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Sample records for modulating gene function

  1. Identifying disease feature genes based on cellular localized gene functional modules and regulation networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing; GUO Zheng; LI Xia; YANG Da; WANG Lei; RAO Shaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Identifying disease-relevant genes and functional modules, based on gene expression profiles and gene functional knowledge, is of high importance for studying disease mechanisms and subtyping disease phenotypes. Using gene categories of biological process and cellular component in Gene Ontology, we propose an approach to selecting functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes, and identifying the feature functional modules of high disease discriminating abilities. Using the differentially expressed genes in each feature module as the feature genes, we reveal the relevance of the modules to the studied diseases. Using three datasets for prostate cancer, gastric cancer, and leukemia, we have demonstrated that the proposed modular approach is of high power in identifying functionally integrated feature gene subsets that are highly relevant to the disease mechanisms. Our analysis has also shown that the critical disease-relevant genes might be better recognized from the gene regulation network, which is constructed using the characterized functional modules, giving important clues to the concerted mechanisms of the modules responding to complex disease states. In addition, the proposed approach to selecting the disease-relevant genes by jointly considering the gene functional knowledge suggests a new way for precisely classifying disease samples with clear biological interpretations, which is critical for the clinical diagnosis and the elucidation of the pathogenic basis of complex diseases.

  2. Modulating gene function with peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2008-01-01

    A review on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers as modulators of gene expression ranging from gene silencing at the mRNAor the dsDNA (antigene) level, and redirection of mRNA splicing to gene activation through transcription bubble mimicking. PNA chem., anti-infective agents, cellular delivery, ...

  3. A Network Partition Algorithm for Mining Gene Functional Modules of Colon Cancer from DNA Microarray Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Gang Ruan; Jin-Lian Wang; Jian-Geng Li

    2006-01-01

    Computational analysis is essential for transforming the masses of microarray data into a mechanistic understanding of cancer. Here we present a method for finding gene functional modules of cancer from microarray data and have applied it to colon cancer. First, a colon cancer gene network and a normal colon tissue gene network were constructed using correlations between the genes. Then the modules that tended to have a homogeneous functional composition were identified by splitting up the network. Analysis of both networks revealed that they are scale-free.Comparison of the gene functional modules for colon cancer and normal tissues showed that the modules' functions changed with their structures.

  4. The microRNA (miRNA): overview of the RNA genes that modulate gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Shao-Yao; Chang, Donald C; Lin, Shi-Lung

    2008-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), widely distributed, small regulatory RNA genes, target both messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation and suppression of protein translation based on sequence complementarity between the miRNA and its targeted mRNA. Different names have been used to describe various types of miRNA. During evolution, RNA retroviruses or transgenes invaded the eukaryotic genome and inserted in the non-coding regions of DNA, conceivably acting as transposon-like jumping genes, providing defense from viral invasion and fine-tuning of gene expression as a secondary level of gene modulation in eukaryotes. When a transposon is inserted in the intron, it becomes an intronic miRNA, taking advantage of the protein synthesis machinery, i.e., mRNA transcription and splicing, as a means for processing and maturation. Recently, miRNAs have been found to play an important, but not life-threatening, role in embryonic development. They might play a pivotal role in diverse biological systems in various organisms, facilitating a quick response and accurate plotting of body physiology and structures. Based on these unique properties, man-made intronic miRNAs have been developed for in vitro evaluation of gene function, in vivo gene therapy and generation of transgenic animal models. The biogenesis and identification of miRNAs, potential applications, and future directions for research are presented, hopefully providing a guideline for further miRNA and gene function studies.

  5. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  6. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in proteomic and transcriptomic technologies resulted in the accumulation of vast amount of high-throughput data that span multiple biological processes and characteristics in different organisms. Much of the data come in the form of interaction networks and mRNA expression arrays. An important task in systems biology is functional modules discovery where the goal is to uncover well-connected sub-networks (modules). These discovered modules help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the observed biological processes. While most of the existing module discovery methods use only the interaction data, in this work we propose, CLARM, which discovers biological modules by incorporating gene profiles data with protein-protein interaction networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional module discovery methods.

  7. GO-2D: identifying 2-dimensional cellular-localized functional modules in Gene Ontology

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    Yang Da

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid progress in high-throughput biotechnologies (e.g. microarrays and exponential accumulation of gene functional knowledge make it promising for systematic understanding of complex human diseases at functional modules level. Based on Gene Ontology, a large number of automatic tools have been developed for the functional analysis and biological interpretation of the high-throughput microarray data. Results Different from the existing tools such as Onto-Express and FatiGO, we develop a tool named GO-2D for identifying 2-dimensional functional modules based on combined GO categories. For example, it refines biological process categories by sorting their genes into different cellular component categories, and then extracts those combined categories enriched with the interesting genes (e.g., the differentially expressed genes for identifying the cellular-localized functional modules. Applications of GO-2D to the analyses of two human cancer datasets show that very specific disease-relevant processes can be identified by using cellular location information. Conclusion For studying complex human diseases, GO-2D can extract functionally compact and detailed modules such as the cellular-localized ones, characterizing disease-relevant modules in terms of both biological processes and cellular locations. The application results clearly demonstrate that 2-dimensional approach complementary to current 1-dimensional approach is powerful for finding modules highly relevant to diseases.

  8. Therapeutic modulation of endogenous gene function by agents with designed DNA-sequence specificities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, T.G.; Haisma, H.J.; Rots, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Designer molecules that can specifically target pre-determined DNA sequences provide a means to modulate endogenous gene function. Different classes of sequence-specific DNA-binding agents have been developed, including triplex-forming molecules, synthetic polyamides and designer zinc finger protein

  9. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

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    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  10. Posterior association networks and functional modules inferred from rich phenotypes of gene perturbations.

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    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Combinatorial gene perturbations provide rich information for a systematic exploration of genetic interactions. Despite successful applications to bacteria and yeast, the scalability of this approach remains a major challenge for higher organisms such as humans. Here, we report a novel experimental and computational framework to efficiently address this challenge by limiting the 'search space' for important genetic interactions. We propose to integrate rich phenotypes of multiple single gene perturbations to robustly predict functional modules, which can subsequently be subjected to further experimental investigations such as combinatorial gene silencing. We present posterior association networks (PANs to predict functional interactions between genes estimated using a Bayesian mixture modelling approach. The major advantage of this approach over conventional hypothesis tests is that prior knowledge can be incorporated to enhance predictive power. We demonstrate in a simulation study and on biological data, that integrating complementary information greatly improves prediction accuracy. To search for significant modules, we perform hierarchical clustering with multiscale bootstrap resampling. We demonstrate the power of the proposed methodologies in applications to Ewing's sarcoma and human adult stem cells using publicly available and custom generated data, respectively. In the former application, we identify a gene module including many confirmed and highly promising therapeutic targets. Genes in the module are also significantly overrepresented in signalling pathways that are known to be critical for proliferation of Ewing's sarcoma cells. In the latter application, we predict a functional network of chromatin factors controlling epidermal stem cell fate. Further examinations using ChIP-seq, ChIP-qPCR and RT-qPCR reveal that the basis of their genetic interactions may arise from transcriptional cross regulation. A Bioconductor package

  11. Predictive screening for regulators of conserved functional gene modules (gene batteries in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigvardsson Mikael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of gene batteries, genomic units of functionally linked genes which are activated by similar sets of cis- and trans-acting regulators, has been proposed as a major determinant of cell specialization in metazoans. We developed a predictive procedure to screen the mouse and human genomes and transcriptomes for cases of gene-battery-like regulation. Results In a screen that covered ~40 per cent of all annotated protein-coding genes, we identified 21 co-expressed gene clusters with statistically supported sharing of cis-regulatory sequence elements. 66 predicted cases of over-represented transcription factor binding motifs were validated against the literature and fell into three categories: (i previously described cases of gene battery-like regulation, (ii previously unreported cases of gene battery-like regulation with some support in a limited number of genes, and (iii predicted cases that currently lack experimental support. The novel predictions include for example Sox 17 and RFX transcription factor binding sites that were detected in ~10% of all testis specific genes, and HNF-1 and 4 binding sites that were detected in ~30% of all kidney specific genes respectively. The results are publicly available at http://www.wlab.gu.se/lindahl/genebatteries. Conclusion 21 co-expressed gene clusters were enriched for a total of 66 shared cis-regulatory sequence elements. A majority of these predictions represent novel cases of potential co-regulation of functionally coupled proteins. Critical technical parameters were evaluated, and the results and the methods provide a valuable resource for future experimental design.

  12. FOXO3 modulates endothelial gene expression and function by classical and alternative mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymai, Tobias; Viemann, Dorothee; Sticht, Carsten; Molema, Grietje; Goebeler, Matthias; Schmidt, Marc

    2010-04-02

    FOXO transcription factors represent targets of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B survival pathway controlling important biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, vascular remodeling, stress responses, and metabolism. Recent studies suggested the existence of alternative mechanisms of FOXO-dependent gene expression beyond classical binding to a FOXO-responsive DNA-binding element (FRE). Here we analyzed the relative contribution of those mechanisms to vascular function by comparing the transcriptional and cellular responses to conditional activation of FOXO3 and a corresponding FRE-binding mutant in human primary endothelial cells. We demonstrate that FOXO3 controls expression of vascular remodeling genes in an FRE-dependent manner. In contrast, FOXO3-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis occurs independently of FRE binding, albeit FRE-dependent gene expression augments the proapoptotic response. These findings are supported by bioinformatical analysis, which revealed a statistical overrepresentation of cell cycle regulators and apoptosis-related genes in the group of co-regulated genes. Molecular analysis of FOXO3-induced endothelial apoptosis excluded modulators of the extrinsic death receptor pathway and demonstrated important roles for the BCL-2 family members BIM and NOXA in this process. Although NOXA essentially contributed to FRE-dependent apoptosis, BIM was effectively induced in the absence of FRE-binding, and small interfering RNA-mediated BIM depletion could rescue apoptosis induced by both FOXO3 mutants. These data suggest BIM as a critical cell type-specific mediator of FOXO3-induced endothelial apoptosis, whereas NOXA functions as an amplifying factor. Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis of alternatively regulated FOXO3 targets in relevant primary cells and underscores the importance of such genes for endothelial function and integrity.

  13. Application of random matrix theory to microarray data for discovering functional gene modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Zhong, Jianxin; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-03-01

    We show that spectral fluctuation of coexpression correlation matrices of yeast gene microarray profiles follows the description of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of the random matrix theory (RMT) and removal of small values of the correlation coefficients results in a transition from the GOE statistics to the Poisson statistics of the RMT. This transition is directly related to the structural change of the gene expression network from a global network to a network of isolated modules.

  14. Application of random matrix theory to microarray data for discovering functional gene modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, F. [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Zhong, Jianxin [ORNL; Yang, Y. F. [unknown; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL

    2006-03-01

    We show that spectral fluctuation of coexpression correlation matrices of yeast gene microarray profiles follows the description of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of the random matrix theory (RMT) and removal of small values of the correlation coefficients results in a transition from the GOE statistics to the Poisson statistics of the RMT. This transition is directly related to the structural change of the gene expression network from a global network to a network of isolated modules.

  15. DTNBP1 (dysbindin) gene variants modulate prefrontal brain function in schizophrenic patients--support for the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenias.

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    Fallgatter, A J; Ehlis, A-C; Herrmann, M J; Hohoff, C; Reif, A; Freitag, C M; Deckert, J

    2010-07-01

    Dysbindin (DTNBP1) is a recently characterized protein that seems to be involved in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the human brain, thereby influencing prefrontal cortex function and associated cognitive processes. While association, neuroanatomical and cellular studies indicate that DTNBP1 might be one of several susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, the effect of dysbindin on prefrontal brain function at an underlying neurophysiological level has not yet been explored for these patients. The NoGo-anteriorization (NGA) is a topographical event-related potential measure, which has been established as a valid neurophysiological marker of prefrontal brain function. In the present study, we investigated the influence of seven dysbindin gene variants on the NGA in a group of 44 schizophrenic patients. In line with our a priori hypothesis, one DTNBP1 polymorphism previously linked to schizophrenia (rs2619528) was found to be associated with changes in the NGA; however, the direction of this association directly contrasts with our previous findings in a healthy control sample. This differential impact of DTNBP1 gene variation on prefrontal functioning in schizophrenic patients vs. healthy controls is discussed in terms of abnormal glutamatergic baseline levels in patients suffering from schizophrenic illnesses. This is the first report on a role of DTNBP1 gene variation for prefrontal functioning at a basic neurophysiological level in schizophrenic patients. An impact on fundamental processes of cognitive response control may be one mechanism by which DTNBP1 gene variants via glutamatergic transmission contribute to the pathophysiology underlying schizophrenic illnesses.

  16. Oil components modulate physical characteristics and function of the natural oil emulsions as drug or gene delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H; Kim, T W; Kwon, M; Kwon, I C; Jeong, S Y

    2001-04-28

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type lipid emulsions were formulated by using 18 different natural oils and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) to investigate how emulsion particle size and stability change with different oils. Cottonseed, linseed and evening primrose oils formed emulsions with very large and unstable particles. Squalene, light mineral oil and jojoba bean oil formed stable emulsions with small particles. The remaining natural oils formed moderately stable emulsions. Emulsions with smaller initial particle size were more stable than those with larger particles. The correlation between emulsion size made with different oils and two physical properties of the oils was also investigated. The o/w interfacial tension and particle size of the emulsion were inversely proportional. The effect of viscosity was less pronounced. To study how the oil component in the emulsion modulates the in vitro release characteristics of lipophilic drugs, three different emulsions loaded with two different drugs were prepared. Squalene, soybean oil and linseed oil emulsions represented the most, medium and the least stable systems, respectively. For the lipophilic drugs, release was the slowest from the most stable squalene emulsion, followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Cationic emulsions were also prepared with the above three different oils as gene carriers. In vitro transfection activity was the highest for the most stable squalene emulsion followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Even though the in vitro transfection activity of emulsions were lower than the liposome in the absence of serum, the activity of squalene emulsion, for instance, was ca. 30 times higher than that of liposome in the presence of 80% (v/v) serum. In conclusion, the choice of oil component in o/w emulsion is important in formulating emulsion-based drug or gene delivery systems.

  17. Interleukin-10-induced gene expression and suppressive function are selectively modulated by the PI3K-Akt-GSK3 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniv, Taras T; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an immunosuppressive cytokine that inhibits inflammatory gene expression. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) -mediated signalling regulates inflammatory responses and can induce IL-10 production, but a role for PI3K signalling in cellular responses to IL-10 is not known. In this study we investigated the involvement of the PI3K-Akt-GSK3 signalling pathway in IL-10-induced gene expression and IL-10-mediated suppression of Toll-like receptor-induced gene expression in primary human macrophages. A combination of loss and gain of function approaches using kinase inhibitors, expression of constitutively active Akt, and RNA interference in primary human macrophages showed that expression of a subset of IL-10-inducible genes was dependent on PI3K-Akt signalling. The effects of PI3K-Akt signalling on IL-10 responses were mediated at least in part by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). In accordance with a functional role for PI3K pathways in contributing to the suppressive actions of IL-10, PI3K signalling augmented IL-10-mediated inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1, IL-8 and cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression. The PI3K signalling selectively modulated IL-10 responses, as it was not required for inhibition of tumour necrosis factor expression or for induction of certain IL-10-inducible genes such as SOCS3. These findings identify a new mechanism by which PI3K-mediated signalling can suppress inflammation by regulating IL-10-mediated gene induction and anti-inflammatory function. PMID:21255011

  18. Integrative analysis of gene expression patterns predicts specific modulations of defined cell functions by estrogen and tamoxifen in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadal, F; Starzec, A; Bozic, C; Pillot-Brochet, C; Malinge, S; Ozanne, V; Vicenzi, J; Buffat, L; Perret, G; Iris, F; Crepin, M

    2005-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms whereby estrogen and antiestrogen (tamoxifen (TAM)) can regulate breast cancer cell growth, we investigated gene expression changes in MCF7 cells treated with 17beta-estradiol (E2) and/or with 4-OH-TAM. The patterns of differential expression were determined by the ValiGen Gene IDentification (VGID) process, a subtractive hybridization approach combined with microarray validation screening. Their possible biologic consequences were evaluated by integrative data analysis. Over 1000 cDNA inserts were isolated and subsequently cloned, sequenced and analyzed against nucleotide and protein databases (NT/NR/EST) with BLAST software. We revealed that E2 induced differential expression of 279 known and 28 unknown sequences, whereas TAM affected the expression of 286 known and 14 unknown sequences. Integrative data analysis singled out a set of 32 differentially expressed genes apparently involved in broad cellular mechanisms. The presence of E2 modulated the expression patterns of 23 genes involved in anchors and junction remodeling; extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation; cell cycle progression, including G1/S check point and S-phase regulation; and synthesis of genotoxic metabolites. In tumor cells, these four mechanisms are associated with the acquisition of a motile and invasive phenotype. TAM partly reversed the E2-induced differential expression patterns and consequently restored most of the biologic functions deregulated by E2, except the mechanisms associated with cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we found that TAM affects the expression of nine additional genes associated with cytoskeletal remodeling, DNA repair, active estrogen receptor formation and growth factor synthesis, and mitogenic pathways. These modulatory effects of E2 and TAM upon the gene expression patterns identified here could explain some of the mechanisms associated with the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype by breast cancer cells, such as E2-independent

  19. Transcriptional responses to loss or gain of function of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene uncover biological processes modulated by LRRK2 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Elena V.; Xiong, Yulan; Tanis, Keith Q.; Dawson, Valina L.; Vogel, Robert L.; Finney, Eva M.; Stone, David J.; Reynolds, Ian J.; Kern, Jonathan T.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) and cause both autosomal dominant familial and sporadic PD. Currently, the physiological and pathogenic activities of LRRK2 are poorly understood. To decipher the biological functions of LRRK2, including the genes and pathways modulated by LRRK2 kinase activity in vivo, we assayed genome-wide mRNA expression in the brain and peripheral tissues from LRRK2 knockout (KO) and kinase hyperactive G2019S (G2019S) transgenic mice. Subtle but significant differences in mRNA expression were observed relative to wild-type (WT) controls in the cortex, striatum and kidney of KO animals, but only in the striatum in the G2019S model. In contrast, robust, consistent and highly significant differences were identified by the direct comparison of KO and G2019S profiles in the cortex, striatum, kidney and muscle, indicating opposite effects on mRNA expression by the two models relative to WT. Ribosomal and glycolytic biological functions were consistently and significantly up-regulated in LRRK2 G2019S compared with LRRK2 KO tissues. Genes involved in membrane-bound organelles, oxidative phosphorylation, mRNA processing and the endoplasmic reticulum were down-regulated in LRRK2 G2019S mice compared with KO. We confirmed the expression patterns of 35 LRRK2-regulated genes using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These findings provide the first description of the transcriptional responses to genetically modified LRRK2 activity and provide preclinical target engagement and/or pharmacodynamic biomarker strategies for LRRK2 and may inform future therapeutic strategies for LRRK2-associated PD. PMID:21972245

  20. Functional gene polymorphisms in the serotonin system and traumatic life events modulate the neural basis of fear acquisition and extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hermann

    Full Text Available Fear acquisition and extinction are crucial mechanisms in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Moreover, they might play a pivotal role in conveying the influence of genetic and environmental factors on the development of a (more or less stronger proneness for, or resilience against psychopathology. There are only few insights in the neurobiology of genetically and environmentally based individual differences in fear learning and extinction. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 74 healthy subjects were investigated. These were invited according to 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 (S+ vs. L(AL(A; triallelic classification and TPH2 (G(-703T (T+ vs. T- genotype. The aim was to investigate the influence of genetic factors and traumatic life events on skin conductance responses (SCRs and neural responses (amygdala, insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC during acquisition and extinction learning in a differential fear conditioning paradigm. Fear acquisition was characterized by stronger late conditioned and unconditioned responses in the right insula in 5-HTTLPR S-allele carriers. During extinction traumatic life events were associated with reduced amygdala activation in S-allele carriers vs. non-carriers. Beyond that, T-allele carriers of the TPH2 (G(-703T polymorphism with a higher number of traumatic life events showed enhanced responsiveness in the amygdala during acquisition and in the vmPFC during extinction learning compared with non-carriers. Finally, a combined effect of the two polymorphisms with higher responses in S- and T-allele carriers was found in the dACC during extinction. The results indicate an increased expression of conditioned, but also unconditioned fear responses in the insula in 5-HTTLPR S-allele carriers. A combined effect of the two polymorphisms on dACC activation during extinction might be associated with prolonged fear expression. Gene

  1. PtrBAM1, a β-amylase-coding gene of Poncirus trifoliata, is a CBF regulon member with function in cold tolerance by modulating soluble sugar levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ting; Zhu, Xiaofang; Duan, Nian; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2014-12-01

    β-Amylase (BAM) catalyses starch breakdown to generate maltose, which can be incorporated into sugar metabolism. However, the role of BAM genes in cold tolerance is less characterized. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a chloroplast-localizing BAM-encoding gene PtrBAM1 from Poncirus trifoliata. PtrBAM1 was induced by cold, dehydration and salt, but repressed by maltose. Overexpression of PtrBAM1 in tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) increased BAM activity, promoted starch degradation and enhanced the contents of maltose and soluble sugars, whereas opposite changes were observed when PtrBAM1 homolog in lemon (Citrus lemon) was knocked down. The tobacco overexpressing lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to cold at chilling or freezing temperatures. Under cold stress, higher BAM activity and greater accumulation of maltose and soluble sugars were observed in the overexpressing lines when compared with the wild-type or empty vector transformants. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that PtrBAM1 promoter contained a CBF-recognizing element. Yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that PtrCBF could interact with the promoter fragment containing the element. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrBAM1 is a member of CBF regulon and plays an important role in cold tolerance by modulating the levels of soluble sugars acting as osmolytes or antioxidants.

  2. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

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    Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Joaquín; Dopazo, Hernán

    2011-03-01

    Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA), a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  3. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Serra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA, a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  4. CLARM: An integrative approach for functional modules discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed M.

    2011-01-01

    Functional module discovery aims to find well-connected subnetworks which can serve as candidate protein complexes. Advances in High-throughput proteomic technologies have enabled the collection of large amount of interaction data as well as gene expression data. We propose, CLARM, a clustering algorithm that integrates gene expression profiles and protein protein interaction network for biological modules discovery. The main premise is that by enriching the interaction network by adding interactions between genes which are highly co-expressed over a wide range of biological and environmental conditions, we can improve the quality of the discovered modules. Protein protein interactions, known protein complexes, and gene expression profiles for diverse environmental conditions from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used for evaluate the biological significance of the reported modules. Our experiments show that the CLARM approach is competitive to wellestablished module discovery methods. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  5. Integrating Gene Ontology and Blast to predict gene functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-gang; MO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    A GoBlast system was built to predict gene function by integrating Blast search and Gene Ontology (GO) annotations together. The operation system was based on Debian Linux 3.1, with Apache as the web server and Mysql database as the data storage system. FASTA files with GO annotations were taken as the sequence source for blast alignment, which were formatted by wu-formatdb program. The GoBlast system includes three Bioperl modules in Perl: a data input module, a data process module and a data output module. A GoBlast query starts with an amino acid or nucleotide sequence. It ends with an output in an html page, presenting high scoring gene products which are of a high homology to the queried sequence and listing associated GO terms beside respective gene poducts. A simple click on a GO term leads to the detailed explanation of the specific gene function. This avails gene function prediction by Blast. GoBlast can be a very useful tool for functional genome research and is available for free at http://bioq.org/goblast.

  6. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  7. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show......, overexpression was achieved by introducing an additional gene copy into a phage attachment site on the chromosome. This resulted in a series of strains with phosphofructokinase activities from 1.4 to 11 times the wild-type activity level. In this example, the pfk gene was cloned upstream of a gusA gene encoding...

  8. Module network inference from a cancer gene expression data set identifies microRNA regulated modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bonnet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs that recognize and regulate mRNA target genes. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that they are key regulators of numerous critical functions in development and disease, including cancer. However, defining the place and function of miRNAs in complex regulatory networks is not straightforward. Systems approaches, like the inference of a module network from expression data, can help to achieve this goal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the last decade, much progress has been made in the development of robust and powerful module network inference algorithms. In this study, we analyze and assess experimentally a module network inferred from both miRNA and mRNA expression data, using our recently developed module network inference algorithm based on probabilistic optimization techniques. We show that several miRNAs are predicted as statistically significant regulators for various modules of tightly co-expressed genes. A detailed analysis of three of those modules demonstrates that the specific assignment of miRNAs is functionally coherent and supported by literature. We further designed a set of experiments to test the assignment of miR-200a as the top regulator of a small module of nine genes. The results strongly suggest that miR-200a is regulating the module genes via the transcription factor ZEB1. Interestingly, this module is most likely involved in epithelial homeostasis and its dysregulation might contribute to the malignant process in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that a robust module network analysis of expression data can provide novel insights of miRNA function in important cellular processes. Such a computational approach, starting from expression data alone, can be helpful in the process of identifying the function of miRNAs by suggesting modules of co-expressed genes in which they play a regulatory role. As shown in this study, those modules can then be

  9. Niche-modulated and niche-modulating genes in bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Y; Garach-Jehoshua, O; Bar-Chaim, A; Kornberg, A

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) cells depend on their niche for growth and survival. However, the genes modulated by niche stimuli have not been discriminated yet. For this purpose, we investigated BM aspirations from patients with various hematological malignancies. Each aspirate was fractionated, and the various samples were fixed at different time points and analyzed by microarray. Identification of niche-modulated genes relied on sustained change in expression following loss of niche regulation. Compared with the reference (‘authentic') samples, which were fixed immediately following aspiration, the BM samples fixed after longer stay out-of-niche acquired numerous changes in gene-expression profile (GEP). The overall genes modulated included a common subset of functionally diverse genes displaying prompt and sustained ‘switch' in expression irrespective of the tumor type. Interestingly, the ‘switch' in GEP was reversible and turned ‘off-and-on' again in culture conditions, resuming cell–cell–matrix contact versus respread into suspension, respectively. Moreover, the resuming of contact prolonged the survival of tumor cells out-of-niche, and the regression of the ‘contactless switch' was followed by induction of a new set of genes, this time mainly encoding extracellular proteins including angiogenic factors and extracellular matrix proteins. Our data set, being unique in authentic expression design, uncovered niche-modulated and niche-modulating genes capable of controlling homing, expansion and angiogenesis. PMID:23241658

  10. Gene coexpression network analysis as a source of functional annotation for rice genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Childs

    Full Text Available With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional

  11. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Background The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2−/− mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Methods Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2−/− mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). Results The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct “modules,” or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). Limitations It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2−/− mice by perturbed mesolimbic

  12. Mining Functional Modules by Multiview-NMF of Phenome-Genome Association

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, YaoGong; Xu, YingJie; Fan, Xin; Hong, Yuxiang; Liu, Jiahui; He, Zhicheng; Huang, Yalou; Xie, Maoqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mining gene modules from genomic data is an important step to detect gene members of pathways or other relations such as protein-protein interactions. In this work, we explore the plausibility of detecting gene modules by factorizing gene-phenotype associations from a phenotype ontology rather than the conventionally used gene expression data. In particular, the hierarchical structure of ontology has not been sufficiently utilized in clustering genes while functionally related gen...

  13. A functional network module for Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, S; Truong, H T; Blanchard, C L; Elsea, S H

    2009-04-01

    Disorders with overlapping diagnostic features are grouped into a network module. Based on phenotypic similarities or differential diagnoses, it is possible to identify functional pathways leading to individual features. We generated a Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS)-specific network module utilizing patient clinical data, text mining from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, and in vitro functional analysis. We tested our module by functional studies based on a hypothesis that RAI1 acts through phenotype-specific pathways involving several downstream genes, which are altered due to RAI1 haploinsufficiency. A preliminary genome-wide gene expression study was performed using microarrays on RAI1 haploinsufficient cells created by RNAi-based approximately 50% knockdown of RAI1 in HEK293T cells. The top dysregulated genes were involved in growth signaling and insulin sensitivity, neuronal differentiation, lipid biosynthesis and fat mobilization, circadian activity, behavior, renal, cardiovascular and skeletal development, gene expression, and cell-cycle regulation and recombination, reflecting the spectrum of clinical features observed in SMS. Validation using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed the gene expression profile of 75% of the selected genes analyzed in both HEK293T RAI1 knockdown cells and SMS lymphoblastoid cell lines. Overall, these data support a method for identifying genes and pathways responsible for individual clinical features in a complex disorder such as SMS.

  14. GOMA: functional enrichment analysis tool based on GO modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Huang; Ling-Yun Wu; Yong Wang; Xiang-Sun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing the function of gene sets is a critical step in interpreting the results of high-throughput experiments in systems biology.A variety of enrichment analysis tools have been developed in recent years,but most output a long list of significantly enriched terms that are often redundant,making it difficult to extract the most meaningful functions.In this paper,we present GOMA,a novel enrichment analysis method based on the new concept of enriched functional Gene Ontology (GO) modules.With this method,we systematically revealed functional GO modules,i.e.,groups of functionally similar GO terms,via an optimization model and then ranked them by enrichment scores.Our new method simplifies enrichment analysis results by reducing redundancy,thereby preventing inconsistent enrichment results among functionally similar terms and providing more biologically meaningful results.

  15. GOMA: functional enrichment analysis tool based on GO modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang; Wu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing the function of gene sets is a critical step in interpreting the results of high-throughput experiments in systems biology. A variety of enrichment analysis tools have been developed in recent years, but most output a long list of significantly enriched terms that are often redundant, making it difficult to extract the most meaningful functions. In this paper, we present GOMA, a novel enrichment analysis method based on the new concept of enriched functional Gene Ontology (GO) modules. With this method, we systematically revealed functional GO modules, i.e., groups of functionally similar GO terms, via an optimization model and then ranked them by enrichment scores. Our new method simplifies enrichment analysis results by reducing redundancy, thereby preventing inconsistent enrichment results among functionally similar terms and providing more biologically meaningful results. PMID:23237213

  16. Finding pathway-modulating genes from a novel Ontology Fingerprint-derived gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tingting; Matmati, Nabil; Tsoi, Lam C; Mohanty, Bidyut K; Gao, Nan; Tang, Jijun; Lawson, Andrew B; Hannun, Yusuf A; Zheng, W Jim

    2014-10-01

    To enhance our knowledge regarding biological pathway regulation, we took an integrated approach, using the biomedical literature, ontologies, network analyses and experimental investigation to infer novel genes that could modulate biological pathways. We first constructed a novel gene network via a pairwise comparison of all yeast genes' Ontology Fingerprints--a set of Gene Ontology terms overrepresented in the PubMed abstracts linked to a gene along with those terms' corresponding enrichment P-values. The network was further refined using a Bayesian hierarchical model to identify novel genes that could potentially influence the pathway activities. We applied this method to the sphingolipid pathway in yeast and found that many top-ranked genes indeed displayed altered sphingolipid pathway functions, initially measured by their sensitivity to myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Further experiments confirmed the modulation of the sphingolipid pathway by one of these genes, PFA4, encoding a palmitoyl transferase. Comparative analysis showed that few of these novel genes could be discovered by other existing methods. Our novel gene network provides a unique and comprehensive resource to study pathway modulations and systems biology in general. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Motif-guided sparse decomposition of gene expression data for regulatory module identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Eric P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes work coordinately as gene modules or gene networks. Various computational approaches have been proposed to find gene modules based on gene expression data; for example, gene clustering is a popular method for grouping genes with similar gene expression patterns. However, traditional gene clustering often yields unsatisfactory results for regulatory module identification because the resulting gene clusters are co-expressed but not necessarily co-regulated. Results We propose a novel approach, motif-guided sparse decomposition (mSD, to identify gene regulatory modules by integrating gene expression data and DNA sequence motif information. The mSD approach is implemented as a two-step algorithm comprising estimates of (1 transcription factor activity and (2 the strength of the predicted gene regulation event(s. Specifically, a motif-guided clustering method is first developed to estimate the transcription factor activity of a gene module; sparse component analysis is then applied to estimate the regulation strength, and so predict the target genes of the transcription factors. The mSD approach was first tested for its improved performance in finding regulatory modules using simulated and real yeast data, revealing functionally distinct gene modules enriched with biologically validated transcription factors. We then demonstrated the efficacy of the mSD approach on breast cancer cell line data and uncovered several important gene regulatory modules related to endocrine therapy of breast cancer. Conclusion We have developed a new integrated strategy, namely motif-guided sparse decomposition (mSD of gene expression data, for regulatory module identification. The mSD method features a novel motif-guided clustering method for transcription factor activity estimation by finding a balance between co-regulation and co-expression. The mSD method further utilizes a sparse decomposition method for regulation strength estimation. The

  18. Modulation of imprinted gene expression following superovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Amanda L; McGraw, Serge; Lopes, Flavia L; Niles, Kirsten M; Landry, Mylène; Trasler, Jacquetta M

    2014-05-05

    Although assisted reproductive technologies increase the risk of low birth weight and genomic imprinting disorders, the precise underlying causes remain unclear. Using a mouse model, we previously showed that superovulation alters the expression of imprinted genes in the placenta at 9.5days (E9.5) of gestation. Here, we investigate whether effects of superovulation on genomic imprinting persisted at later stages of development and assess the surviving fetuses for growth and morphological abnormalities. Superovulation, followed by embryo transfer at E3.5, as compared to spontaneous ovulation (controls), resulted in embryos of normal size and weight at 14.5 and 18.5days of gestation. The normal monoallelic expression of the imprinted genes H19, Snrpn and Kcnq1ot1 was unaffected in either the placentae or the embryos from the superovulated females at E14.5 or E18.5. However, for the paternally expressed imprinted gene Igf2, superovulation generated placentae with reduced production of the mature protein at E9.5 and significantly more variable mRNA levels at E14.5. We propose that superovulation results in the ovulation of abnormal oocytes with altered expression of imprinted genes, but that the coregulated genes of the imprinted gene network result in modulated expression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Influence of candidate polymorphisms on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV and μ-opioid receptor genes expression in aspect of the β-casomorphin-7 modulation functions in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślińska, Anna; Sienkiewicz-Szłapka, Edyta; Wasilewska, Jolanta; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Chwała, Barbara; Moszyńska-Dumara, Małgorzata; Cieśliński, Tomasz; Bukało, Marta; Kostyra, Elżbieta

    2015-03-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with population prevalence of approximately 60-70 per 10,000. Data shows that both opioid system function enhancement and opiate administration can result in autistic-like symptoms. Cow milk opioid peptides, including β-casomorphin-7 (BCM7, Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile), affect the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and are subjected to degradation resulting from the proline dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV, EC 3.4.14.5) enzyme activity. The presence of MOR and DPPIV activity are crucial factors determining biological activity of BCM7 in the human body. Our study examined the effect of β-casomorphin-7 on the MOR and DPPIV genes expression according to specific point mutations in these genes. In addition, we investigated frequency of A118G SNP in the MOR gene and rs7608798 of the DPPIV (A/G) gene in healthy and autistic children. Our research indicated correlation in DPPIV gene expression under the influence of BCM7 and hydrolyzed milk between healthy and ASD-affected children with genotype GG (Pautism symptoms.

  20. Identifying Functional Modules in Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method that enables us to detect and describe the functional modules in complex networks. Using the proposed method, we can classify the nodes of networks into different modules according to their pattern of intra- and extra-module links. We use our method to analyze the modular structures of the ER random networks. We find that different modules of networks have different structure properties, such as the clustering coefficient. Moreover, at the same time, many nodes of networks participate different modules. Remarkably, we find that in the ER random networks, when the probability p is small, different modules or different roles of nodes can be identified by different regionsin the c-p parameter space.

  1. Cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Jisha; Dasgupta, Tanushree; Rhodes, Jenny M; McEwan, Miranda V; Print, Cristin G; O'Sullivan, Justin M; Horsfield, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    The cohesin complex has essential roles in cell division, DNA damage repair and gene transcription. The transcriptional function of cohesin is thought to derive from its ability to connect distant regulatory elements with gene promoters. Genome-wide binding of cohesin in breast cancer cells frequently coincides with estrogen receptor alpha (ER), leading to the hypothesis that cohesin facilitates estrogen-dependent gene transcription. We found that cohesin modulates the expression of only a subset of genes in the ER transcription program, either activating or repressing transcription depending on the gene target. Estrogen-responsive genes most significantly influenced by cohesin were enriched in pathways associated with breast cancer progression such as PI3K and ErbB1. In MCF7 breast cancer cells, cohesin depletion enhanced transcription of TFF1 and TFF2, and was associated with increased ER binding and increased interaction between TFF1 and its distal enhancer situated within TMPRSS3. In contrast, cohesin depletion reduced c-MYC mRNA and was accompanied by reduced interaction between a distal enhancer of c-MYC and its promoters. Our data indicates that cohesin is not a universal facilitator of ER-induced transcription and can even restrict enhancer-promoter communication. We propose that cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-dependent genes to achieve appropriate directionality and amplitude of expression.

  2. Symbiont modulates expression of specific gene categories in Angomonas deanei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Loureiro Penha

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are parasites that cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. Most are non-pathogenic and some harbor a symbiotic bacterium. Endosymbiosis is part of the evolutionary process of vital cell functions such as respiration and photosynthesis. Angomonas deanei is an example of a symbiont-containing trypanosomatid. In this paper, we sought to investigate how symbionts influence host cells by characterising and comparing the transcriptomes of the symbiont-containing A. deanei (wild type and the symbiont-free aposymbiotic strains. The comparison revealed that the presence of the symbiont modulates several differentially expressed genes. Empirical analysis of differential gene expression showed that 216 of the 7625 modulated genes were significantly changed. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the largest categories of genes that downregulated in the absence of the symbiont were those involved in oxidation-reduction process, ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport and glycolysis. In contrast, among the upregulated gene categories were those involved in proteolysis, microtubule-based movement, and cellular metabolic process. Our results provide valuable information for dissecting the mechanism of endosymbiosis in A. deanei.

  3. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  4. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  5. Extended degree functions and monomial modules

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The arithmetic degree, the smallest extended degree, and the homological degree are invariants that have been proposed as alternatives of the degree of a module if this module is not Cohen-Macaulay. We compare these degree functions and study their behavior when passing to the generic initial or the lexicographic submodule. This leads to various bounds and to counterexamples to a conjecture of Gunston and Vasconcelos, respectively. Particular attention is given to the class of sequentially Co...

  6. Additive Functional Inequalities in Banach Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An JongSu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate the following functional inequality in Banach modules over a -algebra and prove the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of linear mappings in Banach modules over a -algebra in the spirit of the Th. M. Rassias stability approach. Moreover, these results are applied to investigate homomorphisms in complex Banach algebras and prove the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of homomorphisms in complex Banach algebras.

  7. Site-specific protein O-glycosylation modulates proprotein processing - Deciphering specific functions of the large polypeptide GalNAc-transferase gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Clausen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) greatly expand the function and regulation of proteins, and glycosylation is the most abundant and diverse PTM. Of the many different types of protein glycosylation, one is quite unique; GalNAc-type (or mucin-type) O-glycosylation, where biosynthesis...... is initiated in the Golgi by up to twenty distinct UDP-N-acetyl-a-d-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts). These GalNAc-Ts are differentially expressed in cells and have different (although partly overlapping) substrate specificities, which provide for both unique functions...... and considerable redundancy. Recently we have begun to uncover human diseases associated with deficiencies in GalNAc-T genes (GALNTs). Thus deficiencies in individual GALNTs produce cell and protein specific effects and subtle distinct phenotypes such as hyperphosphatemia with hyperostosis (GALNT3...

  8. A Walsh Function Module Users' Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) with Walsh functions offers new opportunities to simulate many challenging problems in mathematical physics. The approach was developed to better simulate hypersonic flows with shocks on unstructured grids. It is unique in that integrals and derivatives are computed using simple matrix multiplication of series representations of functions without the need for divided differences. The product of any two Walsh functions is another Walsh function - a feature that radically changes an algorithm for solving PDEs. A FORTRAN module for supporting Walsh function simulations is documented. A FORTRAN code is also documented with options for solving time-dependent problems: an advection equation, a Burgers equation, and a Riemann problem. The sample problems demonstrate the usage of the Walsh function module including such features as operator overloading, Fast Walsh Transforms in multi-dimensions, and a Fast Walsh reciprocal.

  9. Extracting expression modules from perturbational gene expression compendia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dijck Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compendia of gene expression profiles under chemical and genetic perturbations constitute an invaluable resource from a systems biology perspective. However, the perturbational nature of such data imposes specific challenges on the computational methods used to analyze them. In particular, traditional clustering algorithms have difficulties in handling one of the prominent features of perturbational compendia, namely partial coexpression relationships between genes. Biclustering methods on the other hand are specifically designed to capture such partial coexpression patterns, but they show a variety of other drawbacks. For instance, some biclustering methods are less suited to identify overlapping biclusters, while others generate highly redundant biclusters. Also, none of the existing biclustering tools takes advantage of the staple of perturbational expression data analysis: the identification of differentially expressed genes. Results We introduce a novel method, called ENIGMA, that addresses some of these issues. ENIGMA leverages differential expression analysis results to extract expression modules from perturbational gene expression data. The core parameters of the ENIGMA clustering procedure are automatically optimized to reduce the redundancy between modules. In contrast to the biclusters produced by most other methods, ENIGMA modules may show internal substructure, i.e. subsets of genes with distinct but significantly related expression patterns. The grouping of these (often functionally related patterns in one module greatly aids in the biological interpretation of the data. We show that ENIGMA outperforms other methods on artificial datasets, using a quality criterion that, unlike other criteria, can be used for algorithms that generate overlapping clusters and that can be modified to take redundancy between clusters into account. Finally, we apply ENIGMA to the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles for

  10. Gene Regulation, Modulation, and Their Applications in Gene Expression Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Common microarray and next-generation sequencing data analysis concentrate on tumor subtype classification, marker detection, and transcriptional regulation discovery during biological processes by exploring the correlated gene expression patterns and their shared functions. Genetic regulatory network (GRN based approaches have been employed in many large studies in order to scrutinize for dysregulation and potential treatment controls. In addition to gene regulation and network construction, the concept of the network modulator that has significant systemic impact has been proposed, and detection algorithms have been developed in past years. Here we provide a unified mathematic description of these methods, followed with a brief survey of these modulator identification algorithms. As an early attempt to extend the concept to new RNA regulation mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA, into a modulator framework, we provide two applications to illustrate the network construction, modulation effect, and the preliminary finding from these networks. Those methods we surveyed and developed are used to dissect the regulated network under different modulators. Not limit to these, the concept of “modulation” can adapt to various biological mechanisms to discover the novel gene regulation mechanisms.

  11. PROAPOPTOTIC FUNCTION OF FHIT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhe-fu; HAN De-min; ZHANG Luo; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene found recently was studied in a deep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof ep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof anti-tumor in human various type of tissue. Due to the high efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed gh efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed as a candidate of tumor suppressor gene though there are several opposite opinions.several opposite opinions. We stress the summary of some properties of FHIT gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed the stronger proapoptotic function of FHIT gene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of ene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of FHIT; and FHIT gene can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process e can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process induced by FHIT has no relation to p53 gene. In a ward, in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical et for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.le histidine triad (FHIT) gene; Apoptosis; Tumorigenesis; Tumor suppressor gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.

  12. A functional polymorphism in the NKG2D gene modulates NK-cell cytotoxicity and is associated with susceptibility to Human Papilloma Virus-related cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Luis; Nguyen, Viet H; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Pham, Trang T T; Nguyen, Cuong H; Pham, Thuc V; Elbadry, Mahmoud I; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Tanaka, Junji; Trung, Ly Q; Takami, Akiyoshi; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-12-20

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted agent worldwide and is etiologically linked to several cancers, including cervical and genital cancers. NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed by NK cells, plays an important role in cancer immune-surveillance. We analyzed the impact of a NKG2D gene variant, rs1049174, on the incidence of HPV-related cancers in Vietnamese patients and utilized various molecular approaches to elucidate the mechanisms of NKG2D receptor regulation by rs1049174. In a group of 123 patients with HPV+ anogenital cancers, the low cytotoxicity allele LNK was significantly associated with increased cancer susceptibility (p = 0.016). Similar results were also observed in a group of 153 women with cervical cancer (p = 0.05). In functional studies, NK cells from individuals with LNK genotype showed a lower NKG2D expression and displayed less efficient NKG2D-mediated functions than NK cells with HNK genotype. Notably, the rs1049174 variant occurs within a targeting site for miR-1245, a negative regulator of NKG2D expression. Compared with the higher cytotoxicity allele HNK, the LNK allele was more efficiently targeted by miR-1245 and thus determined lower NKG2D expression in NK cells with the LNK genotype. The NKG2D variants may influence cancer immunosurveillance and thus determine susceptibility to various malignancies, including HPV-induced cancers.

  13. FcWRKY70, a WRKY protein of Fortunella crassifolia, functions in drought tolerance and modulates putrescine synthesis by regulating arginine decarboxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jingyan; Hu, Jianbing; Wang, Wei; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Qinghua; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-11-01

    WRKY comprises a large family of transcription factors in plants, but most WRKY members are still poorly understood. In this study, we report functional characterization of a Group III WRKY gene (FcWRKY70) from Fortunella crassifolia. FcWRKY70 was greatly induced by drought and abscisic acid, but slightly or negligibly by salt and cold. Overexpression of FcWRKY70 in tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) and lemon (Citrus lemon) conferred enhanced tolerance to dehydration and drought stresses. Transgenic tobacco and lemon exhibited higher expression levels of ADC (arginine decarboxylase), and accumulated larger amount of putrescine in comparison with wild type (WT). Treatment with D-arginine, an inhibitor of ADC, caused transgenic tobacco plants more sensitive to dehydration. Knock-down of FcWRKY70 in kumquat down-regulated ADC abundance and decreased putrescine level, accompanied by compromised dehydration tolerance. The promoter region of FcADC contained two W-box elements, which were shown to be interacted with FcWRKY70. Taken together, our data demonstrated that FcWRKY70 functions in drought tolerance by, at least partly, promoting production of putrescine via regulating ADC expression.

  14. Function analysis of unknown genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used...... to describe different aspects of molecular biology of the cell, to study changes that occur in the cell due to overexpression or deletion of a gene and to identify various protein modifications. The biological questions and the results of the described studies show the diversity of the information that can...... genes and proteins. It reports the first global proteome database collecting 36 yeast single gene deletion mutants and selecting over 650 differences between analysed mutants and the wild type strain. The obtained results show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome...

  15. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  16. 随机矩阵理论在肝癌基因功能模块识别中的应用%APPLICATION OF RANDOM MATRIX THEORY TO MICROARRAY DATA FOR DISCOVERING FUNCTIONAL GENE MODULES OF EPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜平兰; 李蓉; 陈健; 李金; 张凯旺; 钟建新

    2009-01-01

    采用随机矩阵理论方法研究了肝癌的基因表达网络.通过标准误差分析,得到了从富含噪声的肝癌基因网络中分离出真实肝癌基因网络的、去躁最充分的关联系数,分析了由此获得的基因表达网络的13个基因功能模块,发现这些模块与肝癌的产生和发展有密切关系.基于随机矩阵理论的方法克服了以往模块识别方法带有主观因素且不能去除噪声因子的缺陷,是一种有效去除随机噪声、识别基因模块、简化基因网络的方法.由于基因数目的众多及细胞生物过程的复杂性,从整体的角度系统研究HCC基因表达谱,对理解HCC分子机制和探索新的治疗方法有重要的现实意义.%The function modules of hcpatocellular carcinomas (HCC) gene expression network was identified by Random Matrix Theory (RMT). The standard deviation of the eigen-value spacing distribution of the expression correlation matrices to the two RMT distributions was used to identify the transition, where the random components were ultimately removed and the correlation matrix contains the clear and important modular information. By analyzing the lager 13 modules revealed by RMT, It was found that these models were closely related to the form and development of hepatocellular carcinomas. The RMT method, having the advantages of avoiding the objective effects and removing the noise caused by experiments, can be an effective way to identify gene functional modules from the complex gene expression networks. Because of the large number of genes and the complexity of cell biological processes, the systematic study of HCC using RMT from an integral perspective helps to understand the mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis at molecule level and to advance effective therapy methods.

  17. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells.

  18. Comparing the functions of equine and canine influenza H3N8 virus PA-X proteins: Suppression of reporter gene expression and modulation of global host gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kurtis H; Sun, Miao; Iketani, Sho; Holmes, Edward C; Parrish, Colin R

    2016-09-01

    The influenza PA-X protein is translated from the PA open reading frame from frameshifting and suppresses cellular gene expression due to its ribonuclease activity. We further defined the functional roles of PA-X by comparing PA-X proteins from two related viruses - equine influenza (EIV) and canine influenza (CIV) H3N8 - that differ in a C-terminal truncation and internal mutations. In vitro reporter gene assays revealed that both proteins were able to suppress gene expression. Interestingly, EIV PA-X demonstrated ~50% greater activity compared to CIV PA-X, and we identified the mutations that caused this difference. We used RNA-seq to evaluate the effects of PA-X on host gene expression after transfection into cultured cells. There were no significant differences in this property between EIV and CIV PA-X proteins, but expression of either resulted in the up-regulation of genes when compared to controls, most notably immunity-related proteins, trafficking proteins, and transcription factors.

  19. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-07

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare.

  20. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Koch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models.

  1. Elements and modulation of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Alan C

    2014-10-09

    The existing structure-function paradigm of drug discovery has been evolving toward the essential incorporation of dynamics data. This new functional dynamics paradigm emphasizes conformational entropy as a driving force of protein function and intermolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics (a proxy of conformational entropy) impacts the degree of protein (dis)order and the constitution of the conformational ensemble, the mechanisms of allostery and drug resistance, and the free energy of ligand binding. Specific protein and ligand conformations facilitate favorable, reciprocal interactions. The number of protein and ligand conformers that exhibit favorable binding interactions will vary from system to system. All binding scenarios can modulate protein dynamics by various levels of enthalpic and entropic contribution, with significant influence on the functional dynamics of the system. Analysis and consideration of resulting changes of activity, signaling, catalysis, and subsequent phenotypic outcome are powerful motivations in the drug design process.

  2. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change.

  3. Modulation transfer functions at Ka band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesany, Vahid; Sistani, Bita; Salam, Asif; Haimov, Samuel; Gogineni, Prasad; Moore, Richard K.

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is often used to describe the modulation of the radar signal by the long waves. MTFs were measured at 35 GHz (Ka band) with a switched-beam vector slope gauge/scatterometer on the research platform NORDSEE as part of the SAXON-FPN experiment. Three independent measurements of the scattering were available for each height measurement. This provided the opportunity to average the time series to reduce the effects of fading noise and sea spikes, or, alternatively, to append the time series to achieve more degrees of freedom in the spectral estimates. For upwind measurements, the phase of the VV-polarized Ka-band MTF was always positive, which implies that the maximum of the radar return originates from the forward face of the long-scale waves. This phase increases with increasing wind speed. The magnitude of the MTF decreases with increasing wind speed.

  4. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/.

  5. Weyl modules and q-Whittaker functions

    CERN Document Server

    Braverman, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Let G be a semi-simple simply connected group over complex numbers. In this paper we give a geometric definition of the (dual) Weyl modules over the group G[t] and show that their characters form an eigen-function of the lattice version of the q-Toda integrable integrable system (defined by means of the quantum group version of Kostant-Whittaker reduction due to Etingof and Sevostyanov). All the proofs are algebro-geometric and rely on our previous work which interprets the universal eigen-function of the q-Toda system in terms of rings of functions on the spaces of based quasi-maps from P^1 to the flag variety of G. We discuss in detail the relation between the current work and the works of Cherednik, Ion and Gerasimov-Lebedev-Oblezin.

  6. The functional modulation of epigenetic regulators by alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Balbás Marian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulators (histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, chromatin-remodelling enzymes, etc play a fundamental role in the control of gene expression by modifying the local state of chromatin. However, due to their recent discovery, little is yet known about their own regulation. This paper addresses this point, focusing on alternative splicing regulation, a mechanism already known to play an important role in other protein families, e.g. transcription factors, membrane receptors, etc. Results To this end, we compiled the data available on the presence/absence of alternative splicing for a set of 160 different epigenetic regulators, taking advantage of the relatively large amount of unexplored data on alternative splicing available in public databases. We found that 49 % (70 % in human of these genes express more than one transcript. We then studied their alternative splicing patterns, focusing on those changes affecting the enzyme's domain composition. In general, we found that these sequence changes correspond to different mechanisms, either repressing the enzyme's function (e.g. by creating dominant-negative inhibitors of the functional isoform or creating isoforms with new functions. Conclusion We conclude that alternative splicing of epigenetic regulators can be an important tool for the function modulation of these enzymes. Considering that the latter control the transcriptional state of large sets of genes, we propose that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is itself strongly regulated by alternative splicing.

  7. Computational integration of homolog and pathway gene module expression reveals general stemness signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Koeva

    Full Text Available The stemness hypothesis states that all stem cells use common mechanisms to regulate self-renewal and multi-lineage potential. However, gene expression meta-analyses at the single gene level have failed to identify a significant number of genes selectively expressed by a broad range of stem cell types. We hypothesized that stemness may be regulated by modules of homologs. While the expression of any single gene within a module may vary from one stem cell type to the next, it is possible that the expression of the module as a whole is required so that the expression of different, yet functionally-synonymous, homologs is needed in different stem cells. Thus, we developed a computational method to test for stem cell-specific gene expression patterns from a comprehensive collection of 49 murine datasets covering 12 different stem cell types. We identified 40 individual genes and 224 stemness modules with reproducible and specific up-regulation across multiple stem cell types. The stemness modules included families regulating chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and Wnt signaling. Strikingly, the majority of modules represent evolutionarily related homologs. Moreover, a score based on the discovered modules could accurately distinguish stem cell-like populations from other cell types in both normal and cancer tissues. This scoring system revealed that both mouse and human metastatic populations exhibit higher stemness indices than non-metastatic populations, providing further evidence for a stem cell-driven component underlying the transformation to metastatic disease.

  8. Modulation Based on Probability Density Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of modulating a sinusoidal carrier signal to convey digital information involves the use of histograms representing probability density functions (PDFs) that characterize samples of the signal waveform. The method is based partly on the observation that when a waveform is sampled (whether by analog or digital means) over a time interval at least as long as one half cycle of the waveform, the samples can be sorted by frequency of occurrence, thereby constructing a histogram representing a PDF of the waveform during that time interval.

  9. Reverse-engineering transcriptional modules from gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Michoel, Tom; De Smet, Riet; Joshi, Anagha; Marchal, Kathleen; de Peer, Yves Van

    2009-01-01

    "Module networks" are a framework to learn gene regulatory networks from expression data using a probabilistic model in which coregulated genes share the same parameters and conditional distributions. We present a method to infer ensembles of such networks and an averaging procedure to extract the statistically most significant modules and their regulators. We show that the inferred probabilistic models extend beyond the data set used to learn the models.

  10. Expression QTL modules as functional components underlying higher-order phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Bao

    Full Text Available Systems genetics studies often involve the mapping of numerous regulatory relations between genetic loci and expression traits. These regulatory relations form a bipartite network consisting of genetic loci and expression phenotypes. Modular network organizations may arise from the pleiotropic and polygenic regulation of gene expression. Here we analyzed the expression QTL (eQTL networks derived from expression genetic data of yeast and mouse liver and found 65 and 98 modules respectively. Computer simulation result showed that such modules rarely occurred in randomized networks with the same number of nodes and edges and same degree distribution. We also found significant within-module functional coherence. The analysis of genetic overlaps and the evidences from biomedical literature have linked some eQTL modules to physiological phenotypes. Functional coherence within the eQTL modules and genetic overlaps between the modules and physiological phenotypes suggests that eQTL modules may act as functional units underlying the higher-order phenotypes.

  11. Prioritization of gene regulatory interactions from large-scale modules in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringas Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of groups of co-regulated genes and their transcription factors, called transcriptional modules, has been a focus of many studies about biological systems. While methods have been developed to derive numerous modules from genome-wide data, individual links between regulatory proteins and target genes still need experimental verification. In this work, we aim to prioritize regulator-target links within transcriptional modules based on three types of large-scale data sources. Results Starting with putative transcriptional modules from ChIP-chip data, we first derive modules in which target genes show both expression and function coherence. The most reliable regulatory links between transcription factors and target genes are established by identifying intersection of target genes in coherent modules for each enriched functional category. Using a combination of genome-wide yeast data in normal growth conditions and two different reference datasets, we show that our method predicts regulatory interactions with significantly higher predictive power than ChIP-chip binding data alone. A comparison with results from other studies highlights that our approach provides a reliable and complementary set of regulatory interactions. Based on our results, we can also identify functionally interacting target genes, for instance, a group of co-regulated proteins related to cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we report novel conserved binding sites of a glycoprotein-encoding gene, CIS3, regulated by Swi6-Swi4 and Ndd1-Fkh2-Mcm1 complexes. Conclusion We provide a simple method to prioritize individual TF-gene interactions from large-scale transcriptional modules. In comparison with other published works, we predict a complementary set of regulatory interactions which yields a similar or higher prediction accuracy at the expense of sensitivity. Therefore, our method can serve as an alternative approach to prioritization for

  12. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Alters Cell Function and Pathway-Specific Gene Modulation Reflecting Changes in Cellular Trafficking and MigrationS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Casado, Fanny L.; Singh, Kameshwar P.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor belonging to the Per-ARNT-Sim family of proteins. These proteins sense molecules and stimuli from the cellular/tissue environment and initiate signaling cascades to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Recent literature reports suggest an important function of AhR in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AhR signaling regulates HSC functions are unknown. In previous studies, we and othe...

  13. The modulation of WTI transcription function by cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stefan G E

    2006-01-01

    Wilms' tumour is a paediatric malignancy of the kidneys that affects one in every 10,000 live births, making it the most common solid tumour in the young. This cancer arises due to a failure of the metanephric mesenchyme to differentiate and form the kidney filtration units and tubules, which instead undergo uncontrolled proliferation. WT1 (Wilms' tumour 1) was identified as a factor that is frequently mutated in Wilms' tumours. WT1 plays a central role in the development of the genito-urinary organs and also other regions of the embryo. A major function of WT1 is to act as a regulator of transcription, controlling the expression of genes that are involved in proliferation and differentiation. WT1 can either activate or repress transcription of its target genes. Thus the transcription function of WT1 is highly context-specific, and can be modulated by a number of cofactors. Here, the known interaction partners of WT1 and the mechanisms by which they modulate WT1 transcription function will be discussed.

  14. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  15. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum.

  16. Statistical inference of transcriptional module-based gene networks from time course gene expression profiles by using state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Osamu; Yoshida, Ryo; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Print, Cristin; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    Statistical inference of gene networks by using time-course microarray gene expression profiles is an essential step towards understanding the temporal structure of gene regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, most of the current studies have been limited to analysing a small number of genes because the length of time-course gene expression profiles is fairly short. One promising approach to overcome such a limitation is to infer gene networks by exploring the potential transcriptional modules which are sets of genes sharing a common function or involved in the same pathway. In this article, we present a novel approach based on the state space model to identify the transcriptional modules and module-based gene networks simultaneously. The state space model has the potential to infer large-scale gene networks, e.g. of order 10(3), from time-course gene expression profiles. Particularly, we succeeded in the identification of a cell cycle system by using the gene expression profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the length of the time-course and number of genes were 24 and 4382, respectively. However, when analysing shorter time-course data, e.g. of length 10 or less, the parameter estimations of the state space model often fail due to overfitting. To extend the applicability of the state space model, we provide an approach to use the technical replicates of gene expression profiles, which are often measured in duplicate or triplicate. The use of technical replicates is important for achieving highly-efficient inferences of gene networks with short time-course data. The potential of the proposed method has been demonstrated through the time-course analysis of the gene expression profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) undergoing growth factor deprivation-induced apoptosis. Supplementary Information and the software (TRANS-MNET) are available at http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/software/ssm/.

  17. On the Cauchy Functional Inequality in Banach Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Choonkil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate the following functional inequality: in Banach modules over a -algebra, and prove the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of linear mappings in Banach modules over a -algebra.

  18. Coexpression Analysis Reveals Key Gene Modules and Pathway of Human Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Ke, Zun-Ping; Peng, Yi-Gen; Cai, Ping-Tai

    2017-08-31

    Coronary heart disease is a kind of disease which causes great injury to people world-widely. Although gene expression analyses had been performed previously, to our best knowledge, systemic co-expression analysis for this disease is still lacking to date. Microarray data of coronary heart disease was downloaded from NCBI with the accession number of GSE20681. Co-expression modules were constructed by WGCNA. Besides, the connectivity degree of eigengenes was analyzed. Furthermore, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis was performed on these eigengenes in these constructed modules. A total of 11 co-expression modules were constructed by the 3,000 up-regulated genes from the 99 samples with coronary heart disease. The average number of genes in these modules was 270. The interaction analysis indicated the relative independence of gene expression in these modules. The functional enrichment analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the enriched terms and degree among these 11 modules. The results showed that module 9 and module 10 played critical roles in the occurrence of coronary disease. Pathways of hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation)and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) were thought to be closely related to the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease. Our result demonstrated that module 9 and module 10 were the most critical modules in the occurrence of coronary heart disease. Pathways as hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation) and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) had the potential to serve as the prognostic and predictive marker of coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability.

  20. Gene functional similarity search tool (GFSST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo James J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the genome sequences of human, mouse, and other species and the advent of high throughput functional genomic research technologies such as biomicroarray chips, more and more genes and their products have been discovered and their functions have begun to be understood. Increasing amounts of data about genes, gene products and their functions have been stored in databases. To facilitate selection of candidate genes for gene-disease research, genetic association studies, biomarker and drug target selection, and animal models of human diseases, it is essential to have search engines that can retrieve genes by their functions from proteome databases. In recent years, the development of Gene Ontology (GO has established structured, controlled vocabularies describing gene functions, which makes it possible to develop novel tools to search genes by functional similarity. Results By using a statistical model to measure the functional similarity of genes based on the Gene Ontology directed acyclic graph, we developed a novel Gene Functional Similarity Search Tool (GFSST to identify genes with related functions from annotated proteome databases. This search engine lets users design their search targets by gene functions. Conclusion An implementation of GFSST which works on the UniProt (Universal Protein Resource for the human and mouse proteomes is available at GFSST Web Server. GFSST provides functions not only for similar gene retrieval but also for gene search by one or more GO terms. This represents a powerful new approach for selecting similar genes and gene products from proteome databases according to their functions.

  1. Contractive Hilbert modules and their dilations over natural function algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Ronald G; Sarkar, Jaydeb

    2009-01-01

    In this note, we show that quasi-free Hilbert modules R defined over natural function algebras satisfying a certain positivity condition, defined via the hereditary functional calculus, admit a dilation (actually a co-extension) to the Hardy module over the polydisk. An explicit realization of the dilation space is given along with the isometric embedding of the module R in it. Some consequences of this basic fact is then explored in the case of several natural function algebras.

  2. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  3. High accordance in prognosis prediction of colorectal cancer across independent datasets by multi-gene module expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    Full Text Available A considerable portion of patients with colorectal cancer have a high risk of disease recurrence after surgery. These patients can be identified by analyzing the expression profiles of signature genes in tumors. But there is no consensus on which genes should be used and the performance of specific set of signature genes varies greatly with different datasets, impeding their implementation in the routine clinical application. Instead of using individual genes, here we identified functional multi-gene modules with significant expression changes between recurrent and recurrence-free tumors, used them as the signatures for predicting colorectal cancer recurrence in multiple datasets that were collected independently and profiled on different microarray platforms. The multi-gene modules we identified have a significant enrichment of known genes and biological processes relevant to cancer development, including genes from the chemokine pathway. Most strikingly, they recruited a significant enrichment of somatic mutations found in colorectal cancer. These results confirmed the functional relevance of these modules for colorectal cancer development. Further, these functional modules from different datasets overlapped significantly. Finally, we demonstrated that, leveraging above information of these modules, our module based classifier avoided arbitrary fitting the classifier function and screening the signatures using the training data, and achieved more consistency in prognosis prediction across three independent datasets, which holds even using very small training sets of tumors.

  4. Genomic Heterogeneity of Osteosarcoma - Shift from Single Candidates to Functional Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugg, Doris; Eckstein, Gertrud; Baumhoer, Daniel; Nathrath, Michaela; Korsching, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a bone tumor, exhibit a complex karyotype. On the genomic level a highly variable degree of alterations in nearly all chromosomal regions and between individual tumors is observable. This hampers the identification of common drivers in OS biology. To identify the common molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of OS, we follow the hypothesis that all the copy number-associated differences between the patients are intercepted on the level of the functional modules. The implementation is based on a network approach utilizing copy number associated genes in OS, paired expression data and protein interaction data. The resulting functional modules of tightly connected genes were interpreted regarding their biological functions in OS and their potential prognostic significance. We identified an osteosarcoma network assembling well-known and lesser-known candidates. The derived network shows a significant connectivity and modularity suggesting that the genes affected by the heterogeneous genetic alterations share the same biological context. The network modules participate in several critical aspects of cancer biology like DNA damage response, cell growth, and cell motility which is in line with the hypothesis of specifically deregulated but functional modules in cancer. Further, we could deduce genes with possible prognostic significance in OS for further investigation (e.g. EZR, CDKN2A, MAP3K5). Several of those module genes were located on chromosome 6q. The given systems biological approach provides evidence that heterogeneity on the genomic and expression level is ordered by the biological system on the level of the functional modules. Different genomic aberrations are pointing to the same cellular network vicinity to form vital, but already neoplastically altered, functional modules maintaining OS. This observation, exemplarily now shown for OS, has been under discussion already for a longer time, but often in a hypothetical manner, and

  5. MODULATION OF MDR-1 GENE IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS BY SODIUM BUTYRATE AND DMSO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the regulation effect of MDR-1 gene inhuman breast cancer cell by the differentiating agents, sodium butyrate and dimethyl sulfoxide. Methods: 1. A sensitive assay, RT-PCR, was used to measure the mRNA level before and after the treatment of sodium butyrate, DMSO, using b -actin as control; 2. Evaluated the effect of sodium butyrate, DMSO on MDR-1 gene expression of human breast cancer at the protein level by immunoflow cytometry; 3. P-glycoprotein function was examined after accumulation of the fluorescent drug, Phodamine-123, by flow cytometry; 4. Chemosensitivity to doxorubicin was analyzed using the MTT assay. Results: Sodium butyrate and DMSO were found to increase the MDR characteristics on MDR-1 gene, MDR-1 expression levels, P-glycoprotein function and chemosensitivity to doxorubicin. Conclusion: sodium butyrate, DMSO can modulate the MDR-1 gene at gene level, protein level, protein function level and cell level.

  6. Analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic carcinoma via functional modules in a protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to identify protein clusters with potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and metastatic hepatic carcinoma using network analysis. Materials and Methods: We used human protein interaction data to build a protein-protein interaction network with Cytoscape and then derived functional clusters using MCODE. Combining the gene expression profiles, we calculated the functional scores for the clusters and selected statistically significant clusters. Meanwhile, Gene Ontology was used to assess the functionality of these clusters. Finally, a support vector machine was trained on the gold standard data sets. Results: The differentially expressed genes of HCC were mainly involved in metabolic and signaling processes. We acquired 13 significant modules from the gene expression profiles. The area under the curve value based on the differentially expressed modules were 98.31%, which outweighed the classification with DEGs. Conclusions: Differentially expressed modules are valuable to screen biomarkers combined with functional modules.

  7. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sheon-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation. Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  8. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Sheon-Young; Chang Ick-Soon; Kim Hark-Mahn

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation). Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation) mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  9. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick-Soon Chang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation. Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  10. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  11. Discovering the cellular-localized functional modules and modular interactions in response to liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jing; Guo Zheng; Yang Da; Zhang Min; Wang Jing; Wang Chenguang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly identify the functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and characterized by biological processes in specific cellular locations, based on gene ontology (GO) and microarray data. Then, we further define and filter disease relevant signature modules according to the ranking of the disease discriminating abilities of the pre-selected functional modules. At last, we analyze the potential way by which they cooperate towards human disease. Application of the proposed method to the analysis of a liver cancer dataset shows that, using the same false discovery rate (FDR) threshold, we can find more biologically meaningful and detailed processes by using the cellular localization information. Some biological evidences support the relevancy of our biological modules to the disease mechanism.

  12. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  14. Designing a Growing Functional Modules “Artificial Brain”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Leboeuf-Pasquier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    The present paper illustrates the design process for the Growing Functional Modules (GFM learning based controller. GFM controllers are elaborated interconnecting four kinds of components: Global Goals, Acting Modules, Sensations and Sensing Modules. Global Goals trigger intrinsic motivations, Acting and Sensing Modules develop specific functionalities and Sensations provide the controlled system's feedback. GFM controllers learn to satisfy some predefined goals while interacting with the environment and thus should be considered as artificial brains. An example of the design process of a simple controller is provided herein to explain the inherent methodology, to exhibit the components' interconnections and to demonstrate the control process.

  15. FunGene: the Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A. Fish

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer.While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/ offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes.

  16. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  17. Differential modulation of gene expression in the NMDA postsynaptic density of schizophrenic and control smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, S; Frank, M; Berger, R; Adams, C E; Ross, R G; Freedman, R; Leonard, S

    2005-10-03

    Nicotine is known to induce the release of multiple neurotransmitters, including glutamate and dopamine, through activation of nicotinic receptors. Gene expression in the N-methyl-d-aspartate postsynaptic density (NMDA-PSD), as well as other functional groups, was compared in postmortem hippocampus of schizophrenic and nonmentally ill smokers and nonsmokers utilizing a microarray and quantitative RT-PCR approach. The expression of 277 genes was significantly changed between all smokers and nonsmokers. Specific gene groups, most notably genes expressed in the NMDA-PSD, were prevalent among these transcripts. Analysis of the interaction between smoking and schizophrenia identified several genes in the NMDA-PSD that were differentially affected by smoking in patients. The present findings suggest that smoking may differentially modulate glutamatergic function in schizophrenic patients and control subjects. The biological mechanisms underlying chronic tobacco use are likely to differ substantially between these two groups.

  18. The cis-acting CTTC-P1BS module is indicative for gene function of LjVTI12, a Qb-SNARE protein gene that is required for arbuscule formation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lota, Frédéric; Wegmüller, Sarah; Buer, Benjamin; Sato, Shusei; Bräutigam, Andrea; Hanf, Benjamin; Bucher, Marcel

    2013-04-01

    The majority of land plants live in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota. This symbiosis improves acquisition of phosphorus (P) by the host plant in exchange for carbohydrates, especially under low-P availability. The symbiosome, constituted by root cortex cells accommodating arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae, is the site at which bi-directional exchange of nutrients and metabolites takes place. Uptake of orthophosphate (Pi) in the symbiosome is facilitated by mycorrhiza-specific plant Pi transporters. Modifications of the potato Pi transporter 3 (StPT3) promoter were analysed in transgenic mycorrhizal roots, and it was found that the CTTC cis-regulatory element is necessary and sufficient for a transcriptional response to fungal colonization under low-Pi conditions. Phylogenetic footprinting also revealed binary combination of the CTTC element with the Pi starvation response-associated PHR1-binding site (P1BS) in the promoters of several mycorrhiza-specific Pi transporter genes. Scanning of the Lotus japonicus genome for gene promoters containing both cis-regulatory elements revealed a strong over-representation of genes involved in transport processes. One of these, LjVTI12, encoding a member of the SNARE family of proteins involved in membrane transport, exhibited enhanced transcript levels in Lotus roots colonized with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Down-regulation of LjVTI12 by RNA interference resulted in a mycorrhiza-specific phenotype characterized by distorted arbuscule morphology. The results highlight cooperative cis-regulation which integrates mycorrhiza and Pi starvation signaling with vesicle trafficking in symbiosome development.

  19. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  20. Monaural and binaural subjective modulation transfer functions in simple reverberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The envelope of a signal is filtered by the transmission channel through which it passes. The amount of reduction for a given envelope, or modulation, frequency has been called the modulation transfer function (MTF) and can be derived from the impulse response of the transmission channel [Schroeder......, M.R. (1981) Modulation transfer-functions: Definition and measurement, Acustica, 49, 179-182]. The envelope of a speech signal is critical for intelligibility, and the speech transmission index (STI) predicts the intelligibility of speech through a given transmission channel based on its MTF...... [Houtgast, T. and Steeneken, H.J.M. (1973) Modulation transfer-function in room acoustics as a predictor of speech intelligibility, Acustica, 28, 66-73]. In the present study, the results of intensity modulation detection experiments with broad-band noise carriers are reported in monaural and binaural...

  1. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasis Stephanou; Latchman, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  2. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Stephanou; Latchman, D S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  3. bc-GenExMiner 3.0: new mining module computes breast cancer gene expression correlation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, Pascal; Frénel, Jean-Sébastien; Campion, Loïc; Guérin-Charbonnel, Catherine; Gouraud, Wilfried; Ricolleau, Gabriel; Campone, Mario

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed a user-friendly web-based application called bc-GenExMiner (http://bcgenex.centregauducheau.fr), which offered the possibility to evaluate prognostic informativity of genes in breast cancer by means of a 'prognostic module'. In this study, we develop a new module called 'correlation module', which includes three kinds of gene expression correlation analyses. The first one computes correlation coefficient between 2 or more (up to 10) chosen genes. The second one produces two lists of genes that are most correlated (positively and negatively) to a 'tested' gene. A gene ontology (GO) mining function is also proposed to explore GO 'biological process', 'molecular function' and 'cellular component' terms enrichment for the output lists of most correlated genes. The third one explores gene expression correlation between the 15 telomeric and 15 centromeric genes surrounding a 'tested' gene. These correlation analyses can be performed in different groups of patients: all patients (without any subtyping), in molecular subtypes (basal-like, HER2+, luminal A and luminal B) and according to oestrogen receptor status. Validation tests based on published data showed that these automatized analyses lead to results consistent with studies' conclusions. In brief, this new module has been developed to help basic researchers explore molecular mechanisms of breast cancer. DATABASE URL: http://bcgenex.centregauducheau.fr

  4. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  5. Localization of genes modulating the predisposition to schizophrenia: a revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes-Machado E.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetics of schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder has advanced greatly at the molecular level since the introduction of probes for the localization of specific genes. Research on gene candidates for susceptibility to schizophrenia can broadly be divided into two types, i.e., linkage studies, where a gene is found near a specific DNA marker on a specific chromosome, and association studies, when a condition is associated with a specific allele of a specific gene. This review covers a decade of publications in this area, from the 1988 works of Bassett et al. and Sherrington et al. on a gene localized on the long arm of chromosome 5 at the 5q11-13 loci, to the 1997 work of Lin et al. pointing to the 13q14.1-q32 loci of chromosome 13 and to the 1998 work of Wright et al. on an HLA DRB1 gene locus on chromosome 6 at 6p21-3. The most replicated loci were those in the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q12-q13.1 and on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p24-22. In this critical review of the molecular genetic studies involved in the localization of genes which modulate the predisposition to schizophrenia the high variability in the results obtained by different workers suggests that multiple loci are involved in the predisposition to this illness.

  6. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  7. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices.

  8. The aging memory: Modulating epigenetic modifications to improve cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is a major concern in society. Here, I discuss recent evidence that shows an age-related modulation of gene transcription by epigenetic modifications. Epigenetic modifications, such as histone acetylation, is unbalanced in aging, with an increase in histone deacetylation, that limits the expression of plasticity-related genes. By modifying the balance towards histone acetylation, histone deacetylase inhibitors present a new pharmacological approach to ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits.

  9. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated π-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  10. Gene transfer strategies for augmenting cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppel, K; Koch, W J; Lefkowitz, R J

    1997-07-01

    Recent transgenic as well as gene-targeted animal models have greatly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of normal and compromised heart function. These studies have raised the possibility of using somatic gene transfer as a means for improving cardiac function. DNA transfer to a significant portion of the myocardium has thus far been difficult to accomplish. This review describes current efforts to achieve myocardial gene transfer in several model systems, with particular emphasis placed on adenovirus-mediated gene delivery, its possibilities, and current limitations. (Trend Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:145-150). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Symbiosis-related pea genes modulate fungal and plant gene expression during the arbuscule stage of mycorrhiza with Glomus intraradices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Seddas-Dozolme, Pascale M A; Arnould, Christine; Tollot, Marie; van Tuinen, Diederik; Borisov, Alexey; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2010-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza association results from a successful interaction between genomes of the plant and fungal symbiotic partners. In this study, we analyzed the effect of inactivation of late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes on symbiosis-associated fungal and plant molecular responses in order to gain insight into their role in the functional mycorrhizal association. The expression of a subset of ten fungal and eight plant genes, previously reported to be activated during mycorrhiza development, was compared in Glomus intraradices-inoculated wild-type and isogenic genotypes of pea mutated for the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 genes where arbuscule formation is inhibited or fungal turnover modulated, respectively. Microdissection was used to corroborate arbuscule-related fungal gene expression. Molecular responses varied between pea genotypes and with fungal development. Most of the fungal genes were downregulated when arbuscule formation was defective, and several were upregulated with more rapid fungal development. Some of the plant genes were also affected by inactivation of the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 loci, but in a more time-dependent way during root colonization by G. intraradices. Results indicate a role of the late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes not only in mycorrhiza development but also in the symbiotic functioning of arbuscule-containing cells.

  12. Identification of functional modules in a PPI network by clique percolation clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Ning, Xuemei; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2006-12-01

    Large-scale experiments and data integration have provided the opportunity to systematically analyze and comprehensively understand the topology of biological networks and biochemical processes in cells. Modular architecture which encompasses groups of genes/proteins involved in elementary biological functional units is a basic form of the organization of interacting proteins. Here we apply a graph clustering algorithm based on clique percolation clustering to detect overlapping network modules of a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Our analysis of the yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae suggests that most of the detected modules correspond to one or more experimentally functional modules and half of these annotated modules match well with experimentally determined protein complexes. Our method of analysis can of course be applied to protein-protein interaction data for any species and even other biological networks.

  13. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

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    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  14. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  15. Modulation of R-gene expression across environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Alice; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-03-01

    Some environments are more conducive to pathogen growth than others, and, as a consequence, plants might be expected to invest more in resistance when pathogen growth is favored. Resistance (R-) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana have unusually extensive variation in basal expression when comparing the same R-gene among accessions collected from different environments. R-gene expression variation was characterized to explore whether R-gene expression is up-regulated in environments favoring pathogen proliferation and down-regulated when risks of infection are low; down-regulation would follow if costs of R-gene expression negatively impact plant fitness in the absence of disease. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to quantify the expression of 13 R-gene loci in plants grown in eight environmental conditions for each of 12 A. thaliana accessions, and large effects of the environment on R-gene expression were found. Surprisingly, almost every change in the environment--be it a change in biotic or abiotic conditions--led to an increase in R-gene expression, a response that was distinct from the average transcriptome response and from that of other stress response genes. These changes in expression are functional in that environmental change prior to infection affected levels of specific disease resistance to isolates of Pseudomonas syringae. In addition, there are strong latitudinal clines in basal R-gene expression and clines in R-gene expression plasticity correlated with drought and high temperatures. These results suggest that variation in R-gene expression across environments may be shaped by natural selection to reduce fitness costs of R-gene expression in permissive or predictable environments.

  16. dlk1/FA1 regulates the function of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by modulating gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune response-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M.; Boissy, Patrice; Tan, Qihua

    2007-01-01

    dlk1/FA1 (delta-like 1/fetal antigen-1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like homeotic protein family whose expression is known to modulate the differentiation signals of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. We have demonstrated previously that Dlk1 can maintain...... the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in an undifferentiated state. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, we compared the basal gene expression pattern in Dlk1-overexpressing hMSC cells (hMSC-dlk1) versus control hMSC (negative for Dlk1 expression) by using Affymetrix......, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. Also, addition of purified FA1 to hMSC up-regulated the same factors in a dose-dependent manner. As biological consequences of up-regulating these immune response-related factors, we showed that the inhibitory effects of dlk1 on osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of h...

  17. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

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    Zhang Wen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics.

  18. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy.

  19. Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    dependent compound screen, aided by the University of Michigan Center for Chemical Genomics . Differential AR activation in transfected cells was assessed...WR, Parker JS, Lee MX, Kass EM, Spratt DE, Iaquinta PJ, Arora VK, Yen WF, Cai L, Zheng D, Carver BS, Chen Y, Watson PA, Shah NP, Fujisawa S, Goglia...for known genes and genome -wide by ChIP-seq. Results will strengthen our overall hypothesis that genes with similar function (i.e

  20. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

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    Anastasis Stephanou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-shock proteins (Hsps are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  1. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Anastasis; Latchman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

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    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  3. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

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    Buddhasukh Duang

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170, thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. Methods In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Results Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. Conclusion These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents.

  4. Gene, environment and cognitive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunsheng; Sun, Jianping; Duan, Haiping

    2015-01-01

    population living under distinct environmental condition as the Western populations. OBJECTIVE: this study aims to explore the genetic and environmental impact on normal cognitive ageing in the Chinese twins. DESIGN/SETTING: cognitive function was measured on 384 complete twin pairs with median age of 50...... factors accounting for 23-33% of the total variances. In contrast, all cognitive performances showed moderate to high influences by the unique environmental factors. CONCLUSIONS: genetic factor and common family environment have a limited contribution to cognitive function in the Chinese adults......BACKGROUND: the genetic and environmental contributions to cognitive function in the old people have been well addressed for the Western populations using twin modelling showing moderate to high heritability. No similar study has been conducted in the world largest and rapidly ageing Chinese...

  5. Gene expression profile of androgen modulated genes in the murine fetal developing lung

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    Côté Mélissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidences suggest that sex affects lung development. Indeed, a higher incidence of respiratory distress syndrome is observed in male compared to female preterm neonates at comparable developmental stage and experimental studies demonstrated an androgen-related delay in male lung maturation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of androgens in lung maturation are only partially understood. Methods To build up a better understanding of the effect of androgens on lung development, we analyzed by microarrays the expression of genes showing a sexual difference and those modulated by androgens. Lungs of murine fetuses resulting from a timely mating window of 1 hour were studied at gestational day 17 (GD17 and GD18, corresponding to the period of surge of surfactant production. Using injections of the antiandrogen flutamide to pregnant mice, we hunted for genes in fetal lungs which are transcriptionally modulated by androgens. Results Results revealed that 1844 genes were expressed with a sexual difference at GD17 and 833 at GD18. Many genes were significantly modulated by flutamide: 1597 at GD17 and 1775 at GD18. Datasets were analyzed by using in silico tools for reconstruction of cellular pathways. Between GD17 and GD18, male lungs showed an intensive transcriptional activity of proliferative pathways along with the onset of lung differentiation. Among the genes showing a sex difference or an antiandrogen modulation of their expression, we specifically identified androgen receptor interacting genes, surfactant related genes in particularly those involved in the pathway leading to phospholipid synthesis, and several genes of lung development regulator pathways. Among these latter, some genes related to Shh, FGF, TGF-beta, BMP, and Wnt signaling are modulated by sex and/or antiandrogen treatment. Conclusion Our results show clearly that there is a real delay in lung maturation between

  6. Nanomaterial-modulated autophagy: underlying mechanisms and functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential lysosome-dependent process that controls the quality of the cytoplasm and maintains cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of this protein degradation system is correlated with various disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests that nanomaterials (NMs) have autophagy-modulating effects, thus predicting a valuable and promising application potential of NMs in the diagnosis and treatment of autophagy-related diseases. NMs exhibit unique physical, chemical and biofunctional properties, which may endow NMs with capabilities to modulate autophagy via various mechanisms. The present review highlights the impacts of various NMs on autophagy and their functional consequences. The possible underlying mechanisms for NM-modulated autophagy are also discussed.

  7. Exercise and neuroendocrine modulation of macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J A

    2000-05-01

    Like all immune cells, Mphi's cannot simply be viewed as individual cells, but as part of a complex network of cells and tissues that communicate in many different ways in an attempt to elicit an appropriate host response to immune and other challenges. Mphi's are important initial effector cells and are highly regulated by other cells (including T and B lymphocytes) and hormones produced by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Indeed, it may well be that stressors, including exercise, exert their regulatory influence over these cells by activating the SNS, HPA axis, or by influencing other tissues or cells. With this in mind, the overall objective of this review is to introduce and provide current information regarding the role of neuroendocrine factors in mediating exercise-induced changes in macrophage (Mphi) function. Under this broad objective this review will: 1) briefly discuss the cell biology of the Mphi and its role in host defense, 2) explore the potential regulatory influence of selected neuroendocrine hormones (glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone, prolactin, and beta-endorphin) that may potentially mediate exercise-induced changes in Mphi function, and 3) describe the effects of exercise on the functions of the Mphi.

  8. Assessing the functional coherence of modules found in multiple-evidence networks from Arabidopsis

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    Hodgman Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combining multiple evidence-types from different information sources has the potential to reveal new relationships in biological systems. The integrated information can be represented as a relationship network, and clustering the network can suggest possible functional modules. The value of such modules for gaining insight into the underlying biological processes depends on their functional coherence. The challenges that we wish to address are to define and quantify the functional coherence of modules in relationship networks, so that they can be used to infer function of as yet unannotated proteins, to discover previously unknown roles of proteins in diseases as well as for better understanding of the regulation and interrelationship between different elements of complex biological systems. Results We have defined the functional coherence of modules with respect to the Gene Ontology (GO by considering two complementary aspects: (i the fragmentation of the GO functional categories into the different modules and (ii the most representative functions of the modules. We have proposed a set of metrics to evaluate these two aspects and demonstrated their utility in Arabidopsis thaliana. We selected 2355 proteins for which experimentally established protein-protein interaction (PPI data were available. From these we have constructed five relationship networks, four based on single types of data: PPI, co-expression, co-occurrence of protein names in scientific literature abstracts and sequence similarity and a fifth one combining these four evidence types. The ability of these networks to suggest biologically meaningful grouping of proteins was explored by applying Markov clustering and then by measuring the functional coherence of the clusters. Conclusions Relationship networks integrating multiple evidence-types are biologically informative and allow more proteins to be assigned to a putative functional module. Using additional

  9. Xanthophylls as modulators of membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Alexander V; Johnson, Matthew P

    2010-12-01

    This review discusses the structural aspect of the role of photosynthetic antenna xanthophylls. It argues that xanthophyll hydrophobicity/polarity could explain the reason for xanthophyll variety and help to understand their recently emerging function--control of membrane organization and the work of membrane proteins. The structure of a xanthophyll molecule is discussed in relation to other amphiphilic compounds like lipids, detergents, etc. Xanthophyll composition of membrane proteins, the role of their variety in protein function are discussed using as an example for the major light harvesting antenna complex of photosystem II, LHCII, from higher plants. A new empirical parameter, hydrophobicity parameter (H-parameter), has been introduced as an effective measure of the hydrophobicity of the xanthophyll complement of LHCII from different xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis. Photosystem II quantum efficiency was found to correlate well with the H-parameter of LHCII xanthophylls. PSII down-regulation by non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, NPQ, had optimum corresponding to the wild-type xanthophyll composition, where lutein occupies intrinsic sites, L1 and L2. Xanthophyll polarity/hydrophobicity alteration by the activity of the xanthophyll cycle explains the allosteric character of NPQ regulation, memory of illumination history and the hysteretic nature of the relationship between the triggering factor, ΔpH, and the energy dissipation process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil functions by astrocytes

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    Xie Luokun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation is a complex process involving cells from the immune system and the central nerve system (CNS. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN are the most abundant class of white blood cells, and typically the first type of leukocyte recruited to sites of inflammation. In the CNS, astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell population and participate in the local innate immune response triggered by a variety of insults. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of astrocytes on PMN function. Methods Primary astrocyte cultures were derived from postnatal C57BL/6 mice and primary neutrophils were isolated from 8 to 12 weeks old C57BL/6 mice. PMNs respiratory burst was analyzed by H2DCFDA assay. For phagocytosis assay, neutrophils were incubated with FITC-labeled E. coli and the phagocytosis of E coli was determined by flow cytometer. PMNs degranulation was determined by myeloperoxidase assay. Cytokine expression was determined by real-time PCR. To determine the involvement of different signaling pathway, protein lysates were prepared and western blots were conducted to assess the activation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38. Results Using ex vivo neutrophils and primary astrocyte cultures, our study demonstrated that astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions, depending upon whether the interactions between the two cell types are direct or indirect. Upon direct cell-cell contact, astrocytes attenuate neutrophil apoptosis, respiratory bust, and degranulation, while enhancing neutrophil phagocytic capability and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Through indirect interaction with neutrophils, astrocytes attenuate apoptosis and enhance necrosis in neutrophils, augment neutrophil phagocytosis and respiratory burst, and inhibit neutrophil degranulation. In addition, astrocytes could augment Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 activation in neutrophils. Conclusions Astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions through

  11. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  12. Clock gene modulates roles of OXTR and AVPR1b genes in prosociality.

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    Haipeng Ci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The arginine vasopressin receptor (AVPR and oxytocin receptor (OXTR genes have been demonstrated to contribute to prosocial behavior. Recent research has focused on the manner by which these simple receptor genes influence prosociality, particularly with regard to the AVP system, which is modulated by the clock gene. The clock gene is responsible for regulating the human biological clock, affecting sleep, emotion and behavior. The current study examined in detail whether the influences of the OXTR and AVPR1b genes on prosociality are dependent on the clock gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study assessed interactions between the clock gene (rs1801260, rs6832769 and the OXTR (rs1042778, rs237887 and AVPR1b (rs28373064 genes in association with individual differences in prosociality in healthy male Chinese subjects (n = 436. The Prosocial Tendencies Measure (PTM-R was used to assess prosociality. Participants carrying both the GG/GA variant of AVPR1b rs28373064 and the AA variant of clock rs6832769 showed the highest scores on the Emotional PTM. Carriers of both the T allele of OXTR rs1042778 and the C allele of clock rs1801260 showed the lowest total PTM scores compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The observed interaction effects provide converging evidence that the clock gene and OXT/AVP systems are intertwined and contribute to human prosociality.

  13. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

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    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  14. A large scale survey reveals that chromosomal copy-number alterations significantly affect gene modules involved in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigudosa Juan C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent observations point towards the existence of a large number of neighborhoods composed of functionally-related gene modules that lie together in the genome. This local component in the distribution of the functionality across chromosomes is probably affecting the own chromosomal architecture by limiting the possibilities in which genes can be arranged and distributed across the genome. As a direct consequence of this fact it is therefore presumable that diseases such as cancer, harboring DNA copy number alterations (CNAs, will have a symptomatology strongly dependent on modules of functionally-related genes rather than on a unique "important" gene. Methods We carried out a systematic analysis of more than 140,000 observations of CNAs in cancers and searched by enrichments in gene functional modules associated to high frequencies of loss or gains. Results The analysis of CNAs in cancers clearly demonstrates the existence of a significant pattern of loss of gene modules functionally related to cancer initiation and progression along with the amplification of modules of genes related to unspecific defense against xenobiotics (probably chemotherapeutical agents. With the extension of this analysis to an Array-CGH dataset (glioblastomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate the validity of this approach to investigate the functional impact of CNAs. Conclusions The presented results indicate promising clinical and therapeutic implications. Our findings also directly point out to the necessity of adopting a function-centric, rather a gene-centric, view in the understanding of phenotypes or diseases harboring CNAs.

  15. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  16. Conservation and Rewiring of Functional Modules Revealed by an Epistasis Map in Fission Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguev, Assen; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Zofall, Martin; Zhang, Ke; Fischer, Tamas; Collins, Sean R.; Qu, Hongjing; Shales, Michael; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Ideker, Trey; Grewal, Shiv I.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2009-01-01

    An epistasis map (E-MAP) was constructed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, by systematically measuring the phenotypes associated with pairs of mutations. This high-density, quantitative genetic interaction map focused on various aspects of chromosome function, including transcription regulation and DNA repair/replication. The E-MAP uncovered a previously unidentified component of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (rsh1) and linked the RNAi pathway to several other biological processes. Comparison of the S. pombe E-MAP to an analogous genetic map from the budding yeast revealed that, whereas negative interactions were conserved between genes involved in similar biological processes, positive interactions and overall genetic profiles between pairs of genes coding for physically associated proteins were even more conserved. Hence, conservation occurs at the level of the functional module (protein complex), but the genetic cross talk between modules can differ substantially. PMID:18818364

  17. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  18. Identification of fractional order systems using modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2013-06-01

    The modulating functions method has been used for the identification of linear and nonlinear systems. In this paper, we generalize this method to the on-line identification of fractional order systems based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. First, a new fractional integration by parts formula involving the fractional derivative of a modulating function is given. Then, we apply this formula to a fractional order system, for which the fractional derivatives of the input and the output can be transferred into the ones of the modulating functions. By choosing a set of modulating functions, a linear system of algebraic equations is obtained. Hence, the unknown parameters of a fractional order system can be estimated by solving a linear system. Using this method, we do not need any initial values which are usually unknown and not equal to zero. Also we do not need to estimate the fractional derivatives of noisy output. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed estimators are robust against high frequency sinusoidal noises and the ones due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, the efficiency and the stability of the proposed method is confirmed by some numerical simulations.

  19. A Study on the Design of Electronic SAMG Functional Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Ahn, K. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper describes a study on the design of e-SAMG functional modules. A study of for the design of e-SAMG was introduced. During an emergency status of a severe accident, the items for the functional module during a rapid and exact action are surveyed. The results are being implemented in e-SAMG. The operators can be supported through the use of e-SAMG. Based on the design of functional modules, the implementation will be accelerated and the refined design can also be applied. As a part of the Ministry of Science, ICT and future Planning (MSIP) Project, we at KAERI are developing electronic SAMG (e-SAMG, severe accident mitigation guideline) for general SAMG for nuclear power plants. Due to computerized trends, various efforts related to computer systems have been carried out for safety systems in nuclear power plants. In particular, since the Fukushima accident, unexpected accidents or extreme damages have become a concern. With this status, a rapid and exact confrontation such as a computerized attempt in SAMG has been tried. To develop an electronic SAMG, based on an analysis of the general SAMG, the architecture of e-SAMG was founded. The functional modules occupy important parts in the e-SAMG.

  20. fabp4 is central to eight obesity associated genes: a functional gene network-based polymorphic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Susmita; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2015-01-07

    Network study on genes and proteins offers functional basics of the complexity of gene and protein, and its interacting partners. The gene fatty acid-binding protein 4 (fabp4) is found to be highly expressed in adipose tissue, and is one of the most abundant proteins in mature adipocytes. Our investigations on functional modules of fabp4 provide useful information on the functional genes interacting with fabp4, their biochemical properties and their regulatory functions. The present study shows that there are eight set of candidate genes: acp1, ext2, insr, lipe, ostf1, sncg, usp15, and vim that are strongly and functionally linked up with fabp4. Gene ontological analysis of network modules of fabp4 provides an explicit idea on the functional aspect of fabp4 and its interacting nodes. The hierarchal mapping on gene ontology indicates gene specific processes and functions as well as their compartmentalization in tissues. The fabp4 along with its interacting genes are involved in lipid metabolic activity and are integrated in multi-cellular processes of tissues and organs. They also have important protein/enzyme binding activity. Our study elucidated disease-associated nsSNP prediction for fabp4 and it is interesting to note that there are four rsID׳s (rs1051231, rs3204631, rs140925685 and rs141169989) with disease allelic variation (T104P, T126P, G27D and G90V respectively). On the whole, our gene network analysis presents a clear insight about the interactions and functions associated with fabp4 gene network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-functional Electric Module for a Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Fraser-Chanpong, Nathan (Inventor); Reed, Ryan (Inventor); Akinyode, Akinjide Akinniyi (Inventor); Spain, Ivan (Inventor); Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Figuered, Joshua M. (Inventor); Herrera, Eduardo (Inventor); Markee, Mason M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A multi-functional electric module (eModule) is provided for a vehicle having a chassis, a master controller, and a drive wheel having a propulsion-braking module. The eModule includes a steering control assembly, mounting bracket, propulsion control assembly, brake controller, housing, and control arm. The steering control assembly includes a steering motor controlled by steering controllers in response to control signals from the master controller. A mounting feature of the bracket connects to the chassis. The propulsion control assembly and brake controller are in communication with the propulsion-braking module. The control arm connects to the lower portion and contains elements of a suspension system, with the control arm being connectable to the drive wheel via a wheel input/output block. The controllers are responsive to the master controller to control a respective steering, propulsion, and braking function. The steering motor may have a dual-wound stator with windings controlled via the respective steering controllers.

  2. Fold modulating function: Bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Khawaja Syed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  3. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Adnan K; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  4. Gene function prediction based on the Gene Ontology hierarchical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liangxi; Lin, Hongfei; Hu, Yuncui; Wang, Jian; Yang, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    The information of the Gene Ontology annotation is helpful in the explanation of life science phenomena, and can provide great support for the research of the biomedical field. The use of the Gene Ontology is gradually affecting the way people store and understand bioinformatic data. To facilitate the prediction of gene functions with the aid of text mining methods and existing resources, we transform it into a multi-label top-down classification problem and develop a method that uses the hierarchical relationships in the Gene Ontology structure to relieve the quantitative imbalance of positive and negative training samples. Meanwhile the method enhances the discriminating ability of classifiers by retaining and highlighting the key training samples. Additionally, the top-down classifier based on a tree structure takes the relationship of target classes into consideration and thus solves the incompatibility between the classification results and the Gene Ontology structure. Our experiment on the Gene Ontology annotation corpus achieves an F-value performance of 50.7% (precision: 52.7% recall: 48.9%). The experimental results demonstrate that when the size of training set is small, it can be expanded via topological propagation of associated documents between the parent and child nodes in the tree structure. The top-down classification model applies to the set of texts in an ontology structure or with a hierarchical relationship.

  5. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, HongTao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecule...

  6. On the Cauchy Functional Inequality in Banach Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonkil Park

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the following functional inequality: ‖f(x+f(y+f(z‖≤‖f(x+y+z‖ in Banach modules over a C∗-algebra, and prove the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of linear mappings in Banach modules over a C∗-algebra.

  7. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  8. Functional analysis of prognostic gene expression network genes in metastatic breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Identification of conserved co-expression networks is a useful tool for clustering groups of genes enriched for common molecular or cellular functions [1]. The relative importance of genes within networks can frequently be inferred by the degree of connectivity, with those displaying high connectivity being significantly more likely to be associated with specific molecular functions [2]. Previously we utilized cross-species network analysis to identify two network modules that were significantly associated with distant metastasis free survival in breast cancer. Here, we validate one of the highly connected genes as a metastasis associated gene. Tpx2, the most highly connected gene within a proliferation network specifically prognostic for estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancers, enhances metastatic disease, but in a tumor autonomous, proliferation-independent manner. Histologic analysis suggests instead that variation of TPX2 levels within disseminated tumor cells may influence the transition between dormant to actively proliferating cells in the secondary site. These results support the co-expression network approach for identification of new metastasis-associated genes to provide new information regarding the etiology of breast cancer progression and metastatic disease.

  9. A multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors for functional gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kristoffer; Bartsch, Udo; Stocking, Carol; Fehse, Boris

    2008-04-01

    Functional gene analysis requires the possibility of overexpression, as well as downregulation of one, or ideally several, potentially interacting genes. Lentiviral vectors are well suited for this purpose as they ensure stable expression of complementary DNAs (cDNAs), as well as short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and can efficiently transduce a wide spectrum of cell targets when packaged within the coat proteins of other viruses. Here we introduce a multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors designed according to the "building blocks" principle. Using a wide spectrum of different fluorescent markers, including drug-selectable enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)- and dTomato-blasticidin-S resistance fusion proteins, LeGO vectors allow simultaneous analysis of multiple genes and shRNAs of interest within single, easily identifiable cells. Furthermore, each functional module is flanked by unique cloning sites, ensuring flexibility and individual optimization. The efficacy of these vectors for analyzing multiple genes in a single cell was demonstrated in several different cell types, including hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem and progenitor cells, as well as hepatocytes. LeGO vectors thus represent a valuable tool for investigating gene networks using conditional ectopic expression and knock-down approaches simultaneously.

  10. String Functions for Affine Lie Algebras Integrable Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kulish

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The recursion relations of branching coefficients kξ(μ for a module Lg¯ hμ reduced to a Cartan subalgebra h are transformed in order to place the recursion shifts γ Î Γa Ì h into the fundamental Weyl chamber. The new ensembles FΨ (the ''folded fans'' of shifts were constructed and the corresponding recursion properties for the weights belonging to the fundamental Weyl chamber were formulated. Being considered simultaneously for the set of string functions (corresponding to the same congruence class Ξv of modules the system of recursion relations constitute an equation M(u Ξv m(u μ = δ(u μ where the operator M(u Ξv is an invertible matrix whose elements are defined by the coordinates and multiplicities of the shift weights in the folded fans FΨ and the components of the vector m(u μ are the string function coefficients for Lμ enlisted up to an arbitrary fixed grade u. The examples are presented where the string functions for modules of g = A2(1 are explicitly constructed demonstrating that the set of folded fans provides a compact and effective tool to study the integrable highest weight modules.

  11. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Khawaja Syed; Blaise R. Boles

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity...

  12. Functional analysis of plastid-encoded genes

    OpenAIRE

    Swiatek, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Plastid chromosomes from the variety of plant species contain several conserved open reading frames of unknown function, which most probably represent functional genes. The primary aim of this thesis was the analysis of the role of two such ORFs, designated ycfs or hypothetical chloroplast reading frames, namely ycf9 (ORF62) and ycf10 (ORF229, cemA). Both were analyzed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) via their inactivation using biolistic plastid transformation. A new experiment...

  13. H-ferritin-regulated microRNAs modulate gene expression in K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Biamonte

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA. Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, "Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis", is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs.

  14. H-Ferritin-Regulated MicroRNAs Modulate Gene Expression in K562 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Bisognin, Andrea; Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Saccoman, Claudia; Scumaci, Domenica; Aversa, Ilenia; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC) offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC) comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA). Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, “Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis”, is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs. PMID:25815883

  15. A module-based analytical strategy to identify novel disease-associated genes shows an inhibitory role for interleukin 7 Receptor in allergic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Andy D

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of novel genes by high-throughput studies of complex diseases is complicated by the large number of potential genes. However, since disease-associated genes tend to interact, one solution is to arrange them in modules based on co-expression data and known gene interactions. The hypothesis of this study was that such a module could be a found and validated in allergic disease and b used to find and validate one ore more novel disease-associated genes. Results To test these hypotheses integrated analysis of a large number of gene expression microarray experiments from different forms of allergy was performed. This led to the identification of an experimentally validated reference gene that was used to construct a module of co-expressed and interacting genes. This module was validated in an independent material, by replicating the expression changes in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells. Moreover, the changes were reversed following treatment with corticosteroids. The module contained several novel disease-associated genes, of which the one with the highest number of interactions with known disease genes, IL7R, was selected for further validation. The expression levels of IL7R in allergen challenged CD4+ cells decreased following challenge but increased after treatment. This suggested an inhibitory role, which was confirmed by functional studies. Conclusion We propose that a module-based analytical strategy is generally applicable to find novel genes in complex diseases.

  16. A module-based analytical strategy to identify novel disease-associated genes shows an inhibitory role for interleukin 7 Receptor in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Reza; Andersson, Bengt A; Erjefält, Jonas; Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana; Langston, Michael A; Perkins, Andy D; Cardell, Lars Olaf; Benson, Mikael

    2009-02-12

    The identification of novel genes by high-throughput studies of complex diseases is complicated by the large number of potential genes. However, since disease-associated genes tend to interact, one solution is to arrange them in modules based on co-expression data and known gene interactions. The hypothesis of this study was that such a module could be a) found and validated in allergic disease and b) used to find and validate one ore more novel disease-associated genes. To test these hypotheses integrated analysis of a large number of gene expression microarray experiments from different forms of allergy was performed. This led to the identification of an experimentally validated reference gene that was used to construct a module of co-expressed and interacting genes. This module was validated in an independent material, by replicating the expression changes in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells. Moreover, the changes were reversed following treatment with corticosteroids. The module contained several novel disease-associated genes, of which the one with the highest number of interactions with known disease genes, IL7R, was selected for further validation. The expression levels of IL7R in allergen challenged CD4+ cells decreased following challenge but increased after treatment. This suggested an inhibitory role, which was confirmed by functional studies. We propose that a module-based analytical strategy is generally applicable to find novel genes in complex diseases.

  17. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  18. K(v)7 channels: function, pharmacology and channel modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby-Brown, William; Hansen, Henrik H; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Mirza, Naheed; Olesen, Søren-P

    2006-01-01

    K(v)7 channels are unique among K(+) channels, since four out of the five channel subtypes have well-documented roles in the development of human diseases. They have distinct physiological functions in the heart and in the nervous system, which can be ascribed to their voltage-gating properties. The K(v)7 channels also lend themselves to pharmacological modulation, and synthetic openers as well as blockers of the channels, regulating neuronal excitability, have existed even before the K(v)7 channels were identified by cloning. In the present review we give an account on the focused efforts to develop selective modulators, openers as well as blockers, of the K(v)7 channel subtypes, which have been undertaken during recent years, along with a discussion of the K(v)7 ion channel physiology and therapeutic indications for modulators of the neuronal K(v)7 channels.

  19. Matrix factorization reveals aging-specific co-expression gene modules in the fat and muscle tissues in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongcui; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-10-01

    Accurate identification of coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) in adipose and muscle tissues is important for revealing the related mechanisms and co-regulated pathways involved in the development of aging-related diseases. Here, we proposed a systematically computational approach, called ICEGM, to Identify the Co-Expression Gene Modules through a novel mathematical framework of Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (HO-GSVD). ICEGM was applied on the adipose, and heart and skeletal muscle tissues in old and young female African green vervet monkeys. The genes associated with the development of inflammation, cardiovascular and skeletal disorder diseases, and cancer were revealed by the ICEGM. Meanwhile, genes in the ICEGM modules were also enriched in the adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, and immune cells. Comprehensive disease annotation and canonical pathway analysis indicated that immune cells, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells played a synergistic role in cardiac and physical functions in the aged monkeys by regulation of the biological processes associated with metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the ICEGM provides an efficiently systematic framework for decoding the co-expression gene modules in multiple tissues. Analysis of genes in the ICEGM module yielded important insights on the cooperative role of multiple tissues in the development of diseases.

  20. Identification of gene co-regulatory modules and associated cis-elements involved in degenerative heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Charles G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyopathies, degenerative diseases of cardiac muscle, are among the leading causes of death in the developed world. Microarray studies of cardiomyopathies have identified up to several hundred genes that significantly alter their expression patterns as the disease progresses. However, the regulatory mechanisms driving these changes, in particular the networks of transcription factors involved, remain poorly understood. Our goals are (A to identify modules of co-regulated genes that undergo similar changes in expression in various types of cardiomyopathies, and (B to reveal the specific pattern of transcription factor binding sites, cis-elements, in the proximal promoter region of genes comprising such modules. Methods We analyzed 149 microarray samples from human hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies of various etiologies. Hierarchical clustering and Gene Ontology annotations were applied to identify modules enriched in genes with highly correlated expression and a similar physiological function. To discover motifs that may underly changes in expression, we used the promoter regions for genes in three of the most interesting modules as input to motif discovery algorithms. The resulting motifs were used to construct a probabilistic model predictive of changes in expression across different cardiomyopathies. Results We found that three modules with the highest degree of functional enrichment contain genes involved in myocardial contraction (n = 9, energy generation (n = 20, or protein translation (n = 20. Using motif discovery tools revealed that genes in the contractile module were found to contain a TATA-box followed by a CACC-box, and are depleted in other GC-rich motifs; whereas genes in the translation module contain a pyrimidine-rich initiator, Elk-1, SP-1, and a novel motif with a GCGC core. Using a naïve Bayes classifier revealed that patterns of motifs are statistically predictive of expression patterns, with

  1. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  2. The PSE1 gene modulates lead tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Yang, Libo; Wu, Xi; Ni, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Haikun; Zhang, Qi’an; Fang, Ling; Sheng, Yibao; Ren, Yongbing; Cao, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a dangerous heavy metal contaminant with high toxicity to plants. However, the regulatory mechanism of plant Pb tolerance is poorly understood. Here, we showed that the PSE1 gene confers Pb tolerance in Arabidopsis. A novel Pb-sensitive mutant pse1-1 (Pb-sensitive1) was isolated by screening T-DNA insertion mutants. PSE1 encodes an unknown protein with an NC domain and was localized in the cytoplasm. PSE1 was induced by Pb stress, and the pse1-1 loss-of-function mutant showed enhanced Pb sensitivity; overexpression of PSE1 resulted in increased Pb tolerance. PSE1-overexpressing plants showed increased Pb accumulation, which was accompanied by the activation of phytochelatin (PC) synthesis and related gene expression. In contrast, the pse1-1 mutant showed reduced Pb accumulation, which was associated with decreased PC synthesis and related gene expression. In addition, the expression of PDR12 was also increased in PSE1-overexpressing plants subjected to Pb stress. Our results suggest that PSE1 regulates Pb tolerance mainly through glutathione-dependent PC synthesis by activating the expression of the genes involved in PC synthesis and at least partially through activating the expression of the ABC transporter PDR12/ABCG40. PMID:27335453

  3. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  4. Light-controlled modulation of gene expression by chemical optoepigenetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J Adam; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatiotemporal control. Here we present a generalizable approach, referred to as 'chemo-optical modulation of epigenetically regulated transcription' (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may be translated into new therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required.

  5. Clock genes, pancreatic function, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elaine; Burris, Thomas P; Quesada, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    Circadian physiology is responsible for the temporal regulation of metabolism to optimize energy homeostasis throughout the day. Disturbances in the light/dark cycle, sleep/wake schedule, or feeding/activity behavior can affect the circadian function of the clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. These alterations have been associated with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. Animal models with molecular manipulation of clock genes and genetic studies in humans also support these links. It has been demonstrated that the endocrine pancreas has an intrinsic self-sustained clock, and recent studies have revealed an important role of clock genes in pancreatic β cells, glucose homeostasis, and diabetes.

  6. Robust fractional order differentiators using generalized modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims at designing a fractional order differentiator for a class of signals satisfying a linear differential equation with unknown parameters. A generalized modulating functions method is proposed first to estimate the unknown parameters, then to derive accurate integral formulae for the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives of the studied signal. Unlike the improper integral in the definition of the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative, the integrals in the proposed formulae can be proper and be considered as a low-pass filter by choosing appropriate modulating functions. Hence, digital fractional order differentiators applicable for on-line applications are deduced using a numerical integration method in discrete noisy case. Moreover, some error analysis are given for noise error contributions due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, numerical examples are given to show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed fractional order differentiators.

  7. Gene fusions and gene duplications: relevance to genomic annotation and functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Monica

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli a model organism provides information for annotation of other genomes. Our analysis of its genome has shown that proteins encoded by fused genes need special attention. Such composite (multimodular proteins consist of two or more components (modules encoding distinct functions. Multimodular proteins have been found to complicate both annotation and generation of sequence similar groups. Previous work overstated the number of multimodular proteins in E. coli. This work corrects the identification of modules by including sequence information from proteins in 50 sequenced microbial genomes. Results Multimodular E. coli K-12 proteins were identified from sequence similarities between their component modules and non-fused proteins in 50 genomes and from the literature. We found 109 multimodular proteins in E. coli containing either two or three modules. Most modules had standalone sequence relatives in other genomes. The separated modules together with all the single (un-fused proteins constitute the sum of all unimodular proteins of E. coli. Pairwise sequence relationships among all E. coli unimodular proteins generated 490 sequence similar, paralogous groups. Groups ranged in size from 92 to 2 members and had varying degrees of relatedness among their members. Some E. coli enzyme groups were compared to homologs in other bacterial genomes. Conclusion The deleterious effects of multimodular proteins on annotation and on the formation of groups of paralogs are emphasized. To improve annotation results, all multimodular proteins in an organism should be detected and when known each function should be connected with its location in the sequence of the protein. When transferring functions by sequence similarity, alignment locations must be noted, particularly when alignments cover only part of the sequences, in order to enable transfer of the correct function. Separating multimodular proteins into module units makes

  8. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Proud

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  9. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  10. Mining susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes from SNP data by combining network topological properties with support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lin; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Hong; Li, Lin; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Zhi-cheng

    2011-11-21

    Genome-wide association study is a powerful approach to identify disease risk loci. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms for most complex diseases are still not well understood. Therefore, further investigating the interplay between genetic factors and biological networks is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Here, we proposed a novel framework to identify susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes by combining network topological properties with support vector regression from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. We assigned risk SNPs to genes using the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database, and then mapped these genes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The gene modules implicated by hub genes were extracted using the PPI networks and the topological property was analyzed for these gene modules. For each gene module, risk feature genes were determined by topological property analysis and support vector regression. As a result, five shared risk feature genes, CD80, EGFR, FN1, GSK3B and TRAF6 were found and proven to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis by previous reports. Our approach showed a good performance in comparison with other approaches and can be used for prioritizing candidate genes associated with complex diseases.

  11. Parametric dependence of ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Cross, A.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave techniques at X and L band were used to determine the dependence of ocean-wave radar modulation transfer functions (MTFs) on various environmental and radar parameters during the Marine Remote Sensing experiment of 1979 (MARSEN 79). These MIF are presented, as are coherence functions between the AM and FM parts of the backscattered microwave signal. It is shown that they both depend on several of these parameters. Besides confirming many of the properties of transfer functions reported by previous authors, indications are found that MTFs decrease with increasing angle between wave propagation and antenna-look directions but are essentially independent of small changes in air-sea temperature difference. However, coherence functions are much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves. It is found that X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization.

  12. Cancer bioinformatics: detection of chromatin states,SNP-containing motifs, and functional enrichment modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Zhou

    2013-01-01

    In this editorial preface,I briefly review cancer bioinformatics and introduce the four articles in this special issue highlighting important applications of the field:detection of chromatin states; detection of SNP-containing motifs and association with transcription factor-binding sites; improvements in functional enrichment modules; and gene association studies on aging and cancer.We expect this issue to provide bioinformatics scientists,cancer biologists,and clinical doctors with a better understanding of how cancer bioinformatics can be used to identify candidate biomarkers and targets and to conduct functional analysis.

  13. Age-related decline in brain resources modulates genetic effects on cognitive functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulman Lindenberger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging.Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008, who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed.

  14. Age-Related Decline in Brain Resources Modulates Genetic Effects on Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Nagel, Irene E.; Chicherio, Christian; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Bäckman, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging. Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008), who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed. (150 of 150 words) PMID:19225597

  15. Leucocyte expression of genes implicated in the plasminogen activation cascade is modulated by yoghurt peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Georgios; Politis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA), its receptor (u-PAR) and the inhibitors of u-PA (PAI-1 and PAI-2) provide a multi-molecular system in leucocytes that exerts pleiotropic functions influencing the development of inflammatory and immune responses. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of water soluble extracts (WSE) obtained from traditional Greek yoghurt made from bovine or ovine milk to modulate the expression of u-PA, u-PAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 in ovine monocytes and neutrophils. WSE were obtained from 8 commercial traditional type Greek yoghurts made from ovine or bovine milk. WSE upregulated the expression of all 4 u-PA related genes in monocytes but the upregulation was much higher in the PAI-1 (10-fold) than in u-PA and u-PAR (3-4 fold) thus, shifting the system towards inhibition. In line with this observation, WSE reduced total and membrane-bound u-PA activity in monocytes. In neutrophils, WSE caused small (50-60%) but significant (P yoghurts made from bovine or ovine milk were essentially equally effective in affecting the u-PA system except for the u-PAR gene in ovine neutrophils that was affected (reduced) by the ovine and not the bovine WSE. In conclusion, peptides present in WSE modulated the expression of u-PA related genes but the effect was much more prominent in monocytes than in neutrophils.

  16. Degree of musical expertise modulates higher order brain functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Mathias S; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Lazeyras, François; Hauert, Claude-Alain; James, Clara E

    2013-09-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show for the first time that levels of musical expertise stepwise modulate higher order brain functioning. This suggests that degree of training intensity drives such cerebral plasticity. Participants (non-musicians, amateurs, and expert musicians) listened to a comprehensive set of specifically composed string quartets with hierarchically manipulated endings. In particular, we implemented 2 irregularities at musical closure that differed in salience but were both within the tonality of the piece (in-key). Behavioral sensitivity scores (d') of both transgressions perfectly separated participants according to their level of musical expertise. By contrasting brain responses to harmonic transgressions against regular endings, functional brain imaging data showed compelling evidence for stepwise modulation of brain responses by both violation strength and expertise level in a fronto-temporal network hosting universal functions of working memory and attention. Additional independent testing evidenced an advantage in visual working memory for the professionals, which could be predicted by musical training intensity. The here introduced findings of brain plasticity demonstrate the progressive impact of musical training on cognitive brain functions that may manifest well beyond the field of music processing.

  17. Modulation of p53's transcriptional function by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional factor which induces apoptosis or growth arrest in response to stress thus eliminating damaged cells. p53 function is frequently abrogated in tumours either via inactivation mutations in the TP53 gene or by elevated activity of p53 negative regulators HDM2 and HDMX. Therefore application of small molecules that reactivate p53 function is a promising strategy for anti-cancer therapy. In addition, small molecules can serve as valuable research tool to ...

  18. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  19. Genetic interaction motif finding by expectation maximization – a novel statistical model for inferring gene modules from synthetic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic lethality experiments identify pairs of genes with complementary function. More direct functional associations (for example greater probability of membership in a single protein complex may be inferred between genes that share synthetic lethal interaction partners than genes that are directly synthetic lethal. Probabilistic algorithms that identify gene modules based on motif discovery are highly appropriate for the analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interaction data and have great potential in integrative analysis of heterogeneous datasets. Results We have developed Genetic Interaction Motif Finding (GIMF, an algorithm for unsupervised motif discovery from synthetic lethal interaction data. Interaction motifs are characterized by position weight matrices and optimized through expectation maximization. Given a seed gene, GIMF performs a nonlinear transform on the input genetic interaction data and automatically assigns genes to the motif or non-motif category. We demonstrate the capacity to extract known and novel pathways for Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast. Annotations suggested for several uncharacterized genes are supported by recent experimental evidence. GIMF is efficient in computation, requires no training and automatically down-weights promiscuous genes with high degrees. Conclusion GIMF effectively identifies pathways from synthetic lethality data with several unique features. It is mostly suitable for building gene modules around seed genes. Optimal choice of one single model parameter allows construction of gene networks with different levels of confidence. The impact of hub genes the generic probabilistic framework of GIMF may be used to group other types of biological entities such as proteins based on stochastic motifs. Analysis of the strongest motifs discovered by the algorithm indicates that synthetic lethal interactions are depleted between genes within a motif, suggesting that synthetic

  20. Pro-cognitive drug effects modulate functional brain network organization

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    Carsten eGiessing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies document that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs improve attention, memory and cognitive control in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. In humans neural mechanisms of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation have mainly been analyzed by investigating drug-induced changes of task-related neural activity measured with fMRI. Endogenous neural activity has often been neglected. Further, although drugs affect the coupling between neurons, only a few human studies have explicitly addressed how drugs modulate the functional connectome, i.e. the functional neural interactions within the brain. These studies have mainly focused on synchronization or correlation of brain activations. Recently, there are some drug studies using graph theory and other new mathematical approaches to model the brain as a complex network of interconnected processing nodes. Using such measures it is possible to detect not only focal, but also subtle, widely distributed drug effects on functional network topology. Most important, graph theoretical measures also quantify whether drug-induced changes in topology or network organization facilitate or hinder information processing. Several studies could show that functional brain integration is highly correlated with behavioral performance suggesting that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs which improve measures of cognitive performance should increase functional network integration. The purpose of this paper is to show that graph theory provides a mathematical tool to develop theory-driven biomarkers of pro-cognitive drug effects, and also to discuss how these approaches can contribute to the understanding of the role of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in the human brain. Finally we discuss the global workspace theory as a theoretical framework of pro-cognitive drug effects and argue that pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs might be related to higher

  1. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  2. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteome Profiling Outperforms Transcriptome Profiling for Coexpression Based Gene Function Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Zihao; Carr, Steven A.; Mertins, Philipp; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Townsend, R. Reid; Smith, Richard D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Chen, Xian; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Boja, Emily S.; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-11-11

    Coexpression of mRNAs under multiple conditions is commonly used to infer cofunctionality of their gene products despite well-known limitations of this “guilt-by-association” (GBA) approach. Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have enabled global expression profiling at the protein level; however, whether proteome profiling data can outperform transcriptome profiling data for coexpression based gene function prediction has not been systematically investigated. Here, we address this question by constructing and analyzing mRNA and protein coexpression networks for three cancer types with matched mRNA and protein profiling data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). Our analyses revealed a marked difference in wiring between the mRNA and protein coexpression networks. Whereas protein coexpression was driven primarily by functional similarity between coexpressed genes, mRNA coexpression was driven by both cofunction and chromosomal colocalization of the genes. Functionally coherent mRNA modules were more likely to have their edges preserved in corresponding protein networks than functionally incoherent mRNA modules. Proteomic data strengthened the link between gene expression and function for at least 75% of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and 90% of KEGG pathways. A web application Gene2Net (http://cptac.gene2net.org) developed based on the three protein coexpression networks revealed novel gene-function relationships, such as linking ERBB2 (HER2) to lipid biosynthetic process in breast cancer, identifying PLG as a new gene involved in complement activation, and identifying AEBP1 as a new epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker. Our results demonstrate that proteome profiling outperforms transcriptome profiling for coexpression based gene function prediction. Proteomics should be integrated if not preferred in gene function and human disease studies

  4. Proteome Profiling Outperforms Transcriptome Profiling for Coexpression Based Gene Function Prediction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Zihao; Carr, Steven A.; Mertins, Philipp; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Townsend, R. Reid; Smith, Richard D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Chen, Xian; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Boja, Emily S.; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Coexpression of mRNAs under multiple conditions is commonly used to infer cofunctionality of their gene products despite well-known limitations of this “guilt-by-association” (GBA) approach. Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have enabled global expression profiling at the protein level; however, whether proteome profiling data can outperform transcriptome profiling data for coexpression based gene function prediction has not been systematically investigated. Here, we address this question by constructing and analyzing mRNA and protein coexpression networks for three cancer types with matched mRNA and protein profiling data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). Our analyses revealed a marked difference in wiring between the mRNA and protein coexpression networks. Whereas protein coexpression was driven primarily by functional similarity between coexpressed genes, mRNA coexpression was driven by both cofunction and chromosomal colocalization of the genes. Functionally coherent mRNA modules were more likely to have their edges preserved in corresponding protein networks than functionally incoherent mRNA modules. Proteomic data strengthened the link between gene expression and function for at least 75% of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and 90% of KEGG pathways. A web application Gene2Net (http://cptac.gene2net.org) developed based on the three protein coexpression networks revealed novel gene-function relationships, such as linking ERBB2 (HER2) to lipid biosynthetic process in breast cancer, identifying PLG as a new gene involved in complement activation, and identifying AEBP1 as a new epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker. Our results demonstrate that proteome profiling outperforms transcriptome profiling for coexpression based gene function prediction. Proteomics should be integrated if not preferred in gene function and human disease studies. PMID

  5. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B. P.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Neves, Haroldo H. R.; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J.; Garcia, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  6. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore Cattle Are Modulators of Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirene G T Pereira

    Full Text Available Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS, were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1 as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1, IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2, GH1 (growth hormone 1, IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor and GHR (growth hormone receptor, suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway.

  7. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate gene and protein expression in the mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Kappeler, Connie J; Martin, Douglas S; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has both beneficial and detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) exhibit partial estrogen agonist/antagonist activity in estrogen target tissues. Gene targets of estrogen and SERMs in the vasculature are not well-known. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that estrogens (ethinyl estradiol, estradiol benzoate, and equilin) and SERMs (tamoxifen and raloxifene) cause differential gene and protein expression in the vasculature. DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate gene expression in the mesenteric arteries of estrogen and SERM treated ovariectomized rats. The genes shown to be differentially expressed included stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), secreted frizzled related protein-4 (SFRP-4), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), phospholipase A2 group 1B (PLA2-G1B), and fatty acid synthase (FAS). Western blot further confirmed the differential expression of sEH, SFRP-4, FAS, and SCD protein. These results reveal that estrogens and SERMs cause differential gene and protein expression in the mesenteric artery. Consequently, the use of these agents may be associated with a unique profile of functional and structural changes in the mesenteric arterial circulation.

  8. Evolution and function of de novo originated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-05-01

    De novo origination has recently been appreciated to be an important mechanism contributing to the origin of genes. Evidence indicates that de novo originated genes can evolve important and even essential functions rapidly. We present an "adaptation following neutrality" process to explain the evolution of essential function of new genes. How new de novo originated genes become involved in pathways and interact with other old genes, and the exact functions of these new genes, however, remains largely undocumented. Examinations of the function of de novo origin and the function of noncoding RNA genes should become more frequent and appreciated in the future studies.

  9. Modulation of gene expression in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exposed to bronchoalveolar fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul G Lone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, is an important pathogen of swine throughout the world. It must rapidly overcome the innate pulmonary immune defenses of the pig to cause disease. To better understand this process, the objective of this study was to identify genes that are differentially expressed in a medium that mimics the lung environment early in the infection process. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF contains innate immune and other components found in the lungs, we examined gene expression of a virulent serovar 1 strain of A. pleuropneumoniae after a 30 min exposure to BALF, using DNA microarrays and real-time PCR. The functional classes of genes found to be up-regulated most often in BALF were those encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism, especially anaerobic metabolism, and in cell envelope, DNA, and protein biosynthesis. Transcription of a number of known virulence genes including apxIVA and the gene for SapF, a protein which is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides, was also up-regulated in BALF. Seventy-nine percent of the genes that were up-regulated in BALF encoded a known protein product, and of these, 44% had been reported to be either expressed in vivo and/or involved in virulence. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that in early stages of infection, A. pleuropneumoniae may modulate expression of genes involved in anaerobic energy generation and in the synthesis of proteins involved in cell wall biogenesis, as well as established virulence factors. Given that many of these genes are thought to be expressed in vivo or involved in virulence, incubation in BALF appears, at least partially, to simulate in vivo conditions and may provide a useful medium for the discovery of novel vaccine or therapeutic targets.

  10. GO-based Functional Dissimilarity of Gene Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Ruiz Jesús S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology (GO provides a controlled vocabulary for describing the functions of genes and can be used to evaluate the functional coherence of gene sets. Many functional coherence measures consider each pair of gene functions in a set and produce an output based on all pairwise distances. A single gene can encode multiple proteins that may differ in function. For each functionality, other proteins that exhibit the same activity may also participate. Therefore, an identification of the most common function for all of the genes involved in a biological process is important in evaluating the functional similarity of groups of genes and a quantification of functional coherence can helps to clarify the role of a group of genes working together. Results To implement this approach to functional assessment, we present GFD (GO-based Functional Dissimilarity, a novel dissimilarity measure for evaluating groups of genes based on the most relevant functions of the whole set. The measure assigns a numerical value to the gene set for each of the three GO sub-ontologies. Conclusions Results show that GFD performs robustly when applied to gene set of known functionality (extracted from KEGG. It performs particularly well on randomly generated gene sets. An ROC analysis reveals that the performance of GFD in evaluating the functional dissimilarity of gene sets is very satisfactory. A comparative analysis against other functional measures, such as GS2 and those presented by Resnik and Wang, also demonstrates the robustness of GFD.

  11. Selection for tameness modulates the expression of heme related genes in silver foxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilà Carles

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic and molecular mechanisms of tameness are largely unknown. A line of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes selected for non-aggressive behavior has been used in Russia since the 1960's to study the effect of domestication. We have previously compared descendants of these selected (S animals with a group of non-selected (NS silver foxes kept under identical conditions, and showed that changes in the brain transcriptome between the two groups are small. Unexpectedly, many of the genes showing evidence of differential expression between groups were related to hemoproteins. Results In this study, we use quantitative RT-PCR to demonstrate that the activity of heme related genes differ between S and NS foxes in three regions of the brain. Furthermore, our analyses also indicate that changes in mRNA levels of heme related genes can be well described by an additive polygenic effect. We also show that the difference in genetic background between the two lines of foxes is limited, as estimated by mitochondrial DNA divergence. Conclusion Our results indicate that selection for tameness can modify the expression of heme related genes in canid brain regions known to modulate emotions and behavior. The possible involvement of heme related genes in behavior is surprising. It is possible that hemoglobin modulates the behavior of canids by interaction with CO and NO signaling. Another possibility is that hemorphins, known to be produced after enzymatic cleavage of hemoglobin, are responsible for behavioral alterations. Thus, we hypothesize that hemoglobin metabolism can be a functionally relevant aspect of the domestic phenotype in foxes selected for tameness.

  12. Modulation of Vascular Cell Function by Bim Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Morrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim−/− mice. Bim−/− endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim−/− endothelial cells with Bim−/− pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  13. Modulation of vascular cell function by bim expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaret E; Palenski, Tammy L; Jamali, Nasim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim(-/-)) mice. Bim(-/-) endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim(-/-) endothelial cells with Bim(-/-) pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  14. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  15. Estimation of presampling modulation transfer function in synchrotron radiation microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The spatial resolution achieved by recent synchrotron radiation microtomographs should be estimated from the modulation transfer function (MTF) on the micrometer scale. Step response functions of a synchrotron radiation microtomograph were determined by the slanted edge method by using high-precision surfaces of diamond crystal and ion-milled aluminum wire. Tilted reconstruction was introduced to enable any edge to be used as the slanted edge by defining the reconstruction pixel matrix in an arbitrary orientation. MTFs were estimated from the step response functions of the slanted edges. The obtained MTFs coincided with MTF values estimated from square-wave patterns milled on the aluminum surface. Although x-ray refraction influences should be taken into account to evaluate MTFs, any flat surfaces with nanometer roughness can be used to determine the spatial resolutions of microtomographs.

  16. Cholinergic modulation of the hippocampal region and memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2017-08-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in memory function and has been implicated in aging-related dementia, in which the impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning strongly manifests. Cholinergic neurons densely innervate the hippocampus, mediating the formation of episodic as well as semantic memory. Here, we will review recent findings on acetylcholine's modulation of memory function, with a particular focus on hippocampus-dependent learning, and the circuits involved. In addition, we will discuss the complexity of ACh actions in memory function to better understand the physiological role of ACh in memory. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies.

  18. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eKurtenbach

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction communication mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases and signaling cascades. This gap junction network can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies.

  19. Remote synchronization reveals network symmetries and functional modules

    CERN Document Server

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Chavez, Mario; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Latora, Vito

    2012-01-01

    We study a Kuramoto model in which the oscillators are associated to the nodes of a complex network and the interactions include a phase frustration, thus preventing full synchronization. The system organizes into a regime of remote synchronization where pairs of nodes with the same network symmetry are fully synchronized, despite their distance on the graph. We provide analytical arguments to explain this result and we show how the frustration parameter affects the distribution of phases. An application to brain networks suggests that anatomical symmetry plays a role in neural synchronization by determining correlated functional modules across distant locations.

  20. Characterization of chemically induced liver injuries using gene co-expression modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Tawa

    Full Text Available Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1 known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2 clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20% genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects.

  1. Characterization of Chemically Induced Liver Injuries Using Gene Co-Expression Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Gregory J.; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Yu, Xueping; Kumar, Kamal; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules) specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1) known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2) clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20%) genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects. PMID:25226513

  2. A Method of Clustering Components into Modules Based on Products' Functional and Structural Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-hui; JIANG Zu-hua; ZHENG Ying-fei

    2006-01-01

    Modularity is the key to improving the cost-variety trade-off in product development. To achieve the functional independency and structural independency of modules, a method of clustering components to identify modules based on functional and structural analysis was presented. Two stages were included in the method. In the first stage the products' function was analyzed to determine the primary level of modules. Then the objective function for modules identifying was formulated to achieve functional independency of modules. Finally the genetic algorithm was used to solve the combinatorial optimization problem in modules identifying to form the primary modules of products. In the second stage the cohesion degree of modules and the coupling degree between modules were analyzed. Based on this structural analysis the modular scheme was refined according to the thinking of structural independency. A case study on the gear reducer was conducted to illustrate the validity of the presented method.

  3. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya, E-mail: suzukis@ph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  4. FOXO3a regulates BNIP3 and modulates mitochondrial calcium, dynamics, and function in cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaanine, Antoine H; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Gamb, Scott I; Guenzel, Adam J; Klaus, Katherine; Fayyaz, Ahmed U; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Hajjar, Roger J; Redfield, Margaret M

    2016-12-01

    The forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) transcription factor has been shown to regulate glucose metabolism, muscle atrophy, and cell death in postmitotic cells. Its role in regulation of mitochondrial and myocardial function is not well studied. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that FOXO3a, through BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), modulates mitochondrial morphology and function in heart failure (HF). We modulated the FOXO3a-BNIP3 pathway in normal and phenylephrine (PE)-stressed adult cardiomyocytes (ACM) in vitro and developed a cardiotropic adeno-associated virus serotype 9 encoding dominant-negative FOXO3a (AAV9.dn-FX3a) for gene delivery in a rat model of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We found that FOXO3a upregulates BNIP3 expression in normal and PE-stressed ACM, with subsequent increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), leading to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, and apoptosis. Whereas dn-FX3a attenuated the increase in BNIP3 expression and its consequences in PE-stressed ACM, AAV9.dn-FX3a delivery in an experimental model of HFpEF decreased BNIP3 expression, reversed adverse left ventricular remodeling, and improved left ventricular systolic and, particularly, diastolic function, with improvements in mitochondrial structure and function. Moreover, AAV9.dn-FX3a restored phospholamban phosphorylation at S16 and enhanced dynamin-related protein 1 phosphorylation at S637. Furthermore, FOXO3a upregulates maladaptive genes involved in mitochondrial apoptosis, autophagy, and cardiac atrophy. We conclude that FOXO3a activation in cardiac stress is maladaptive, in that it modulates Ca(2+) cycling, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and mitochondrial dynamics and function. Our results suggest an important role of FOXO3a in HF, making it an attractive potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  6. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Amador

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression.

  7. Arabidopsis ATRX Modulates H3.3 Occupancy and Fine-Tunes Gene Expression

    KAUST Repository

    Duc, Céline

    2017-07-07

    Histones are essential components of the nucleosome, the major chromatin subunit that structures linear DNA molecules and regulates access of other proteins to DNA. Specific histone chaperone complexes control the correct deposition of canonical histones and their variants to modulate nucleosome structure and stability. In this study, we characterize the Arabidopsis Alpha Thalassemia-mental Retardation X-linked (ATRX) ortholog and show that ATRX is involved in histone H3 deposition. Arabidopsis ATRX mutant alleles are viable, but show developmental defects and reduced fertility. Their combination with mutants of the histone H3.3 chaperone HIRA (Histone Regulator A) results in impaired plant survival, suggesting that HIRA and ATRX function in complementary histone deposition pathways. Indeed, ATRX loss of function alters cellular histone H3.3 pools and in consequence modulates the H3.1/H3.3 balance in the cell. H3.3 levels are affected especially at genes characterized by elevated H3.3 occupancy, including the 45S ribosomal DNA (45S rDNA) loci, where loss of ATRX results in altered expression of specific 45S rDNA sequence variants. At the genome-wide scale, our data indicate that ATRX modifies gene expression concomitantly to H3.3 deposition at a set of genes characterized both by elevated H3.3 occupancy and high expression. Altogether, our results show that ATRX is involved in H3.3 deposition and emphasize the role of histone chaperones in adjusting genome expression.

  8. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Bhismadev

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC. However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking. Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380 were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing

  9. Module-based quality system functionality evaluation in production logistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabbazi, M.R.; Wikander, J.; Onori, M.; Maffei, A.; Chen, D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses a comprehensive modeling and functionality evaluation of a module-based quality system in production logistics at the highest domain abstract level of business processes. All domain quality business processes and quality data transactions are modeled using BPMN and UML tools and standards at the business process and data modeling. A modular web-based prototype is developed to evaluate the models addressing the quality information system functionality requirements and modularity in production logistics through data scenarios and data queries. Using the object-oriented technique in design at the highest domain level, the proposed models are subject further development in the lower levels for the implementing case. The models are specifically able to manipulate all quality operations including remedy and control in a lot-based make-to-order production logistics system as an individual module. Due to the specification of system as domain design structure, all proposed BPMs, data models, and the actual database prototype are seen referential if not a solution as a practical “to-be” quality business process re-engineering template. This paper sets out to provide an explanatory approach using different practical technique at modeling steps as well as the prototype implementation. (Author)

  10. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined D

  11. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined D

  12. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer's disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs) of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs. PMID:28163934

  13. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer’s disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs.

  14. Beta Function Measurement in the Tevatron Using Quadrupole Gradient Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Jansson, Andreas; Volk, James T

    2005-01-01

    Early in Run2, there was an effort to compare the different emittance measurements in the Tevatron (flying wires and synchtotron light) and understand the origin of the observed differences. To measure the beta function at a few key locations near the instruments, air-core quadrupoles were installed. By modulating the gradient of these magents and measuring the effect on the tune, the lattice parameters can be extracted. Initially, the results seem to disagree with with other methods. At the time, the lattice was strongly coupled due to a skew component in the main dipoles, caused by sagging of the cryostat. After a large fraction of the superconducting magnets were shimmed to remove a strong skew quadrupole component, the results now agree with expectations, confirming that the beta function is not the major error source of discrepancy in the emittance measurement.

  15. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed.

  16. Functional analysis of fungal polyketide biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Isao

    2010-05-01

    Fungal polyketides have huge structural diversity from simple aromatics to highly modified complex reduced-type compounds. Despite such diversty, single modular iterative type I polyketide synthases (iPKSs) are responsible for their carbon skeleton construction. Using heterologous expression systems, we have studied on ATX, a 6-methylsalicylic acid synthase from Aspergillus terreus as a model iPKS. In addition, iPKS functions involved in fungal spore pigment biosynthesis were analyzed together with polyketide-shortening enzymes that convert products of PKSs to shorter ketides by hydrolytic C-C bond cleavage. In our studies on reducing-type iPKSs, we cloned and expressed PKS genes, pksN, pksF, pksK and sol1 from Alternaria solani. The sol gene cluster was found to be involved in solanapyrone biosynthesis and sol5 was identified to encode solanapyrone synthase, a Diels-Alder enzyme. Our fungal PKS studies were further extended to identify the function of PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthase involved in cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis.

  17. Modulation of biofilm exopolysaccharides by the Streptococcus mutans vicX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans effectively utilizes dietary sucrose for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide, which act as a scaffold for its biofilm, thus contributing to its pathogenicity, environmental stress tolerance, and antimicrobial resistance. The two-component system VicRK of S. mutans regulates a group of virulence genes that are associated with biofilm matrix synthesis. Knockout of vicX affects biofilm formation, oxidative stress tolerance, and transformation of S. mutans. However, little is known regarding the vicX-modulated structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharides underlying the biofilm formation and the phenotypes of the vicX mutants. Here, we identified the role of vicX in the structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm physiology. The vicX mutant (SmuvicX biofilms seemingly exhibited desertification with architecturally impaired exopolysaccharide-enmeshed cell clusters, compared with the UA159 strain (S. mutans wild type strain. Concomitantly, SmuvicX showed a decrease in water-insoluble glucan (WIG synthesis and in WIG/water-soluble glucan (WSG ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC showed that the WIG isolated from the SmuvicX biofilms had a much lower molecular weight compared with the UA159 strain indicating differences in polysaccharide chain lengths. A monosaccharide composition analysis demonstrated the importance of the vicX gene in the glucose metabolism. We performed metabolite profiling via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that several chemical shifts were absent in both WSG and WIG of SmuvicX biofilms compared with the UA159 strain. Thus, the modulation of structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide by vicX provides new insights into the interaction between the exopolysaccharide structure, gene functions, and cariogenicity. Our results suggest that vicX gene modulates the structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide associated with

  18. From gene engineering to gene modulation and manipulation: can we prevent or detect gene doping in sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetto, Giuseppe; Bermon, Stéphane

    2013-10-01

    During the last 2 decades, progress in deciphering the human gene map as well as the discovery of specific defective genes encoding particular proteins in some serious human diseases have resulted in attempts to treat sick patients with gene therapy. There has been considerable focus on human recombinant proteins which were gene-engineered and produced in vitro (insulin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, erythropoietin). Unfortunately, these substances and methods also became improper tools for unscrupulous athletes. Biomedical research has focused on the possible direct insertion of gene material into the body, in order to replace some defective genes in vivo and/or to promote long-lasting endogenous synthesis of deficient proteins. Theoretically, diabetes, anaemia, muscular dystrophies, immune deficiency, cardiovascular diseases and numerous other illnesses could benefit from such innovative biomedical research, though much work remains to be done. Considering recent findings linking specific genotypes and physical performance, it is tempting to submit the young athletic population to genetic screening or, alternatively, to artificial gene expression modulation. Much research is already being conducted in order to achieve a safe transfer of genetic material to humans. This is of critical importance since uncontrolled production of the specifically coded protein, with serious secondary adverse effects (polycythaemia, acute cardiovascular problems, cancer, etc.), could occur. Other unpredictable reactions (immunogenicity of vectors or DNA-vector complex, autoimmune anaemia, production of wild genetic material) also remain possible at the individual level. Some new substances (myostatin blockers or anti-myostatin antibodies), although not gene material, might represent a useful and well-tolerated treatment to prevent progression of muscular dystrophies. Similarly, other molecules, in the roles of gene or metabolic activators [5-aminoimidazole-4

  19. Long-term oil contamination alters the molecular ecological networks of soil microbial functional genes

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    Yuting eLiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001. Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential keystone genes, defined as either hubs or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions.

  20. Constructing gene co-expression networks and predicting functions of unknown genes by random matrix theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Haichun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale sequencing of entire genomes has ushered in a new age in biology. One of the next grand challenges is to dissect the cellular networks consisting of many individual functional modules. Defining co-expression networks without ambiguity based on genome-wide microarray data is difficult and current methods are not robust and consistent with different data sets. This is particularly problematic for little understood organisms since not much existing biological knowledge can be exploited for determining the threshold to differentiate true correlation from random noise. Random matrix theory (RMT, which has been widely and successfully used in physics, is a powerful approach to distinguish system-specific, non-random properties embedded in complex systems from random noise. Here, we have hypothesized that the universal predictions of RMT are also applicable to biological systems and the correlation threshold can be determined by characterizing the correlation matrix of microarray profiles using random matrix theory. Results Application of random matrix theory to microarray data of S. oneidensis, E. coli, yeast, A. thaliana, Drosophila, mouse and human indicates that there is a sharp transition of nearest neighbour spacing distribution (NNSD of correlation matrix after gradually removing certain elements insider the matrix. Testing on an in silico modular model has demonstrated that this transition can be used to determine the correlation threshold for revealing modular co-expression networks. The co-expression network derived from yeast cell cycling microarray data is supported by gene annotation. The topological properties of the resulting co-expression network agree well with the general properties of biological networks. Computational evaluations have showed that RMT approach is sensitive and robust. Furthermore, evaluation on sampled expression data of an in silico modular gene system has showed that under

  1. A conserved BDNF, glutamate- and GABA-enriched gene module related to human depression identified by coexpression meta-analysis and DNA variant genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Ching Chang

    Full Text Available Large scale gene expression (transcriptome analysis and genome-wide association studies (GWAS for single nucleotide polymorphisms have generated a considerable amount of gene- and disease-related information, but heterogeneity and various sources of noise have limited the discovery of disease mechanisms. As systematic dataset integration is becoming essential, we developed methods and performed meta-clustering of gene coexpression links in 11 transcriptome studies from postmortem brains of human subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD and non-psychiatric control subjects. We next sought enrichment in the top 50 meta-analyzed coexpression modules for genes otherwise identified by GWAS for various sets of disorders. One coexpression module of 88 genes was consistently and significantly associated with GWAS for MDD, other neuropsychiatric disorders and brain functions, and for medical illnesses with elevated clinical risk of depression, but not for other diseases. In support of the superior discriminative power of this novel approach, we observed no significant enrichment for GWAS-related genes in coexpression modules extracted from single studies or in meta-modules using gene expression data from non-psychiatric control subjects. Genes in the identified module encode proteins implicated in neuronal signaling and structure, including glutamate metabotropic receptors (GRM1, GRM7, GABA receptors (GABRA2, GABRA4, and neurotrophic and development-related proteins [BDNF, reelin (RELN, Ephrin receptors (EPHA3, EPHA5]. These results are consistent with the current understanding of molecular mechanisms of MDD and provide a set of putative interacting molecular partners, potentially reflecting components of a functional module across cells and biological pathways that are synchronously recruited in MDD, other brain disorders and MDD-related illnesses. Collectively, this study demonstrates the importance of integrating transcriptome data, gene

  2. A conserved BDNF, glutamate- and GABA-enriched gene module related to human depression identified by coexpression meta-analysis and DNA variant genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lun-Ching; Jamain, Stephane; Lin, Chien-Wei; Rujescu, Dan; Tseng, George C; Sibille, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Large scale gene expression (transcriptome) analysis and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for single nucleotide polymorphisms have generated a considerable amount of gene- and disease-related information, but heterogeneity and various sources of noise have limited the discovery of disease mechanisms. As systematic dataset integration is becoming essential, we developed methods and performed meta-clustering of gene coexpression links in 11 transcriptome studies from postmortem brains of human subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) and non-psychiatric control subjects. We next sought enrichment in the top 50 meta-analyzed coexpression modules for genes otherwise identified by GWAS for various sets of disorders. One coexpression module of 88 genes was consistently and significantly associated with GWAS for MDD, other neuropsychiatric disorders and brain functions, and for medical illnesses with elevated clinical risk of depression, but not for other diseases. In support of the superior discriminative power of this novel approach, we observed no significant enrichment for GWAS-related genes in coexpression modules extracted from single studies or in meta-modules using gene expression data from non-psychiatric control subjects. Genes in the identified module encode proteins implicated in neuronal signaling and structure, including glutamate metabotropic receptors (GRM1, GRM7), GABA receptors (GABRA2, GABRA4), and neurotrophic and development-related proteins [BDNF, reelin (RELN), Ephrin receptors (EPHA3, EPHA5)]. These results are consistent with the current understanding of molecular mechanisms of MDD and provide a set of putative interacting molecular partners, potentially reflecting components of a functional module across cells and biological pathways that are synchronously recruited in MDD, other brain disorders and MDD-related illnesses. Collectively, this study demonstrates the importance of integrating transcriptome data, gene coexpression modules

  3. Identification of novel gene targets and functions of p21-activated kinase 1 during DNA damage by gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Motwani

    Full Text Available P21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, modulates many cellular processes by phosphorylating its downstream substrates. In addition to its role in the cytoplasm, PAK1 also affects gene transcription due to its nuclear localization and association with chromatin. It is now recognized that PAK1 kinase activity and its nuclear translocation are rapidly stimulated by ionizing radiation (IR, and that PAK1 activation is a component of the DNA damage response. Owing to the role of PAK1 in the cell survival, its association with the chromatin, and now, stimulation by ionizing radiation, we hypothesize that PAK1 may be contributing to modulation of genes with roles in cellular processes that might be important in the DNA damage response. The purpose of this study was to identify new PAK1 targets in response to ionizing radiation with putative role in the DNA damage response. We examined the effect of IR on the gene expression patterns in the murine embryonic fibroblasts with or without Pak1 using microarray technology. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using Gene Spring GX 10.0.2. Pathway, network, functional analyses and gene family classification were carried out using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, Ingenuity Pathway, Gene Ontology and PANTHER respectively. Selective targets of PAK1 were validated by RT-qPCR. For the first time, we provide a genome-wide analysis of PAK1 and identify its targets with potential roles in the DNA damage response. Gene Ontology analysis identified genes in the IR-stimulated cells that were involved in cell cycle arrest and cell death. Pathway analysis revealed p53 pathway being most influenced by IR responsive, PAK1 targets. Gene family of transcription factors was over represented and gene networks involved in DNA replication, repair and cellular signaling were identified. In brief, this study identifies novel PAK1 dependent IR responsive genes which reveal new

  4. (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families: abundance and selective patterns of distribution according to function and gene length

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    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creation of human gene families was facilitated significantly by gene duplication and diversification. The (TG/CAn repeats exhibit length variability, display genome-wide distribution, and are abundant in the human genome. Accumulation of evidences for their multiple functional roles including regulation of transcription and stimulation of recombination and splicing elect them as functional elements. Here, we report analysis of the distribution of (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families. Results The 1,317 human gene families were classified into six functional classes. Distribution of (TG/CAn repeats were analyzed both from a global perspective and from a stratified perspective based on their biological properties. The number of genes with repeats decreased with increasing repeat length and several genes (53% had repeats of multiple types in various combinations. Repeats were positively associated with the class of Signaling and communication whereas, they were negatively associated with the classes of Immune and related functions and of Information. The proportion of genes with (TG/CAn repeats in each class was proportional to the corresponding average gene length. The repeat distribution pattern in large gene families generally mirrored the global distribution pattern but differed particularly for Collagen gene family, which was rich in repeats. The position and flanking sequences of the repeats of Collagen genes showed high conservation in the Chimpanzee genome. However the majority of these repeats displayed length polymorphism. Conclusion Positive association of repeats with genes of Signaling and communication points to their role in modulation of transcription. Negative association of repeats in genes of Information relates to the smaller gene length, higher expression and fundamental role in cellular physiology. In genes of Immune and related functions negative association of repeats perhaps relates to the smaller gene

  5. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  6. Gene set-based module discovery in the breast cancer transcriptome

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    Zhang Michael Q

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although microarray-based studies have revealed global view of gene expression in cancer cells, we still have little knowledge about regulatory mechanisms underlying the transcriptome. Several computational methods applied to yeast data have recently succeeded in identifying expression modules, which is defined as co-expressed gene sets under common regulatory mechanisms. However, such module discovery methods are not applied cancer transcriptome data. Results In order to decode oncogenic regulatory programs in cancer cells, we developed a novel module discovery method termed EEM by extending a previously reported module discovery method, and applied it to breast cancer expression data. Starting from seed gene sets prepared based on cis-regulatory elements, ChIP-chip data, and gene locus information, EEM identified 10 principal expression modules in breast cancer based on their expression coherence. Moreover, EEM depicted their activity profiles, which predict regulatory programs in each subtypes of breast tumors. For example, our analysis revealed that the expression module regulated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 is downregulated in triple negative breast cancers, suggesting similarity of transcriptional programs between stem cells and aggressive breast cancer cells. We also found that the activity of the PRC2 expression module is negatively correlated to the expression of EZH2, a component of PRC2 which belongs to the E2F expression module. E2F-driven EZH2 overexpression may be responsible for the repression of the PRC2 expression modules in triple negative tumors. Furthermore, our network analysis predicts regulatory circuits in breast cancer cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the gene set-based module discovery approach is a powerful tool to decode regulatory programs in cancer cells.

  7. Modulation of Aanat gene transcription in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anthony K; Chik, Constance L

    2010-01-01

    The main function of the rat pineal gland is to transform the circadian rhythm generated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus into a rhythmic signal of circulating melatonin characterized by a large nocturnal increase that closely reflects the duration of night period. This is achieved through the tight coupling between environmental lighting and the expression of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase, the rhythm-controlling enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The initiation of Aanat transcription at night is controlled largely by the norepinephrine-stimulated phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein by protein kinase A. However, to accurately reflect the duration of darkness, additional signaling mechanisms also participate to fine-tune the temporal profile of adrenergic-induced Aanat transcription. Here, we reviewed some of these signaling mechanisms, with emphasis on the more recent findings. These signaling mechanisms can be divided into two groups: those involving modification of constitutively expressed proteins and those requiring synthesis of new proteins. This review highlights the pineal gland as an excellent model system for studying neurotransmitter-regulated rhythmic gene expression.

  8. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Tobias eSchuwerk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition.

  9. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyakshi Mahanta; Hasin Afzal Ahmed; Dhruba Kumar Bhattacharyya; Ashish Ghosh

    2014-06-01

    Construction of co-expression network and extraction of network modules have been an appealing area of bioinformatics research. This article presents a co-expression network construction and a biologically relevant network module extraction technique based on fuzzy set theoretic approach. The technique is able to handle both positive and negative correlations among genes. The constructed network for some benchmark gene expression datasets have been validated using topological internal and external measures. The effectiveness of network module extraction technique has been established in terms of well-known p-value, Q-value and topological statistics.

  10. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  11. IQGAP1 functions as a modulator of dishevelled nuclear localization in Wnt signaling.

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    Toshiyasu Goto

    Full Text Available Dishevelled (DVL is a central factor in the Wnt signaling pathway, which is highly conserved among various organisms. DVL plays important roles in transcriptional activation in the nucleus, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their nuclear localization remain unclear. In the present study, we identified IQGAP1 as a regulator of DVL function. In Xenopus embryos, depletion of IQGAP1 reduced Wnt-induced nuclear accumulation of DVL, and expression of Wnt target genes during early embryogenesis. The domains in DVL and IQGAP1 that mediated their interaction are also required for their nuclear localization. Endogenous expression of Wnt target genes was reduced by depletion of IQGAP1 during early embryogenesis, but notably not by depletion of other IQGAP family genes. Moreover, expression of Wnt target genes caused by depletion of endogenous IQGAP1 could be rescued by expression of wild-type IQGAP1, but not IQGAP1 deleting DVL binding region. These results provide the first evidence that IQGAP1 functions as a modulator in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway.

  12. Experimental research of limits for thermal modulation transfer function

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    Tomić Ljubiša D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented testing of surface defects by pulse video thermography techniques. Such techniques rely on transient infrared radiation from the sample heated by the short duration flux initiated by flesh. Experimental measurements are realized by infrared sensor (FLIR camera. Testing results are considered for the samples with controlled designed defects beyond observed surfaces. The effects of response through the transparent wall are measured as infrared visible radiance. Researches with controlled samples are performed to verify visibility threshold of defect dimensions and forms, for possible use as modulation transfer function of defects hidden beyond the surfaces of thin metal walls. Dimensionless coefficients are derived for method estimations as the results from experimental research.

  13. Modulation of immune development and function by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Srinivasan, Naren; Maloy, Kevin J

    2014-11-01

    The immune system must constantly monitor the gastrointestinal tract for the presence of pathogens while tolerating trillions of commensal microbiota. It is clear that intestinal microbiota actively modulate the immune system to maintain a mutually beneficial relation, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are not fully understood. Recent advances have begun to shed light on the cellular and molecular factors involved, revealing that a range of microbiota derivatives can influence host immune functions by targeting various cell types, including intestinal epithelial cells, mononuclear phagocytes, innate lymphoid cells, and B and T lymphocytes. Here, we review these findings, highlighting open questions and important challenges to overcome in translating this knowledge into new therapies for intestinal and systemic immune disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. EXPOSURE TO SWINE HOUSING DUST MODULATES MACROPHAGE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION

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    Ruth J. Pender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine Confinement Facility (SCF dust consists of a complex mixture of feed grain particles, bacterial components, organic particulates and gases. When these particles are inhaled they deposit along the respiratory tract and mediate respiratory symptoms and disease in swine farmers and facility workers. Macrophages ingest and eliminate microbes and debris under chronic conditions; however, the role of macrophages in agricultural-related respiratory disease has not been fully elucidated. The goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SCF dust causes inflammation by modulating pulmonary protein levels and macrophage function. Balb/c mice were exposed to 5, 12.5 and 25% SCF Dust Extract (DE via nebulization 30 min/day five days a week, for eight weeks with weekends excluded. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF was collected and analyzed for protein concentration, leukocyte distribution and macrophage morphology. For comparison, THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to 0.1-10% DE overnight and evaluated for phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species production. Repeated exposure to DE via nebulizer caused a significant increase in protein concentration and inflammatory cell number, namely macrophages, in a dose-dependent manner within the lung as compared to controls. Macrophages with pseudopods and vacuoles were the most abundant leukocytes within BALF of mice exposed to DE. Similarly, in vitro studies with 10% DE treated THP-1 cells revealed enhanced phagocytosis (p<0.05, pseudopodia and vacuolization following exposure to compared to control cells. In addition, there were time- and dose-dependent increases of intracellular ROS production by THP-1 cells exposed to 5 and 10% DE compared to control (p<0.01. These findings indicate repeated, long-term inhalation of swine confinement facility dust may mediate chronic airway and lung inflammation through modulation of protein concentration and macrophage function. The aerosolized dust

  15. Reconstruction of gene regulatory modules in cancer cell cycle by multi-source data integration.

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    Yuji Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Precise regulation of the cell cycle is crucial to the growth and development of all organisms. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of the cell cycle is crucial to unraveling many complicated diseases, most notably cancer. Multiple sources of biological data are available to study the dynamic interactions among many genes that are related to the cancer cell cycle. Integrating these informative and complementary data sources can help to infer a mutually consistent gene transcriptional regulatory network with strong similarity to the underlying gene regulatory relationships in cancer cells. RESULTS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We propose an integrative framework that infers gene regulatory modules from the cell cycle of cancer cells by incorporating multiple sources of biological data, including gene expression profiles, gene ontology, and molecular interaction. Among 846 human genes with putative roles in cell cycle regulation, we identified 46 transcription factors and 39 gene ontology groups. We reconstructed regulatory modules to infer the underlying regulatory relationships. Four regulatory network motifs were identified from the interaction network. The relationship between each transcription factor and predicted target gene groups was examined by training a recurrent neural network whose topology mimics the network motif(s to which the transcription factor was assigned. Inferred network motifs related to eight well-known cell cycle genes were confirmed by gene set enrichment analysis, binding site enrichment analysis, and comparison with previously published experimental results. CONCLUSIONS: We established a robust method that can accurately infer underlying relationships between a given transcription factor and its downstream target genes by integrating different layers of biological data. Our method could also be beneficial to biologists for predicting the components of regulatory modules in which any candidate gene is involved

  16. Ras GTPases modulate morphogenesis, sporulation and cellulase gene expression in the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei.

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    Jiwei Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2(G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute

  17. Complex modulation of androgen responsive gene expression by methoxyacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Kerri A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal androgen signaling is critical for testicular development and spermatogenesis. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA, the primary active metabolite of the industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, disrupts spermatogenesis and causes testicular atrophy. Transcriptional trans-activation studies have indicated that MAA can enhance androgen receptor activity, however, whether MAA actually impacts the expression of androgen-responsive genes in vivo, and which genes might be affected is not known. Methods A mouse TM3 Leydig cell line that stably expresses androgen receptor (TM3-AR was prepared and analyzed by transcriptional profiling to identify target gene interactions between MAA and testosterone on a global scale. Results MAA is shown to have widespread effects on androgen-responsive genes, affecting processes ranging from apoptosis to ion transport, cell adhesion, phosphorylation and transcription, with MAA able to enhance, as well as antagonize, androgenic responses. Moreover, testosterone is shown to exert both positive and negative effects on MAA gene responses. Motif analysis indicated that binding sites for FOX, HOX, LEF/TCF, STAT5 and MEF2 family transcription factors are among the most highly enriched in genes regulated by testosterone and MAA. Notably, 65 FOXO targets were repressed by testosterone or showed repression enhanced by MAA with testosterone; these include 16 genes associated with developmental processes, six of which are Hox genes. Conclusions These findings highlight the complex interactions between testosterone and MAA, and provide insight into the effects of MAA exposure on androgen-dependent processes in a Leydig cell model.

  18. Statistical analysis of genomic protein family and domain controlled annotations for functional investigation of classified gene lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masseroli Marco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing protein family and domain based annotations constitute important information to understand protein functions and gain insight into relations among their codifying genes. To allow analyzing of gene proteomic annotations, we implemented novel modules within GFINDer, a Web system we previously developed that dynamically aggregates functional and phenotypic annotations of user-uploaded gene lists and allows performing their statistical analysis and mining. Results Exploiting protein information in Pfam and InterPro databanks, we developed and added in GFINDer original modules specifically devoted to the exploration and analysis of functional signatures of gene protein products. They allow annotating numerous user-classified nucleotide sequence identifiers with controlled information on related protein families, domains and functional sites, classifying them according to such protein annotation categories, and statistically analyzing the obtained classifications. In particular, when uploaded nucleotide sequence identifiers are subdivided in classes, the Statistics Protein Families&Domains module allows estimating relevance of Pfam or InterPro controlled annotations for the uploaded genes by highlighting protein signatures significantly more represented within user-defined classes of genes. In addition, the Logistic Regression module allows identifying protein functional signatures that better explain the considered gene classification. Conclusion Novel GFINDer modules provide genomic protein family and domain analyses supporting better functional interpretation of gene classes, for instance defined through statistical and clustering analyses of gene expression results from microarray experiments. They can hence help understanding fundamental biological processes and complex cellular mechanisms influenced by protein domain composition, and contribute to unveil new biomedical knowledge about the codifying genes.

  19. CarD integrates three functional modules to promote efficient transcription, antibiotic tolerance, and pathogenesis in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Ashley L; Weiss, Leslie A; Manzano, Ana Ruiz; Galburt, Eric A; Stallings, Christina L

    2014-08-01

    Although the basic mechanisms of prokaryotic transcription are conserved, it has become evident that some bacteria require additional factors to allow for efficient gene transcription. CarD is an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-binding protein conserved in numerous bacterial species and essential in mycobacteria. Despite the importance of CarD, its function at transcription complexes remains unclear. We have generated a panel of mutations that individually target three independent functional modules of CarD: the RNAP interaction domain, the DNA-binding domain, and a conserved tryptophan residue. We have dissected the roles of each functional module in CarD activity and built a model where each module contributes to stabilizing RNAP-promoter complexes. Our work highlights the requirement of all three modules of CarD in the obligate pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We also report divergent use of the CarD functional modules in resisting oxidative stress and pigmentation. These studies provide new information regarding the functional domains involved in transcriptional regulation by CarD while also improving understanding of the physiology of M. tuberculosis.

  20. CarD integrates three functional modules to promote efficient transcription, antibiotic tolerance, and pathogenesis in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Ashley L.; Weiss, Leslie A.; Manzano, Ana Ruiz; Galburt, Eric A.; Stallings, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the basic mechanisms of prokaryotic transcription are conserved, it has become evident that some bacteria require additional factors to allow for efficient gene transcription. CarD is an RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding protein conserved in numerous bacterial species and essential in mycobacteria. Despite the importance of CarD, its function at transcription complexes remains unclear. We have generated a panel of mutations that individually target three independent functional modules of CarD: the RNAP interaction domain, the DNA binding domain, and a conserved tryptophan residue. We have dissected the roles of each functional module in CarD activity and built a model where each module contributes to stabilizing RNAP-promoter complexes. Our work highlights the requirement of all three modules of CarD in the obligate pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We also report divergent use of the CarD functional modules in resisting oxidative stress and pigmentation. These studies provide new information regarding the functional domains involved in transcriptional regulation by CarD while also improving understanding of the physiology of M. tuberculosis. PMID:24962732

  1. Identifying modules of coexpressed transcript units and their organization of Saccharopolyspora erythraea from time series gene expression profiles.

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    Xiao Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome sequence was released in 2007. In order to look at the gene regulations at whole transcriptome level, an expression microarray was specifically designed on the S. erythraea strain NRRL 2338 genome sequence. Based on these data, we set out to investigate the potential transcriptional regulatory networks and their organization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In view of the hierarchical structure of bacterial transcriptional regulation, we constructed a hierarchical coexpression network at whole transcriptome level. A total of 27 modules were identified from 1255 differentially expressed transcript units (TUs across time course, which were further classified in to four groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the biological significance of our hierarchical network. It was indicated that primary metabolism is activated in the first rapid growth phase (phase A, and secondary metabolism is induced when the growth is slowed down (phase B. Among the 27 modules, two are highly correlated to erythromycin production. One contains all genes in the erythromycin-biosynthetic (ery gene cluster and the other seems to be associated with erythromycin production by sharing common intermediate metabolites. Non-concomitant correlation between production and expression regulation was observed. Especially, by calculating the partial correlation coefficients and building the network based on Gaussian graphical model, intrinsic associations between modules were found, and the association between those two erythromycin production-correlated modules was included as expected. CONCLUSIONS: This work created a hierarchical model clustering transcriptome data into coordinated modules, and modules into groups across the time course, giving insight into the concerted transcriptional regulations especially the regulation corresponding to erythromycin production of S. erythraea. This strategy may be extendable to studies

  2. Transcriptional modulation of squalene synthase genes in barley treated with PGPR

    OpenAIRE

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene squalene synthase (SS). In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27 ± 3°C) greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analyzed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of SS. Results revealed that among four SS genes (i.e...

  3. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  4. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  5. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  6. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  7. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara M Stawicki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf, that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf. The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  8. [Association of the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) gene with human cognitive functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimova, M V; Lezheĭko, T V; Gritsenko, I K; Golimbet, V E

    2012-08-01

    Active search for candidate genes whose polymorphisms are associated with human cognitive functions has been in progress in the past years. The study focused on the role that the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) gene may play in the variation of cognitive processes related to executive functions. The ApaI polymorphism of the IGF2 gene was tested for association with selective attention during visual search, working memory/mental control, and semantic verbal fluency in a group of 182 healthy individuals. The ApaI polymorphism was associated with the general cognitive index and selective attention measure. Carriers of genotype AA displayed higher values of the two parameters than carriers of genotype GG. It was assumed that the ApaI polymorphism of the IGF2 gene influences the human cognitive functions, acting possibly via modulation of the IGF-II level in the central nervous system.

  9. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    OpenAIRE

    He Cui; Xi Lan; Shemin Lu; Fujun Zhang; Wanggang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA) gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system in U937 cells...

  10. A new analytical edge spread function fitting model for modulation transfer function measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiecheng Li; Huajun Feng; Zhihai Xu

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose a new analytical edge spread function (ESF) fitting model to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF).The ESF data obtained from a slanted-edge image are fitted to our model through the non-linear least squares (NLLSQ) method.The differentiation of the ESF yields the line spread function (LSF), the Fourier transform of which gives the profile of two-dimensional MTF.Compared with the previous methods, the MTF estimate determined by our method conforms more closely to the reference.A practical application of our MTF measurement in degraded image restoration also validates the accuracy of our model.%We propose a new analytical edge spread function (ESF) fitting model to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF). The ESF data obtained from a slanted-edge image are fitted to our model through the non-linear least squares (NLLSQ) method. The differentiation of the ESF yields the line spread function (LSF), the Fourier transform of which gives the profile of two-dimensional MTF. Compared with the previous methods, the MTF estimate determined by our method conforms more closely to the reference. A practical application of our MTF measurement in degraded image restoration also validates the accuracy of our model.

  11. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  12. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine.

  13. Inhaled corticosteroid treatment modulates ZNF432 gene variant's effect on bronchodilator response in asthmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ann C.; Himes, Blanca E.; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Litonjua, Augusto; Peters, Stephen P.; Lima, John; Kubo, Michiaki; Tamari, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Qiu, Weiliang; Weiss, Scott T.; Tantisira, Kelan

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence a patient's response to inhaled corticosteroids and β2-agonists, and the effect of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids is synergistic with the effect of β2-agonists. We hypothesized that use of inhaled corticosteroids could influence the effect of SNPs associated with bronchodilator response. Objective To assess whether, among asthma subjects, the association of SNPs with bronchodilator response is different between those treated with inhaled corticosteroids vs. those on placebo. Methods A genome-wide association analysis was conducted using 581 white subjects from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Using data for 449,540 SNPs, we conducted a gene by environment analysis in PLINK with inhaled corticosteroid treatment as the environmental exposure and bronchodilator response as the outcome measure. We attempted to replicate the top 12 SNPs in the Leukotriene Modifier Or Corticosteroid or Corticosteroid-Salmeterol (LOCCS) Trial. Results The combined P-value for the CAMP and LOCCS populations was 4.81E-08 for rs3752120, which is located in the zinc finger protein gene ZNF432, and has unknown function. Conclusions Inhaled corticosteroids appear to modulate the association of bronchodilator response with variant(s) in the ZNF432 gene among adults and children with asthma. Clinical Implications Clinicians who treat asthma patients with inhaled corticosteroids should be aware that the patient's genetic makeup likely influences response as measured in lung function. Capsule Summary Our study suggests that inhaled corticosteroids could influence the effect of multiple SNPs associated with bronchodilator response across the genome. PMID:24280104

  14. Ethanol modulation of gene networks: implications for alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Sean P; Miles, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disease caused by a confluence of environmental and genetic factors influencing multiple brain pathways to produce a variety of behavioral sequelae, including addiction. Genetic factors contribute to over 50% of the risk for alcoholism and recent evidence points to a large number of genes with small effect sizes as the likely molecular basis for this disease. Recent progress in genomics (microarrays or RNA-Seq) and genetics has led to the identification of a large number of potential candidate genes influencing ethanol behaviors or alcoholism itself. To organize this complex information, investigators have begun to focus on the contribution of gene networks, rather than individual genes, for various ethanol-induced behaviors in animal models or behavioral endophenotypes comprising alcoholism. This chapter reviews some of the methods used for constructing gene networks from genomic data and some of the recent progress made in applying such approaches to the study of the neurobiology of ethanol. We show that rapid technology development in gathering genomic data, together with sophisticated experimental design and a growing collection of analysis tools are producing novel insights for understanding the molecular basis of alcoholism and that such approaches promise new opportunities for therapeutic development.

  15. DENSE: efficient and prior knowledge-driven discovery of phenotype-associated protein functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrix Willam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying cellular subsystems that are involved in the expression of a target phenotype has been a very active research area for the past several years. In this paper, cellular subsystem refers to a group of genes (or proteins that interact and carry out a common function in the cell. Most studies identify genes associated with a phenotype on the basis of some statistical bias, others have extended these statistical methods to analyze functional modules and biological pathways for phenotype-relatedness. However, a biologist might often have a specific question in mind while performing such analysis and most of the resulting subsystems obtained by the existing methods might be largely irrelevant to the question in hand. Arguably, it would be valuable to incorporate biologist's knowledge about the phenotype into the algorithm. This way, it is anticipated that the resulting subsytems would not only be related to the target phenotype but also contain information that the biologist is likely to be interested in. Results In this paper we introduce a fast and theoretically guranteed method called DENSE (Dense and ENriched Subgraph Enumeration that can take in as input a biologist's prior knowledge as a set of query proteins and identify all the dense functional modules in a biological network that contain some part of the query vertices. The density (in terms of the number of network egdes and the enrichment (the number of query proteins in the resulting functional module can be manipulated via two parameters γ and μ, respectively. Conclusion This algorithm has been applied to the protein functional association network of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, a hydrogen producing, acid-tolerant organism. The algorithm was able to verify relationships known to exist in literature and also some previously unknown relationships including those with regulatory and signaling functions. Additionally, we were also able to hypothesize

  16. In vitro gene regulatory networks predict in vivo function of liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Choo Y

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of toxicity testing is predicated upon using in vitro cell based systems to rapidly screen and predict how a chemical might cause toxicity to an organ in vivo. However, the degree to which we can extend in vitro results to in vivo activity and possible mechanisms of action remains to be fully addressed. Results Here we use the nitroaromatic 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT as a model chemical to compare and determine how we might extrapolate from in vitro data to in vivo effects. We found 341 transcripts differentially expressed in common among in vitro and in vivo assays in response to TNT. The major functional term corresponding to these transcripts was cell cycle. Similarly modulated common pathways were identified between in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we uncovered the conserved common transcriptional gene regulatory networks between in vitro and in vivo cellular liver systems that responded to TNT exposure, which mainly contain 2 subnetwork modules: PTTG1 and PIR centered networks. Interestingly, all 7 genes in the PTTG1 module were involved in cell cycle and downregulated by TNT both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions The results of our investigation of TNT effects on gene expression in liver suggest that gene regulatory networks obtained from an in vitro system can predict in vivo function and mechanisms. Inhibiting PTTG1 and its targeted cell cyle related genes could be key machanism for TNT induced liver toxicity.

  17. In vitro gene regulatory networks predict in vivo function of liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Evolution of toxicity testing is predicated upon using in vitro cell based systems to rapidly screen and predict how a chemical might cause toxicity to an organ in vivo. However, the degree to which we can extend in vitro results to in vivo activity and possible mechanisms of action remains to be fully addressed. Results Here we use the nitroaromatic 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a model chemical to compare and determine how we might extrapolate from in vitro data to in vivo effects. We found 341 transcripts differentially expressed in common among in vitro and in vivo assays in response to TNT. The major functional term corresponding to these transcripts was cell cycle. Similarly modulated common pathways were identified between in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we uncovered the conserved common transcriptional gene regulatory networks between in vitro and in vivo cellular liver systems that responded to TNT exposure, which mainly contain 2 subnetwork modules: PTTG1 and PIR centered networks. Interestingly, all 7 genes in the PTTG1 module were involved in cell cycle and downregulated by TNT both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions The results of our investigation of TNT effects on gene expression in liver suggest that gene regulatory networks obtained from an in vitro system can predict in vivo function and mechanisms. Inhibiting PTTG1 and its targeted cell cyle related genes could be key machanism for TNT induced liver toxicity. PMID:21073692

  18. Heat-inducible RNAi for gene functional analysis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masclaux, Frédéric; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Controlling gene expression during plant development is an efficient method to explore gene function and RNA interference (RNAi) is now considered as a powerful technology for gene functional analysis. However, constitutive gene silencing cannot be used with genes involved in fundamental processes such as embryo viability or plant growth and alternative silencing strategies avoiding these limitations should be preferred. Tissue-specific and inducible promoters, able to control gene expression at spatial and/or temporal level, can be used to circumvent viability problems. In this chapter, after a rapid overview of the inducible promoters currently used for transgenic approaches in plants, we describe a method we have developed to study gene function by heat-inducible RNAi. This system is easy to use and complementary to those based on chemical gene inducer treatments and might be useful for both research and biotechnological applications.

  19. Semantic particularity measure for functional characterization of gene sets using gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettembourg, Charles; Diot, Christian; Dameron, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and genomic data analyses are outputting large sets of genes. Functional comparison of these gene sets is a key part of the analysis, as it identifies their shared functions, and the functions that distinguish each set. The Gene Ontology (GO) initiative provides a unified reference for analyzing the genes molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. Numerous semantic similarity measures have been developed to systematically quantify the weight of the GO terms shared by two genes. We studied how gene set comparisons can be improved by considering gene set particularity in addition to gene set similarity. We propose a new approach to compute gene set particularities based on the information conveyed by GO terms. A GO term informativeness can be computed using either its information content based on the term frequency in a corpus, or a function of the term's distance to the root. We defined the semantic particularity of a set of GO terms Sg1 compared to another set of GO terms Sg2. We combined our particularity measure with a similarity measure to compare gene sets. We demonstrated that the combination of semantic similarity and semantic particularity measures was able to identify genes with particular functions from among similar genes. This differentiation was not recognized using only a semantic similarity measure. Semantic particularity should be used in conjunction with semantic similarity to perform functional analysis of GO-annotated gene sets. The principle is generalizable to other ontologies.

  20. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  1. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects.

  2. Circadian modulation of gene expression, but not glutamate uptake, in mouse and rat cortical astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beaulé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks control daily rhythms including sleep-wake, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These clocks are based on intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops that sustain daily oscillations of gene expression in many cell types. Mammalian astrocytes display circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1 and Period2 (Per2. However, a functional role for circadian oscillations in astrocytes is unknown. Because uptake of extrasynaptic glutamate depends on the presence of Per2 in astrocytes, we asked whether glutamate uptake by glia is circadian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured glutamate uptake, transcript and protein levels of the astrocyte-specific glutamate transporter, Glast, and the expression of Per1 and Per2 from cultured cortical astrocytes and from explants of somatosensory cortex. We found that glutamate uptake and Glast mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in Clock/Clock, Per2- or NPAS2-deficient glia. Uptake was augmented when the medium was supplemented with dibutyryl-cAMP or B27. Critically, glutamate uptake was not circadian in cortical astrocytes cultured from rats or mice or in cortical slices from mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that glutamate uptake levels are modulated by CLOCK, PER2, NPAS2, and the composition of the culture medium, and that uptake does not show circadian variations.

  3. Gene Targeting and Expression Modulation by Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids capable of sequence specific hybridization to both RNA and DNA. Thus they have obvious potential as gene targeting agents for drug discovery approaches. An overview with emphasis on recent progress on RNA "interference"...

  4. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... Light is known to induce the expression of the NR genes. (Tischner, 2000; Lillo et .... diluted 1:10. The reactions were performed in a thermocycler model ..... Effects of long-term soil drought on photosynthesis and carbohydrate ...

  5. A product of heme catabolism modulates bacterial function and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Nobles

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome. This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models.

  6. Intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks coordinate the expression of genes for organellar functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leister, Dario; Wang, Xi; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F X; Kleine, Tatjana

    2011-09-01

    Genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are distributed between the nuclear and organellar genomes. Organelle biogenesis and metabolism, therefore, require appropriate coordination of gene expression in the different compartments to ensure efficient synthesis of essential multiprotein complexes of mixed genetic origin. Whereas organelle-to-nucleus signaling influences nuclear gene expression at the transcriptional level, organellar gene expression (OGE) is thought to be primarily regulated posttranscriptionally. Here, we show that intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks coordinate the expression of genes for organellar functions. Nearly 1,300 ATH1 microarray-based transcriptional profiles of nuclear and organellar genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were analyzed. The activity of genes involved in organellar energy production (OEP) or OGE in each of the organelles and in the nucleus is highly coordinated. Intracompartmental networks that link the OEP and OGE gene sets serve to synchronize the expression of nucleus- and organelle-encoded proteins. At a higher regulatory level, coexpression of organellar and nuclear OEP/OGE genes typically modulates chloroplast functions but affects mitochondria only when chloroplast functions are perturbed. Under conditions that induce energy shortage, the intercompartmental coregulation of photosynthesis genes can even override intracompartmental networks. We conclude that dynamic intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks for OEP and OGE genes adjust the activity of organelles in response to the cellular energy state and environmental stresses, and we identify candidate cis-elements involved in the transcriptional coregulation of nuclear genes. Regarding the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes, novel tentative target genes of σ factors are identified.

  7. Module-based functional pathway enrichment analysis of a protein-protein interaction network to study the effects of intestinal microbiota depletion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yi; Xia, Yang; Tong, Danian; Yao, Jing; Chen, Hong-Qi; Yang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Complex communities of microorganisms play important roles in human health, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota may induce intestinal inflammation and numerous diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify the key genes and processes affected by depletion of the intestinal microbiota in a murine model. The Affymetrix microarray dataset GSE22648 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the limma package in R. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed for the DEGs using the Cytoscape software, and the network was divided into several modules using the MCODE plugin. Furthermore, the modules were functionally annotated using the PiNGO plugin, and DEG-related pathways were retrieved and analyzed using the GenMAPP software. A total of 53 DEGs were identified, of which 26 were upregulated and 27 were downregulated. The PPI network of these DEGs comprised 3 modules. The most significant module-related DEGs were the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4B1 isozyme gene (CYP4B1) in module 1, CYP4F14 in module 2 and the tachykinin precursor 1 gene (TAC1) in module 3. The majority of enriched pathways of module 1 and 2 were oxidation reduction pathways (metabolism of xenobiotics by CYPs) and lipid metabolism-related pathways, including linoleic acid and arachidonic acid metabolism. The neuropeptide signaling pathway was the most significantly enriched functional pathway of module 3. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that intestinal microbiota depletion affects cellular metabolism and oxidation reduction pathways. In addition, this is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the neuropeptide signaling pathway is reported to be affected by intestinal microbiota depletion in mice. The present study provides a list of candidate genes and processes related to the interaction of microbiota with the intestinal tract.

  8. Modulation of neutrophil function by the tripeptide feG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Joseph S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are critical in the defense against potentially harmful microorganisms, but their excessive and inappropriate activation can contribute significantly to tissue damage and a worsening pathology. Through the release of endocrine factors submandibular glands contribute to achieving a balance in neutrophil function by modulating the state of activation and migratory potential of circulating neutrophils. A putative hormonal candidate for these effects on neutrophils was identified as a heptapeptide named submandibular gland peptide T (SGP-T; sequence = TDIFEGG. Since the tripeptide FEG, derived from SGP-T, and its D-amino acid analogue feG had similar inhibitory effects on inflammatory reactions, we investigated the effects of feG on human and rat neutrophil function. Results With human neutrophils feG had no discernible effect on oxidative burst or phagocytosis, but in picomolar amounts it reduced PAF-induced neutrophil movement and adhesion, and the binding of CD11b by 34% and that of CD16b close to control values. In the rat feG (10-11M reduced the binding of CD11b and CD16 antibodies to PAF-stimulated circulating neutrophils by 35% and 43%, respectively, and at 100 micrograms/kilograms intraperitoneally feG reduced neutrophil in vivo migration by 40%. With ovalbumin-sensitized rats that were challenged with antigen, feG inhibited binding of antibodies against CD16b but not CD11b, on peritoneal leukocytes. Conclusions The inhibitory effect of feG on neutrophil movement may be mediated by alterations in the co-stimulatory molecules CD11b and CD16.

  9. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - a fully automated, miniaturized instrument for measuring gene expression in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio; Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kianoosh

    2012-07-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecrafts opens the doors to a large number of experiments on the influence of space environment on biological systems that will profoundly impact our ability to conduct safe and effective space travel, and might also shed light on terrestrial physiology or biological function and human disease and aging processes. Measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, determine metabolic basis of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance, test our ability to sustain and grow in space organisms that can be used for life support and in situ resource utilization during long-duration space exploration, and monitor both the spacecraft environment and crew health. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology and medicine. Accordingly, supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measuring microbial expression of thousands of genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing bacterial cell walls, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing it on a microarray and (4) providing electrochemical readout, all in a microfluidics cartridge. The prototype under development is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by the NASA Small Spacecraft Office. The first target application is to cultivate and measure gene expression of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, i.e. a cyanobacterium known to exhibit remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions

  10. Tracing evolutionary footprints to identify novel gene functional linkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Systematic determination of gene function is an essential step in fully understanding the precise contribution of each gene for the proper execution of molecular functions in the cell. Gene functional linkage is defined as to describe the relationship of a group of genes with similar functions. With thousands of genomes sequenced, there arises a great opportunity to utilize gene evolutionary information to identify gene functional linkages. To this end, we established a computational method (called TRACE to trace gene footprints through a gene functional network constructed from 341 prokaryotic genomes. TRACE performance was validated and successfully tested to predict enzyme functions as well as components of pathway. A so far undescribed chromosome partitioning-like protein ro03654 of an oleaginous bacteria Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 (RHA1 was predicted and verified experimentally with its deletion mutant showing growth inhibition compared to RHA1 wild type. In addition, four proteins were predicted to act as prokaryotic SNARE-like proteins, and two of them were shown to be localized at the plasma membrane. Thus, we believe that TRACE is an effective new method to infer prokaryotic gene functional linkages by tracing evolutionary events.

  11. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D. Wade; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to

  12. FSim: A Novel Functional Similarity Search Algorithm and Tool for Discovering Functionally Related Gene Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During the analysis of genomics data, it is often required to quantify the functional similarity of genes and their products based on the annotation information from gene ontology (GO with hierarchical structure. A flexible and user-friendly way to estimate the functional similarity of genes utilizing GO annotation is therefore highly desired. Results. We proposed a novel algorithm using a level coefficient-weighted model to measure the functional similarity of gene products based on multiple ontologies of hierarchical GO annotations. The performance of our algorithm was evaluated and found to be superior to the other tested methods. We implemented the proposed algorithm in a software package, FSim, based on R statistical and computing environment. It can be used to discover functionally related genes for a given gene, group of genes, or set of function terms. Conclusions. FSim is a flexible tool to analyze functional gene groups based on the GO annotation databases.

  13. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  14. Identification of a gene module associated with BMD through the integration of network analysis and genome-wide association data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Charles R

    2010-11-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by a complex network of gene interactions; therefore, elucidating the relationships between genes and how those genes, in turn, influence BMD is critical for developing a comprehensive understanding of osteoporosis. To investigate the role of transcriptional networks in the regulation of BMD, we performed a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) using microarray expression data on monocytes from young individuals with low or high BMD. WGCNA groups genes into modules based on patterns of gene coexpression. and our analysis identified 11 gene modules. We observed that the overall expression of one module (referred to as module 9) was significantly higher in the low-BMD group (p = .03). Module 9 was highly enriched for genes belonging to the immune system-related gene ontology (GO) category "response to virus" (p = 7.6 × 10(-11)). Using publically available genome-wide association study data, we independently validated the importance of module 9 by demonstrating that highly connected module 9 hubs were more likely, relative to less highly connected genes, to be genetically associated with BMD. This study highlights the advantages of systems-level analyses to uncover coexpression modules associated with bone mass and suggests that particular monocyte expression patterns may mediate differences in BMD.

  15. An improved method for functional similarity analysis of genes based on Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Teng, Zhixia

    2016-12-23

    Measures of gene functional similarity are essential tools for gene clustering, gene function prediction, evaluation of protein-protein interaction, disease gene prioritization and other applications. In recent years, many gene functional similarity methods have been proposed based on the semantic similarity of GO terms. However, these leading approaches may make errorprone judgments especially when they measure the specificity of GO terms as well as the IC of a term set. Therefore, how to estimate the gene functional similarity reliably is still a challenging problem. We propose WIS, an effective method to measure the gene functional similarity. First of all, WIS computes the IC of a term by employing its depth, the number of its ancestors as well as the topology of its descendants in the GO graph. Secondly, WIS calculates the IC of a term set by means of considering the weighted inherited semantics of terms. Finally, WIS estimates the gene functional similarity based on the IC overlap ratio of term sets. WIS is superior to some other representative measures on the experiments of functional classification of genes in a biological pathway, collaborative evaluation of GO-based semantic similarity measures, protein-protein interaction prediction and correlation with gene expression. Further analysis suggests that WIS takes fully into account the specificity of terms and the weighted inherited semantics of terms between GO terms. The proposed WIS method is an effective and reliable way to compare gene function. The web service of WIS is freely available at http://nclab.hit.edu.cn/WIS/ .

  16. Modulation of social behavior by the agouti pigmentation gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eCarola

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Agouti is a secreted neuropeptide that acts as an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin receptors. Mice and rats lacking agouti (called non-agouti have dark fur due to a disinhibition of melanocortin signaling and pigment deposition in the hair follicle. Non-agouti animals have also been reported to exhibit altered behavior, despite no evidence for the expression of agouti outside the skin. Here we confirm that non-agouti mice show altered social behavior and uncover expression of agouti in the preputial gland, a sebaceous organ in the urinary tract that secretes molecules involved in social behavior. Non-agouti mice had enlarged preputial glands and altered levels of putative preputial pheromones and surgical removal of the gland reversed the behavioral phenotype. These findings demonstrate the existence of an autologous, out-of-skin pathway for the modulation of social behavior.

  17. Mitomycin C modulates the circadian oscillation of clock gene period 2 expression through attenuating the glucocorticoid signaling in mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kimoto, Kenichi; Akamine, Takahiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2015-11-06

    Clock gene regulates the circadian rhythm of various physiological functions. The expression of clock gene has been shown to be attenuated by certain drugs, resulting in a rhythm disorder. Mitomycin C (MMC) is often used in combination with ophthalmic surgery, especially in trabeculectomy, a glaucoma surgical procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of MMC on clock gene expression in fibroblasts, the target cells of MMC. Following MMC treatment, Bmal1 mRNA levels was significantly decreased, whereas Dbp, Per1, and Rev-erbα mRNA levels were significantly increased in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells. Microarray analysis was performed to explore of the gene(s) responsible for MMC-induced alteration of clock gene expression, and identified Nr3c1 gene encoding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a candidate. MMC suppressed the induction of Per1 mRNA by dexamethasone (DEX), ligand of GR, in NIH3T3 cells. MMC also modulated the DEX-driven circadian oscillations of Per2::Luciferase bioluminescence in mouse-derived ocular fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of MMC in GR signaling and the circadian clock system. The present findings suggest that MMC combined with trabeculectomy could increase the risk for a local circadian rhythm-disorder at the ocular surface.

  18. PPARα gene polymorphisms modulate the association between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, I; Champlin, J; Sheu, L; Goodpaster, B H; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Muldoon, M F

    2014-07-01

    Habitual physical activity is understood to help prevent type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease via beneficial effects on both metabolism and the vascular system. However, individuals do not have uniform cardiometabolic responses to physical activity. Here we explore the extent to which variation in the proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) gene, which modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, vascular function, and inflammation, predicts the overall cardiometabolic risk (CMR) profile of individuals engaging in various levels of physical activity. 917 unrelated, community volunteers (52% female, of Non-Hispanic European ancestry) aged 30-54 years, participated in the cross-sectional study. Subjects were genotyped for 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PPARα gene, from which common haplotypes were defined. A continuous measure of CMR was calculated as an aggregate of 5 traditional risk factors: waist circumference, resting blood pressure, fasting serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and glucose. Regression models were used to examine the main and interactive effects of physical activity and genetic variation on CMR. One common PPARα haplotype (H-23) was associated with a higher CMR. This association was moderated by daily physical activity (B = -0.11, SE = 0.053, t = -2.05, P = 0.04). Increased physical activity was associated with a steeper reduction of CMR in persons carrying the otherwise detrimental H-23 haplotype. Variations in the PPARα gene appear to magnify the cardiometabolic benefits of habitual physical activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptional Modulation of Squalene Synthase Genes in Barley Treated with PGPR

    OpenAIRE

    Anam eYousaf; Abdul eQadir; Tehmina eAnjum; Aqeel eAhmad

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene Squalene Synthase (SS). In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27±3°C) greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analysed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of squalene synthase. Results revealed that among four ...

  20. Gene Network for Identifying the Entropy Changes of Different Modules in Pediatric Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pediatric sepsis is a disease that threatens life of children. The incidence of pediatric sepsis is higher in developing countries due to various reasons, such as insufficient immunization and nutrition, water and air pollution, etc. Exploring the potential genes via different methods is of significance for the prevention and treatment of pediatric sepsis. This study aimed to identify potential genes associated with pediatric sepsis utilizing analysis of gene network and entropy. Methods: The mRNA expression in the blood samples collected from 20 septic children and 30 healthy controls was quantified by using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray. Two condition-specific protein-protein interaction networks (PINs, one for the healthy control and the other one for the children with sepsis, were deduced by combining the fundamental human PINs with gene expression profiles in the two phenotypes. Subsequently, distinct modules from the two conditional networks were extracted by adopting a maximal clique-merging approach. Delta entropy (ΔS was calculated between sepsis and control modules. Results: Then, key genes displaying changes in gene composition were identified by matching the control and sepsis modules. Two objective modules were obtained, in which ribosomal protein RPL4 and RPL9 as well as TOP2A were probably considered as the key genes differentiating sepsis from healthy controls. Conclusion: According to previous reports and this work, TOP2A is the potential gene therapy target for pediatric sepsis. The relationship between pediatric sepsis and RPL4 and RPL9 needs further investigation.

  1. Characterization and functional analysis of Calmodulin and Calmodulin-like genes in Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal messenger that is involved in the modulation of diverse developmental and adaptive processes in response to various stimuli. Calmodulin (CaM and calmodulin-like (CML proteins are major calcium sensors in all eukaryotes, and they have been extensively investigated for many years in plants and animals. However, little is known about CaMs and CMLs in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the strawberry genome and identified 4 CaM and 36 CML genes. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene structure, phylogenetic tree, synteny and three-dimensional model assessments, revealed the conservation and divergence of FvCaMs and FvCMLs, thus providing insight regarding their functions. In addition, the transcript abundance of four FvCaM genes and the four most related FvCML genes were examined in different tissues and in response to multiple stress and hormone treatments. Moreover, we investigated the subcellular localization of several FvCaMs and FvCMLs, revealing their potential interactions based on the localizations and potential functions. Furthermore, overexpression of five FvCaM and FvCML genes could not induce a hypersensitive response, but four of the five genes could increase resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This study provides evidence for the biological roles of FvCaM and CML genes, and the results lay the foundation for future functional studies of these genes.

  2. Chloroquine mediated modulation of Anopheles gambiae gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Abrantes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium development in the mosquito is crucial for malaria transmission and depends on the parasite's interaction with a variety of cell types and specific mosquito factors that have both positive and negative effects on infection. Whereas the defensive response of the mosquito contributes to a decrease in parasite numbers during these stages, some components of the blood meal are known to favor infection, potentiating the risk of increased transmission. The presence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine in the mosquito's blood meal has been associated with an increase in Plasmodium infectivity for the mosquito, which is possibly caused by chloroquine interfering with the capacity of the mosquito to defend against the infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report a detailed survey of the Anopheles gambiae genes that are differentially regulated by the presence of chloroquine in the blood meal, using an A. gambiae cDNA microarray. The effect of chloroquine on transcript abundance was evaluated separately for non-infected and Plasmodium berghei-infected mosquitoes. Chloroquine was found to affect the abundance of transcripts that encode proteins involved in a variety of processes, including immunity, apoptosis, cytoskeleton and the response to oxidative stress. This pattern of differential gene expression may explain the weakened mosquito defense response which accounts for the increased infectivity observed in chloroquine-treated mosquitoes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study suggest that chloroquine can interfere with several putative mosquito mechanisms of defense against Plasmodium at the level of gene expression and highlight the need for a better understanding of the impacts of antimalarial agents on parasite transmission.

  3. X-linked genes and mental functioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skuse, David H

    2005-01-01

    ... (as indicated by the large number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes). In addition, there is evidence for relatively specific effects of X-linked genes on social-cognition and emotional regulation...

  4. Temporal modulation transfer functions in cochlear implantees using a method that limits overall loudness cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Matthew; McKay, Colette M

    2012-01-01

    Temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) were measured for six users of cochlear implants, using different carrier rates and levels. Unlike most previous studies investigating modulation detection, the experimental design limited potential effects of overall loudness cues. Psychometric functions (percent correct discrimination of modulated from unmodulated stimuli versus modulation depth) were obtained. For each modulation depth, each modulated stimulus was loudness balanced to the unmodulated reference stimulus, and level jitter was applied in the discrimination task. The loudness-balance data showed that the modulated stimuli were louder than the unmodulated reference stimuli with the same average current, thus confirming the need to limit loudness cues when measuring modulation detection. TMTFs measured in this way had a low-pass characteristic, with a cut-off frequency (at comfortably loud levels) similar to that for normal-hearing listeners. A reduction in level caused degradation in modulation detection efficiency and a lower-cut-off frequency (i.e. poorer temporal resolution). An increase in carrier rate also led to a degradation in modulation detection efficiency, but only at lower levels or higher modulation frequencies. When detection thresholds were expressed as a proportion of dynamic range, there was no effect of carrier rate for the lowest modulation frequency (50 Hz) at either level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages.

  6. Genes affecting β-cell function in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial disease resulting from an immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Several environmental and genetic risk factors predispose to the disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified around 50 genetic regions...... that affect the risk of developing T1D, but the disease-causing variants and genes are still largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on the β cell. At least 40 % of the genes in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human...... islets and β cells, where they according to recent studies modulate the β-cell response to the immune system. As most of the risk variants map to noncoding regions of the genome, i.e., promoters, enhancers, intergenic regions, and noncoding genes, their possible involvement in T1D pathogenesis as gene...

  7. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output

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    Bailey Timothy L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs. It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Results Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. Conclusion The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  8. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Denis C; Bailey, Timothy L

    2008-04-29

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs). It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  9. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

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    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  10. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E.; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  11. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity.

  12. A functional profile of gene expression in ARPE-19 cells

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    Johnson Dianna A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal pigment epithelium cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration. Their morphological, molecular and functional phenotype changes in response to various stresses. Functional profiling of genes can provide useful information about the physiological state of cells and how this state changes in response to disease or treatment. In this study, we have constructed a functional profile of the genes expressed by the ARPE-19 cell line of retinal pigment epithelium. Methods Using Affymetrix MAS 5.0 microarray analysis, genes expressed by ARPE-19 cells were identified. Using GeneChip® annotations, these genes were classified according to their known functions to generate a functional gene expression profile. Results We have determined that of approximately 19,044 unique gene sequences represented on the HG-U133A GeneChip® , 6,438 were expressed in ARPE-19 cells irrespective of the substrate on which they were grown (plastic, fibronectin, collagen, or Matrigel. Rather than focus our subsequent analysis on the identity or level of expression of each individual gene in this large data set, we examined the number of genes expressed within 130 functional categories. These categories were selected from a library of HG-U133A GeneChip® annotations linked to the Affymetrix MAS 5.0 data sets. Using this functional classification scheme, we were able to categorize about 70% of the expressed genes and condense the original data set of over 6,000 data points into a format with 130 data points. The resulting ARPE-19 Functional Gene Expression Profile is displayed as a percentage of ARPE-19-expressed genes. Conclusion The Profile can readily be compared with equivalent microarray data from other appropriate samples in order to highlight cell-specific attributes or treatment-induced changes in gene expression. The usefulness of these analyses is based on the assumption that the numbers of genes

  13. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate.

  14. Unravelling the molecular basis for light modulated cellulase gene expression - the role of photoreceptors in Neurospora crassa

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    Schmoll Monika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Light represents an important environmental cue, which exerts considerable influence on the metabolism of fungi. Studies with the biotechnological fungal workhorse Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina have revealed an interconnection between transcriptional regulation of cellulolytic enzymes and the light response. Neurospora crassa has been used as a model organism to study light and circadian rhythm biology. We therefore investigated whether light also regulates transcriptional regulation of cellulolytic enzymes in N. crassa. Results We show that the N. crassa photoreceptor genes wc-1, wc-2 and vvd are involved in regulation of cellulase gene expression, indicating that this phenomenon is conserved among filamentous fungi. The negative effect of VVD on production of cellulolytic enzymes is thereby accomplished by its role in photoadaptation and hence its function in White collar complex (WCC formation. In contrast, the induction of vvd expression by the WCC does not seem to be crucial in this process. Additionally, we found that WC-1 and WC-2 not only act as a complex, but also have individual functions upon growth on cellulose. Conclusions Genome wide transcriptome analysis of photoreceptor mutants and evaluation of results by analysis of mutant strains identified several candidate genes likely to play a role in light modulated cellulase gene expression. Genes with functions in amino acid metabolism, glycogen metabolism, energy supply and protein folding are enriched among genes with decreased expression levels in the wc-1 and wc-2 mutants. The ability to properly respond to amino acid starvation, i. e. up-regulation of the cross pathway control protein cpc-1, was found to be beneficial for cellulase gene expression. Our results further suggest a contribution of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose to plant cell wall degradation in N. crassa.

  15. Methods for transient assay of gene function in floral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana Nilangani N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest in rapid assays or screening systems for assigning gene function. However, analysis of gene function in the flowers of some species is restricted due to the difficulty of producing stably transformed transgenic plants. As a result, experimental approaches based on transient gene expression assays are frequently used. Biolistics has long been used for transient over-expression of genes of interest, but has not been exploited for gene silencing studies. Agrobacterium-infiltration has also been used, but the focus primarily has been on the transient transformation of leaf tissue. Results Two constructs, one expressing an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum majus (Antirrhinum chalcone synthase gene (CHS and the other an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum transcription factor gene Rosea1, were shown to effectively induce CHS and Rosea1 gene silencing, respectively, when introduced biolistically into petal tissue of Antirrhinum flowers developing in vitro. A high-throughput vector expressing the Antirrhinum CHS gene attached to an inverted repeat of the nos terminator was also shown to be effective. Silencing spread systemically to create large zones of petal tissue lacking pigmentation, with transmission of the silenced state spreading both laterally within the affected epidermal cell layer and into lower cell layers, including the epidermis of the other petal surface. Transient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of petal tissue of tobacco and petunia flowers in situ or detached was also achieved, using expression of the reporter genes GUS and GFP to visualise transgene expression. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of using biolistics-based transient RNAi, and transient transformation of petal tissue via Agrobacterium infiltration to study gene function in petals. We have also produced a vector for high throughput gene silencing studies, incorporating the option of using T-A cloning to

  16. Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM: a framework for searching repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of cancer and an application to colorectal adenocarcinoma.

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    Feng-Hsiang Chung

    Full Text Available Drug repurposing has become an increasingly attractive approach to drug development owing to the ever-growing cost of new drug discovery and frequent withdrawal of successful drugs caused by side effect issues. Here, we devised Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM for the discovery of repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of complex diseases, and applied it to colorectal adenocarcinoma. FMCM used multiple functional gene modules to query the Connectivity Map (CMap. The functional modules were built around hub genes identified, through a gene selection by trend-of-disease-progression (GSToP procedure, from condition-specific gene-gene interaction networks constructed from sets of cohort gene expression microarrays. The candidate drug compounds were restricted to drugs exhibiting predicted minimal intracellular harmful side effects. We tested FMCM against the common practice of selecting drugs using a genomic signature represented by a single set of individual genes to query CMap (IGCM, and found FMCM to have higher robustness, accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility in identifying known anti-cancer agents. Among the 46 drug candidates selected by FMCM for colorectal adenocarcinoma treatment, 65% had literature support for association with anti-cancer activities, and 60% of the drugs predicted to have harmful effects on cancer had been reported to be associated with carcinogens/immune suppressors. Compounds were formed from the selected drug candidates where in each compound the component drugs collectively were beneficial to all the functional modules while no single component drug was harmful to any of the modules. In cell viability tests, we identified four candidate drugs: GW-8510, etacrynic acid, ginkgolide A, and 6-azathymine, as having high inhibitory activities against cancer cells. Through microarray experiments we confirmed the novel functional links predicted for three candidate drugs: phenoxybenzamine (broad effects

  17. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-12-22

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution.

  18. Histone deacetylases regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone I gene expression via modulating Otx2-driven transcriptional activity.

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    Lu Gan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Precise coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis orchestrates the normal reproductive function. As a central regulator, the appropriate synthesis and secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I from the hypothalamus is essential for the coordination. Recently, emerging evidence indicates that histone deacetylases (HDACs play an important role in maintaining normal reproductive function. In this study, we identify the potential effects of HDACs on Gnrh1 gene transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inhibition of HDACs activities by trichostatin A (TSA and valproic acid (VPA promptly and dramatically repressed transcription of Gnrh1 gene in the mouse immortalized mature GnRH neuronal cells GT1-7. The suppression was connected with a specific region of Gnrh1 gene promoter, which contains two consensus Otx2 binding sites. Otx2 has been known to activate the basal and also enhancer-driven transcription of Gnrh1 gene. The transcriptional activity of Otx2 is negatively modulated by Grg4, a member of the Groucho-related-gene (Grg family. In the present study, the expression of Otx2 was downregulated by TSA and VPA in GT1-7 cells, accompanied with the opposite changes of Grg4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of Otx2 to Gnrh1 gene was suppressed by TSA and VPA. Overexpression of Otx2 partly abolished the TSA- and VPA-induced downregulation of Gnrh1 gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that HDAC inhibitors downregulate Gnrh1 gene expression via repressing Otx2-driven transcriptional activity. This study should provide an insight for our understanding on the effects of HDACs in the reproductive system and suggests that HDACs could be potential novel targets for the therapy of GnRH-related diseases.

  19. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF.

  20. Identification of antithrombin-modulating genes. Role of LARGE, a gene encoding a bifunctional glycosyltransferase, in the secretion of proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia de la Morena-Barrio

    Full Text Available The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families. Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02. Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins.

  1. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  2. Differential regulation of horizontally acquired and core genome genes by the bacterial modulator H-NS.

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    Rosa C Baños

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal acquisition of DNA by bacteria dramatically increases genetic diversity and hence successful bacterial colonization of several niches, including the human host. A relevant issue is how this newly acquired DNA interacts and integrates in the regulatory networks of the bacterial cell. The global modulator H-NS targets both core genome and HGT genes and silences gene expression in response to external stimuli such as osmolarity and temperature. Here we provide evidence that H-NS discriminates and differentially modulates core and HGT DNA. As an example of this, plasmid R27-encoded H-NS protein has evolved to selectively silence HGT genes and does not interfere with core genome regulation. In turn, differential regulation of both gene lineages by resident chromosomal H-NS requires a helper protein: the Hha protein. Tight silencing of HGT DNA is accomplished by H-NS-Hha complexes. In contrast, core genes are modulated by H-NS homoligomers. Remarkably, the presence of Hha-like proteins is restricted to the Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, conjugative plasmids encoding H-NS variants have hitherto been isolated only from members of the family. Thus, the H-NS system in enteric bacteria presents unique evolutionary features. The capacity to selectively discriminate between core and HGT DNA may help to maintain horizontally transmitted DNA in silent form and may give these bacteria a competitive advantage in adapting to new environments, including host colonization.

  3. Discovery and visualization of miRNA-mRNA functional modules within integrated data using bicluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Kenneth; Terrile, Marta; Bray, Isabella M; Domingo-Fernandéz, Raquel; Watters, Karen M; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. An miRNA may target many messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and each transcript may be targeted by multiple miRNAs. Our understanding of miRNA regulation is evolving to consider modules of miRNAs that regulate groups of functionally related mRNAs. Here we expand the model of miRNA functional modules and use it to guide the integration of miRNA and mRNA expression and target prediction data. We present evidence of cooperativity between miRNA classes within this integrated miRNA-mRNA association matrix. We then apply bicluster analysis to uncover miRNA functional modules within this integrated data set and develop a novel application to visualize and query these results. We show that this wholly unsupervised approach can discover a network of miRNA-mRNA modules that are enriched for both biological processes and miRNA classes. We apply this method to investigate the interplay of miRNAs and mRNAs in integrated data sets derived from neuroblastoma and human immune cells. This study is the first to apply the technique of biclustering to model functional modules within an integrated miRNA-mRNA association matrix. Results provide evidence of an extensive modular miRNA functional network and enable characterization of miRNA function and dysregulation in disease.

  4. Discovery and visualization of miRNA–mRNA functional modules within integrated data using bicluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Kenneth; Terrile, Marta; Bray, Isabella M.; Domingo-Fernandéz, Raquel; Watters, Karen M.; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. An miRNA may target many messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and each transcript may be targeted by multiple miRNAs. Our understanding of miRNA regulation is evolving to consider modules of miRNAs that regulate groups of functionally related mRNAs. Here we expand the model of miRNA functional modules and use it to guide the integration of miRNA and mRNA expression and target prediction data. We present evidence of cooperativity between miRNA classes within this integrated miRNA–mRNA association matrix. We then apply bicluster analysis to uncover miRNA functional modules within this integrated data set and develop a novel application to visualize and query these results. We show that this wholly unsupervised approach can discover a network of miRNA–mRNA modules that are enriched for both biological processes and miRNA classes. We apply this method to investigate the interplay of miRNAs and mRNAs in integrated data sets derived from neuroblastoma and human immune cells. This study is the first to apply the technique of biclustering to model functional modules within an integrated miRNA–mRNA association matrix. Results provide evidence of an extensive modular miRNA functional network and enable characterization of miRNA function and dysregulation in disease. PMID:24357407

  5. Gene modulation associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B virus X transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malgorzata Sidorkiewicz; Jean-Philippe Jais; Guilherme Tralhao; Serban Morosan; Carlo Giannini; Nicolas Brezillon; Patrick Soussan; Oona Delpuech; Dina Kremsdorf

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the modulation of gene expression profile associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B X (HBx)-expressing transgenic mice.METHODS: Microarray technology was performed on liver tissue obtained from 4 control (LacZ) and 4 transgenic mice (HBx-LacZ), 48 h after partial hepatectomy. The significance of the normalized log-ratios was assessed for each gene, using robust Mests under an empirical Bayes approach. Microarray hybridization data was verified on selected genes by quantitative PCR.RESULTS: The comparison of gene expression patterns showed a consistent modulation of the expression of 26 genes, most of which are implicated in liver regeneration. Up-regulated genes included DNA repair proteins (Rad-52, MSH6) and transmembrane proteins (syndecan 4, tetraspanin), while down-regulated genes were connected to the regulation of transcription (histone deacetylase, Zfp90, MyoDl) and were involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway and isoprenoidbiosynthesis (farnesyl diphosphate synthase, Cyp7b1, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, SAA3).CONCLUSION: Our results provide a novel insight into the biological activities of HBx, implicated in the inhibition of liver regeneration.

  6. Saliva microbiota carry caries-specific functional gene signatures.

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    Fang Yang

    Full Text Available Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis.

  7. Modules Identification in Gene Positive Networks of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Pearson Agglomerative Method and Pearson Cohesion Coupling Modularity

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jinyu; Gao, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a gene positive network is proposed based on a weighted undirected graph, where the weight represents the positive correlation of the genes. A Pearson agglomerative clustering algorithm is employed to build a clustering tree, where dotted lines cut the tree from bottom to top leading to a number of subsets of the modules. In order to achieve better module partitions, the Pearson correlation coefficient modularity is addressed to seek optimal module decomposition by selecting an...

  8. Dynamic range of frontoparietal functional modulation is associated with working memory capacity limitations in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakun, Jonathan G; Johnson, Nathan F

    2017-11-01

    Older adults tend to over-activate regions throughout frontoparietal cortices and exhibit a reduced range of functional modulation during WM task performance compared to younger adults. While recent evidence suggests that reduced functional modulation is associated with poorer task performance, it remains unclear whether reduced range of modulation is indicative of general WM capacity-limitations. In the current study, we examined whether the range of functional modulation observed over multiple levels of WM task difficulty (N-Back) predicts in-scanner task performance and out-of-scanner psychometric estimates of WM capacity. Within our sample (60-77years of age), age was negatively associated with frontoparietal modulation range. Individuals with greater modulation range exhibited more accurate N-Back performance. In addition, despite a lack of significant relationships between N-Back and complex span task performance, range of frontoparietal modulation during the N-Back significantly predicted domain-general estimates of WM capacity. Consistent with previous cross-sectional findings, older individuals with less modulation range exhibited greater activation at the lowest level of task difficulty but less activation at the highest levels of task difficulty. Our results are largely consistent with existing theories of neurocognitive aging (e.g. CRUNCH) but focus attention on dynamic range of functional modulation asa novel marker of WM capacity-limitations in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation transfer function of a digital dental x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S K; Hollender, L

    1994-03-01

    An impulse train method to control aliasing was used to measure the modulation transfer function of a digital dental x-ray system (RVG 32000 ZHR, Trophy Radiologie, Vincennes, France). The detector of this system is composed of an intensifying screen, a fiber optics taper, and a charged couple device chip. The modulation transfer function could not be measured by impulse method such as the line spread function or edge response function because of aliasing from undersampling of the digital system. The system modulation transfer function was difficult to recover at the spatial frequencies smaller than the Nyquist frequency. The modulation transfer function beyond the Nyquist frequencies was impossible to recover in this study.

  10. Gene-gene interaction and functional impact of polymorphisms on innate immune genes in controlling Plasmodium falciparum blood infection level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Basu

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in toll-like receptors and cytokine genes of the innate immune pathways have been implicated in controlling parasite growth and the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum mediated malaria. We previously published genetic association of TLR4 non-synonymous and TNF-α promoter polymorphisms with P.falciparum blood infection level and here we extend the study considerably by (i investigating genetic dependence of parasite-load on interleukin-12B polymorphisms, (ii reconstructing gene-gene interactions among candidate TLRs and cytokine loci, (iii exploring genetic and functional impact of epistatic models and (iv providing mechanistic insights into functionality of disease-associated regulatory polymorphisms. Our data revealed that carriage of AA (P = 0.0001 and AC (P = 0.01 genotypes of IL12B 3'UTR polymorphism was associated with a significant increase of mean log-parasitemia relative to rare homozygous genotype CC. Presence of IL12B+1188 polymorphism in five of six multifactor models reinforced its strong genetic impact on malaria phenotype. Elevation of genetic risk in two-component models compared to the corresponding single locus and reduction of IL12B (2.2 fold and lymphotoxin-α (1.7 fold expressions in patients'peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells under TLR4Thr399Ile risk genotype background substantiated the role of Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction derived models. Marked reduction of promoter activity of TNF-α risk haplotype (C-C-G-G compared to wild-type haplotype (T-C-G-G with (84% and without (78% LPS stimulation and the loss of binding of transcription factors detected in-silico supported a causal role of TNF-1031. Significantly lower expression of IL12B+1188 AA (5 fold and AC (9 fold genotypes compared to CC and under-representation (P = 0.0048 of allele A in transcripts of patients' PBMCs suggested an Allele-Expression-Imbalance. Allele (A+1188C dependent differential stability (2 fold of IL12B-transcripts upon

  11. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  12. Combining sequence and Gene Ontology for protein module detection in the Weighted Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jie; Feng, Nuan; Song, Bo; Zheng, Zeyu

    2017-01-07

    Studies of protein modules in a Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network contribute greatly to the understanding of biological mechanisms. With the development of computing science, computational approaches have played an important role in locating protein modules. In this paper, a new approach combining Gene Ontology and amino acid background frequency is introduced to detect the protein modules in the weighted PPI networks. The proposed approach mainly consists of three parts: the feature extraction, the weighted graph construction and the protein complex detection. Firstly, the topology-sequence information is utilized to present the feature of protein complex. Secondly, six types of the weighed graph are constructed by combining PPI network and Gene Ontology information. Lastly, protein complex algorithm is applied to the weighted graph, which locates the clusters based on three conditions, including density, network diameter and the included angle cosine. Experiments have been conducted on two protein complex benchmark sets for yeast and the results show that the approach is more effective compared to five typical algorithms with the performance of f-measure and precision. The combination of protein interaction network with sequence and gene ontology data is helpful to improve the performance and provide a optional method for protein module detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overexpression of soybean ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2 confers enhanced drought and salt tolerance through modulating abiotic stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-An; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that ubiquitination plays important roles in plant abiotic stress responses. In the present study, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2, a homologue of yeast RAD6, was cloned from soybean and functionally characterized. GmUBC2 was expressed in all tissues in soybean and was up-regulated by drought and salt stress. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmUBC2 were more tolerant to salinity and drought stresses compared with the control plants. Through expression analyses of putative downstream genes in the transgenic plants, we found that the expression levels of two ion antiporter genes AtNHX1 and AtCLCa, a key gene involved in the biosynthesis of proline, AtP5CS, and the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase gene AtCCS, were all increased significantly in the transgenic plants. These results suggest that GmUBC2 is involved in the regulation of ion homeostasis, osmolyte synthesis, and oxidative stress responses. Our results also suggest that modulation of the ubiquitination pathway could be an effective means of improving salt and drought tolerance in plants through genetic engineering.

  14. Imaging performance of annular apertures. III - Apodization and modulation transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization functions with decreasing transmission and their opposite, functions with increasing transmission, are investigated for various central obstruction ratios. The resultant modulation transfer functions are presented for various transmission functions and central obstruction ratios. Conclusions applicable to the improvement of imaging performance are discussed.

  15. Functional roles of a tetraloop/receptor interacting module in a cyclic di-GMP riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2012-02-01

    Riboswitches are a class of structural RNAs that regulate transcription and translation through specific recognition of small molecules. Riboswitches are attractive not only as drug targets for novel antibiotics but also as modular tools for controlling gene expression. Sequence comparison of a class of riboswitches that sense cyclic di-GMP (type-I c-di-GMP riboswitches) revealed that this type of riboswitch frequently shows a GAAA loop/receptor interaction between P1 and P3 elements. In the crystal structures of a type-I c-di-GMP riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae (the Vc2 riboswitch), the GNRA loop/receptor interaction assembled P2 and P3 stems to organize a ligand-binding pocket. In this study, the functional importance of the GAAA loop-receptor interaction in the Vc2 riboswitch was examined. A series of variant Vc2 riboswitches with mutations in the GAAA loop/receptor interaction were assayed for their switching abilities. In mutants with mutations in the P2 GAAA loop, expression of the reporter gene was reduced to approximately 40% - 60% of that in the wild-type. However, mutants in which the P3 receptor motif was substituted with base pairs were as active as the wild-type. These results suggested that the GAAA loop/receptor interaction does not simply establish the RNA 3D structure but docking of P2 GAAA loop reduces the flexibility of the GAAA receptor motif in the P3 element. This mechanism was supported by a variant riboswitch bearing a theophylline aptamer module in P3 the structural rigidity of which could be modulated by the small molecule theophylline.

  16. The Biological Function of the Prion Protein: A Cell Surface Scaffold of Signaling Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The prion glycoprotein (PrPC) is mostly located at the cell surface, tethered to the plasma membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatydil inositol (GPI) anchor. Misfolding of PrPC is associated with the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), whereas its normal conformer serves as a receptor for oligomers of the β-amyloid peptide, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). PrPC is highly expressed in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in other organs, but its functions are controversial. Extensive experimental work disclosed multiple physiological roles of PrPC at the molecular, cellular and systemic levels, affecting the homeostasis of copper, neuroprotection, stem cell renewal and memory mechanisms, among others. Often each such process has been heralded as the bona fide function of PrPC, despite restricted attention paid to a selected phenotypic trait, associated with either modulation of gene expression or to the engagement of PrPC with a single ligand. In contrast, the GPI-anchored prion protein was shown to bind several extracellular and transmembrane ligands, which are required to endow that protein with the ability to play various roles in transmembrane signal transduction. In addition, differing sets of those ligands are available in cell type- and context-dependent scenarios. To account for such properties, we proposed that PrPC serves as a dynamic platform for the assembly of signaling modules at the cell surface, with widespread consequences for both physiology and behavior. The current review advances the hypothesis that the biological function of the prion protein is that of a cell surface scaffold protein, based on the striking similarities of its functional properties with those of scaffold proteins involved in the organization of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Those properties are: the ability to recruit spatially restricted sets of binding molecules involved in specific signaling

  17. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2 Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca González-Fernández

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676, which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4 and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4 and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox.

  18. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2) Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Ávila, Julio; Arteaga, María F.; Canessa, Cecilia M.; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676), which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4) and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4) and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox). PMID:25849655

  19. Modulating functions method for parameters estimation in the fifth order KdV equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-07-25

    In this work, the modulating functions method is proposed for estimating coefficients in higher-order nonlinear partial differential equation which is the fifth order Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The proposed method transforms the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations of the unknowns. The statistical properties of the modulating functions solution are described in this paper. In addition, guidelines for choosing the number of modulating functions, which is an important design parameter, are provided. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are shown through numerical simulations in both noise-free and noisy cases.

  20. Theoretical model of the modulation transfer function for fiber optic taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoxiang; Tian, Weijian; Bin, XiangLi

    2005-02-01

    Fiber optic taper has been used more and more widely as a relay optical component in the integrated taper assembly image intensified sensors for military and medical imaging application. In this paper, the transmission characteristic of energy in the taper is analyzed, and following the generalized definition of the modulation transfer function for sampled imaging system, a spatial averaged impulse response and a corresponding MTF component that are inherent in the sampling process of taper are deduced, and the mathematical model for evaluating the modulation transfer function of fiber optic taper is built. Finally, the dynamic and static modulation transfer function curves simulated by computer have been exhibited.

  1. The Detection of Metabolite-Mediated Gene Module Co-Expression Using Multivariate Linear Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trishanta Padayachee

    Full Text Available Investigating whether metabolites regulate the co-expression of a predefined gene module is one of the relevant questions posed in the integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic data. This article concerns the integrative analysis of the two high-dimensional datasets by means of multivariate models and statistical tests for the dependence between metabolites and the co-expression of a gene module. The general linear model (GLM for correlated data that we propose models the dependence between adjusted gene expression values through a block-diagonal variance-covariance structure formed by metabolic-subset specific general variance-covariance blocks. Performance of statistical tests for the inference of conditional co-expression are evaluated through a simulation study. The proposed methodology is applied to the gene expression data of the previously characterized lipid-leukocyte module. Our results show that the GLM approach improves on a previous approach by being less prone to the detection of spurious conditional co-expression.

  2. Epigenetic modulations in activated cells early after HIV-1 infection and their possible functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana T Maricato

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications refer to a number of biological processes which alter the structure of chromatin and its transcriptional activity such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational processing. Studies have tried to elucidate how the viral genome and its products are affected by epigenetic modifications imposed by cell machinery and how it affects the ability of the virus to either, replicate and produce a viable progeny or be driven to latency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate epigenetic modifications in PBMCs and CD4+ cells after HIV-1 infection analyzing three approaches: (i global DNA- methylation; (ii qPCR array and (iii western blot. HIV-1 infection led to methylation increases in the cellular DNA regardless the activation status of PBMCs. The analysis of H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 suggested a trend towards transcriptional repression in activated cells after HIV-1 infection. Using a qPCR array, we detected genes related to epigenetic processes highly modulated in activated HIV-1 infected cells. SETDB2 and RSK2 transcripts showed highest up-regulation levels. SETDB2 signaling is related to transcriptional silencing while RSK2 is related to either silencing or activation of gene expression depending on the signaling pathway triggered down-stream. In addition, activated cells infected by HIV-1 showed lower CD69 expression and a decrease of IL-2, IFN-γ and metabolism-related factors transcripts indicating a possible functional consequence towards global transcriptional repression found in HIV-1 infected cells. Conversely, based on epigenetic markers studied here, non-stimulated cells infected by HIV-1, showed signs of global transcriptional activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 infection exerts epigenetic modulations in activated cells that may lead these cells to transcriptional repression with important functional consequences. Moreover, non-stimulated cells seem to increase gene transcription after HIV-1 infection

  3. Monitoring aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by functional marker genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyyssoenen, Mari [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)], E-mail: mari.nyyssonen@vtt.fi; Piskonen, Reetta; Itaevaara, Merja [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2008-07-15

    The development of biological treatment technologies for contaminated environments requires tools for obtaining direct information about the biodegradation of specific contaminants. The potential of functional gene array analysis to monitor changes in the amount of functional marker genes as indicators of contaminant biodegradation was investigated. A prototype functional gene array was developed for targeting key functions in the biodegradation of naphthalene, toluene and xylenes. Internal standard probe based normalization was introduced to facilitate comparison across multiple samples. Coupled with one-colour hybridization, the signal normalization improved the consistency among replicate hybridizations resulting in better discrimination for the differences in the amount of target DNA. During the naphthalene biodegradation in a PAH-contaminated soil slurry microcosm, the normalized hybridization signals in naphthalene catabolic gene probes were in good agreement with the amount of naphthalene-degradation genes and the production of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Gene arrays provide efficient means for monitoring of contaminant biodegradation in the environment. - Functional gene array analysis coupled with one-colour hybridization and internal standard based signal normalization provides efficient tool for monitoring contaminant biodegradation processes.

  4. Heterodyne technique for measuring the amplitude and phase transfer functions of an optical modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal; Birkedal, Dan; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a technique based on heterodyne detection for accurately and simultaneously measuring the amplitude and phase transfer functions of an optical modulator. The technique is used to characterize an InGaAsp multiple quantum-well electroabsorption modulator. From...

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-2, Pump Functional Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasel, Ed; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes typical pump functional tests which are performed after pump installation and prior to release of the plant for unrestricted power operation. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module…

  6. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  7. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: evidence from functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch Volker; Dieckmann Anja; Pedroni Andreas F; Koeneke Susan; Jäncke Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively meas...

  8. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch Volker; Dieckmann Anja; Pedroni Andreas F; Koeneke Susan; Jäncke Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively meas...

  9. Identification of Risk Pathways and Functional Modules for Coronary Artery Disease Based on Genome-wide SNP Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a complex human disease, involving multiple genes and their nonlinear interactions, which often act in a modular fashion. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP profiling provides an effective technique to unravel these underlying genetic interplays or their functional involvements for CAD. This study aimed to identify the susceptible pathways and modules for CAD based on SNP omics. First, the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC SNP datasets of CAD and control samples were used to assess the joint effect of multiple genetic variants at the pathway level, using logistic kernel machine regression model. Then, an expanded genetic network was constructed by integrating statistical gene–gene interactions involved in these susceptible pathways with their protein–protein interaction (PPI knowledge. Finally, risk functional modules were identified by decomposition of the network. Of 276 KEGG pathways analyzed, 6 pathways were found to have a significant effect on CAD. Other than glycerolipid metabolism, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, and cardiac muscle contraction pathways, three pathways related to other diseases were also revealed, including Alzheimer’s disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and Huntington’s disease. A genetic epistatic network of 95 genes was further constructed using the abovementioned integrative approach. Of 10 functional modules derived from the network, 6 have been annotated to phospholipase C activity and cell adhesion molecule binding, which also have known functional involvement in Alzheimer’s disease. These findings indicate an overlap of the underlying molecular mechanisms between CAD and Alzheimer’s disease, thus providing new insights into the molecular basis for CAD and its molecular relationships with other diseases.

  10. eNOS gene haplotype is indirectly associated with the recovery of cardiovascular autonomic modulation from exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno M; Barbosa, Thales C; Neves, Fabricia J; Sales, Allan K; Rocha, Natalia G; Medeiros, Renata F; Pereira, Felipe S; Garcia, Vinicius P; Cardoso, Fabiane T; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphisms in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene decrease expression and activation of eNOS in vitro, which is associated with lower post-exercise increase in vasodilator reactivity in vivo. However, it is unknown whether such polymorphisms are associated with other eNOS-related phenotypes during recovery from exercise. Therefore, we investigated the impact of an eNOS haplotype containing polymorphic alleles at loci -786 and 894 on the recovery of cardiovascular autonomic function from exercise. Sedentary, non-obese, healthy subjects were enrolled [n = 107, age 32 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM)]. Resting autonomic modulation (heart rate variability, systolic blood pressure variability, and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity) and vascular reactivity (forearm hyperemic response post-ischemia) were assessed at baseline, 10, 60, and 120 min after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Besides, autonomic function was assessed by heart rate recovery (HRR) immediately after peak exercise. Haplotype analysis showed that vagal modulation (i.e., HF n.u.) was significantly higher, combined sympathetic and vagal modulation (i.e., LF/HF) was significantly lower and total blood pressure variability was significantly lower post-exercise in a haplotype containing polymorphic alleles (H2) compared to a haplotype with wild type alleles (H1). HRR was similar between groups. Corroborating previous evidence, H2 had significantly lower post-exercise increase in vasodilator reactivity than H1. In conclusion, a haplotype containing polymorphic alleles at loci -786 and 894 had enhanced recovery of autonomic modulation from exercise, along with unchanged HRR, and attenuated vasodilator reactivity. Then, these results suggest an autonomic compensatory response of a direct deleterious effect of eNOS polymorphisms on the vascular function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies for aggregating gene expression data: The collapseRows R function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Jeremy A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic and other high dimensional analyses often require one to summarize multiple related variables by a single representative. This task is also variously referred to as collapsing, combining, reducing, or aggregating variables. Examples include summarizing several probe measurements corresponding to a single gene, representing the expression profiles of a co-expression module by a single expression profile, and aggregating cell-type marker information to de-convolute expression data. Several standard statistical summary techniques can be used, but network methods also provide useful alternative methods to find representatives. Currently few collapsing functions are developed and widely applied. Results We introduce the R function collapseRows that implements several collapsing methods and evaluate its performance in three applications. First, we study a crucial step of the meta-analysis of microarray data: the merging of independent gene expression data sets, which may have been measured on different platforms. Toward this end, we collapse multiple microarray probes for a single gene and then merge the data by gene identifier. We find that choosing the probe with the highest average expression leads to best between-study consistency. Second, we study methods for summarizing the gene expression profiles of a co-expression module. Several gene co-expression network analysis applications show that the optimal collapsing strategy depends on the analysis goal. Third, we study aggregating the information of cell type marker genes when the aim is to predict the abundance of cell types in a tissue sample based on gene expression data ("expression deconvolution". We apply different collapsing methods to predict cell type abundances in peripheral human blood and in mixtures of blood cell lines. Interestingly, the most accurate prediction method involves choosing the most highly connected "hub" marker gene. Finally, to facilitate

  12. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstrate that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited. Supplementary information and software are available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/NETSIM .

  13. A functional SNP associated with atopic dermatitis controls cell type-specific methylation of the VSTM1 gene locus

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Dilip; Puan, Kia Joo; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Lee, Bernett; Geertje H A Westerlaken; Haase, Doreen; Melchiotti, Rossella; Li, Zhuang; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Lum, Josephine; Koh, Geraldine; Foo, Shihui; Yeong, Joe; Alves, Alexessander da Silva Couto; Pekkanen, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Background Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) databases represent a valuable resource to link disease-associated SNPs to specific candidate genes whose gene expression is significantly modulated by the SNP under investigation. We previously identified signal inhibitory receptor on leukocytes-1 (SIRL-1) as a powerful regulator of human innate immune cell function. While it is constitutively high expressed on neutrophils, on monocytes the SIRL-1 surface expression varies strongly between...

  14. Functional Insight From Fruit Flies on Human ADHD Candidate Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2015-01-01

    , and increased risk of mental comorbidities, makes ADHD a disorder with high individual and societal costs. We use Drosophila melanogaster as a model to investigate the phenotypic consequences of gene disruption of 14 genes with human orthologs, selected by their proposed contribution to increased risk...... for other mutants. Decreased activity level, when treated with dexamphetamine, is seen when using other ADHD animal models. Our findings suggest involvement of the proposed candidate genes Genes, Brain, and Behavior 2015 36 Talk Abstracts in hyperactivity in D. melanogaster, providing functional evidence...

  15. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT Val108/158 Met polymorphism does not modulate executive function in children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanian Marina

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An association has been observed between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene, the predominant means of catecholamine catabolism within the prefrontal cortex (PFC, and neuropsychological task performance in healthy and schizophrenic adults. Since several of the cognitive functions typically deficient in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD are mediated by prefrontal dopamine (DA mechanisms, we investigated the relationship between a functional polymorphism of the COMT gene and neuropsychological task performance in these children. Methods The Val108/158 Met polymorphism of the COMT gene was genotyped in 118 children with ADHD (DSM-IV. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST, Tower of London (TOL, and Self-Ordered Pointing Task (SOPT were employed to evaluate executive functions. Neuropsychological task performance was compared across genotype groups using analysis of variance. Results ADHD children with the Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met genotypes were similar with regard to demographic and clinical characteristics. No genotype effects were observed for WCST standardized perseverative error scores [F2,97 = 0.67; p > 0.05], TOL standardized scores [F2,99 = 0.97; p > 0.05], and SOPT error scores [F2,108 = 0.62; p > 0.05]. Conclusions Contrary to the observed association between WCST performance and the Val108/158 Met polymorphism of the COMT gene in both healthy and schizophrenic adults, this polymorphism does not appear to modulate executive functions in children with ADHD.

  16. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, Seth A; Ronan, Elizabeth A; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. For this, we challenged drug-naive C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine (100 μmol/l) while recording changes in their locomotion speed. Although nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2, modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, indicating a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling.

  17. Physical exercise as an epigenetic modulator: Eustress, the "positive stress" as an effector of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Garcia-Gimenez, Jose Luis; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Pallardo, Federico V; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Physical exercise positively influences epigenetic mechanisms and improves health. Several issues remain unclear concerning the links between physical exercise and epigenetics. There is growing concern about the negative influence of excessive and persistent physical exercise on health. How an individual physically adapts to the prevailing environmental conditions might influence epigenetic mechanisms and modulate gene expression. In this article, we put forward the idea that physical exercise, especially long-term repetitive strenuous exercise, positively affects health, reduces the aging process, and decreases the incidence of cancer through induced stress and epigenetic mechanisms. We propose herein that stress may stimulate genetic adaptations through epigenetics that, in turn, modulate the link between the environment, human lifestyle factors, and genes.

  18. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Kristie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016 contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes.

  19. Integrase-directed recovery of functional genes from genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A

    2009-09-01

    Large population sizes, rapid growth and 3.8 billion years of evolution firmly establish microorganisms as a major source of the planet's biological and genetic diversity. However, up to 99% of the microorganisms in a given environment cannot be cultured. Culture-independent methods that directly access the genetic potential of an environmental sample can unveil new proteins with diverse functions, but the sequencing of random DNA can generate enormous amounts of extraneous data. Integrons are recombination systems that accumulate open reading frames (gene cassettes), many of which code for functional proteins with enormous adaptive potential. Some integrons harbor hundreds of gene cassettes and evidence suggests that the gene cassette pool may be limitless in size. Accessing this genetic pool has been hampered since sequence-based techniques, such as hybridization or PCR, often recover only partial genes or a small subset of those present in the sample. Here, a three-plasmid genetic strategy for the sequence-independent recovery of gene cassettes from genomic libraries is described and its use by retrieving functional gene cassettes from the chromosomal integron of Vibrio vulnificus ATCC 27562 is demonstrated. By manipulating the natural activity of integrons, we can gain access to the caches of functional genes amassed by these structures.

  20. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions

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    Stanley E. Lazic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0–1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/ and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR.

  1. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    OpenAIRE

    Gerosolimo Germano; Dallapiccola Bruno; Bruni Roberto; Ferraris Alessandro; Tataseo Paola; Tritarelli Elena; Marcantonio Cinzia; Ciccaglione Anna; Costantino Angela; Rapicetta Maria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system). Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 ...

  2. FUNCTIONAL SPECIALIZATION OF DUPLICATED FLAVONOID BIOSYNTHESIS GENES IN WHEAT

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    Khlestkina E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization is of a great evolutionary importance. In plant genomes, duplicated genes may result from either polyploidization (homoeologous genes or segmental chromosome duplications (paralogous genes. In allohexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum L. (2n=6x=42, genome BBAADD, both homoeologous and paralogous copies were found for the regulatory gene Myc encoding MYC-like transcriptional factor in the biosynthesis of flavonoid pigments, anthocyanins, and for the structural gene F3h encoding one of the key enzymes of flavonoid biosynthesis, flavanone 3-hydroxylase. From the 5 copies (3 homoeologous and 2 paralogous of the Myc gene found in T. aestivum, only one plays a regulatory role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, interacting complementary with another transcriptional factor (MYB-like to confer purple pigmentation of grain pericarp in wheat. The role and functionality of the other 4 copies of the Myc gene remain unknown. From the 4 functional copies of the F3h gene in T. aestivum, three homoeologues have similar function. They are expressed in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins or in the endosperm, participating there in biosynthesis of uncolored flavonoid substances. The fourth copy (the B-genomic paralogue is transcribed neither in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins nor in seeds, however, it’s expression has been noticed in roots of aluminium-stressed plants, where the three homoeologous copies are not active. Functional diversification of the duplicated flavonoid biosynthesis genes in wheat may be a reason for maintenance of the duplicated copies and preventing them from pseudogenization.The study was supported by RFBR (11-04-92707. We also thank Ms. Galina Generalova for technical assistance.

  3. Recent Achievement in Gene Cloning and Functional Genomics in Soybean

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    Zhengjun Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a model plant for photoperiodism as well as for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, a rather low efficiency in soybean transformation hampers functional analysis of genes isolated from soybean. In comparison, rapid development and progress in flowering time and photoperiodic response have been achieved in Arabidopsis and rice. As the soybean genomic information has been released since 2008, gene cloning and functional genomic studies have been revived as indicated by successfully characterizing genes involved in maturity and nematode resistance. Here, we review some major achievements in the cloning of some important genes and some specific features at genetic or genomic levels revealed by the analysis of functional genomics of soybean.

  4. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  5. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  6. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciello, Isidoro; Akrap, Ivana; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2015-08-01

    Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  7. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Feliciello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  8. Stability of a Bi-Additive Functional Equation in Banach Modules Over a C⋆-Algebra

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    Won-Gil Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We solve the bi-additive functional equation f(x+y,z−w+f(x−y,z+w=2f(x,z−2f(y,w and prove that every bi-additive Borel function is bilinear. And we investigate the stability of a bi-additive functional equation in Banach modules over a unital C⋆-algebra.

  9. Disintegrins: integrin selective ligands which activate integrin-coupled signaling and modulate leukocyte functions

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    Barja-Fidalgo C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix proteins and cell adhesion receptors (integrins play essential roles in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Interactions of integrins with the extracellular matrix proteins lead to phosphorylation of several intracellular proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, activating different signaling pathways responsible for the regulation of a variety of cell functions, including cytoskeleton mobilization. Once leukocytes are guided to sites of infection, inflammation, or antigen presentation, integrins can participate in the initiation, maintenance, or termination of the immune and inflammatory responses. The modulation of neutrophil activation through integrin-mediated pathways is important in the homeostatic control of the resolution of inflammatory states. In addition, during recirculation, T lymphocyte movement through distinct microenvironments is mediated by integrins, which are critical for cell cycle, differentiation and gene expression. Disintegrins are a family of low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich peptides first identified in snake venom, usually containing an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, which confers the ability to selectively bind to integrins, inhibiting integrin-related functions in different cell systems. In this review we show that, depending on the cell type and the microenvironment, disintegrins are able to antagonize the effects of integrins or to act agonistically by activating integrin-mediated signaling. Disintegrins have proven useful as tools to improve the understanding of the molecular events regulated by integrin signaling in leukocytes and prototypes in order to design therapies able to interfere with integrin-mediated effects.

  10. Modulating epigenetic mechanisms: the diverse functions of Ski during cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranek, Constanze; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2012-07-01

    In the developing forebrain, neural stem and progenitor cells generate a large variety of neurons with specific functions in the mature cortex. A central issue is to understand the roles of transcriptional networks and regulatory pathways that control these complex developmental processes. The proto-oncogene Ski is a transcriptional regulator linked to the human 1p36 deletion syndrome, which involves a set of phenotypes including nervous system defects. Ski shows a dynamic expression pattern during cortical development and, accordingly, the phenotype of Ski-deficient cortices is complex, involving altered cell cycle characteristics of neural progenitors, disturbed timing of neurogenesis and mis-specification of projection neurons. Ski is likely to play a role in various pathways by virtue of its ability to interact with a range of signaling molecules, thereby modulating transcriptional activity of corresponding target genes. Ski regulates proliferation and differentiation of various cell types, and more recent data from my laboratory demonstrates that Ski is also involved in the specification of cortical projection neurons. This Point-of-View elucidates the role of Ski as an essential linker between sequence-specific transcription factors and non-DNA binding cofactors with chromatin modifying activities. In particular, it puts forward the hypothesis that the diverse functions of Ski as a co-repressor might be related to its association with distinct HDAC-complexes.

  11. MicroRNAs function as cis- and trans-acting modulators of peripheral circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R; Kim, Sam-Moon; Neuendorff, Nichole; Earnest, David J

    2014-08-25

    Based on their extracellular expression and targeting of the clock gene Bmal1, miR-142-3p and miR-494 were analyzed for evidence of vesicle-mediated communication between cells and intracellular functional activity. Our studies demonstrate that: miR-142-3p+miR-494 overexpression decreases endogenous BMAL1 levels, increases the period of Per2 oscillations, and increases extracellular miR-142-3p/miR-494 abundance in conditioned medium; miRNA-enriched medium increases intracellular expression of miR-142-3p and represses Bmal1 3'-UTR activity in naïve cells; and inhibitors of vesicular trafficking modulate intercellular communication of these miRNAs and ensemble Per2 rhythms. Thus, miR-142-3p and miR-494 may function as cis- and trans-acting signals contributing to local temporal coordination of cell-autonomous circadian clocks.

  12. Calcitonin gene related peptide and its functions

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    Karimian M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP was first reported in 1982. This peptide contains 37 amino acids which could be found in Alpha and Beta forms. CGRP shows diversity both in its receptors and biological effects and up to now four different types of receptors have been reported. It can act like a neurotransmitter, local hormone and neuromodulator. They have a variety of effects on different organs such as a potent effect on vasodilation and smooth muscle relaxation. Ability of CGRP for induction of protein extravasation from blood vessels was uncertain. In this study intra-articular infusion of 10^-6 M CGRP to the rat knee joint induced significant protein extravasation into the rat knee joint space. The amount of protein was detected by modified Iawata method which could detect amount of protein between 5-500 mg/L. Higher and lower concentrations failed to induce protein extravasation. Failure in higher concentration was likely due to significant fall in blood pressure. In the presence of an arterial hypotension induced by an ? adenoreceptor antagonist, 10^-6 M of CGRP failed to produce protein extravasation. This effect of CGRP was a specific active effect and not a passive effect due to its potent vasodilation effect, as similar vasodilatory response induced by a ?-adrenoreceptor agonist failed to induce protein extravasation. There is more than 50% of sensory neurons which contain CGRP and they are spread in all over the body and joints, therefore CGRP induced protein extravasation can potentiate inflammation in different organs.

  13. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue specific and gender related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C.; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods.. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  14. Gene function in early mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation

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    Campbell Pearl A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the genes that drive embryonic stem cell differentiation. However, such knowledge is necessary if we are to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells. To uncover the genetic determinants of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC differentiation, we have generated and analyzed 11-point time-series of DNA microarray data for three biologically equivalent but genetically distinct mESC lines (R1, J1, and V6.5 undergoing undirected differentiation into embryoid bodies (EBs over a period of two weeks. Results We identified the initial 12 hour period as reflecting the early stages of mESC differentiation and studied probe sets showing consistent changes of gene expression in that period. Gene function analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes related to regulation of transcription and mRNA splicing, and down-regulation of genes related to intracellular signaling. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the genes showing the largest expression changes were more likely to have originated in metazoans. The probe sets with the most consistent gene changes in the three cell lines represented 24 down-regulated and 12 up-regulated genes, all with closely related human homologues. Whereas some of these genes are known to be involved in embryonic developmental processes (e.g. Klf4, Otx2, Smn1, Socs3, Tagln, Tdgf1, our analysis points to others (such as transcription factor Phf21a, extracellular matrix related Lama1 and Cyr61, or endoplasmic reticulum related Sc4mol and Scd2 that have not been previously related to mESC function. The majority of identified functions were related to transcriptional regulation, intracellular signaling, and cytoskeleton. Genes involved in other cellular functions important in ESC differentiation such as chromatin remodeling and transmembrane receptors were not observed in this set. Conclusion Our analysis profiles for the first time gene expression at a very early stage of m

  15. Primary functional identification of gene TMSG-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Chunshu; (马春树); NING; Junyu; (宁钧宇); YOU; Jiangfeng; (由江峰); LIU; Lin; (柳林); WANG; Jieliang; (王洁良); CUI; Xianglin; (崔湘琳); WU; Bingquan; (吴秉铨); ZHENG; Jie; (郑杰)

    2003-01-01

    TMSG-1 was a tumor metastasis-related gene identified using mRNA differential display, whose expression level was lower in cancer cell lines with higher metastatic potential and in tumor tissue with metastasis. TMSG-1 was transfected to prostate cancer cell line (PC-3M-1E8) with high metastatic potential to observe the effects of increased expression of TMSG-1 on V-ATPase activity, intracellular pH and cell apoptosis. Subcellular localization of the encoded protein of TMSG-1 was determined by using GFP. Results showed that there were no differences of V-ATPase activity among parental PC-3M-1E8 cell line, pcDNA3 transfectant and anti-TMSG-1 transfectant, whereas the V-ATPase activity was significantly higher in TMSG-1 transfectant than that in parental PC-3M-1E8 cell line, pcDNA3 transfectant and Anti-TMSG-1 transfectant (p<0.001). Intracellular pH (pHi) was detected by using the pH-dependent fluorescence probe BECEF. Results showed the pHi was significantly increased in TMSG-1 transfectant. Cell apoptosis assay demonstrated cell apoptosis was significantly higher in -1 transfectant (p<0.01) and BCL2 expression was down regulated. Subcellular localization of TMSG-1 protein showed TMSG-1 was a transmembrane protein, which predicted TMSG-1 protein was located in cytoplasm system, such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial. These results indicated TMSG-1 up regulation in prostate cancer cell line could promote V-ATPase activity, increase pHi and cell apoptosis, and inhibit the expression of BCL2.

  16. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren C J; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M

    2014-07-15

    The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world's most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a "guilt-by-association" principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks, functional enrichment analysis and gene

  17. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Darren CJ; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related bi...

  18. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Darren CJ; Sweetman, Crystal; Ford, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related bi...

  19. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  20. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  1. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas 9 system in U937 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were next evaluated in KIAA0100-knockdown U937 cells. The bioinformatic prediction showed that human KIAA0100 gene was located on 17q11.2, and human KIAA0100 protein was located in the secretory pathway. Besides, human KIAA0100 protein contained a signalpeptide, a transmembrane region, three types of secondary structures (alpha helix, extended strand, and random coil , and four domains from mitochondrial protein 27 (FMP27. The observation on functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene revealed that its downregulation inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis in U937 cells. To summarize, these results suggest human KIAA0100 gene possibly comes within mitochondrial genome; moreover, it is a novel anti-apoptotic factor related to carcinogenesis or progression in acute monocytic leukemia, and may be a potential target for immunotherapy against acute monocytic leukemia.

  2. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. Results We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3, which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Conclusions Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments.

  3. Ionic modulation of QPX stability as a nano-switch regulating gene expression in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaee Ravari, Soodeh

    G-quadruplexes (G-QPX) have been the subject of intense research due to their unique structural configuration and potential applications, particularly their functionality in biological process as a novel type of nano--switch. They have been found in critical regions of the human genome such as telomeres, promoter regions, and untranslated regions of RNA. About 50% of human DNA in promoters has G-rich regions with the potential to form G-QPX structures. A G-QPX might act mechanistically as an ON/OFF switch, regulating gene expression, meaning that the formation of G-QPX in a single strand of DNA disrupts double stranded DNA, prevents the binding of transcription factors (TF) to their recognition sites, resulting in gene down-regulation. Although there are numerous studies on biological roles of G-QPXs in oncogenes, their potential formation in neuronal cells, in particular upstream of transcription start sites, is poorly investigated. The main focus of this research is to identify stable G-QPXs in the 97bp active promoter region of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene, the terminal enzyme involved in synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and to clarify ionic modulation of G-QPX nanostructures through the mechanism of neural action potentials. Different bioinformatics analyses (in silico), including the QGRS, quadparser and G4-Calculator programs, have been used to predict stable G-QPX in the active promoter region of the human ChAT gene, located 1000bp upstream from the TATA box. The results of computational studies (using those three different algorithms) led to the identification of three consecutive intramolecular G-QPX structures in the negative strand (ChAT G17-2, ChAT G17, and ChAT G29) and one intramolecular G-QPX structure in the positive strand (ChAT G30). Also, the results suggest the possibility that nearby G-runs in opposed DNA strands with a short distance of each other may be able to form a stable intermolecular G-QPX involving two DNA

  4. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  5. Learning and cognitive flexibility: frontostriatal function and monoaminergic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehagia, Angie A; Murray, Graham K; Robbins, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    Learning in a constant environment, and adapting flexibly to a changing one, through changes in reinforcement contingencies or valence-free cues, depends on overlapping circuitry that interconnects the prefrontal cortex (PFC) with the striatum and is subject to several forms of neurochemical modulation. We present evidence from recent studies in animals employing electrophysiological, pharmacological and lesion techniques, and neuroimaging, neuropsychological and pharmacological investigations of healthy humans and clinical patients. Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the medial striatum and PFC is critical for basic reinforcement learning and the integration of negative feedback during reversal learning, whilst orbitofrontal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) likely mediates this type of low level flexibility, perhaps by reducing interference from salient stimuli. The role of prefrontal noradrenaline (NA) in higher order flexibility indexed through attentional set-shifting has recently received significant empirical support, and similar avenues appear promising in the field of task switching.

  6. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Audra L; Card, Daren C; Ruggiero, Robert P; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Pollock, David D; Secor, Stephen M; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-05-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans.

  7. The use of multiple hierarchically independent gene ontology terms in gene function prediction and genome annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.I.A.; Burgt, van der A.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a widely used controlled vocabulary for the description of gene function. In this study we quantify the usage of multiple and hierarchically independent GO terms in the curated genome annotations of seven well-studied species. In most genomes, significant proportions (6 -

  8. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERRalpha in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERRalpha and ERRalpha-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERRalpha-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1alpha in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERRalpha and PGC-1beta mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERRalpha in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERRalpha may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  9. Sumoylation of bZIP transcription factor NRL modulates target gene expression during photoreceptor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-08-13

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl(-/-) mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl(-/-) phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis.

  10. Sumoylation of bZIP Transcription Factor NRL Modulates Target Gene Expression during Photoreceptor Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E.; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl−/− mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl−/− phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis. PMID:20551322

  11. Gene analogue finder: a GRID solution for finding functionally analogous gene products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licciulli Flavio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date more than 2,1 million gene products from more than 100000 different species have been described specifying their function, the processes they are involved in and their cellular localization using a very well defined and structured vocabulary, the gene ontology (GO. Such vast, well defined knowledge opens the possibility of compare gene products at the level of functionality, finding gene products which have a similar function or are involved in similar biological processes without relying on the conventional sequence similarity approach. Comparisons within such a large space of knowledge are highly data and computing intensive. For this reason this project was based upon the use of the computational GRID, a technology offering large computing and storage resources. Results We have developed a tool, GENe AnaloGue FINdEr (ENGINE that parallelizes the search process and distributes the calculation and data over the computational GRID, splitting the process into many sub-processes and joining the calculation and the data on the same machine and therefore completing the whole search in about 3 days instead of occupying one single machine for more than 5 CPU years. The results of the functional comparison contain potential functional analogues for more than 79000 gene products from the most important species. 46% of the analyzed gene products are well enough described for such an analysis to individuate functional analogues, such as well-known members of the same gene family, or gene products with similar functions which would never have been associated by standard methods. Conclusion ENGINE has produced a list of potential functionally analogous relations between gene products within and between species using, in place of the sequence, the gene description of the GO, thus demonstrating the potential of the GO. However, the current limiting factor is the quality of the associations of many gene products from non

  12. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  13. Modulation of proprioceptive feedback during functional electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grey, Michael James

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is sometimes used as a therapeutic modality in motor rehabilitation to augment voluntary motor drive to effect movement that would otherwise not be possible through voluntary activation alone. Effective motor rehabilitation should require that the central...

  14. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  15. Dopamine Modulates the Functional Organization of the Orbitofrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Tobler, Philippe N

    2017-02-08

    Neuromodulators such as dopamine can alter the intrinsic firing properties of neurons and may thereby change the configuration of larger functional circuits. The primate orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) receives dopaminergic input from midbrain nuclei, but the role of dopamine in the OFC is still unclear. Here we tested the idea that dopaminergic activity changes the pattern of connectivity between the OFC and the rest of the brain and thereby reconfigures functional networks in the OFC. To this end, we combined double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacology [D2 receptor (D2R) antagonist amisulpride] in humans with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and clustering methods. In the placebo group, we replicated previously observed parcellations of the OFC into two and six subregions based on connectivity patterns with the rest of the brain. Most importantly, while the twofold clustering did not differ significantly between groups, blocking D2Rs significantly changed the composition of the sixfold parcellation, suggesting a dopamine-dependent reconfiguration of functional OFC subregions. Moreover, multivariate decoding analyses revealed that amisulpride changed the whole-brain connectivity patterns of individual OFC subregions. In particular, D2R blockade shifted the balance of OFC connectivity from associative areas in the temporal and parietal lobe toward functional connectivity with the frontal cortex. In summary, our results suggest that dopamine alters the composition of functional OFC circuits, possibly indicating a broader role for neuromodulators in the dynamic reconfiguration of functional brain networks.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A key role of any neuromodulator may be the reconfiguration of functional brain circuits. Here we test this idea with regard to dopamine and the organization of functional networks in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). We show that blockade of dopamine D2 receptors has profound effects on the functional connectivity patterns of

  16. Modulated modularity clustering as an exploratory tool for functional genomic inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Stone

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the advent of high-throughput assays, coupled with their diminishing cost, has facilitated a systems approach to biology. As a consequence, massive amounts of data are currently being generated, requiring efficient methodology aimed at the reduction of scale. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling is a standard component of systems-level analyses, and to reduce scale and improve inference clustering genes is common. Since clustering is often the first step toward generating hypotheses, cluster quality is critical. Conversely, because the validation of cluster-driven hypotheses is indirect, it is critical that quality clusters not be obtained by subjective means. In this paper, we present a new objective-based clustering method and demonstrate that it yields high-quality results. Our method, modulated modularity clustering (MMC, seeks community structure in graphical data. MMC modulates the connection strengths of edges in a weighted graph to maximize an objective function (called modularity that quantifies community structure. The result of this maximization is a clustering through which tightly-connected groups of vertices emerge. Our application is to systems genetics, and we quantitatively compare MMC both to the hierarchical clustering method most commonly employed and to three popular spectral clustering approaches. We further validate MMC through analyses of human and Drosophila melanogaster expression data, demonstrating that the clusters we obtain are biologically meaningful. We show MMC to be effective and suitable to applications of large scale. In light of these features, we advocate MMC as a standard tool for exploration and hypothesis generation.

  17. MFSD2A is a novel lung tumor suppressor gene modulating cell cycle and matrix attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shames David S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MFSD2A (major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2 gene maps on chromosome 1p34 within a linkage disequilibrium block containing genetic elements associated with progression of lung cancer. Results Here we show that MFSD2A expression is strongly downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines of different histotypes and in primary lung adenocarcinomas. Experimental modulation of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells is associated with alteration of mRNA levels of genes involved in cell cycle control and interaction with the extracellular matrix. Exogenous expression of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells induced a G1 block, impaired adhesion and migration in vitro, and significantly reduced tumor colony number in vitro (4- to 27-fold, P in vivo (~3-fold, P Conclusion Together these data suggest that MFSD2A is a novel lung cancer tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell cycle progression and matrix attachment.

  18. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  19. A modest but significant effect of CGB5 gene promoter polymorphisms in modulating the risk of recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rull, Kristiina; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne; Nagirnaja, Liina

    2013-01-01

    To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland.......To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland....

  20. Global properties and functional complexity of human gene regulatory variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification and functional interpretation of gene regulatory variants is a major focus of modern genomics. The application of genetic mapping to molecular and cellular traits has enabled the detection of regulatory variation on genome-wide scales and revealed an enormous diversity of regulatory architecture in humans and other species. In this review I summarise the insights gained and questions raised by a decade of genetic mapping of gene expression variation. I discuss recent extensions of this approach using alternative molecular phenotypes that have revealed some of the biological mechanisms that drive gene expression variation between individuals. Finally, I highlight outstanding problems and future directions for development.

  1. Structure and function of Rac genes in higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Min; WU Naihu

    2003-01-01

    As the sole ubiquitous signal GTP-binding protein in higher plants, Rac genes act as pivotal molecular switches and participate in regulations of many life activities, such as cell morphogenesis and polarity growth, programmed cell death, production of H2O2, cell differentiation, and hormone reaction. Based on our work on rice Rac genes, this paper summarizes the researches on Rac genes in higher plant of the last ten years. It will help us to understand the relation between the signal tranduction and the biological functions of plant Rac.

  2. Diverse functions of spindle assembly checkpoint genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jewel A; Keyes, Brice E; Ng, Yvonne P Y; Freeman, C Onyi; Burke, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint regulates the metaphase-to-anaphase transition from yeast to humans. We examined the genetic interactions with four spindle assembly checkpoint genes to identify nonessential genes involved in chromosome segregation, to identify the individual roles of the spindle assembly checkpoint genes within the checkpoint, and to reveal potential complexity that may exist. We used synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis using spindle assembly checkpoint mutants mad1, mad2, mad3, and bub3. We found 228 synthetic interactions with the four spindle assembly checkpoint mutants with substantial overlap in the spectrum of interactions between mad1, mad2, and bub3. In contrast, there were many synthetic interactions that were common to mad1, mad2, and bub3 that were not shared by mad3. We found shared interactions between pairs of spindle assembly checkpoint mutants, suggesting additional complexity within the checkpoint and unique interactions for all of the spindle assembly checkpoint genes. We show that most genes in the interaction network, including ones with unique interactions, affect chromosome transmission or microtubule function, suggesting that the complexity of interactions reflects diverse roles for the checkpoint genes within the checkpoint. Our analysis expands our understanding of the spindle assembly checkpoint and identifies new candidate genes with possible roles in chromosome transmission and mitotic spindle function.

  3. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  4. Identification of functional toxin/immunity genes linked to contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI and rearrangement hotspot (Rhs systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Poole

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI is mediated by the CdiA/CdiB family of two-partner secretion proteins. Each CdiA protein exhibits a distinct growth inhibition activity, which resides in the polymorphic C-terminal region (CdiA-CT. CDI(+ cells also express unique CdiI immunity proteins that specifically block the activity of cognate CdiA-CT, thereby protecting the cell from autoinhibition. Here we show that many CDI systems contain multiple cdiA gene fragments that encode CdiA-CT sequences. These "orphan" cdiA-CT genes are almost always associated with downstream cdiI genes to form cdiA-CT/cdiI modules. Comparative genome analyses suggest that cdiA-CT/cdiI modules are mobile and exchanged between the CDI systems of different bacteria. In many instances, orphan cdiA-CT/cdiI modules are fused to full-length cdiA genes in other bacterial species. Examination of cdiA-CT/cdiI modules from Escherichia coli EC93, E. coli EC869, and Dickeya dadantii 3937 confirmed that these genes encode functional toxin/immunity pairs. Moreover, the orphan module from EC93 was functional in cell-mediated CDI when fused to the N-terminal portion of the EC93 CdiA protein. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the genetic organization of CDI systems shares features with rhs (rearrangement hotspot loci. Rhs proteins also contain polymorphic C-terminal regions (Rhs-CTs, some of which share significant sequence identity with CdiA-CTs. All rhs genes are followed by small ORFs representing possible rhsI immunity genes, and several Rhs systems encode orphan rhs-CT/rhsI modules. Analysis of rhs-CT/rhsI modules from D. dadantii 3937 demonstrated that Rhs-CTs have growth inhibitory activity, which is specifically blocked by cognate RhsI immunity proteins. Together, these results suggest that Rhs plays a role in intercellular competition and that orphan gene modules expand the diversity of toxic activities deployed by both CDI and Rhs systems.

  5. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeneke, Susan; Pedroni, Andreas F; Dieckmann, Anja; Bosch, Volker; Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations. PMID:19032746

  6. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Volker

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value. Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations.

  7. Modules Identification in Gene Positive Networks of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Pearson Agglomerative Method and Pearson Cohesion Coupling Modularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a gene positive network is proposed based on a weighted undirected graph, where the weight represents the positive correlation of the genes. A Pearson agglomerative clustering algorithm is employed to build a clustering tree, where dotted lines cut the tree from bottom to top leading to a number of subsets of the modules. In order to achieve better module partitions, the Pearson correlation coefficient modularity is addressed to seek optimal module decomposition by selecting an optimal threshold value. For the liver cancer gene network under study, we obtain a strong threshold value at 0.67302, and a very strong correlation threshold at 0.80086. On the basis of these threshold values, fourteen strong modules and thirteen very strong modules are obtained respectively. A certain degree of correspondence between the two types of modules is addressed as well. Finally, the biological significance of the two types of modules is analyzed and explained, which shows that these modules are closely related to the proliferation and metastasis of liver cancer. This discovery of the new modules may provide new clues and ideas for liver cancer treatment.

  8. Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wati Durani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piper betle (PB is a traditional medicine that is widely used to treat different diseases around Asian region. The leaf extracts contain various bioactive compounds, which were reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In this study, the effect of PB aqueous extracts on replicative senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs was investigated by determining the expressions of senescence-associated genes using quantitative PCR. Our results showed that PB extracts at 0.4 mg/ml can improve cell proliferation of young (143%, presenescent (127.3%, and senescent (157.3% HDFs. Increased expressions of PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were observed in senescent HDFs compared to young and/or presenescent HDFs. Treatment with PB extracts modulates the transcriptional profile changes in senescent HDFs. By contrast, expressions of SOD1 increased, whereas GPX1, PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were decreased in PB-treated senescent HDFs compared to untreated senescent HDFs. In conclusion, this study indicates the modulation of PB extracts on senescence-associated genes expression of replicative senescent HDFs. Further studies warrant determining the mechanism of PB in modulating replicative senescence of HDFs through these signaling pathways.

  9. Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functions, Protein Degradation, and Chromatin Folding Are Differentially Expressed in Lymphomonocytes of Rett Syndrome Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Guido; Cervellati, Franco; Canali, Raffaella; Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein (MeCP2) gene. By binding to methylated promoters on CpG islands, MeCP2 protein is able to modulate several genes and important cellular pathways. Therefore, mutations in MeCP2 can seriously affect the cellular phenotype. Today, the pathways that MeCP2 mutations are able to affect in RTT are not clear yet. The aim of our study was to investigate the gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphomonocytes (PBMC) isolated from RTT patients to try to evidence new genes and new pathways that are involved in RTT pathophysiology. LIMMA (Linear Models for MicroArray) and SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) analyses on microarray data from 12 RTT patients and 7 control subjects identified 482 genes modulated in RTT, of which 430 were upregulated and 52 were downregulated. Functional clustering of a total of 146 genes in RTT identified key biological pathways related to mitochondrial function and organization, cellular ubiquitination and proteosome degradation, RNA processing, and chromatin folding. Our microarray data reveal an overexpression of genes involved in ATP synthesis suggesting altered energy requirement that parallels with increased activities of protein degradation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mitochondrial-ATP-proteasome functions are likely to be involved in RTT clinical features. PMID:24453408

  10. Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functions, Protein Degradation, and Chromatin Folding Are Differentially Expressed in Lymphomonocytes of Rett Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pecorelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein (MeCP2 gene. By binding to methylated promoters on CpG islands, MeCP2 protein is able to modulate several genes and important cellular pathways. Therefore, mutations in MeCP2 can seriously affect the cellular phenotype. Today, the pathways that MeCP2 mutations are able to affect in RTT are not clear yet. The aim of our study was to investigate the gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphomonocytes (PBMC isolated from RTT patients to try to evidence new genes and new pathways that are involved in RTT pathophysiology. LIMMA (Linear Models for MicroArray and SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays analyses on microarray data from 12 RTT patients and 7 control subjects identified 482 genes modulated in RTT, of which 430 were upregulated and 52 were downregulated. Functional clustering of a total of 146 genes in RTT identified key biological pathways related to mitochondrial function and organization, cellular ubiquitination and proteosome degradation, RNA processing, and chromatin folding. Our microarray data reveal an overexpression of genes involved in ATP synthesis suggesting altered energy requirement that parallels with increased activities of protein degradation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mitochondrial-ATP-proteasome functions are likely to be involved in RTT clinical features.

  11. A new gene ontology-based measure for the functional similarity of gene products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Guo-long; QIAN Shi-yu; FANG Ji-qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Although biomedical ontologies have standardized the representation of gene products across species and databases,a method for determining the functional similarities of gene products has not yet been developed.Methods We proposed a new semantic similarity measure based on Gene Ontology that considers the semantic influences from all of the ancestor terms in a graph.Our measure was compared with Resnik's measure in two applications,which were based on the association of the measure used with the gene co-expression and the proteinprotein interactions.Results The results showed a considerable association between the semantic similarity and the expression correlation and between the semantic similarity and the protein-protein interactions,and our measure performed the best overall.Conclusion These results revealed the potential value of our newly proposed semantic similarity measure in studying the functional relevance of gene products.

  12. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism

  13. Ontology-Based Prediction and Prioritization of Gene Functional Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicco, Davide; Masseroli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Genes and their protein products are essential molecular units of a living organism. The knowledge of their functions is key for the understanding of physiological and pathological biological processes, as well as in the development of new drugs and therapies. The association of a gene or protein with its functions, described by controlled terms of biomolecular terminologies or ontologies, is named gene functional annotation. Very many and valuable gene annotations expressed through terminologies and ontologies are available. Nevertheless, they might include some erroneous information, since only a subset of annotations are reviewed by curators. Furthermore, they are incomplete by definition, given the rapidly evolving pace of biomolecular knowledge. In this scenario, computational methods that are able to quicken the annotation curation process and reliably suggest new annotations are very important. Here, we first propose a computational pipeline that uses different semantic and machine learning methods to predict novel ontology-based gene functional annotations; then, we introduce a new semantic prioritization rule to categorize the predicted annotations by their likelihood of being correct. Our tests and validations proved the effectiveness of our pipeline and prioritization of predicted annotations, by selecting as most likely manifold predicted annotations that were later confirmed.

  14. Immune Reactions against Gene Gun Vaccines Are Differentially Modulated by Distinct Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Stefanie Weber

    Full Text Available The skin accommodates multiple dendritic cell (DC subsets with remarkable functional diversity. Immune reactions are initiated and modulated by the triggering of DC by pathogen-associated or endogenous danger signals. In contrast to these processes, the influence of intrinsic features of protein antigens on the strength and type of immune responses is much less understood. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of distinct DC subsets in immune reactions against two structurally different model antigens, E. coli beta-galactosidase (betaGal and chicken ovalbumin (OVA under otherwise identical conditions. After epicutaneous administration of the respective DNA vaccines with a gene gun, wild type mice induced robust immune responses against both antigens. However, ablation of langerin+ DC almost abolished IgG1 and cytotoxic T lymphocytes against betaGal but enhanced T cell and antibody responses against OVA. We identified epidermal Langerhans cells (LC as the subset responsible for the suppression of anti-OVA reactions and found regulatory T cells critically involved in this process. In contrast, reactions against betaGal were not affected by the selective elimination of LC, indicating that this antigen required a different langerin+ DC subset. The opposing findings obtained with OVA and betaGal vaccines were not due to immune-modulating activities of either the plasmid DNA or the antigen gene products, nor did the differential cellular localization, size or dose of the two proteins account for the opposite effects. Thus, skin-borne protein antigens may be differentially handled by distinct DC subsets, and, in this way, intrinsic features of the antigen can participate in immune modulation.

  15. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  16. Task modulates functional connectivity networks in free viewing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidkhani, Hossein; Nikolaev, Andrey R; Meghanathan, Radha Nila; Pezeshk, Hamid; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2017-08-03

    In free visual exploration, eye-movement is immediately followed by dynamic reconfiguration of brain functional connectivity. We studied the task-dependency of this process in a combined visual search-change detection experiment. Participants viewed two (nearly) same displays in succession. First time they had to find and remember multiple targets among distractors, so the ongoing task involved memory encoding. Second time they had to determine if a target had changed in orientation, so the ongoing task involved memory retrieval. From multichannel EEG recorded during 200 ms intervals time-locked to fixation onsets, we estimated the functional connectivity using a weighted phase lag index at the frequencies of theta, alpha, and beta bands, and derived global and local measures of the functional connectivity graphs. We found differences between both memory task conditions for several network measures, such as mean path length, radius, diameter, closeness and eccentricity, mainly in the alpha band. Both the local and the global measures indicated that encoding involved a more segregated mode of operation than retrieval. These differences arose immediately after fixation onset and persisted for the entire duration of the lambda complex, an evoked potential commonly associated with early visual perception. We concluded that encoding and retrieval differentially shape network configurations involved in early visual perception, affecting the way the visual input is processed at each fixation. These findings demonstrate that task requirements dynamically control the functional connectivity networks involved in early visual perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive analysis of schizophrenia risk genes that function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Laura; Cosgrove, Donna; Clarkson, Christopher; Harold, Denise; Kendall, Kimberley; Richards, Alex; Mantripragada, Kiran; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James; Hartmann, Annette; Konte, Betina; Rujescu, Dan; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Rea, Stephen; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek W

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are an important heritable and dynamic means of regulating various genomic functions, including gene expression, to orchestrate brain development, adult neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. These processes when perturbed are thought to contribute to schizophrenia pathophysiology. A core feature of schizophrenia is cognitive dysfunction. For genetic disorders where cognitive impairment is more severe such as intellectual disability, there are a disproportionally high number of genes involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Evidence now supports some shared genetic aetiology between schizophrenia and intellectual disability. GWAS have identified 108 chromosomal regions associated with schizophrenia risk that span 350 genes. This study identified genes mapping to those loci that have epigenetic functions, and tested the risk alleles defining those loci for association with cognitive deficits. We developed a list of 350 genes with epigenetic functions and cross-referenced this with the GWAS loci. This identified eight candidate genes: BCL11B, CHD7, EP300, EPC2, GATAD2A, KDM3B, RERE, SATB2. Using a dataset of Irish psychosis cases and controls (n = 1235), the schizophrenia risk SNPs at these loci were tested for effects on IQ, working memory, episodic memory, and attention. Strongest associations were for rs6984242 with both measures of IQ (P = 0.001) and episodic memory (P = 0.007). We link rs6984242 to CHD7 via a long range eQTL. These associations were not replicated in independent samples. Our study highlights that a number of genes mapping to risk loci for schizophrenia may function as epigenetic regulators of gene expression but further studies are required to establish a role for these genes in cognition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients: development of a new module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena; Bianco, Flaviana; Martinelli, Diego; Glanzman, Allan M; Messina, Sonia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Main, Marion; Eagle, Michelle; Florence, Julaine; Krosschell, Kristin; Vasco, Gessica; Pelliccioni, Marco; Lombardo, Marilena; Pane, Marika; Finkel, Richard; Muntoni, Francesco; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-06-01

    We report the development of a module specifically designed for assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients, including young children and those with severe contractures. The application of the module to a preschool cohort of 40 children (age 30-48 months) showed that all the items could be completed by 30 months. The module was also used in 45 nonambulant SMA patients (age 30 months to 27 years). Their scores were more variable than in the preschool cohort, ranging from 0 to 18. The magnitude of scores was not related to age (r=-0.19). The upper limb scores had a good correlation with the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, r=0.75, but the upper limb function did not always strictly follow the overall gross motor function. These findings suggest that even some of the very weak nonambulant children possess upper limb skills that can be measured.

  19. [The assessment of modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation on cognitive function in rats of different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priakhin, E A; Triapitsyna, G A; Andreev, S S; Kolomiets, I A; Polevik, N D; Akleev, A V

    2007-01-01

    The modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation influence on cognitive function of male uninbred Wister rat exposed at the age of sexual maturation (2 months) and at the age of morphofunctional maturity (3.5 months) was examined. Animals were subjected to pulse electromagnetic radiation (925 MHz) modulated as a GSM standard with the power density 1.2 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes every day for 12 days. At day 8 of exposure the cognitive function were examined with the Morris water maze. In the result of investigation it was determines that modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation at the sexual maturation age did not affect the spatial learning and improve the visual orientation performance. Modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic exposure of animals at the sex maturity age did not affect the visual performance and improve the spatial performance of male rats.

  20. STAT3 Activity and Function in Cancer: Modulation by STAT5 and miR-146b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Frank, David A., E-mail: david_frank@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-04-23

    The transcription factor STAT3 regulates genes that control critical cellular processes such as proliferation, survival, pluripotency, and motility. Thus, under physiological conditions, the transcriptional function of STAT3 is tightly regulated as one part of a complex signaling matrix. When these processes are subverted through mutation or epigenetic events, STAT3 becomes highly active and drives elevated expression of genes underlying these phenotypes, leading to malignant cellular behavior. However, even in the presence of activated STAT3, other cellular modulators can have a major impact on the biological properties of a cancer cell, which is reflected in the clinical behavior of a tumor. Recent evidence has suggested that two such key modulators are the activation status of other STAT family members, particularly STAT5, and the expression of STAT3-regulated genes that are part of negative feedback circuits, including microRNAs such as miR-146b. With attention to these newly emerging areas, we will gain greater insight into the consequence of STAT3 activation in the biology of human cancers. In addition, understanding these subtleties of STAT3 signaling in cancer pathogenesis will allow the development of more rational molecular approaches to cancer therapy.

  1. Sexual hormones modulate compensatory renal growth and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Azurmendi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The role played by sexual hormones and vasoactive substances in the compensatory renal growth (CRG that follows uninephrectomy (uNx is still controversial. Intact and gonadectomized adult Wistar rats of both sexes, with and without uNx, performed at 90 days age, were studied at age 150 days. Daily urine volume, electrolyte excretion and kallikrein activity (UKa were determined. Afterwards, glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were measured, the kidneys weighed and DNA, protein and RNA studied to determine nuclei content and cell size. When the remnant kidney weight at age 150 days was compared with the weight of the kidney removed at the time of uNx, male uNx rats showed the greatest CRG (50% while growth in the other uNx groups was 25%, 15% and 19% in orchidectomized, female and ovariectomized rats, respectively. The small CRG observed in the uNx female rats was accompanied by the lowest glomerular filtration value, 0.56 ± 0.02 ml/min/g kwt compared, with the other uNx groups, p < 0.05. Cell size (protein or RNA/DNA was similar for all the groups except for uNx orchidectomized rats. In this group the cytoplasmatic protein or RNA content was lower than in the other groups while DNA (nuclei content was similar. Some degree of hyperplasia was determined by DNA content in the uNx groups. Male sexual hormones positively influenced CRG and its absence modulated cell size. Female sexual hormones, instead, did not appear to stimulate CRG. The kallikrein kinin system may not be involved in CRG.

  2. Functional Toxicogenomic Profiling Expands Insight into Modulators of Formaldehyde Toxicity in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Gaytán, Brandon D.; Romero, Carlos; De La Rosa, Vanessa Y.; Loguinov, Alex; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a commercially important chemical with numerous and diverse uses. Accordingly, occupational and environmental exposure to FA is prevalent worldwide. Various adverse effects, including nasopharyngeal, sinonasal, and lymphohematopoietic cancers, have been linked to FA exposure, prompting designation of FA as a human carcinogen by U.S. and international scientific entities. Although the mechanism(s) of FA toxicity have been well studied, additional insight is needed in regard to the genetic requirements for FA tolerance. In this study, a functional toxicogenomics approach was utilized in the model eukaryotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes and cellular processes modulating the cellular toxicity of FA. Our results demonstrate mutant strains deficient in multiple DNA repair pathways–including homologous recombination, single strand annealing, and postreplication repair–were sensitive to FA, indicating FA may cause various forms of DNA damage in yeast. The SKI complex and its associated factors, which regulate mRNA degradation by the exosome, were also required for FA tolerance, suggesting FA may have unappreciated effects on RNA stability. Furthermore, various strains involved in osmoregulation and stress response were sensitive to FA. Together, our results are generally consistent with FA-mediated damage to both DNA and RNA. Considering DNA repair and RNA degradation pathways are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans, mechanisms of FA toxicity identified in yeast may be relevant to human disease and genetic susceptibility. PMID:27909446

  3. The polyamine inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine modulates hippocampus-dependent function after single and combined injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Rosi

    Full Text Available Exposure to uncontrolled irradiation in a radiologic terrorism scenario, a natural disaster or a nuclear battlefield, will likely be concomitantly superimposed on other types of injury, such as trauma. In the central nervous system, radiation combined injury (RCI involving irradiation and traumatic brain injury may have a multifaceted character. This may entail cellular and molecular changes that are associated with cognitive performance, including changes in neurogenesis and the expression of the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc. Because traumatic stimuli initiate a characteristic early increase in polyamine metabolism, we hypothesized that treatment with the polyamine inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO would reduce the adverse effects of single or combined injury on hippocampus structure and function. Hippocampal dependent cognitive impairments were quantified with the Morris water maze and showed that DFMO effectively reversed cognitive impairments after all injuries, particularly traumatic brain injury. Similar results were seen with respect to the expression of Arc protein, but not neurogenesis. Given that polyamines have been found to modulate inflammatory responses in the brain we also assessed the numbers of total and newly born activated microglia, and found reduced numbers of newly born cells. While the mechanisms responsible for the improvement in cognition after DFMO treatment are not yet clear, the present study provides new and compelling data regarding the potential use of DFMO as a potential countermeasure against the adverse effects of single or combined injury.

  4. Functional toxicogenomic profiling expands insight into modulators of formaldehyde toxicity in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew North

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA is a commercially important chemical with numerous and diverse uses. Accordingly, occupational and environmental exposure to FA is prevalent worldwide. Various adverse effects, including nasopharyngeal, sinonasal, and lymphohematopoietic cancers, have been linked to FA exposure, prompting designation of FA as a human carcinogen by U.S. and international scientific entities. Although the mechanism(s of FA toxicity have been well studied, additional insight is needed in regard to the genetic requirements for FA tolerance. In this study, a functional toxicogenomics approach was utilized in the model eukaryotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes and cellular processes modulating the cellular toxicity of FA. Our results demonstrate mutant strains deficient in multiple DNA repair pathways–including homologous recombination, single strand annealing, and postreplication repair–were sensitive to FA, indicating FA may cause various forms of DNA damage in yeast. The SKI complex and its associated factors, which regulate mRNA degradation by the exosome, were also required for FA tolerance, suggesting FA may have unappreciated effects on RNA stability. Furthermore, various strains involved in osmoregulation and stress response were sensitive to FA. Together, our results are generally consistent with FA-mediated damage to both DNA and RNA. Considering DNA repair and RNA degradation pathways are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans, mechanisms of FA toxicity identified in yeast may be relevant to human disease and genetic susceptibility.

  5. An Analysis of the Cost and Performance of Photovoltaic Systems as a Function of Module Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Kelsey A.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Silverman, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Woodhouse, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Xingshu [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Alam, Mohammed A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-04-07

    We investigate the potential effects of module area on the cost and performance of photovoltaic systems. Applying a bottom-up methodology, we analyzed the costs associated with mc-Si and thin-film modules and systems as a function of module area. We calculate a potential for savings of up to $0.04/W, $0.10/W, and $0.13/W in module manufacturing costs for mc-Si, CdTe, and CIGS respectively, with large area modules. We also find that an additional $0.05/W savings in balance-of-systems costs may be achieved. However, these savings are dependent on the ability to maintain efficiency and manufacturing yield as area scales. Lifetime energy yield must also be maintained to realize reductions in the levelized cost of energy. We explore the possible effects of module size on efficiency and energy production, and find that more research is required to understand these issues for each technology. Sensitivity of the $/W cost savings to module efficiency and manufacturing yield is presented. We also discuss non-cost barriers to adoption of large area modules.

  6. A binaural advantage in the subjective modulation transfer function with simple impulse responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Eric Robert; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    into account that humans listen with two ears. There can be large interaural phase differences in the modulation transfer functions, which can create detectable interaural level difference fluctuations. Measurements were made to determine whether these interaural modulation phase differences can be used...... to enhance the detectability of sinusoidal intensity modulations imposed on a broadband noise carrier and then convolved with simple, dichotic impulse responses. The results show that there can be a significant advantage to listening with two ears over listening with just one. Some further investigations...... were made to determine whether this advantage in signal detection can also be used as an advantage for speech intelligibility....

  7. GeneCodis3: a non-redundant and modular enrichment analysis tool for functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Nogales-Cadenas, Ruben; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Since its first release in 2007, GeneCodis has become a valuable tool to functionally interpret results from experimental techniques in genomics. This web-based application integrates different sources of information to finding groups of genes with similar biological meaning. This process, known as enrichment analysis, is essential in the interpretation of high-throughput experiments. The frequent feedbacks and the natural evolution of genomics and bioinformatics have allowed the growth of the tool and the development of this third release. In this version, a special effort has been made to remove noisy and redundant output from the enrichment results with the inclusion of a recently reported algorithm that summarizes significantly enriched terms and generates functionally coherent modules of genes and terms. A new comparative analysis has been added to allow the differential analysis of gene sets. To expand the scope of the application, new sources of biological information have been included, such as genetic diseases, drugs-genes interactions and Pubmed information among others. Finally, the graphic section has been renewed with the inclusion of new interactive graphics and filtering options. The application is freely available at http://genecodis.cnb.csic.es.

  8. The HY5-PIF regulatory module coordinates light and temperature control of photosynthetic gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Toledo-Ortiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interpret daily and seasonal alterations in light and temperature signals is essential for plant survival. This is particularly important during seedling establishment when the phytochrome photoreceptors activate photosynthetic pigment production for photoautotrophic growth. Phytochromes accomplish this partly through the suppression of phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs, negative regulators of chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis. While the bZIP transcription factor long hypocotyl 5 (HY5, a potent PIF antagonist, promotes photosynthetic pigment accumulation in response to light. Here we demonstrate that by directly targeting a common promoter cis-element (G-box, HY5 and PIFs form a dynamic activation-suppression transcriptional module responsive to light and temperature cues. This antagonistic regulatory module provides a simple, direct mechanism through which environmental change can redirect transcriptional control of genes required for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In the regulation of photopigment biosynthesis genes, HY5 and PIFs do not operate alone, but with the circadian clock. However, sudden changes in light or temperature conditions can trigger changes in HY5 and PIFs abundance that adjust the expression of common target genes to optimise photosynthetic performance and growth.

  9. Korean ginseng modulates the ileal microbiota and mucin gene expression in the growing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyoung-Sik; Balan, Prabhu; Hong, Hee-Do; Choi, Won-Il; Cho, Chang-Won; Lee, Young-Chul; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2014-07-25

    The study was conducted to investigate whether oral administration of Korean ginseng powders can modulate gut microbiota as well as intestinal mucin production at the translational and transcriptional levels in the ileum of the growing rat. Thirty individually caged Sprague-Dawley male rats were allocated to three groups (n = 10) and fed for 21 days either a basal control diet or one of the two treatment diets each containing white or red Korean ginseng (WG or RG) powder. Bacterial DNA was extracted from ileal digesta and subjected to quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using primers for total bacteria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides, and Clostridium strains. The qPCR results showed that consumption of WG or RG powder significantly increased the number of total bacteria and Lactobacillus strains compared to the control group. Consumption of WG powder increased mRNA expression of the Muc2 gene in the small intestine compared to the control group. There was no effect of WG or RG on the small intestinal digesta mucin content. Correlation analysis showed that expression of the Muc2 gene was significantly associated with the number of total bacteria (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and Lactobacillus strains (r = 0.53, P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, the number of Lactobacillus strains was significantly correlated with the number of total bacteria (r = 0.87, P < 0.05). Consumption of the WG powder modulated the intestinal ecosystem of the growing rat and intestinal mucin gene expression.

  10. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah gene: a novel gene with ancient functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Araújo

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth, has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila, a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general.

  11. Modeling the allosteric modulation of CCR5 function by Maraviroc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagane, Bernard; Garcia-Perez, Javier; Kellenberger, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Maraviroc is a non-peptidic, low molecular weight CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) ligand that has recently been marketed for the treatment of HIV infected individuals. This review discusses recent molecular modeling studies of CCR5 by homology to CXC chemokine receptor 4, their contribution to the understanding of the allosteric mode of action of the inhibitor and their potential for the development of future drugs with improved efficiency and preservation of CCR5 biological functions.

  12. DAVID Knowledgebase: a gene-centered database integrating heterogeneous gene annotation resources to facilitate high-throughput gene functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baseler Michael W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the complex and distributed nature of biological research, our current biological knowledge is spread over many redundant annotation databases maintained by many independent groups. Analysts usually need to visit many of these bioinformatics databases in order to integrate comprehensive annotation information for their genes, which becomes one of the bottlenecks, particularly for the analytic task associated with a large gene list. Thus, a highly centralized and ready-to-use gene-annotation knowledgebase is in demand for high throughput gene functional analysis. Description The DAVID Knowledgebase is built around the DAVID Gene Concept, a single-linkage method to agglomerate tens of millions of gene/protein identifiers from a variety of public genomic resources into DAVID gene clusters. The grouping of such identifiers improves the cross-reference capability, particularly across NCBI and UniProt systems, enabling more than 40 publicly available functional annotation sources to be comprehensively integrated and centralized by the DAVID gene clusters. The simple, pair-wise, text format files which make up the DAVID Knowledgebase are freely downloadable for various data analysis uses. In addition, a well organized web interface allows users to query different types of heterogeneous annotations in a high-throughput manner. Conclusion The DAVID Knowledgebase is designed to facilitate high throughput gene functional analysis. For a given gene list, it not only provides the quick accessibility to a wide range of heterogeneous annotation data in a centralized location, but also enriches the level of biological information for an individual gene. Moreover, the entire DAVID Knowledgebase is freely downloadable or searchable at http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/knowledgebase/.

  13. Functional analysis of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing disc: role of transcripts enriched in the wing region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas L; Cain, Donna; Paul, Litty; Justiniano, Steven; Alli, Anwar; Mullins, Jeremi S; Wang, Chun Ping; Butchar, Jon P; Simcox, Amanda

    2006-12-01

    Differential gene expression is the major mechanism underlying the development of specific body regions. Here we assessed the role of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, which gives rise to two distinct adult structures: the body wall and the wing. Reverse genetics was used to test the function of uncharacterized genes first identified in a microarray screen as having high levels of expression in the presumptive wing. Such genes could participate in elaborating the specific morphological characteristics of the wing. The activity of the genes was modulated using misexpression and RNAi-mediated silencing. Misexpression of eight of nine genes tested caused phenotypes. Of 12 genes tested, 10 showed effective silencing with RNAi transgenes, but only 3 of these had resulting phenotypes. The wing phenotypes resulting from RNAi suggest that CG8780 is involved in patterning the veins in the proximal region of the wing blade and that CG17278 and CG30069 are required for adhesion of wing surfaces. Venation and apposition of the wing surfaces are processes specific to wing development providing a correlation between the expression and function of these genes. The results show that a combination of expression profiling and tissue-specific gene silencing has the potential to identify new genes involved in wing development and hence to contribute to our understanding of this process. However, there are both technical and biological limitations to this approach, including the efficacy of RNAi and the role that gene redundancy may play in masking phenotypes.

  14. Gene network analysis in a pediatric cohort identifies novel lung function genes.

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    Bruce A Ong

    Full Text Available Lung function is a heritable trait and serves as an important clinical predictor of morbidity and mortality for pulmonary conditions in adults, however, despite its importance, no studies have focused on uncovering pediatric-specific loci influencing lung function. To identify novel genetic determinants of pediatric lung function, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of four pulmonary function traits, including FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75% in 1556 children. Further, we carried out gene network analyses for each trait including all SNPs with a P-value of <1.0 × 10(-3 from the individual GWAS. The GWAS identified SNPs with notable trends towards association with the pulmonary function measures, including the previously described INTS12 locus association with FEV1 (pmeta=1.41 × 10(-7. The gene network analyses identified 34 networks of genes associated with pulmonary function variables in Caucasians. Of those, the glycoprotein gene network reached genome-wide significance for all four variables. P-value range pmeta=6.29 × 10(-4 - 2.80 × 10(-8 on meta-analysis. In this study, we report on specific pathways that are significantly associated with pediatric lung function at genome-wide significance. In addition, we report the first loci associated with lung function in both pediatric Caucasian and African American populations.

  15. Primer Sets Developed for Functional Genes Reveal Shifts in Functionality of Fungal Community in Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannula, S.E.; van Veen, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of soil microbes is a hot topic at the moment. However, the molecular tools for the assessment of functional diversity in the fungal community are less developed than tools based on genes encoding the ribosomal operon. Here 20 sets of primers targeting genes involved mainly in

  16. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  17. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  18. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic function on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L; Cooke, William H; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Buckey, Jay C; Pawelczyk, James A; Ertl, Andrew C; Cox, James F; Kuusela, Tom A; Tahvanainen, Kari U O; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Levine, Benjamin D; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Robertson, David; Blomqvist, C Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    We studied healthy supine astronauts on Earth with electrocardiogram, non-invasive arterial pressure, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations, breathing depth and sympathetic nerve recordings. The null hypotheses were that heart beat interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are baroreflex mediated, that they persist during apnoea, and that autonomic responses to apnoea result from changes of chemoreceptor, baroreceptor or lung stretch receptor inputs. R-R interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are unlikely to be baroreflex mediated, and disappear during apnoea. The subjects' responses to apnoea could not be attributed to changes of central chemoreceptor activity (hypocapnia prevailed); altered arterial baroreceptor input (vagal baroreflex gain declined and muscle sympathetic nerve burst areas, frequencies and probabilities increased, even as arterial pressure climbed to new levels); or altered pulmonary stretch receptor activity (major breathing frequency and tidal volume changes did not alter vagal tone or sympathetic activity). Apnoea responses of healthy subjects may result from changes of central respiratory motoneurone activity. We studied eight healthy, supine astronauts on Earth, who followed a simple protocol: they breathed at fixed or random frequencies, hyperventilated and then stopped breathing, as a means to modulate and expose to view important, but obscure central neurophysiological mechanisms. Our recordings included the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal volume, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. Arterial pressure, vagal tone and muscle sympathetic outflow were comparable during spontaneous and controlled-frequency breathing. Compared with spontaneous, 0.1 and 0.05 Hz breathing, however, breathing at usual frequencies (∼0.25 Hz) lowered arterial baroreflex gain, and provoked smaller arterial pressure and R-R interval

  19. Saponin determination, expression analysis and functional characterization of saponin biosynthetic genes in Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallos-Jurado, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; Arendt, Philipp; Barriga-Medina, Noelia; Morillo, Eduardo; Arahana, Venancio; de Lourdes Torres, Maria; Goossens, Alain; Leon-Reyes, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly nutritious pseudocereal with an outstanding protein, vitamin, mineral and nutraceutical content. The leaves, flowers and seed coat of quinoa contain triterpenoid saponins, which impart bitterness to the grain and make them unpalatable without postharvest removal of the saponins. In this study, we quantified saponin content in quinoa leaves from Ecuadorian sweet and bitter genotypes and assessed the expression of saponin biosynthetic genes in leaf samples elicited with methyl jasmonate. We found saponin accumulation in leaves after MeJA treatment in both ecotypes tested. As no reference genes were available to perform qPCR in quinoa, we mined publicly available RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The quinoa ortholog of At2g28390 (Monensin Sensitivity 1, MON1) was stably expressed and chosen as a suitable reference gene for qPCR analysis. Candidate saponin biosynthesis genes were screened in the quinoa RNA-Seq data and subsequent functional characterization in yeast led to the identification of CqbAS1, CqCYP716A78 and CqCYP716A79. These genes were found to be induced by MeJA, suggesting this phytohormone might also modulate saponin biosynthesis in quinoa leaves. Knowledge of the saponin biosynthesis and its regulation in quinoa may aid the further development of sweet cultivars that do not require postharvest processing.

  20. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Jaing

    Full Text Available Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples.

  1. Sponge microbiota are a reservoir of functional antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Versluis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional resistance genes in the sponges Aplysina aerophoba, Petrosia ficiformis and Corticium candelabrum. We obtained 37 insert sequences facilitating resistance to D-cycloserine (n=6, gentamicin (n=1, amikacin (n=7, trimethoprim (n=17, chloramphenicol (n=1, rifampicin (n=2 and ampicillin (n=3. Fifteen of 37 inserts harboured resistance genes that shared <90% amino acid identity with known gene products, whereas on 13 inserts no resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance genes that may be harnessed by phylogenetically distinct bacteria.

  2. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Thein, Swee Lay; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function. PMID:22139419

  3. Functional validation of GWAS gene candidates for abnormal liver function during zebrafish liver development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Y. Liu

    2013-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed numerous associations between many phenotypes and gene candidates. Frequently, however, further elucidation of gene function has not been achieved. A recent GWAS identified 69 candidate genes associated with elevated liver enzyme concentrations, which are clinical markers of liver disease. To investigate the role of these genes in liver homeostasis, we narrowed down this list to 12 genes based on zebrafish orthology, zebrafish liver expression and disease correlation. To assess the function of gene candidates during liver development, we assayed hepatic progenitors at 48 hours post fertilization (hpf and hepatocytes at 72 hpf using in situ hybridization following morpholino knockdown in zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of three genes (pnpla3, pklr and mapk10 decreased expression of hepatic progenitor cells, whereas knockdown of eight genes (pnpla3, cpn1, trib1, fads2, slc2a2, pklr, mapk10 and samm50 decreased cell-specific hepatocyte expression. We then induced liver injury in zebrafish embryos using acetaminophen exposure and observed changes in liver toxicity incidence in morphants. Prioritization of GWAS candidates and morpholino knockdown expedites the study of newly identified genes impacting liver development and represents a feasible method for initial assessment of candidate genes to instruct further mechanistic analyses. Our analysis can be extended to GWAS for additional disease-associated phenotypes.

  4. Investigation of gene expression profiles in coronary heart disease and functional analysis of target gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN HuiJun; MA Xiaoduan; JIANG YueRong; SHI DaZhuo; CHEN KeJi

    2009-01-01

    The research outlined here includes constitution of the differential gene expression profile by means of oligonucleotide gene microarray and functional analysis of the target gene for coronary heart disease (CHD). In a microarray screening experiment, the predominance of inflammation-and immune-related genes is presented in the expression profile of 107 differential genes based on the analysis of gene ontology and gene pathway. IL-8, an inflammatory factor, is identified as one of the genes that were markedly up-regulated in CHD. The plasma level of IL-8 is significantly raised in patients with CHD (n = 30) compared with healthy controls (n = 40), which underscores the clinical relevance of the in vitro finding. The further functional analysis shows that IL-8 affects platelet aggregation percentage, ex-pression of CD62p and platelet aggregation morphology in 12 healthy volunteers to some extent. These findings suggest the relevance of inflammation and immune responses to CHD at the DNA level. Moreover, IL-8 may be involved in the pathogenesis of CHD through the pathway of platelet activation.

  5. Prenatal Exposure to TCDD Triggers Significant Modulation of microRNA Expression Profile in the Thymus That Affects Consequent Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Narendra P; Singh, Udai P.; Hongbing Guan; Prakash Nagarkatti; Mitzi Nagarkatti

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression. There are over 700 miRs encoded in the mouse genome and modulate most of the cellular pathways and functions by controlling gene expression. However, there is not much known about the pathophysiological role of miRs. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), an environmental contaminant is well known to induce severe toxicity (acute and chronic) with long-term effects. Also, in utero exposure of fetus to T...

  6. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Lauritzen, L.; Kjaer, T.M.R.;

    2007-01-01

    (n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 x 2 intervention in 64 healthy...... Danish infants, who received cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil (FO) (3.4 +/- 1.1 mL/d) from 9 to 12 mo of age. Before and after the intervention, fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes, plasma IgE, C-reactive protein, and soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations were measured. TNF...

  7. Heterologous expression of the filarial nematode alt gene products reveals their potential to inhibit immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aebischer Toni

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites exploit sophisticated strategies to evade host immunity that require both adaptation of existing genes and evolution of new gene families. We have addressed this question by testing the immunological function of novel genes from helminth parasites, in which conventional transgenesis is not yet possible. We investigated two such novel genes from Brugia malayi termed abundant larval transcript (alt, expression of which reaches ~5% of total transcript at the time parasites enter the human host. Results To test the hypothesis that ALT proteins modulate host immunity, we adopted an alternative transfection strategy to express these products in the protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana. We then followed the course of infection in vitro in macrophages and in vivo in mice. Expression of ALT proteins, but not a truncated mutant, conferred greater infectivity of macrophages in vitro, reaching 3-fold higher parasite densities. alt-transfected parasites also caused accelerated disease in vivo, and fewer mice were able to clear infection of organisms expressing ALT. alt-transfected parasites were more resistant to IFN-γ-induced killing by macrophages. Expression profiling of macrophages infected with transgenic L. mexicana revealed consistently higher levels of GATA-3 and SOCS-1 transcripts, both associated with the Th2-type response observed in in vivo filarial infection. Conclusion Leishmania transfection is a tractable and informative approach to determining immunological functions of single genes from heterologous organisms. In the case of the filarial ALT proteins, our data suggest that they may participate in the Th2 bias observed in the response to parasite infection by modulating cytokine-induced signalling within immune system cells.

  8. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - A Fully Automated, Miniaturized Instrument for Measuring Gene Expression in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kia; Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecraft opens the door to a large number of high-value experiments on the influence of the space environment on biological systems. For example, measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, and determine the metabolic bases of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology, and medicine. Supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measurement of expression of several hundreds of microbial genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing cell walls of bacteria sampled from cultures grown in space, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing the RNA on a microarray and (4) providing readout of the microarray signal, all in a single microfluidics cartridge. The device is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by NASA Ames' Small Spacecraft Division. To meet space and other technical constraints imposed by these platforms, a number of technical innovations are being implemented. The integration and end-to-end technological and biological validation of the instrument are carried out using as a model the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, known for its remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions. Each step in the measurement process-lysis, nucleic acid extraction, purification, and hybridization to an array-is assessed through comparison of the results obtained using the instrument with

  9. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer. PMID:28123849

  10. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer.

  11. Information theory applied to the sparse gene ontology annotation network to predict novel gene function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ying; Li, Jianrong

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Despite advances in the gene annotation process, the functions of a large portion of the gene products remain insufficiently characterized. In addition, the “in silico” prediction of novel Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for partially characterized gene functions or processes is highly dependent on reverse genetic or function genomics approaches. Results We propose a novel approach, Information Theory-based Semantic Similarity (ITSS), to automatically predict molecular functions of genes based on Gene Ontology annotations. We have demonstrated using a 10-fold cross-validation that the ITSS algorithm obtains prediction accuracies (Precision 97%, Recall 77%) comparable to other machine learning algorithms when applied to similarly dense annotated portions of the GO datasets. In addition, such method can generate highly accurate predictions in sparsely annotated portions of GO, in which previous algorithm failed to do so. As a result, our technique generates an order of magnitude more gene function predictions than previous methods. Further, this paper presents the first historical rollback validation for the predicted GO annotations, which may represent more realistic conditions for an evaluation than generally used cross-validations type of evaluations. By manually assessing a random sample of 100 predictions conducted in a historical roll-back evaluation, we estimate that a minimum precision of 51% (95% confidence interval: 43%–58%) can be achieved for the human GO Annotation file dated 2003. Availability The program is available on request. The 97,732 positive predictions of novel gene annotations from the 2005 GO Annotation dataset are available at http://phenos.bsd.uchicago.edu/mphenogo/prediction_result_2005.txt. PMID:17646340

  12. Myocyte repolarization modulates myocardial function in aging dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Signore, Sergio; Qanud, Khaled; Borghetti, Giulia; Meo, Marianna; Cannata, Antonio; Zhou, Yu; Wybieralska, Ewa; Luciani, Marco; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Zhang, Eric; Matsuda, Alex; Webster, Andrew; Cimini, Maria; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; D'Alessandro, David A; Wunimenghe, Oriyanhan; Michler, Robert E; Royer, Christopher; Goichberg, Polina; Leri, Annarosa; Barrett, Edward G; Anversa, Piero; Hintze, Thomas H; Rota, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Studies of myocardial aging are complex and the mechanisms involved in the deterioration of ventricular performance and decreased functional reserve of the old heart remain to be properly defined. We have studied a colony of beagle dogs from 3 to 14 yr of age kept under a highly regulated environment to define the effects of aging on the myocardium. Ventricular, myocardial, and myocyte function, together with anatomical and structural properties of the organ and cardiomyocytes, were evaluated. Ventricular hypertrophy was not observed with aging and the structural composition of the myocardium was modestly affected. Alterations in the myocyte compartment were identified in aged dogs, and these factors negatively interfere with the contractile reserve typical of the young heart. The duration of the action potential is prolonged in old cardiomyocytes contributing to the slower electrical recovery of the myocardium. Also, the remodeled repolarization of cardiomyocytes with aging provides inotropic support to the senescent muscle but compromises its contractile reserve, rendering the old heart ineffective under conditions of high hemodynamic demand. The defects in the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiomyocytes with aging suggest that this cell population is an important determinant of the cardiac senescent phenotype. Collectively, the delayed electrical repolarization of aging cardiomyocytes may be viewed as a critical variable of the aging myopathy and its propensity to evolve into ventricular decompensation under stressful conditions.

  13. The potato amylase inhibitor gene SbAI regulates cold-induced sweetening in potato tubers by modulating amylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun; Hou, Juan; Yao, Ying; Lin, Yuan; Ou, Yongbin; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2014-09-01

    Potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is critical for the postharvest quality of potato tubers. Starch degradation is considered to be one of the key pathways in the CIS process. However, the functions of the genes that encode enzymes related to starch degradation in CIS and the activity regulation of these enzymes have received less attention. A potato amylase inhibitor gene known as SbAI was cloned from the wild potato species Solanum berthaultii. This genetic transformation confirmed that in contrast to the SbAI suppression in CIS-resistant potatoes, overexpressing SbAI in CIS-sensitive potatoes resulted in less amylase activity and a lower rate of starch degradation accompanied by a lower reducing sugar (RS) content in cold-stored tubers. This finding suggested that the SbAI gene may play crucial roles in potato CIS by modulating the amylase activity. Further investigations indicated that pairwise protein-protein interactions occurred between SbAI and α-amylase StAmy23, β-amylases StBAM1 and StBAM9. SbAI could inhibit the activities of both α-amylase and β-amylase in potato tubers primarily by repressing StAmy23 and StBAM1, respectively. These findings provide the first evidence that SbAI is a key regulator of the amylases that confer starch degradation and RS accumulation in cold-stored potato tubers.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of sugar beet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis) genes modulated by the Beta vulgaris host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Smigocki, Ann C

    2016-10-03

    Sugar beet root maggot (SBRM, Tetanops myopaeformis von Röder) is a major but poorly understood insect pest of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular mechanisms underlying plant defense responses are well documented, however, little information is available about complementary mechanisms for insect adaptive responses to overcome host resistance. To date, no studies have been published on SBRM gene expression profiling. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) generated more than 300 SBRM ESTs differentially expressed in the interaction of the pest with a moderately resistant (F1016) and a susceptible (F1010) sugar beet line. Blast2GO v. 3.2 search indicated that over 40% of the differentially expressed genes had known functions, primarily driven by fruit fly D. melanogaster genes. Expression patterns of 18 selected EST clones were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis predicted a dominance of metabolic and catalytic genes involved in the interaction of SBRM with its host. SBRM genes functioning during development, regulation, cellular process, signaling and under stress conditions were annotated. SBRM genes that were common or unique in response to resistant or susceptible interactions with the host were identified and their possible roles in insect responses to the host are discussed.

  15. PRODH gene is associated with executive function in schizophrenic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaohong; Hu, Xun; Wang, Yingcheng; Yan, Chengying; Meng, Huaqing; Liu, Xiehe; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A

    2008-07-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in the PRODH and COMT genes and selected neurocognitive functions. Six SNPs in PRODH and two SNPs in COMT were genotyped in 167 first-episode schizophrenic families who had been assessed by a set of 14 neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological measures were selected as quantitative traits for association analysis. The haplotype of SNPs PRODH 1945T/C and PRODH 1852G/A was associated with impaired performance on the Tower of Hanoi, a problem-solving task mainly reflecting planning capacity. There was no significant evidence for association with any other neuropsychological traits for other SNPs or haplotypes of paired SNPs in the two genes. This study takes previous findings of association between PRODH and schizophrenia further by associating variation within the gene with performance on a neurocognitive trait characteristic of the illness. It fails to confirm previous reports of an association between COMT and cognitive function.

  16. Dioxin exposure of human CD34+ hemopoietic cells induces gene expression modulation that recapitulates its in vivo clinical and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano; Todoerti, Katia; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Servida, Federica; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana; Colombi, Antonio; Cecilia Pesatori, Angela; Neri, Antonino; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2011-04-28

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a large number of biological effects, including skin, cardiovascular, neurologic diseases, diabetes, infertility, cancers and immunotoxicity. We analysed the in vitro TCDD effects on human CD34+ cells and tested the gene expression modulation by means of microarray analyses before and after TCDD exposure. We identified 257 differentially modulated probe sets, identifying 221 well characterized genes. A large part of these resulted associated to cell adhesion and/or angiogenesis and to transcription regulation. Synaptic transmission and visual perception functions, with the particular involvement of the GABAergic pathway were also significantly modulated. Numerous transcripts involved in cell cycle or cell proliferation, immune response, signal transduction, ion channel activity or calcium ion binding, tissue development and differentiation, female or male fertility or in several metabolic pathways were also affected after dioxin exposure. The transcriptional profile induced by TCDD treatment on human CD34+ cells strikingly reproduces the clinical and biological effects observed in individuals exposed to dioxin and in biological experimental systems. Our data support a role of dioxin in the neoplastic transformation of hemopoietic stem cells and in immune modulation processes after in vivo exposure, as indicated by the epidemiologic data in dioxin accidentally exposed populations, providing a molecular basis for it. In addition, TCDD alters genes associated to glucidic and lipidic metabolisms, to GABAergic transmission or involved in male and female fertility, thus providing a possible explanation of the diabetogenic, dyslipidemic, neurologic and fertility effects induced by TCDD in vivo exposure.

  17. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  18. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  19. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydoux E

    2014-08-01

    of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion: These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the importance of performing in-depth analysis of DC function when developing novel approaches for immune modulation with nanoparticles. Keywords: polystyrene particles, nanoparticles, immune modulation, mouse dendritic cells, CD4+ T-cells

  20. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration

  1. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  2. The dystrophin gene and cognitive function in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Vojinovic (Dina); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); S. van der Lee (Sven); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); E. Oole (Edwin); J. van Rooij (Jeroen); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A. Aartsma-Rus (Annemieke); G.-J.B. Van Ommen (Gert-Jan B.); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); N. Amin (Najaf)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of our study is to investigate whether single-nucleotide dystrophin gene (DMD) variants associate with variability in cognitive functions in healthy populations. The study included 1240 participants from the Erasmus Rucphen family (ERF) study and 1464 individuals from the Rotterd

  3. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Ping Feng; John Mundy

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions,TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also discussed.

  4. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  5. Effects of modulation of calcium levels and calcium fluxes on ABA- induced gene expression in barley aleurone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, R.M. van der; Visser, K.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present data to elucidate the involvement of calcium ions in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene expression. Modulation of external calcium concentrations was able to affect ABA-induced specific RAB gene expression. At a constant ABA level with increasing extracellular calcium level, an increasing R

  6. Effects of modulation of calcium levels and calcium fluxes on ABA- induced gene expression in barley aleurone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, R.M. van der; Visser, K.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present data to elucidate the involvement of calcium ions in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene expression. Modulation of external calcium concentrations was able to affect ABA-induced specific RAB gene expression. At a constant ABA level with increasing extracellular calcium level, an increasing R

  7. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Fiume

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03% of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7% and 698 downregulated (54.3% RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1% of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7% and 906 downregulated (46.3%. Only 137 transcripts (0.22% were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3′- and 5′-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  8. A2 gene of Old World cutaneous Leishmania is a single highly conserved functional gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derouin Francis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmaniases are among the most proteiform parasitic infections in humans ranging from unapparent to cutaneous, mucocutaneous or visceral diseases. The various clinical issues depend on complex and still poorly understood mechanisms where both host and parasite factors are interacting. Among the candidate factors of parasite virulence are the A2 genes, a family of multiple genes that are developmentally expressed in species of the Leishmania donovani group responsible for visceral diseases (VL. By contrast, in L. major determining cutaneous infections (CL we showed that A2 genes are present in a truncated form only. Furthermore, the A2 genomic sequences of L. major were considered subsequently to represent non-expressed pseudogenes 1. Consequently, it was suggested that the structural and functional properties of A2 genes could play a role in the differential tropism of CL and VL leishmanias. On this basis, it was of importance to determine whether the observed structural/functional particularities of the L. major A2 genes were shared by other CL Leishmania, therefore representing a proper characteristic of CL A2 genes as opposed to those of VL isolates. Methods In the present study we amplified by PCR and sequenced the A2 genes from genomic DNA and from clonal libraries of the four Old World CL species comparatively to a clonal population of L. infantum VL parasites. Using RT-PCR we also amplified and sequenced A2 mRNA transcripts from L. major. Results A unique A2 sequence was identified in Old World cutaneous Leishmania by sequencing. The shared sequence was highly conserved among the various CL strains and species analysed, showing a single polymo