors which reveal that the number of low-energy addition states per electron per spin exceeds unity, in direct violation of the key Fermi liquid tenet. These experiments point to new degrees of freedom, not made out of the elemental excitations, as the key mechanism by which Fermi liquid theory breaks down in the cuprates. A recent theoretical advance which permits an explicit integration of the high-energy scale in the standard model for the cuprates reveals the source of the new dynamical degrees of freedom at low energies, a charge 2e bosonic field which has nothing to do with pairing but rather represents the mixing with the high-energy scales. We demonstrate explicitly that at half-filling, this new degree of freedom provides a dynamical mechanism for the generation of the charge gap and antiferromagnetism in the insulating phase. At finite doping, many of the anomalies of the normal state of the cuprates including the pseudogap, T-linear resistivity and the mid-infrared band are reproduced. A possible route to superconductivity is explored

  13. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper. It...

  14. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.M.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (<1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  15. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G.J. van den; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendruiks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (< 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  16. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  17. Copper complexes as 'radiation recovery' agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Copper and its compounds have been used for their remedial effects since the beginning of recorded history. As early as 3000 BC the Egyptians used copper as an antiseptic for healing wounds and to sterilise drinking water; and later, ca 1550 BC, the Ebers Papyrus reports the use of copper acetate, copper sulphate and pulverised metallic copper for the treatment of eye infections. These historical uses of copper and its compounds are particularly interesting in the light of modern evidence concerning the use of certain copper complexes for the treatment of radiation sickness and more recently as an adjunct to radiotherapy for cancer patients. (author)

  18. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-09-01

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 OE ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 OE rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 OE rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  19. Structural phase transitions and superconductivity in lanthanum copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, M.K.; Harlow, R.L.; McCarron, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the enormous effort expended over the past ten years to determine the mechanism underlying high temperature superconductivity in cuprates there is still no consensus on the physical origin of this fascinating phenomenon. This is a consequence of a number of factors, among which are the intrinsic difficulties in understanding the strong electron correlations in the copper oxides, determining the roles played by antiferromagnetic interactions and low dimensionality, analyzing the complex phonon dispersion relationships, and characterizing the phase diagrams which are functions of the physical parameters of temperature and pressure, as well as the chemical parameters of stoichiometry and hole concentration. In addition to all of these intrinsic difficulties, extrinsic materials issues such as sample quality and homogeneity present additional complications. Within the field of high temperature superconductivity there exists a subfield centered around the material originally reported to exhibit high temperature superconductivity by Bednorz and Mueller, Ba doped La 2 CuO 4 . This is structurally the simplest cuprate superconductor. The authors report on studies of phase differences observed between such base superconductors doped with Ba or Sr. What these studies have revealed is a fascinating interplay of structural, magnetic and superconducting properties which is unique in the field of high temperature superconductivity and is summarized in this paper

  20. Eco-Friendly Inhibitors for Copper Corrosion in Nitric Acid: Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savita; Mourya, Punita; Chaubey, Namrata; Singh, V. K.; Singh, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The inhibitive performance of Vitex negundo, Adhatoda vasica, and Saraka asoka leaf extracts on corrosion of copper in 3M HNO3 solution was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that these extracts act as efficient and predominantly cathodic mixed inhibitor. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that the adsorption of these inhibitors on copper surface was spontaneous, controlled by physiochemical processes and occurred according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. AFM examination of copper surface confirmed that the inhibitor prevented corrosion by forming protective layer on its surface. The correlation between inhibitive effect and molecular structure was ascertained by density functional theory data.